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Anesthesiology

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 3.

Zafgen's Epoxide Clears A Hurdle
I wrote here about Zafgen and their covalent Met-Ap2 inhibitor beloranib. Word is out today that the compound has passed its first Phase II trial handily, so score one for covalent epoxides as drug candidates. Zafgen has followed up promising results from early-stage work on its weight drug beloranib with a stellar Phase II study that tracked rapid weight loss among the severely obese, with one group shedding an average of 22 pounds in 12 weeks. CEO Tom Hughes says the mid-stage success clears a path to a Phase IIb trial that can fine tune the dose while taking more time to gauge the longterm impact of its treatment on we...
Source: In the Pipeline - November 15, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Diabetes and Obesity Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 11-14-2013
See more news from around the web over at my other blog at DrWhitecoat.com An example of the downside to government-run health care. Patients in Venezuela can’t get proper medical care. 300 cancer patients were just sent home when supply shortages and “overtaxed equipment” made it “impossible … to perform non-emergency surgeries.” 70% of the radiation therapy machines are inoperable. Basic supplies such as needles, syringes, medications, operating room equipment, X-ray film, and blood needed for transfusions are all in short supply. There is no anesthesia for elective surgery. Patients can no longer get organ d...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - November 15, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

The Anesthesia Machine Check
Geetings to all readers that have been waiting for a new post from the Nurse Anesthetist.  Today the focus on anesthesia equipment is increasing both in board review preparation and in the practicing anesthestist.  I will highlight this by a short vignette from this week. This is another day in the OR with simple cases and […] (Source: Nurse Anesthetist)
Source: Nurse Anesthetist - November 9, 2013 Category: Nurses Authors: David Roy Tags: General Source Type: blogs

Who’s in control? Why both doctors and patients are frustrated
I hate being told what to do.  I will scratch and claw when ordered around.  It takes a conscious act of will to smile and say, “sure, I’ll get going on that right now.” This is a problem since, as an anesthesiologist, I get told what to do all the time.  My kids order me around all the time.  When I was a nurse I used to bristle at the term “order” as in, “doctor, can you please write an order for Tylenol?” Most of us have lives in which a certain amount of following orders is inevitable.  There are very few people who get to do whatever they want all the time and never follow an order.  Queen Elizabet...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 7, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Hospital nurse Patients Source Type: blogs

OrSense NBM 200MP Continuous Noninvasive Hemoglobin Monitor Wins FDA Clearance
OrSense (Petach Tikva, Israel) received FDA clearance to bring the company’s NBM 200MP hemoglobin monitor to the U.S., a system that the company hopes will help detect and prevent anemia in hospitalized patients. The device continuously measures hemoglobin (Hb), peripheral oxygen saturation of Hb (SpO2), and it also has low perfusion oximetry, pulse rate, and plethysmography (contraction of the thumb along to the heartbeat). Alarms can be set to warn clinicians when oxygen saturation or the pulse rate fall outside of preset limits. More from OrSense about the company’s technology: OrSense’s devices are based...
Source: Medgadget - November 6, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Source Type: blogs

Not to generalize, but . . .
I have finally encountered the perfect analogy for the stereotypical relationship between a surgeon and an anesthesiologist. The video is of a sheep trying to teach a bull how to head butt.  Watch what happens when aggression meets passive aggression. (Source: Running a hospital)
Source: Running a hospital - November 1, 2013 Category: Health Managers Source Type: blogs

Eggs are not follicles
IVF patients often don’t understand the difference between follicles ( which are affectionately called “follies” ) and eggs .  Doctors are sometimes responsible for this confusion , because we usually loosely refer to the follicles we see on your ultrasound scan as eggs. This is especially true during IUI cycles; or when the scans are being done by a sonographer or technician. When she sees that your ovaries have responded well to the superovulation, she will often say – Good, your eggs are growing well. In reality, eggs are microscopic structures which cannot be seen on ultrasound scans. They are only 100...
Source: The Patient's Doctor - October 29, 2013 Category: Obstetricians and Gynecologists Source Type: blogs

