Medicine RSS Search Engine

Anesthesiology

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 3.

Aviation and anesthesiology: The importance of training
A guest column by the American Society of Anesthesiologists, exclusive to KevinMD.com. Comparisons between the airline industry and anesthesia care are common.  One of the most commonly heard analogies is that the takeoff and landing of a jetliner are similar to induction and emergence during a general anesthetic.  But there are other equally important analogies between the two professions.  Today, payers, health care organizations and medical providers are focused more than ever on cutting costs.  In this environment, it is helpful to look at other similarities between aviation and anesthesiology. Continue reading ....
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 8, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Surgery Source Type: blogs

Tramadol: Uses, Side-Effects, and Interactions
When it comes to pain pills, tramadol is one of the most common prescription painkillers currently prescribed by doctors. It is often used to manage severe pain and it is readily available.  In fact, you can even buy tramadol online in the UK without a prescription.  At least, you don’t need a prescription when you start the process. In reality, however, the legitimate sites that let you buy tramadol with no prescription have doctors who issue a prescription for the purchase. I found out that some pharmacies in the UK even include a doctor’s prescription in the cost of the medication.  Visit this site for more infor...
Source: Mental Nurse - March 7, 2014 Category: Nurses Authors: Author037 Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

What A Fabulous Collection Of Techno Inventions In Healthcare That Might Actually Not Be Worth It!
This appeared a little while ago.ECRI Cautions Hospitals About Tech HypeCheryl Clark, for HealthLeaders Media , February 12, 2014 Independent research from the non-profit ECRI Institute aims to distinguish between must-have hospital technologies and manufacturer hype.A device that allows untrained nurses to sedate colonoscopy patients without an anesthesiologist, hospital gowns woven with infection-fighting copper, and oral drugs embedded with sensors are among the emerging technologies senior executives may be pressured to bring into their hospitals and healthcare systems.But the 2014 edition of the ECRI Institute's annua...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - March 7, 2014 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

Enter the smaccGOLD RUSH!
  As you already know smaccGOLD promises to be an amazing event… Now it is shaping up to be ludicrously awesome… If you can demonstrate that you can function as part of the ultimate multi-disciplinary critical care team during the conference, your team will win $5,000 cold hard cash. That’s right, FIVE GRAND! Here’s the low down, from ICN’s Oli Flower on behalf of the smaccGOLD organising committee: Competition Objective Teams should visit as many trade exhibits as possible and complete the short (< 5 minute) challenge at each stand. The challenges are scored out of 10 at each stand...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 5, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Conference Emergency Medicine Featured Intensive Care SMACC competition critical care GOLD RUSH prize smaccGOLD Source Type: blogs

Warning about Ketamine in the American Journal of Psychiatry
The dissociative anesthetic and ravey club drug ketamine has been hailed as a possible “miracle” cure for depression. In contrast to the delayed action of standard antidepressants such as SSRIs, the uplifting effects of Special K are noticeable within an hour. “Experimental Medication Kicks Depression in Hours Instead of Weeks,” says the National Institute of Mental Health. NIMH has been bullish on ketamine for years now. Prominent researchers Duman and Aghajanian called it the “the most important discovery in half a century” in a recent Science review.But in 2010, I pondered whether this use of ketamine...
Source: The Neurocritic - March 5, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

How can you avoid shampoo buildup? The Beauty Brains Show episode 20
Did you know that most shampoos today are secretly 2-in-1′s? In today’s episode we tell which ingredients to avoid if you’re worried about shampoo buildup. Plus, we discuss the case the disturbing plastic surgery app! Click below to play Episode 20: “How to avoid shampoo buildup” or click “download” to save the MP3 file to your computer. Show Notes Beauty Science News: “The case of the disturbing plastic surgery app” Putting the app in inappropriate. It’s called “Plastic Surgery & Plastic Doctor & Plastic Hospital Office for Barbie version.” It lets children play plastic s...
Source: thebeautybrains.com - March 4, 2014 Category: Physicians With Health Advice Authors: Randy SchuellerThe Beauty Brains Tags: Podcast Problems Source Type: blogs

Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTTION)
The mission of the Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTTION) public-private partnership with the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to identify, prioritize, sponsor, coordinate, and promote innovative activities — with a special interest in optimizing clinical trials — that will expedite the discovery and development of improved analgesic, anesthetic, and addiction treatments for the benefit of the public health. ACTTION is a multi-year, multi-phase initiative that is closely aligned with the FDA's Critical Path Initiative. ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - March 3, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

SGR Fix The Final Deal?
On Thursday, February 6th, a bipartisan group of congressional lawmakers announced they had reached a deal on legislation to repeal Medicare's widely criticized sustainable growth rate formula, replacing volume-based payments with measures that reward care efficiency and quality. The legislation is described below, but stakeholders should be cautious about its prospects given the remaining political hurdles it faces. SGR Repeal and Medicare Provider Payment Modernization Act The bill, the SGR Repeal and Medicare Provider Payment Modernization Act, was jointly announced by the chairmen and ranking minority members of th...
Source: Policy and Medicine - March 3, 2014 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

When chronic pain is there before surgery
In this study, therefore, the researchers monitored the use of opioids pre and post-operatively. After some serious statistical work, the group found that younger people, anaesthetic technique, having a total knee replacement (as opposed to a total hip replacement), and longer stays were more likely to use a greater amount of opioid. And, more importantly, the scores obtained for fibromyalgia corresponded the most – an increased opioid consumption of 9.1mg for every 1-point increase on the 0 – 31 point scale. What does this mean for nonmedical clinicians working with people in that important post-operative per...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - March 2, 2014 Category: Occupational Therapists Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Coping strategies Occupational therapy Pain Pain conditions Physiotherapy Chronic pain function pain management self management surgery surgical pain THKR total knee joint replacement Source Type: blogs

FDA Draft Guidance Analgesic Indications: Developing Drug and Biological Products
The FDA recently released a new draft guidance with recommendations on how sponsors of analgesic painkillers should develop products in preparation for future marketing authorization. The draft, "Analgesic Indications: Developing Drug and Biological Products", is intended for sponsors of analgesic products intended to treat acute, chronic and breakthrough pain. All three types of pain—acute, chronic and breakthrough—are characterized by the need for long-term, regular treatment with analgesics. FDA notes that while it is important to understand how a single dose of the drug works, it's even more interested in underst...
Source: Policy and Medicine - February 27, 2014 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

First Do No Harm
As I’ve become balder and more grey, I have come to think about the health system as much as the delivery of acute care.  This is another advantage of FOAMed.  It allows you to broaden your horizons and still stay in touch with the latest in your chosen specialty.  I would like to share a story that has brought me out of the blogging wilderness. Last week, I looked over the fence and noticed my neighbour had her arm in a cast.  She told me she had fallen over playing tennis and fractured her wrist.  She had been seen by her GP first, then sent up to a local private emergency department.  This would have cost he...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 26, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Sean Rothwell Tags: Administration Emergency Medicine Featured Health expenses First Do No Harm out of pocket private insurance public health Source Type: blogs

Why Getting Good Mental Health Treatment is Complicated
As long-time readers of World of Psychology know, there’s no easy fix to the convoluted, second-class mental health care system in the United States. People with mental disorders — like depression, anxiety, ADHD or bipolar disorder — are shunted away from the mainstream healthcare system into a patchwork quilt of “care” that varies greatly depending upon where you live, what kind of insurance you have (if you have any), and whether you want to pay cash for treatment instead of using your insurance. It shouldn’t be this way. It shouldn’t be so hard to find a good treatment provider....
Source: World of Psychology - February 25, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Minding the Media Policy and Advocacy Professional Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Treatment Health Care System Medication Mental Health Professional Mental Health Treatment Source Type: blogs

