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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 3.

mud weekend
When I decided to go down to 60% at work, I figured the easiest way to do so (for the ease of my group and for my own personal budgetary calculus) was to do 60% of everything. That is to say: 60% of days, 60% of call, 60% of weekends, as well as my share of holiday call, which is distributed on a rotating basis. (For example, this year I worked the fourth of July. Last year I had New Year's and Labor Day; the year before that, Christmas.) I considered briefly a work configuration in which I didn't take night and weekend call, but it was a surprisingly easy decision against that. First of all, there is an element to the kin...
Source: the underwear drawer - September 27, 2013 Category: Anesthetists Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

VenaSeal Sapheon Vein Closure System Going on Trial in U.S. (VIDEO)
As veins in the leg enlarge and become weaker, valves meant to maintain uni-directional blood flow begin to falter. This condition is known as venous reflux disease, and roughly 30 million people suffer from the symptomatic disease state in the United States alone. Aptly named Sapheon Medical has developed an alternative new technology to address venous reflux. Current treatment options, including vein stripping, radio frequency (RF) ablation, and sclerotherapy require surgery and can be traumatic or require compression hosing and don’t always have great outcome. The VenaSeal Sapheon Closure System uses a proprietary med...
Source: Medgadget - September 25, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Nishey Wanchoo Tags: Radiology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Sugammadex's Problems: Is the Merck/Schering-Plough Deal the Worst?
That didn't take long. Just a few days after Roger Perlmutter at Merck had praised the team that developed Bridon (sugammadex), the FDA turned it down for the second time. The FDA seems to be worried about hypersensitivity reactions to the drug - that was the grounds on which they rejected it in 2008. Merck ran another study to address this, but the agency apparently is now concerned about how that trial was run. What we know, according to FiercePharma, is that they "needed to assess an inspection of a clinical trial site conducting the hypersensitivity study". Frustratingly for Merck, their application was approved in the...
Source: In the Pipeline - September 25, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Business and Markets Source Type: blogs

sartorius
Blogging has changed a lot in the almost 13 years (!) since I started writing online, and I often think--particularly during this most recent long hiatus, when I was too busy to perform anything but the most basic of life tasks (see: job, performance of; family, keeping alive of)--why do I still do it? What is it, aside from perhaps the compulsive need for me to document the minutiae of my life, that makes me continue to write online?It's not a business decision, certainly. It probably speaks to the direction that online media is moving these days that this blog is such an aberration--a more than decade-old blog that is al...
Source: the underwear drawer - September 25, 2013 Category: Anesthetists Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

New Wireless Blood Pressure Wrist Monitor by iHealth
iHealth, a company that develops mobile personal healthcare products, is now making available its new wireless blood pressure wrist monitor.The device attaches at the wrist using a small cuff and uses the oscillometric principle to measure systolic and diastolic blood pressure, as well as pulse rate. The wrist monitor also has motion sensors to detect the optimal wrist position to help users accurately take their blood pressure readings. It received both FDA clearance in U.S. as well as CE Mark approval in Europe. The monitor works with the free iHealth MyVitals mobile app that has tools to help individuals not only meas...
Source: Medgadget - September 23, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Gaurav Krishnamurthy Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Under Sedation? A Merck Setback As FDA Rejects Anesthesia Drug
In a move that is unlikely to come as a big surprise, the FDA has bounced a Merck drug for anesthesia over concerns about a hypersensitive study that had been requested five years ago. The complete response letter emerges just two months after the agency canceled an advisory meeting for the medication in order to assess the results of one of the clinical trial sites where the study was conducted (read the Merck statements here and here). The decision is a clear setback to the drugmaker, which a year ago cited sugammadex, also known as Bridon, as one of its top five late-stage candidates. The medication, which Merck inherit...
Source: Pharmalot - September 23, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

How a salt jab could be more effective for lower back pain than steroids | Mail Online
A saline injection in the spine could be more effective than steroids for treating lower back pain, a new study has revealed. Spinal pain is a leading cause of disability in the industrialised world and epidural steroid injections - the most common nonsurgical treatment - have been the standard treatment for more than 50 years. Yet the alternative spinal injection in the space around the spinal cord may provide better relief than steroids which can have adverse side effects. Steroids raise blood sugar in diabetic back patients, slow the healing of wounds and accelerate bone disease in older women, the Johns Hopkins Univ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