Nonin Medical Gets FDA Approval for New Finger Pulse Oximeter
Minneapolis, Minnesota-based Nonin Medical received FDA approval for the Nonin Model 3230 Bluetooth Smart finger pulse oximeter. The Nonin Model 3230 shares its readings with other devices via Bluetooth. It also features Correct Check feature to ensure patients have properly placed the pulse oximeter on their finger, enabling correct readings of oxygen saturation. The device also comes with SmartPoint to automatically determine when a measurement is accurate and ready to be transmitted. The Model 3230 has advanced algorithms to overcome potentially challenging measurement conditions, such as low perfusion, variable skin t...
Source: Medgadget - October 28, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Nishey Wanchoo Tags: Anesthesiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Philips Introduces New Anesthesia Machine, IntelliSave AX700, and New Patient Monitors
Philips is introducing to the market the IntelliSave AX700 anesthesia machine as well as the IntelliVue MX400 and MX450 patient monitors. The AX700, a machine that features a touch screen-based user interface and electronic gas mixing for precision control and display of gas mixtures, as well as a host of advanced ventilator modes, communicates with the patient monitors via the IntelliBridge system and everything can be hooked up to a Philips IntelliSpace anesthesia system or the hospital’s central information system. Philips focused on reducing the size of the devices, making everything more ergonomic and intuit...
Source: Medgadget - October 25, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

'Love Hormone' May Mediate Placebo Effect - MedPage Today
Intranasal oxytocin, sometimes called the "love hormone," intensified the painkilling effect of placebo in a clinical study, suggesting a physical basis for the placebo effect, researchers said.Among 75 healthy young men exposed to painful heat stimuli on their forearms in the randomized, double-blind study, ratings of a placebo cream's analgesic effect were greater after the participants received active intranasal oxytocin than when they snorted a saline solution, with a difference of 5.76 points out of 60 (95% CI 0.59-10.93, P=0.03), according to Ulrike Bingel, MD, of the University of Duisberg-Essen in Germany...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Operating room uses of Google Glass
In this short video you can see some uses of Google Glass by an anesthesiologist. Checking vital sign during operation, taking notes etc. More uses and a short explanation on the development of uses foor Google Glass in heathcare can be read in this post on iMedicalApps Some more examples: Additional areas of operating room uses with Google Glass may include: 1. Accessing a near real-time feed of vital signs in Google Glass 2. Calling up images and other patient data by clinicians from anywhere in the hospital 3. Accessing a pre-surgery safety checklist 4. Giving clinicians the ability to view the patient in the recovery r...
Source: Dr Shock MD PhD - October 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dr Shock Tags: General Medicine Source Type: blogs

The Beast, a New Anesthesiology Ether Screen from Emory University Hospital
During surgery, anesthesiologists typically sit behind the “ether screen” (aka “blood-brain barrier,” where the blood is the surgeon and the brain is an anesthesiologist). The screen is typically made from elevated drapes connected to IV poles. This setup is often awkward, not stable, and potentially dangerous to the patient. Now a new device created by Jerry Lewis, facilities director at Emory University Hospital, helps attach the screen so it moves along with the bed, provides support for equipment, and has clear access to the patient. Here’s a video about The Beast anesthesia screen system:...
Source: Medgadget - October 23, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Toumaz Receives CE Mark Approval for SensiumVitals Patient Monitoring System (VIDEO)
Toumaz has received CE Mark approval in Europe for its SensiumVitals system, allowing patients’ vitals to be monitored and transmitted wirelessly to a nurse station or directly to clinicians through any approved web-enabled device. The sensor tracks the heart rate, temperature, and respiration every two minutes, rather than the standard four to eight hour cycle rate. This can help clinicians stay on top of patient health, and act in an appropriate time frame if their health begins to degrade. During a six month study, 270 patients were monitored and 170 were included in the study. Early detection of deterioration wa...
Source: Medgadget - October 22, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Nishey Wanchoo Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Medicine Net News Source Type: blogs

My Chances
by eomeroglu85 (Posted Tue Oct 22, 2013 8:46 am)aributterly wrote:Hi all!Sorry for the random post. I'm a graduate of Harvard Medical School and Anesthesia resident at Massachusetts General Hospital. During my residency, I helped start an admissions counseling company, inGenius prep (http://www.inGeniusprep.com), which helps students build their candidacy and perfect their applications for medical school.Our students work one-on-one with our team of professional med-school admissions counselors. Our team includes former admissions officers from the best medical schools across the country, including: Harvard, Johns Hopkins,...
Source: Med Student Guide - October 22, 2013 Category: Medical Students Source Type: forums