HIMSS, Continua launch Personal Connected Health Alliance
ORLANDO, Fla.—As HIMSS President and CEO hinted at yesterday in his podcast with me, HIMSS today announced the formation of the Personal Connected Health Alliance, in conjunction with the Continua Health Alliance and the HIMSS-owned mHealth Summit. This short video from HIMSS explains: Also, Lieber mentioned that HIMSS has not signed on to a letter from 48 organizations—led by CHIME—to HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, calling for more time and flexibility in meeting Meaningful Use Stage 2 requirements., Lieber said HIMSS declined to sign because the requests were, in his opinion, “very vague.” Today, the...
Source: Neil Versel's Healthcare IT Blog - February 24, 2014 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Neil Versel Tags: CIOs CMS consumerism EMR/EHR health IT health reform Healthcare IT HHS HIMSS Innovation meaningful use mobile ONC regulations remote monitoring video CHIME Continua Health Alliance Kathleen Sebelius mHealth Summit P Source Type: blogs

An acerbic opinion versus a sweet solution towards chronic pain
CONCLUSION: Glucose sublingual is and effective analgesic in infants between 1 and 12 months of age Barry E. Levin,1,2 Vanessa H. Routh,3 Ling Kang,2 Nicole M. Sanders,4 and Ambrose A. Dunn-Meynell1,2. Neuronal Glucosensing. What Do We Know After 50 Years? DIABETES, VOL. 53, OCTOBER 2004 Min-tsai Liu1, 2, Susumu Seino3, and Annette L. Kirchgessner1, 2 Identification and Characterization of Glucoresponsive Neurons in the Enteric Nervous System. The Journal of Neuroscience, December 1, 1999, 19(23):10305-10317 J. Antonio Gonzàlez1, Frank Reimann2 and Denis Burdakov1.Dissociation between sensing and metabolism of glucose in ...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - February 16, 2014 Category: Occupational Therapists Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Pain conditions Professional topics Therapeutic approaches Chronic pain healthcare Source Type: blogs

Factors affecting the success rate of buccal infiltration anaesthesia in the mandibular molar region
ConclusionsThe differences in the injection sites did not affect the anaesthetic success rates for the mandibular second premolar and molar teeth. However, articaine buccal infiltration produced a higher anaesthetic success rate in the second premolar and first molar teeth of Korean female patients. (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - February 13, 2014 Category: Dentists Source Type: blogs

Patient Modesty: Volume 63
Discussion Blog)
Source: Bioethics Discussion Blog - February 10, 2014 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Source Type: blogs

Pain | VQR Online
My father was never one to complain. On the morning of the day he died, an ulcer he'd suffered from for years, and left untreated, ruptured and began to bleed. Two days later I met with the town coroner. He told me the end had been painless, that, as his life leached away, my father would only have felt increasingly weak and light-​headed. The coroner, trying to make me feel better, was lying. By any other account, when an ulcer perforates and blood, bile, bacteria, and partially digested food begin to spill into the abdominal cavity, you feel as if a knife has just been buried in your guts. You might faint. You migh...
Source: Psychology of Pain - February 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Prescription Drugs May Cause Forgetfulness
Most of us have had moments of forgetfulness at one time or another throughout our lives. Memory loss is commonly associated with the signs of getting older and is a symptom of Alzheimer’s disease. Alcohol and illicit drug abuse have also been shown to impair memory. What many people are not aware of is that certain commonly prescribed medications can impair memory too. Being aware that a prescription drug may cause memory problems is important information that needs to be shared with patients. “Scientists now know that memory loss as you get older is by no means inevitable,” writes Dr. Armon B. Neel, a geriatric ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - January 28, 2014 Category: Addiction Authors: Richard Taite Tags: Richard Taite Source Type: blogs

In the treatment of pain, OPIOID helps caregivers weather the regulatory storm
What follows is a guest post. James Patrick Murphy, MD, MMM is board-certified in Pain, Addiction, and Anesthesiology. He is President of The Greater Louisville Medical Society and the Course Director for OPIOID — Optimal Prescribing Is Our Inherent Duty. Dr Murphy, a friend, writes on the matter of optimal prescribing of pain therapy. It’s a timely and important topic. As a bike racer, I have experienced the anguish of pain. From a patient perspective, the problem with pain is not just that it hurts, but also, that it’s hard to see the end of suffering. Thankfully, I have been lucky to have had compassio...
Source: Dr John M - January 27, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