The LITFL Review 110
The LITFL Review is your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peaks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the best and brightest from the blogosphere, the podcast video/audiosphere and the rest of the Web 2.0 social media jungle to find the most fantastic EM/CC FOAM (Free Open Access Meducation) around. Welcome to the 109th edition, brought to you by: Kane Guthrie [KG] from LITFL Tessa Davis [TRD] from LITFL and Don’t Forget The Bubbles Brent Thoma [BT] from BoringEM, and Chris Nickson [C...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 23, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Kane Guthrie Tags: Education eLearning Emergency Medicine Featured Intensive Care LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

The LITFL Review 110
The LITFL Review is your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peaks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the best and brightest from the blogosphere, the podcast video/audiosphere and the rest of the Web 2.0 social media jungle to find the most fantastic EM/CC FOAM (Free Open Access Meducation) around. Welcome to the 109th edition, brought to you by: Kane Guthrie [KG] from LITFL Tessa Davis [TRD] from LITFL and Don’t Forget The Bubbles Brent Thoma [BT] from BoringEM, and Chris Nickson [C...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 23, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Kane Guthrie Tags: Education eLearning Emergency Medicine Featured Intensive Care LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

In need of Counseling Services
by riajoseph (Posted Sat Sep 21, 2013 4:04 am)Hi All! Sorry for the random post. I'm a graduate of Harvard Medical School and Anesthesia resident at Massachusetts General Hospital. During my residency, I helped start an admissions counseling company, inGenius prep (www.inGeniusprep.com), which helps students build their candidacy and perfect their applications for medical school.Our students work one-on-one with our team of professional med-school admissions counselors. Our team includes more than 20 former admissions officers from the best medical schools in the country, including: Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Stanford, UCSF, ...
Source: Med Student Guide - September 21, 2013 Category: Medical Students Source Type: blogs

FDA Approves Crosstrees Medical’s Device to Treat Compression Spinal Fractures
The FDA has approved the PVA Pod System for percutaneous vertebral augmentation (PVA). The device is made by Crosstrees Medical, a Boulder, Colorado based medical device company. PVA is a minimally invasive procedure to augment a vertebra that has fractured due to vertebral compression fracture. A vertebral compression fracture occurs when osteoporosis, trauma, or any other medical condition causes the vertebra to become fragile and collapse, causing severe pain. Vertebral compression fractures can lead to loss of height, postural deformity and pulmonary complications. An estimated 700,000 people in the United States hav...
Source: Medgadget - September 20, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Gaurav Krishnamurthy Tags: Orthopedic Surgery Source Type: blogs

UnitedHealth's Latest Blunders Include Lax Fraud Detection, Recalled EHRs - So Why is its CEO Worth $13.9 Million, or is it $34.7 Million?
We managed to go four months since our last post about UnitedHealth, but sure enough, the company that keeps on giving... examples of poor management to contrast with ridiculous management pay... has done so again.There were two obvious examples of poor management that recently appeared in the media.Lax Fraud DectionThe background, as noted in a Kaiser Health News article published in September, is that it is now fashionable for American states to outsource some or most of their Medicaid health insurance programs to managed care organizations, often for-profit, as is UnitedHealth.  These programs are meant to provide ...
Source: Health Care Renewal - September 17, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: executive compensation fraud healthcare IT risks managed care organizations Medicaid out-sourcing UnitedHealth Source Type: blogs

23andMe Genetic Testing: What's the Deal?
Curious about what the future might hold for your health? After reading a great post on DNA testing by Charlotte at The Great Fitness Experiment, I became curious about 23andMe, a direct-to-consumer genetic testing outfit that's been getting quite a bit of buzz. As a former hypochondriac, and as someone with a family medical history that doesn't inspire much optimism for a long and healthy life, I knew this was a bit of a psychological gamble. Did I really want to know how screwed I might be genetically? Mightn't I be better off thinking happy thoughts, trying to be reasonably conscientious about diet and exercise, and h...
Source: Cranky Fitness - September 16, 2013 Category: Eating Disorders Authors: Crabby McSlacker Source Type: blogs

Concierge Medicine: Opening the Door to Better Medicine?
Discussion Blog)
Source: Bioethics Discussion Blog - September 14, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Source Type: blogs