Post Bac Suggestions?
by aributterly (Posted Tue Oct 22, 2013 8:03 am)Hi all!Sorry for the random post. I'm a graduate of Harvard Medical School and Anesthesia resident at Massachusetts General Hospital. During my residency, I helped start an admissions counseling company, inGenius prep (www.inGeniusprep.com), which helps students build their candidacy and perfect their applications for medical school.Our students work one-on-one with our team of professional med-school admissions counselors. Our team includes former admissions officers from the best medical schools across the country, including: Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Stanford, UCSF, UPenn, Y...
Source: Med Student Guide - October 22, 2013 Category: Medical Students Source Type: forums

Bing Search - new research surgery after 80 inducing altzheimer symptoms
What is responsible for post operative cognitive decline: the anesthetic drugs or the surgical procedure itself? A syndrome called "post-operative cognitive decline" has been coined to refer to the commonly reported loss of cognitive abilities, usually in older adults, in the days to weeks after surgery. In fact, some patients time the onset of their Alzheimer's disease symptoms from a surgical procedure. Bing Search recommends this article Post Operative Cognitive Decline, Alzheimer's, After Surgery +Bob DeMarco , +Alzheimer's Reading Room  (Source: The CareGiver)
Source: The CareGiver - October 21, 2013 Category: Caregivers Authors: Bob DeMarco Source Type: blogs

Sleep: The new health craze?
The last few decades have seen various wellness fads and health scares. Some topics that come to mind are sodium, cholesterol, saturated fats, trans fats, carbs, acai berry, bran, oats, whole grains, organic, jogging, yoga and yogurt. Maybe it’s time we focus on sleep as the key to health. After all we are a sleep deprived nation, with 50-70 million US adults having trouble sleeping. Two news articles today make me think it might be time for sleep to gain its due: Regular bedtimes help kids’ behavior reports on a study of 10,000 seven year old kids. Those who went to bed at a regular time had significantly fewe...
Source: Health Business Blog - October 18, 2013 Category: Health Managers Authors: dewe67 Tags: Culture Research sleep sleep patterns The brain Source Type: blogs

Capnostream 20p Bedside Monitor Unveiled by Covidien
Covidien has launched the Capnostream 20p bedside capnography monitor, a device that features Apnea-Sat Alert algorithm that, as the name implies, sounds an alarm if the patient stops breathing or oxygen saturation levels drop in the blood. The device could be particularly useful in PACUs and post-operative care floors, as well as in critical care units. According to Scott Kelley, M.D., Chief Medical Officer, Respiratory and Monitoring Solutions at Covidien, “studies show that as many as 88% of hospitalized patients may be at risk for recurrent apneas, yet we’re only identifying and treating a very small number. The C...
Source: Medgadget - October 17, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Samsung Releases UGEO PT60A Tablet Ultrasound Device
FUJIFILM SonoSite is not the only player in the field any more, as competitive pressures are building up with the introduction of new offerings from competitors. Case in point is the new ultrasound from Samsung Medison. The FDA granted the company 510(k) clearance for the UGEO PT60A in August of this year, and the company is now releasing the new tablet-based ultrasound system. As the company’s first diagnostic point-of-care ultrasound , Samsung aims to make it practical for a variety of clinical situations. The touch input device comes equipped with several features, including NeedleMate to accurately identify the ...
Source: Medgadget - October 17, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Nishey Wanchoo Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Ob/Gyn Pediatrics Radiology Urology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

A Good Night's Rest May Literally Clear the Mind
In this study, Dr. Nedergaard and her colleagues unexpectedly found that sleep may be also be the period when the brain cleanses itself of toxic molecules. The Alzheimer's Reading Room Knowledge Base  contains more than 4,000 articles. Their results, published in Science, show that during sleep a plumbing system called the glymphatic system may open, letting fluid flow rapidly through the brain. Dr. Nedergaard's lab recently discovered the glymphatic system helps control the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a clear liquid surrounding the brain and spinal cord. "It's as if Dr. Nedergaard and her colleagues have...
Source: I am an Alzheimer's Caregiver - October 17, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Bob DeMarco Source Type: blogs