Why you should ignore altmetrics and other bibliometric nightmares
Conclusions about bibliometrics Bibliometricians spend much time correlating one surrogate outcome with another, from which they learn little.  What they don’t do is take the time to examine individual papers.  Doing that makes it obvious that most metrics, and especially altmetrics, are indeed an ill-conceived and meretricious idea. Universities should know better than to subscribe to them. Although altmetrics may be the silliest bibliometric idea yet, much this criticism applies equally to all such metrics.  Even the most plausible metric, counting citations, is easily shown to be nonsense by simply...
Source: DC's goodscience - January 16, 2014 Category: Professors and Educators Authors: David Colquhoun Tags: Academia altmetrics bibliometrics open access peer review Public relations publishing acupuncture badscience bibliobollocks publication regulation Source Type: blogs

The unmentionable pain down there
Chronic pain isn’t a popular topic in health, or even socially. Chronic pain “down there” (yes, I’m talking genitals and in both women AND men) must be the least popular topic in pain management. I think it might be a throwback to the Victorian past, or maybe that pelvic pain isn’t usually a compensable pain so it doesn’t get blamed for work loss, but whatever, it’s just not featured all that often in pain management. Courtesy of my wonderful friend Sandy Hilton from Entropy Physio Therapy I’ve been prodded into looking at this problem, and came across a preprint of the Briti...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - January 12, 2014 Category: Occupational Therapists Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Interdisciplinary teams Pain conditions healthcare pelvic pain physiotherapy Source Type: blogs

Burn, baby, burn... on strep throat, insufficient anesthesia, and other woes
Disclaimer: This is not a real advertisement, it is not a real product,and Jackie Chan has not endorsed it. Yet.So, it happened that over the last Thanksgiving I was stricken for the first time with the dreaded strep throat. A miserable business. In addition to the antibiotics, the Doc gave me a prescription for a lidocaine rinse to ease what was a surprisingly incredible amount of pain for a sore throat. Turned out to be about as useful as a snooze button on a smoke detector. You can't swish and gargle the stuff because it's as viscous as honey, but you're not supposed to swallow it either (presumably because you don't wa...
Source: Across the Bilayer - January 12, 2014 Category: Medical Scientists Source Type: blogs

Pain-Topics News/Research UPDATES: Another Book About Pain; Only Much Better
Of nearly 240 million adults in the United States, more than 4 in 10, or about 100 million, live with chronic pain of some sort. Yet, the professional and popular news media focus more on abuses of pain medications than the dreaded conditions the drugs are intended to treat. Meanwhile, the suffering of untreated or mistreated patients with pain is largely overlooked. In her new book — A Nation in Pain: Healing Our Biggest Health Problem — author Judy Foreman provides a deeply researched account of today's chronic pain crisis and reasons behind it, and she discusses some solutions that could be within reach. Far mo...
Source: Psychology of Pain - January 6, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

How Can We Forget?
** This post is meant to be read in tandem with its more complimentary cousin, Electroconvulsive Therapy Impairs Memory Reconsolidation, at The Neurocomplimenter. **spECTrum 5000Q® ECT device (MECTA)Bad memories haunt a significant number of people with serious mental illnesses, such as chronic major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). If it were possible to undergo an experimental procedure that selectively impairs your memory for an extremely unpleasant event, would you do it? If this sounds like the plot of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, you're not alone.A pet peeve of mine is reference to thi...
Source: The Neurocritic - December 31, 2013 Category: Neurologists Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 12-30-2013
More updates on my other blog at DrWhiteCoat.com North Las Vegas VA Hospital emergency department repeatedly “disrespected and mistreated” a 78 year old diabetic volunteer with more than 5,000 hours of service at local VA facilities. A few weeks after two visits for a colon problem, the patient died in a hospice. When the patient’s friend went to get video of the events from the emergency department, the footage had been erased. What types of things do Australian emergency departments see on Christmas? Stonefish stings, jet ski accidents, inhaled foreign bodies … not that different from the US, although I had no id...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - December 30, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