Dental Implant Procedure
My Dental Implant This post has nothing to do with myeloma, except that I am able do implants now because I am not (yet) taking any bisphosphonates. I'm writing it here because it was an interesting experience and I want to keep a permanent record of it. My left lower jaw is running out of teeth. Number 17, the "wisdom tooth," has been gone for 50 years (possibly explaining the lack of wisdom). Number 18, a huge molar, is in place and working, the only remaining chewing surface. Numbers 19 and 20 have been gone for years, and number 21 has been slowly "resorbed" (dissolved from the inside - unusual) over the last five ye...
Source: Myeloma Hope - September 14, 2013 Category: Cancer Source Type: blogs

Accessing The Axillary Vein
This is a guest post by Jack LeDonne (@jackledonnemd), Tom Petry and Peter Carr (@paedarg) The Axillary Vein (AXV) has  compelling advantages over other access sites for Central Venous Access Device (CVAD) insertion (namely the Internal Jugular Vein (IJV), Subclavian Vein (SCV) and the Femoral Vein). In particular, the AXV approach helps avoid iatrogenic complications during and after CVAD insertion. The AXV traverses from the arm to the thorax in the infraclavicular fossa, where there is considerably less motion compared to the neck or the groin. Dressing maintenance is optimized at this site, reducing the risk of Cathe...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 13, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Kane Guthrie Tags: Health Axillary Vein AXV Ultrasound Guided Vascular Access Source Type: blogs

Effect of the topical application of 50% lignocaine hydrochloride on the sensitivity of dentine in man
ConclusionsLignocaine will diffuse into exposed dentine and block the pain evoked by probing and air-blast stimuli provided that a sufficiently steep diffusion gradient is created. A topical application of a 50% (w/v) solution of lignocaine HCl for 10min will anaesthetise dentine within 30min. (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - September 13, 2013 Category: Dentists Source Type: blogs

Ketamine, A Darling of the Club Scene, Inspires Next-Generation Antidepressants [Part 3]
Recent experimental research showing that ketamine, an anesthetic and club drug (Special K), can relieve depression quickly has intrigued a number of major pharmaceutical companies. Depression, it goes without saying, affects huge numbers and a fundamentally new and effective pharmaceutical approach to treating the disorder hasn’t emerged in decades. The enthusiasm for ketamine is such that physicians, often working out of small clinics, have already started prescribing low doses of the generic anesthetic off-label for fast relief of le cafard—and drug companies are contemplating whether to get into the act by creatin...
Source: PharmaGossip - September 13, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Seeing Her For the First Time Again Youtube Guy – No Crackers!!
Seeing her for the first time again Youtube guy Jason Mortensen was filmed by his wife Candace in a video that was posted showing him groggily hitting on his wife, whom he did not recognize as he was emerging from general anesthesia. Jason, who had undergone hernia surgery at American Fork Hospital in Utah, is shown lying almost supine and slurring his words and slowly moving his arms as he groggily awakes from anesthesia. He is confused that he does not recognize his wife of six years sitting next to him and forgets that he is even married when he queries who the “stranger” is. While an amusing and charming ta...
Source: Inside Surgery - September 12, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Anesthesia Musings again American Fork Hospital Candace hitting on wife Jason Mortenson youtube Source Type: blogs

just the two of us
I'm in a Starbucks with a pumpkin spice latte and my laptop now like some goddamn stereotype. Man, even I hate myself right now.Starbucks always makes me think of working hard. I studied for all my board exams in Starbucks-es, from Step I at that Starbucks on 103nd and Broadway all the way up through my Anesthesia Oral Boards at the location on Monroe and 8th. The difference between Starbucks-es in New York and Atlanta, by the way? The Starbucks-es in New York serve you much, much faster. I also wrote my entire book at the Starbucks on 29th and Park, which if you need to do work is (or at least was five years ago) an ideal...
Source: the underwear drawer - September 11, 2013 Category: Anesthetists Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

Physicians Against Drug Shortages Challenge the Controlled Drug Market for Hospital
We have written previously about the shortage of lifesaving drugs in the United States. This crucial topic is addressed in a recent New York Times editorial by Margaret Clapp, former chief pharmacy officer at Massachusetts General Hospital, Michael A. Rie, associate professor of anesthesiology at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine and co-chairman of Physicians Against Drug Shortages, and Phillip L. Zweig, executive director of Physicians Against Drug Shortages. They note 302 drugs were in short supply as of July 31, up from 211 a year earlier. The editorial asks: "Policy makers apparently failed to ask th...
Source: Policy and Medicine - September 11, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