Had I met her anywhere but the hospital, I would have helped her
Had I met her anywhere but the hospital, I would have gone to her side. I would have asked her what was wrong. I would have offered to help. She was 99-years-old and about to undergo surgery. Pre-operative holding is generally a busy place. Patients lie in gurneys, spending some last moments with loved ones and fielding questions from various players of the surgical team as they come to the bedside. No, I’ve never had surgery before. Yes, I have sleep apnea. Just gonna place your IV! It’s a highly controlled, organized process. Nurses, anesthesiologists, surgeons come with specific tasks to be done: forms to be signed...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 16, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Education Geriatrics Hospital Medical school Source Type: blogs

Your Advice on Interviews.
by aributterly (Posted Wed Oct 16, 2013 6:44 am)Hi all!Sorry for the random post. I'm a graduate of Harvard Medical School and Anesthesia resident at Massachusetts General Hospital. During my residency, I helped start an admissions counseling company, inGenius prep (www.inGeniusprep.com), which helps students build their candidacy and perfect their applications for medical school.Our students work one-on-one with our team of professional med-school admissions counselors. Our team includes former admissions officers from the best medical schools across the country, including: Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Stanford, UCSF, UPenn, Y...
Source: Med Student Guide - October 16, 2013 Category: Medical Students Source Type: forums

Samsung UGEO WS80A Ob/Gyn Ultrasound with 3D TV Capabilities
Samsung Medison unveiled a new ultrasound optimized for Ob/Gyn practicitioners, the UGEO WS80A, at the 23rd ISUOG (International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology) World Congress. The device features a 21.5″ wide LED imaging screen and a 10.1″ touchscreen for the controls, as well as a bunch of software optimizations that help resolve relevant anatomy and outputs data to 3D TV’s for an even more realistic view. More features according to the announcement: FRV™ + Inversion Mode — Faster realization of FRV™ (Feto Realistic View) that displays life-like detail of anatomic str...
Source: Medgadget - October 14, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Ob/Gyn Radiology Urology Source Type: blogs

Breast reconstruction: Has the pendulum swung too far the other way?
Once upon a time, women with suspicious breast masses were put under general anesthesia for surgery not knowing whether they were going to wake up with or without their breast. If the biopsy showed cancer, the surgeon went right ahead with the mastectomy. No time to lose.  It’s cancer, you know. Breast reconstruction? Don’t be silly. No one does that. You should feel lucky to be alive! Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 11, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Cancer Source Type: blogs

FDA Approves ViSi Mobile System for Cuffless, Non-Invasive Continuous BP Monitoring
Sotera Wireless has been granted FDA approval for the ViSi Mobile continuous, non-invasive blood pressure (cNIBP) monitoring. The system will allow clinicians not to insert a catheter or to have a cuff to continuously monitor systolic and diastolic, beat-to-beat blood pressure along with other core vital signs including pulse rate, skin temperature, electrocardiogram, blood oxygenation and respiration rates. One sensor around the thumb and another placed on the chest are connected to the ViSi Mobile worn on the wrist, and feed all the vitals to the device (ViSi is short for Vital Signals). The data can then be transmitted ...
Source: Medgadget - October 10, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Nishey Wanchoo Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 10-09-2013
Government getting pissed because providers are beating it at its own game? When feds started pushing electronic medical records and threatening to penalize patient, a funny thing happened … the amount of money the feds spent on healthcare increased by billions of dollars. Now Kathleen Sebelius and Eric “Fast N Furious” Holder are warning that doctors that copying and pasting patient data between patient medical record entries should not occur because it risks medical errors and overpayments. They promise to “prosecute health care fraud” and will “consider future payment reductions as warranted.” In other wor...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - October 10, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

AliveCor Launches New Universal Mobile Heart Monitor
AliveCor, a SF Bay Area company that has been extensively featured on Medgadget for developing an iPhone ECG, has now announced the launch of a universal heart monitor that can be attached to any smartphone or smartphone case. The FDA-cleared universal Heart Monitor is both iOS and Android compatible and features AliveCor’s technology that provides a clinical-quality one-lead ECG of the heart. The new design is not a phone case like the existing AliveECG for the iPhone or Samsung Galaxy S4, but instead is a pocket-sized wireless sensor that secures into a universal plate that attaches to the back of a mobile device ...
Source: Medgadget - October 7, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Gaurav Krishnamurthy Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Medicine Net News Source Type: blogs