Women report complications from Essure
CHICAGO -- Angie Derry knew that her Essure implants were designed to remain inside her body forever. But two years after a doctor inserted the tiny coils into her fallopian tubes to prevent pregnancy, the Rockford, Ill., woman wants them removed.Derry, 35, isn't hoping to have more children. Instead, she wonders whether getting rid of the implants will somehow alleviate the mysterious ailments that she said began after seeking permanent birth control with Essure in 2011.At the very least, Derry wants to rule out Essure as the cause of her joint, back and pelvic pain, chronic low-grade fever, cramping, numbness and tinglin...
Source: PharmaGossip - December 27, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Anesthesiologist assistants should be able to practice in every state
A guest column by the American Society of Anesthesiologists, exclusive to KevinMD.com. When you need anesthesia for surgery or a diagnostic procedure, of course you want to know who’ll be giving you anesthesia.  If you live in Texas, Florida, the District of Columbia, or 14 other states, you may be lucky enough to have an anesthesia team taking care of you that includes a physician anesthesiologist and an anesthesiologist assistant, or “AA”.  If you live in many other states — including my own state of California — care from an AA isn’t yet an option. Continue reading ... Your patien...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 22, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Surgery Source Type: blogs

Anaesthetic Crisis Manual
Book Review: The Anaesthetic Crisis Manual, David C Borshoff The Anaesthetic Crisis Manual (The ACM), was first published in 2011 and is a collection of 22 life threatening crises that anaesthetists manage in everyday practice. Based on the cockpit QRH (quick reference handbook) used in the airline industry, and using CRM (crew resource management) principles developed for aviation safety, the ACM brings tried and tested checklist instruction to the field of Patient Safety. LITFL reviewed the book as a potential resource in the setting of the emergency resuscitation area and at the ICU bedside. The ACM utilises accepted...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - December 20, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Mike Cadogan Tags: Book Review Education eLearning Emergency Medicine Featured Reviews ACM Anaesthetic Crisis Manual Anesthetic Manual CRM David C Borshoff Dr Borshoff QRH Source Type: blogs

Dogs And Cows And Toxic Vials, That’s What Vaccines Are Made Of!
Conclusion It is apparent that our vaccinations include some very strange and unsavoury ingredients. The three single vaccines were certainly not the only vaccines I came across containing parts of animals, humans and insects. In fact, I found a huge list of them on a PDF which I have included as extra research. For some reason, many parents are perfectly happy to have their tiny babies vaccinated with everything from insect cells to pigs’ gelatin, without a moment’s hesitation, arguing that the vaccines are to protect their children and keep them strong and healthy. Others remain totally unaware of the vaccine...
Source: vactruth.com - December 18, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Christina England Tags: Christina England Top Stories Adverse Events adverse reactions Measles Vaccine Medi-Mumps MMR mumps vaccine Pavivac rubella vaccine truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs

What Mark Kleiman Wants You To Know About Drugs
The public policy guru guiding state legalization efforts.Mark A. R. Kleiman is the Professor of Public Policy at UCLA, editor of the Journal of Drug Policy Analysis, author of many books, and generally regarded as one of the nation’s premier voices on drug policy and criminal justice issues. Mr. Kleiman provides advice to local, state, and national governments on crime control and drug policy. When the state of Washington needed an adviser on the many policy questions they left unanswered with the passage of I-502, which legalized marijuana in that state, they turned to Kleiman. In the past two years, Kleiman has co-aut...
Source: Addiction Inbox - December 18, 2013 Category: Addiction Authors: Dirk Hanson Source Type: blogs

liquid schwartz
Well howdy. Explaining why this blog hasn't been updated is only slightly more boring than reading the blog itself, but in short I had to give Grand Rounds last week, and since I couldn't work on Grand Rounds at work or while my kids were awake, basically every free minute I had up until last Wednesday was channelled into that presentation. Thankfully, it's finished! Now to resume my life of indolent goofery!You may also be disappointed to know that I ultimately decided against using the "Exorcist" slide in the talk (Factor 1: too early in the morning, Factor 2: Catholic hospital) but it may please you equally or maybe eve...
Source: the underwear drawer - December 17, 2013 Category: Anesthetists Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