emergency nursing #101.
Received the following question today from Sophie: Love your blog, been a follower for a long time! Just writing for some advice.. So I’m an EEN, studying B. Nursing (graduating next year) I’ve been hiding in Theatres for the last 5yrs doing Anaesthetics, I have just accepted a job at a major Sydney ED as I needed a little change.. Anyways, do you have any advice on textbooks, literature or anything that I can use to make me a half decent ED Nurse? As in ED Nursing 101.. I have played in ED previously, but that was a while ago.. Thanks Sophie….a good question. To tell you the truth, if I spin around and look at the b...
Source: impactEDnurse - September 9, 2013 Category: Nurses Authors: impactEDnurse Tags: the nurses desk: Source Type: blogs

Update on Ketamine in Palliative Care Settings
Many recent headlines have heralded a new use for the old veterinary anesthetic ketamine, which can provide rapid-onset (albeit short-lived) relief for some patients with treatment-resistant depression (aan het Rot et al., 2012). This finding has been inflated into “arguably the most important discovery in half a century” by Duman and Aghajanian (2012). While finding a cure for refractory depression is undoubtedly an important research priority, might ketamine be useful for other conditions that cause profound human misery? The care of terminally ill patients suffering from unbearable pain is not a sexy topic, and hosp...
Source: The Neurocritic - September 7, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Sonosite X-Porte Ultrasound System Features Clean, Button-Free Design (video)
FUJIFILM SonoSite received the CE Mark for its X-Porte ultrasound system, a device the company bills as the “world’s first ultrasound kiosk.”  The X-Porte is available as a stationary or mobile unit and features a sealed, cleanable touchscreen interface with gesture controls and proprietary beam forming technology called Extreme Definition Imaging (XDI). There are a variety of transducers available for anything from cardiac to gynecological exams and animation tutorials are built-in that can help with training and recalling proper techniques. From the announcement: To maximize the utility of the XDI te...
Source: Medgadget - September 6, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Ob/Gyn Radiology Surgery Urology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Billing for end of life conversations needs to be an honest discussion
Good old Earl Blumenauer.  A bespectacled and bowtied Congressman from Oregon.  He of the “death panel” proposal.  Thank God he’s still here.  Presuming that the crazy talk over the provision in the Affordable Care Act that would have paid doctors to discuss end-of-life issues with patients is over, he has introduced a separate bill with this provision and hopes to get it passed in the next couple of years. What Congressman Blumenauer is proposing is really to validate conversation by providing it with a monetary value.   Everything that is valued in medicine has a monetary value.  In anesthesia the value of ti...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 5, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Palliative care Source Type: blogs

SAGIV Semi-Automatic IV Catheter Insertion System
Inserting IV catheters is a common medical procedure that requires training, a good deal of experience, and a steady hand, especially when working with the elderly and young children. Errors are common and clinicians often end up repeating their attempts at placing the needle, a particularly unpleasant experience for the patient. A team of engineers and clinicians from Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Hadassah Medical Center in Israel have developed a device that makes IV catheter insertion a safer, more automatic, and reliable procedure. The SAGIV device employs infrared light to visualize the veins and to guide the nee...
Source: Medgadget - September 4, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

NEW:Med.Studies in English at adriatic sea in Split,Croatia
by riajoseph (Posted Wed Sep 04, 2013 1:37 am)Hi All! Sorry for the random post. I'm a graduate of Harvard Medical School and Anesthesia resident at Massachusetts General Hospital. During my residency, I helped start an admissions counseling company, inGenius prep (www.inGeniusprep.com), which helps students build their candidacy and perfect their applications for medical school.Our students work one-on-one with our team of professional med-school admissions counselors. Our team includes more than 20 former admissions officers from the best medical schools in the country, including: Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Stanford, UCSF, ...
Source: Med Student Guide - September 4, 2013 Category: Medical Students Source Type: blogs

Searching university
by riajoseph (Posted Wed Sep 04, 2013 1:36 am)Hi All! Sorry for the random post. I'm a graduate of Harvard Medical School and Anesthesia resident at Massachusetts General Hospital. During my residency, I helped start an admissions counseling company, inGenius prep (www.inGeniusprep.com), which helps students build their candidacy and perfect their applications for medical school.Our students work one-on-one with our team of professional med-school admissions counselors. Our team includes more than 20 former admissions officers from the best medical schools in the country, including: Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Stanford, UCSF, ...
Source: Med Student Guide - September 4, 2013 Category: Medical Students Source Type: blogs