5 Things I Wish I Learned in Medical School about Managing Pain - HCPLive.com
With most medical schools devoting only a few curriculum hours to pain management training, many physicians begin their medical career underprepared to meet the needs of patients suffering with chronic pain. Here, Barry Cole, MD, identifies several key concepts that would help improve pain care in the US if only more physicians would learn about them sooner. Pain is highly variable, personal, and cannot be managed with "blanket" order sets. How much someone hurts with a painful condition is based upon past pain experiences, understanding of the present pain circumstance, expectations and outcome, and may be color...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 6, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's Like Symptoms After Leaving the Hospital
As medical care is improving patients are surviving critical illness more often; but,  if they are surviving their critical illness with disabling forms of cognitive impairment like Alzheimer's something has to be done. +Alzheimer's Reading Room Patients treated in intensive care with no evidence of cognitive impairment often leave with deficits similar to those like mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD). These symptoms or deficits often persist for at least a year, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. Subscribe to the Alzheimer's Readin...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - October 5, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Bob DeMarco Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 10-03-2013
Via @mdaware … ever wonder whether you need to prescribe two antibiotics for patients with uncomplicated cellulitis? EM Literature of Note’s Ryan Radecki pulls an article showing that there isn’t much difference in outcome/cure rates between treatment of uncomplicated cellulitis with only cephalexin versus combination treatment with cephalexin and Bactrim. This is important. And it’s from Fox News, so you know it’s fair and balanced. Be very careful about how you sign up for the Obamacare exchanges. Experts expect that there will be a lot of hacking/phishing attacks using phony web sites to try to get unsuspectin...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - October 3, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

SuperSonic Imagine’s Aixplorer Ultrasound with Stiffness and Elasticity Detection Now in U.S.
SuperSonic Imagine (Aix-en-Provence, France) received clearance from the FDA to bring its Aixplorer ultrasound system to the U.S. The device sports the company’s MultiWave Technology that reconstructs images from the interference between longitudinal waves and shear waves within tissue. It is also able to provide tissue stiffness or elasticity info during an exam. According to SuperSonic, the Aixplorer is the only system available that can “generate, capture and compute shear wave velocity resulting in the bi-dimensional display of true tissue elasticity.” Features according to the product page: Ligh...
Source: Medgadget - October 2, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Ob/Gyn Pediatrics Radiology Urology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

The OR is not a good place for a prank
An anesthesiologist at a California hospital pasted stickers simulating a mustache and teardrops on the face of a hospital employee while she was having surgery on a finger. According to the Los Angeles Times, the doctor said, “I thought she would think this is funny and she would appreciate it.” And if that wasn’t bad enough, a “nursing attendant” took a photograph. The patient, who said she had to quit her job because of the humiliation, is suing the hospital and the physician for this confidentiality breach. The woman who took the photo said she deleted it after showing it to the patient a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 2, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Social media Facebook Hospital Surgery Twitter Source Type: blogs

thumbs up
it was a battle. looking back i don't think we ever had a chance, but you don't just give up on a young man in the prime of his life. we had to try. he was my patient. he was a foreigner, on a gap year in africa where he was going to learn all sorts of things about conservation and african wildlife. up until the accident, all had apparently gone well. the group of teenagers on the course had so far enjoyed every moment of their time together and some close friendships had even begun to develop. as it always is with these sorts of things, when they all climbed into the bus that day, no one expected what rippling ramifica...
Source: other things amanzi - October 2, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Bongi Source Type: blogs

Medical Mispronunciations and Misspelled Words: The Definitive List.
Hearing medical mispronunciations and seeing misspelled words are an under appreciated  joy of working in healthcare.  Physicians often forget just how alien the language of medicine is to people who don't live it everyday.  The best part about being a physician is not helping people recover from critical illness. The best part is not  about  listening and understanding with compassion and empathy.  Nope, the best part about being a physician is hearing patients and other healthcare providers butcher the language of medicine and experiencing great entertainment in the process.   Doctors c...
Source: The Happy Hospitalist - October 2, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Authors: Tamer Mahrous Source Type: blogs

thumbs up
it was a battle. looking back i don't think we ever had a chance, but you don't just give up on a young man in the prime of his life. we had to try. he was my patient. he was a foreigner, on a gap year in africa where he was going to learn all sorts of things about conservation and african wildlife. up until the accident, all had apparently gone well. the group of teenagers on the course had so far enjoyed every moment of their time together and some close friendships had even begun to develop. as it always is with these sorts of things, when they all climbed into the bus that day, no one expected what rippling ramifica...
Source: other things amanzi - October 2, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Bongi Source Type: blogs