PEBS Neuroethics Roundup (JHU)
Last Edition's Most Popular Article(s): Memories' pass between generations, BBC News Health In The Popular Press Did Brain Scans Just Save a Convicted Murderer From the Death Penalty? Wired Science What Anesthesia Can Teach Us About Consciousness, New York Times... (Source: Neuroethics and Law Blog)
Source: Neuroethics and Law Blog - December 13, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: NELB Staff Source Type: blogs

▶ Intubation and Mechanical Ventilation
– YouTube. You may receive endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation if you are in an emergency situation involving severe respiratory problems or if you are having general anesthesia during a surgical procedure. If you have severe respiratory problems, the oxygen levels in your blood may drop too low, or the […] (Source: Biosingularity)
Source: Biosingularity - December 12, 2013 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Derya Tags: Biotechnology Source Type: blogs

Lessons from the Bromiley Case
In 2007, Martin Bromiley’s wife died due to medical error. The Bromiley case will be familiar to many of us. The lessons from this case can teach us stark lessons about our own leadership and teamwork. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JzlvgtPIof4 Martin’s story Martin and his wife, Elaine had two young children. Elaine went into hospital for a routine sinus operation and during anaesthetic induction, it all went horribly wrong. Her airway obstructed and the team was unable to gain a secure airway. For 20 minutes they attempted to achieve a stable airway, during which time her sats were around 40%. Although she survive...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - December 12, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Tessa Davis Tags: Anaesthetics Emergency Medicine Featured Intensive Care airway crisis resource management elaine bromily lessons Martin Bromiley teamwork Source Type: blogs

Clear Guide Brings Easy Needle Guidance to Any Ultrasound System (w/video)
Ultrasound guided needle placement has allowed clinicians to perfect regional anesthesia procedures, needle biopsies, central line placement, and other procedures. Though a variety of techniques are used to track the path of the needle, from mechanical to magnetic, most require specialized probes and needles, the placing of markers, calibration, and a certain amount of pre-procedure setup. Clear Guide Medical, a Johns Hopkins spinoff, has developed a simple, easy to use needle guidance system that clips to any ultrasound probe and provides immediate guidance without tracking markers or calibration for each run. The imagi...
Source: Medgadget - December 11, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Ob/Gyn Radiology Urology Source Type: blogs

Stroke damage = vascular dementia
An update on Alzheimer’s Aunt: after many delays, she finally went to a throat specialist. He found that her throat was 60% closed (if I understand it correctly; this is 3d hand information filtered through her) and she has one or more throat polyps. He “opened” her throat while she was under anesthesia and then she was required to take some “suspension” drug for 30 days. Turns out her insurance didn’t pay for that drug and it was $300 so someone made the decision simply not to get it for her.Fast forward two weeks to Thanksgiving at my mom’s house. I was sick that whole week and my mom was going to move the...
Source: Had a Dad Alzheimers Blog - December 11, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: GBP })i({ Source Type: blogs

Drug Dispensing Contact Lenses Replacing Eye Drops in Glaucoma Treatment?
The doctor is always curious whether you have been taking your medication, and some drugs are more difficult to administer than others. Numerous ways have already been put to practice to ensure medication compliance, but now another innovation is significantly closer to practical realization: drug-eluting contact lenses to ensure prolonged delivery of anti-glaucoma eye drops. Glaucoma is a disease in which an elevated intraocular pressure causes damage to the eye, resulting in visual field loss, sometimes progressing to blindness. Treatment mainly relies on lowering the eye pressure and certain eye drops, such as the latan...
Source: Medgadget - December 10, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Stanley Darma Tags: Ophthalmology Source Type: blogs

Study - Treat Alzheimer’s by Delivering Protein Across Blood-Brain Barrier
When we found the glowing protein in the brain and the retina we were quite thrilled. If the protein could cross the blood brain barrier we thought it was likely that it could cross in Alzheimer’s patients brains.+Alzheimer's Reading RoomThe body is structured to ensure that any invading organisms have a tough time reaching the brain, an organ obviously critical to survival. Known as the blood-brain barrier, cells that line the brain and spinal cord are tightly packed, making it difficult for anything besides very small molecules to cross from the bloodstream into the central nervous system.While beneficial, this blockad...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - December 7, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Bob DeMarco Source Type: blogs