Book of Nurses: Collette.
Collette lives in Adelaide, and has been nursing since 1986. She trained in the hospital system, working through the time of “nursing changing from a vocation to a profession”. She has worked in Emergency departments, trauma units, operating theaters, anaesthetics and recovery. And – She is currently a patient. In the last 10 weeks I have been a patient in 2 public hospitals I have been employed, one I currently work at. I have spent 6 weeks in a private hospital. As a nurse I have been saddened by the many of the nurses in the private hospital. And a few in the public hospital. My admitting doctor men...
Source: impactEDnurse - September 3, 2013 Category: Nurses Authors: impactEDnurse Tags: ectopics Source Type: blogs

8 expensive health insurance mistakes
This article appeared in the October 2013 issue of Consumer Reports Money Adviser. Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers or sponsors on this website. Copyright © 2007-2013 Consumers Union of U.S. (Source: Consumer Reports Health Blog)
Source: Consumer Reports Health Blog - September 3, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: Health Health Insurance Money Babies & kids Source Type: blogs

Book of Nurses 2013: Oona.
Well hello there – another chapter closing in the life of Oona deserves an update and so without further adieu - So I’ve gotten rid of my second husband: really we should be allowed to shoot them when the sex stops being good . I am working away saving lives on a daily basis and I LOVE IT. Maybe it has something to do with the 4 girls in Daddy’s family being nurses, but I’ve taken to it like a duck to water. It was about time I got out of offices because the politics was about to kill me and the stint as a motorcycle postie make me realize that there are a lot of options out there. I work in Theatre...
Source: impactEDnurse - September 2, 2013 Category: Nurses Authors: impactEDnurse Tags: ectopics Source Type: blogs

For medical students, learning to keep their emotions aside
Flowers and bees. By no means is that very telling of my current life. On the contrary, I get glimpses of different times of the day when I go into patients’ rooms and look out the window or if by chance the anesthesiologist decides to open the curtains in the OR (yes, this hospital has windows in its ORs!). So this topic of flowers and bees is very random. But it just so happened that one of my patients is an avid gardener. During the midst of morning rounds, I was struggling to read the nurses’ notes, review lab values and images, and see all my (new) patients before the attending. This morning, I decided to ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 1, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

Can technology help individualized medical decision making?
Shouldn’t everyone get an individualized assessment of likely benefits, burdens, and risks before making a big medical decision? I was asked this question recently, during an interview for an Internet radio show on aging. Per my host’s request, I’d been explaining the practice of geriatrics, and talking about the geriatric approach to addressing the medical needs of older adults. Since I’d mentioned that aging often brings on greater risk of side-effects or complications from anesthesia, the host, Harriet Tramer, asked me whether older adults should be trying to avoid surgeries. I responded by tryin...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 1, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Geriatrics Source Type: blogs

the chamber of secrets
Cal did two weeks of "Danger Camp" this summer (basically a summer day camp program based on this book) and came away with it not only with the requisite mosquito bites and tie-dye T-shirt, but also with an enduring passion for spying, ciphers, espionage, and general subterfuge. It's all highly contagious, and while Mack will deny this to his last breath he idolizes Cal beyond all measure so whatever interests Thing 1 has rapidly become the interests of Thing 2.Separate and mostly unrelated: we currently live in a three bedroom house, which while by New York standards is an embarrassment of bedrooms (and square footag...
Source: the underwear drawer - September 1, 2013 Category: Anesthetists Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

After an adverse event: What should doctors disclose to patients?
What should doctors disclose to patients in the aftermath of adverse events?  Does it matter if the adverse event was related to an error?  Does it matter if it was preventable or not, anticipated or unexpected? Recently, I was at the Carolina Refresher Course facilitating a session on adverse events in anesthesiology.   We touched on a variety of issues, but spent the most time discussing the importance of disclosure conversations, as well as the challenges that we face. What is disclosure? Disclosure is really a process rather than an event, and is the series of conversations that convey information to the patient ab...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 30, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Malpractice Surgery Source Type: blogs