The latest salvo in the federal government’s war on physicians
comes to us courtesy of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), which is proposing drastic policy changes to expand nursing scope of practice in all veterans’ hospitals. A new draft VHA Nursing Handbook would eradicate all existing VHA policies concerning physician supervision, and would designate all advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), including nurse anesthetists, as licensed independent practitioners (LIPs).  This means that they would be able to practice on their own without any requirement for physician oversight or support.  In 2011, the Office of General Counsel upheld the VA’s claim of the right t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 27, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Surgery Source Type: blogs

mud weekend
When I decided to go down to 60% at work, I figured the easiest way to do so (for the ease of my group and for my own personal budgetary calculus) was to do 60% of everything. That is to say: 60% of days, 60% of call, 60% of weekends, as well as my share of holiday call, which is distributed on a rotating basis. (For example, this year I worked the fourth of July. Last year I had New Year's and Labor Day; the year before that, Christmas.) I considered briefly a work configuration in which I didn't take night and weekend call, but it was a surprisingly easy decision against that. First of all, there is an element to the kin...
Source: the underwear drawer - September 27, 2013 Category: Anesthetists Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

VenaSeal Sapheon Vein Closure System Going on Trial in U.S. (VIDEO)
As veins in the leg enlarge and become weaker, valves meant to maintain uni-directional blood flow begin to falter. This condition is known as venous reflux disease, and roughly 30 million people suffer from the symptomatic disease state in the United States alone. Aptly named Sapheon Medical has developed an alternative new technology to address venous reflux. Current treatment options, including vein stripping, radio frequency (RF) ablation, and sclerotherapy require surgery and can be traumatic or require compression hosing and don’t always have great outcome. The VenaSeal Sapheon Closure System uses a proprietary med...
Source: Medgadget - September 25, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Nishey Wanchoo Tags: Radiology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Sugammadex's Problems: Is the Merck/Schering-Plough Deal the Worst?
That didn't take long. Just a few days after Roger Perlmutter at Merck had praised the team that developed Bridon (sugammadex), the FDA turned it down for the second time. The FDA seems to be worried about hypersensitivity reactions to the drug - that was the grounds on which they rejected it in 2008. Merck ran another study to address this, but the agency apparently is now concerned about how that trial was run. What we know, according to FiercePharma, is that they "needed to assess an inspection of a clinical trial site conducting the hypersensitivity study". Frustratingly for Merck, their application was approved in the...
Source: In the Pipeline - September 25, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Business and Markets Source Type: blogs

sartorius
Blogging has changed a lot in the almost 13 years (!) since I started writing online, and I often think--particularly during this most recent long hiatus, when I was too busy to perform anything but the most basic of life tasks (see: job, performance of; family, keeping alive of)--why do I still do it? What is it, aside from perhaps the compulsive need for me to document the minutiae of my life, that makes me continue to write online?It's not a business decision, certainly. It probably speaks to the direction that online media is moving these days that this blog is such an aberration--a more than decade-old blog that is al...
Source: the underwear drawer - September 25, 2013 Category: Anesthetists Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

New Wireless Blood Pressure Wrist Monitor by iHealth
iHealth, a company that develops mobile personal healthcare products, is now making available its new wireless blood pressure wrist monitor.The device attaches at the wrist using a small cuff and uses the oscillometric principle to measure systolic and diastolic blood pressure, as well as pulse rate. The wrist monitor also has motion sensors to detect the optimal wrist position to help users accurately take their blood pressure readings. It received both FDA clearance in U.S. as well as CE Mark approval in Europe. The monitor works with the free iHealth MyVitals mobile app that has tools to help individuals not only meas...
Source: Medgadget - September 23, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Gaurav Krishnamurthy Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Under Sedation? A Merck Setback As FDA Rejects Anesthesia Drug
In a move that is unlikely to come as a big surprise, the FDA has bounced a Merck drug for anesthesia over concerns about a hypersensitive study that had been requested five years ago. The complete response letter emerges just two months after the agency canceled an advisory meeting for the medication in order to assess the results of one of the clinical trial sites where the study was conducted (read the Merck statements here and here). The decision is a clear setback to the drugmaker, which a year ago cited sugammadex, also known as Bridon, as one of its top five late-stage candidates. The medication, which Merck inherit...
Source: Pharmalot - September 23, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