The patient hand off
How many times have you been the patient and been handed off from one shift to the next? And  how often does that happen in a slightly overheard conversation between one nurse and the next or one doctor to the next? There never seems to be a formal system of it and it always seems to be rushed. It is a key place where misunderstandings over a patient's care can occur which result in medical errors.I have learned things about my care from hearing the nurse tell the next nurse that my gall bladder surgery did result in some fairly significant internal bruising during the surgery. The nurse had previously told me that it...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - December 4, 2013 Category: Cancer Tags: being a patient hospital medical errors safety Source Type: blogs

The LITFL Review 118
The LITFL Review is your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peaks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the best and brightest from the blogosphere, the podcast video/audiosphere and the rest of the Web 2.0 social media jungle to find the most fantastic EM/CC FOAM (Free Open Access Meducation) around. Welcome to the 118th edition, brought to you by: Kane Guthrie [KG] from LITFL Tessa Davis [TRD] from LITFL and Don’t Forget The Bubbles Brent Thoma [BT] from BoringEM, and Chris Nickson ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - December 4, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Kane Guthrie Tags: Education eLearning Emergency Medicine Featured Health Intensive Care LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

eZono Gets European Approval for eZono 4000 Tablet Ultrasound
eZono AG (Jena, Germany) has received CE Mark approval for its eZono 4000 Tablet Ultrasound System with eZGuide, designed specifically for procedural ultrasound needle guidance. The eZGuide freehand navigation technology will help clinicians overcome the current challenge of properly viewing the needle and needle tip in real time, allowing for greater accuracy even when the needle is out of plane. The system doesn’t require the use of special needles nor any additional tracking technologies are being used besides the ultrasound. The low glare, 12″ multitouch screen and the software below it is designed to be i...
Source: Medgadget - December 3, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Nishey Wanchoo Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Radiology Source Type: blogs

Why IPAB is a good idea
IPAB – the independent payment advisory board is a key feature of the ACA. This board will do what many countries already do – have an independent expert panel to assess the effectiveness of procedures, imaging studies, pharmaceuticals, etc. Why do we need this board? We need careful assessments of new trends in medicine. Let me suggest two situations. We have read much about increasing colonoscopy costs. We have a controversy about anesthesia – conscious sedation versus a more standard anesthesia with propofol. The former only requires the gastroenterologist; the latter adds an anesthesiologist, and the...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - November 29, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Going From Famine To Feast
By Jan Chait Thanksgivukkah is a once-in-a-lifetime holiday you probably haven't heard of, yet it occurs this very week. It's when Hanukkah and Thanksgiving converge to overlap or, as food writer Veronica Meewes put it, "the fried foods of Hanukkah meet the carbfest of Thanksgiving." Some say the next time the two converge is 70,000 or so years away. Others say it's in 2070. Either way, it's rare. (Also rare this year is the turkey-shaped menorah: the Menurkey.) Traditional foods for Thanksgiving include turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes, rolls, green bean casserole (I'm told), and whatever else you can come up with to cau...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - November 27, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: Jan Chait Source Type: blogs

The future of simulation is to be found in Tel Hashomer
Simulation centers have been popping up in hospitals across the world.  These are useful, but for the most part their function is to provide technical training in surgical and other interventional techniques, as well as to practice resucitation and the like. Sometimes, too, they are used to study teams in stressful situations to provide lessons in team dynamics.Amitai Ziv has a broader view of the purpose of simulation. His goal is nothing less than to use this tool to help in the transformation towards a safe, humane, ethical, and patient-centered medical culture.  As the director of MSR, the Israel Center for M...
Source: Running a hospital - November 25, 2013 Category: Health Managers Source Type: blogs