Workloads. Doctors vs Nurses.
    This is not intended to be a gripe or a swipe at doctors. I love doctors (well most of them). A few of them, I am in complete awe of. So, I don’t really know what this is. All I know is that I was thinking about it during a very, very busy shift. Perhaps, it is simply a reflection on the respective PHYSICAL tasks (or the physical workload) a single nurse vs a single doctor perform on a typical emergency department patient. Note: I will be the first to stand up and shout out that overall doctors work their arses off. Long hours. Mental fatigue. Poor peer support networks. Intense responsibility. And when th...
Source: impactEDnurse - August 28, 2013 Category: Nurses Authors: impactEDnurse Tags: ectopics Source Type: blogs

VIN: Disaster Management
On 11th September, the Victorian Intensive Care Network presents Dr Joanne Grindlay and Mr Ben Thomson, speaking at St Katherine’s, in Melbourne. Joanne Grindlay has been an Emergency Physician at the Royal Children’s Hospital for the past 12 years. She is interested in Disaster Medicine and has completed a European Masters in Disaster Medicine. She teaches MIMMS and APLS as well as on Emergo-simulation disaster exercises. She responded to the Samoan tsunami in 2009 as part of the Australian response, which was the first overseas deployment of Victorian Medical Assistance Teams. Ben Thomson is a general and trau...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - August 28, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Gerard Fennessy Tags: Disaster Education Emergency Medicine Featured Health International Emergency Medicine disaster medicine VIN Source Type: blogs

Medegrip, Designed by Nurse to Improve Bedside Procedures, Now Available
After years of progress and coverage in these pages, Medegrip is now available in the US. The concept is simple – the shaped foam makes grabbing and twisting motions safer and more effective. So when you’ve got a Luer lock to unscrew or a glass ampule to break open, Medegrip helps. The fact that this was designed and engineered by a practicing nurse – and that that nurse is a friend of ours – makes this moment even better. From the release: MedeGrip™, a new gripping aid that also protects clinicians against sharps injuries, is now on the market. After two and a half years of development, inventor ...
Source: Medgadget - August 26, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Nicholas Genes Tags: Anesthesiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine etc. in the news... Source Type: blogs

The Art of Resurrection
Resurrection, Raffaellino del Garbo (1510)In the world outside of Christianity, horror, and science fiction, the dead cannot be brought back to life. Or can they? A feature in the The Observer from earlier this year profiled Dr. Sam Parnia, critical care physician and author of Erasing Death: The Science That Is Rewriting the Boundaries Between Life and Death (called The Lazarus Effect in the UK). The article begins in a dramatic fashion:Sam Parnia – the man who could bring you back from the deadSam Parnia MD has a highly sought after medical speciality: resurrection. His patients can be dead for several hours before the...
Source: The Neurocritic - August 25, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

What are my Chances?
by filonumba (Posted Sat Aug 24, 2013 3:04 am)I'm about to enter my final 4th year at a 15-20 ranking undergraduate school. Unfortunately, my GPA is terrible.GPA: 3.2ScienceGPA:3.18MCAT: 341.Been to two different countries(about two weeks each) to shadow and gather immense amount of medical experience.2. Do competitive fencing representing my school3. Research Assistant for Cancer Research (non-publishing)4. Vice president of a school health organization5. Got a national award for volunteer service6. Play intramural basketball and soccer team7. Interning at a National Health Organization8. shadowed: internal medicine, neon...
Source: Med Student Guide - August 24, 2013 Category: Medical Students Source Type: blogs

Why Do I Try So Hard?
It's always the same: It's the fifth hour of the procedure. As your ankles ache and the perspiration drips beneath your lead, you stand there wondering why you try so hard to fix this arrhythmia. You realize this is not cost effective. You're tying up the lab. The staff and anesthesiologist are getting restless. The music drones on. You feel you're not getting anywhere. "Then again, maybe (Source: Dr. Wes)
Source: Dr. Wes - August 21, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Westby G. Fisher, MD Tags: catheter ablation Life Source Type: blogs

Up-and-Coming Disruptive Woman: Erica Frenkel
Partners in Health founder Paul Farmer recently said, “It’s not great if you’re a surgeon and you have to think about getting the generator going.” And in America, the last thing we usually think about when having surgery is a power outage. Sadly, in developing countries the weak infrastructure in many hospitals creates daily power outages that led to unnecessary injury and death on the operating table. It is under these conditions that The Universal Anaesthesia Machine (UAM), a device that delivers anesthesia without the use of electricity, was designed. DW recently spoke with Erica Frenkel, Director of Busine...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - August 21, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Access Innovation Source Type: blogs

Why Do I Try So Hard?
It's always the same: It's the fifth hour of the procedure. As your ankles ache and the perspiration drips beneath your lead, you stand there wondering why you try so hard to fix this arrhythmia. You realize this is not cost effective. You're tying up the lab. The staff and anesthesiologist are getting restless. The music drones on. You feel you're not getting anywhere. "Then again, maybe (Source: Dr. Wes)
Source: Dr. Wes - August 21, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Authors: DrWes Source Type: blogs

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Assessment of Consciousness in Brain Injury Patients
Assessing the level of consciousness in severely injured patients is a difficult task both technically and emotionally. A person might be locked-in and incapable of communicating in any way while the brain is aware of what’s going on around. A team of researchers in Europe have developed a promising way of using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to assess consciousness and tested it on healthy subjects as well as those that emerged from vegetative state, minimally conscious state, and locked-in syndrome. The system calculates a perturbational complexity index (PCI) by directing a magnetic field at the cortex to...
Source: Medgadget - August 16, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: Critical Care Neurology Source Type: blogs

End of Life Gamma Waves: Altered State of Consciousness or Artifactual Brain Activity?
"I had been in labor for my daughter for 16 hours. The labor was difficult and the Dr. approached me and told me it may come down to a choice between the child or myself.  ...  The labor dragged on and on and finally they came in and broke my water. I was rushed into delivery and within minutes my heart had stopped. I remember seeing a beautiful being of light enter the room. She told me I had to return as it was not my time yet. I was sucked back into my body as they restarted my breathing. My daughter began crying the moment I opened my eyes."-Description of a near-death experience1Are you afraid to die? We all...
Source: The Neurocritic - August 15, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

April fooled with PTMC balloon !
PTMC is a revolutionary    interventional cardiology procedure .A fibrosed obstructed  mitral valve is  opened up just like that ,  with few wires and a balloon  .The procedure is performed within 30 minutes .No  anaesthesia . No surgery .No scar. Thousands of procedures are done world-wide (Rich countries excluded    they do not have RHD) .We in our institute , have gained considerable experience in PTMC ,  and  have  completed  nearly  200 procedures  in the last  few years . As we gain experience surprises also galore ! .Suddenly I realised this  funny (At least for me !) phenomenon  from the unique P...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - August 12, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: dr s venkatesan Tags: Cardiology -Non coronary Interventions -PTMC Accura balloon inoue balloon mitral stenosis percutaneous mitral commissurotomy toray vascualr cocnepts waist of mitral stenosis Source Type: blogs

An Interview with Noted Pancreas Surgeon Dr. Charles J. Yeo
Recently, InsideSurgery had a chance to speak with Dr. Charles J. Yeo about his career as a top Whipple and pancreas surgeon and his ongoing role as a surgical leader and educator. As the Samuel D. Gross Professor of Surgery and Chair of the Department of Surgery, you welcomed your second intern class to Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania last month. What one piece advice do you have for your new trainees? One piece of advice….that’s tough! Several pieces of advice….enjoy the challenges and experiences of internship; read and increase your knowledge base outside of that 80 hours; practice knot...
Source: Inside Surgery - August 12, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Interviews Source Type: blogs

6 steps to safer surgery
Bad things happen all too often during surgery: Up to 30 percent of patients suffer infections, heart attacks, strokes, or other complications after surgery and sometimes even die as a result, research suggests. Which hospital you go to can make a difference, according to our new surgery Ratings. And a number of steps, described below, can help keep you safe regardless of which hospital you go to. 1. Go prepared Start healthy. Be as active as possible in the weeks leading up to surgery. Make sure blood pressure and blood sugar are well controlled. If you smoke, quit—even if only temporarily—because smoking slows ...
Source: Consumer Reports Health Blog - August 2, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: Health Doctors & Hospitals Conditions Treatments Source Type: blogs

Anesthesiology and obstructive sleep apnea: A patient safety challenge
A guest column by the American Society of Anesthesiologists, exclusive to KevinMD.com. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been diagnosed in more than 18 million American adults, but there are likely millions of others who suffer with OSA, but are undiagnosed. While OSA is frustrating to the patient and the patient’s family, it is crucial to remember OSA is a significant disease that can affect the patient’s safety during and after medical and surgical procedures. The involvement of a physician anesthesiologist is critical to a successful outcome before, during and after a procedure. While the care of these patients ma...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 1, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Pulmonology Surgery Source Type: blogs