When Should You Go to the Hospital for Severe Depression?
Knowing when to commit yourself or a loved one to the hospital to be treated for severe depression can be a very gray area. I wish there were a set of directions much like those when you are in labor: if contractions come within five minutes of each other and last a minute, pack your bags. Some physicians will make the decision for you, but usually it is up to you. Here are a few guidelines. 1. When you are in danger of hurting yourself or someone else. If you are very suicidal and have gone as far as making plans, you should be in a safe place where you don’t have to rely on sheer willpower. All of us who have experie...
Source: World of Psychology - November 22, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Antidepressant Depression General Medications Psychiatry Psychology Treatment Clinical Depression Depression (mood) Hospital Hospitalization inpatient Medicine Physician Severe Depression Suicide Source Type: blogs

Eyes-On Glasses Help See Veins, Place Needles
Evena Medical (Los Altos, CA) has unveiled its new Eyes-On Glasses System that helps clinicians see vasculature below the skin and deliver needles safely and hopefully on the first try every time. The glasses are based on Epson‘s Moverio technology that, similarly to Google Glass, can display graphics for the wearer to see, but goes further with a pair of forward facing cameras for 3D imaging and illumination to brighten the scene. Though it uses multi-spectral lighting, we suppose that it’s the infrared and near-infrared frequencies that the cameras are tuned to when looking for vasculature. To help document ...
Source: Medgadget - November 22, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Emergency Medicine Military Medicine Pediatrics Surgery Source Type: blogs

Nonin’s Investigational iPhone Regional Oximeter and World’s Smallest Regional Oximeter with Bluetooth Smart
Nonin is demonstrating its investigational iPhone regional oximetry (rSO2) device at the MEDICA conference in Dusseldorf. It’s not available for purchase, nor is there a schedule to commercialize it yet, but the device slips over a fourth generation iPhone and when pressed against tissue, will display and record readings on the partner app. Additionally, the company is also demoing the world’s smallest regional oximeter that can interface with any monitor or mobile device supporting Bluetooth Smart technology. iPads being one of those, at MEDICA Nonin is showing off how the new oximeter works with them. Press...
Source: Medgadget - November 21, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine in the news... Net News Surgery Source Type: blogs

Real Time MRI Guidance and Visualization for Brain Surgery Using Clearpoint System: Interview with CEO of MRI Interventions
Ever since the 1950s neurosurgeons have been using static images, taken prior to the procedure, to guide them through an operation. Brain surgeries performed in this manner are based a great deal on trial and error, and require the patient to stay awake as the surgeon painstakingly works for hours to determine if the therapy reached the correct location in the brain. Now, MRI Interventions, an Irvine, CA company, is developing a novel technology called Clearpoint that uses real time, intra-procedural magnetic resonance imaging to guide neurological  procedures. The Clearpoint system is intended to be used for treatment ...
Source: Medgadget - November 19, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Gaurav Krishnamurthy Tags: Medgadget Exclusive Neurological Surgery Radiology Source Type: blogs

Where is language located in the brain? There are two sides to this story
Simple facts about the brain are rare, but one of them is that for most people language function is located mainly in their left brain hemisphere. The stats vary according to the measures used, but this is the situation for around 95 per cent of right-handers and approximately 75 per cent of left-handers. When it comes to the brain though, few things are straight-forward.If we dig deeper, as Byron Bernal and Alfredo Ardila have done for a new review paper, we find a more complex, two-sided story. The extent to which language is dominated by the left hemisphere is not fixed. It increases through childhood and adolescence, a...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - November 19, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Christian Jarrett Source Type: blogs

Critical Care Compendium update
LITFL’s Critical Care Compendium is a comprehensive collection of pages concisely covering the core topics and controversies of critical care. Currently there are almost 1,500 entries with more in the works… Some pages are more developed than others, and all the pages are being constantly revised and improved. Links to new references and online resources are added daily, with an emphasis on those that are free and open access (FOAM!). These pages originated from the FCICM exam study notes created by Dr Jeremy Fernando in 2011, and have been updated, modified and added to since. As such will be particularly us...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 17, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Critical Care Compendium Education eLearning Emergency Medicine Featured CCC LITFL collection Source Type: blogs