How a salt jab could be more effective for lower back pain than steroids | Mail Online
A saline injection in the spine could be more effective than steroids for treating lower back pain, a new study has revealed. Spinal pain is a leading cause of disability in the industrialised world and epidural steroid injections - the most common nonsurgical treatment - have been the standard treatment for more than 50 years. Yet the alternative spinal injection in the space around the spinal cord may provide better relief than steroids which can have adverse side effects. Steroids raise blood sugar in diabetic back patients, slow the healing of wounds and accelerate bone disease in older women, the Johns Hopkins Univ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

The LITFL Review 110
The LITFL Review is your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peaks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the best and brightest from the blogosphere, the podcast video/audiosphere and the rest of the Web 2.0 social media jungle to find the most fantastic EM/CC FOAM (Free Open Access Meducation) around. Welcome to the 109th edition, brought to you by: Kane Guthrie [KG] from LITFL Tessa Davis [TRD] from LITFL and Don’t Forget The Bubbles Brent Thoma [BT] from BoringEM, and Chris Nickson [C...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 23, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Kane Guthrie Tags: Education eLearning Emergency Medicine Featured Intensive Care LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

The LITFL Review 110
The LITFL Review is your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peaks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the best and brightest from the blogosphere, the podcast video/audiosphere and the rest of the Web 2.0 social media jungle to find the most fantastic EM/CC FOAM (Free Open Access Meducation) around. Welcome to the 109th edition, brought to you by: Kane Guthrie [KG] from LITFL Tessa Davis [TRD] from LITFL and Don’t Forget The Bubbles Brent Thoma [BT] from BoringEM, and Chris Nickson [C...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 23, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Kane Guthrie Tags: Education eLearning Emergency Medicine Featured Intensive Care LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

In need of Counseling Services
by riajoseph (Posted Sat Sep 21, 2013 4:04 am)Hi All! Sorry for the random post. I'm a graduate of Harvard Medical School and Anesthesia resident at Massachusetts General Hospital. During my residency, I helped start an admissions counseling company, inGenius prep (www.inGeniusprep.com), which helps students build their candidacy and perfect their applications for medical school.Our students work one-on-one with our team of professional med-school admissions counselors. Our team includes more than 20 former admissions officers from the best medical schools in the country, including: Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Stanford, UCSF, ...
Source: Med Student Guide - September 21, 2013 Category: Medical Students Source Type: forums

FDA Approves Crosstrees Medical’s Device to Treat Compression Spinal Fractures
The FDA has approved the PVA Pod System for percutaneous vertebral augmentation (PVA). The device is made by Crosstrees Medical, a Boulder, Colorado based medical device company. PVA is a minimally invasive procedure to augment a vertebra that has fractured due to vertebral compression fracture. A vertebral compression fracture occurs when osteoporosis, trauma, or any other medical condition causes the vertebra to become fragile and collapse, causing severe pain. Vertebral compression fractures can lead to loss of height, postural deformity and pulmonary complications. An estimated 700,000 people in the United States hav...
Source: Medgadget - September 20, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Gaurav Krishnamurthy Tags: Orthopedic Surgery Source Type: blogs

UnitedHealth's Latest Blunders Include Lax Fraud Detection, Recalled EHRs - So Why is its CEO Worth $13.9 Million, or is it $34.7 Million?
We managed to go four months since our last post about UnitedHealth, but sure enough, the company that keeps on giving... examples of poor management to contrast with ridiculous management pay... has done so again.There were two obvious examples of poor management that recently appeared in the media.Lax Fraud DectionThe background, as noted in a Kaiser Health News article published in September, is that it is now fashionable for American states to outsource some or most of their Medicaid health insurance programs to managed care organizations, often for-profit, as is UnitedHealth.  These programs are meant to provide ...
Source: Health Care Renewal - September 17, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: executive compensation fraud healthcare IT risks managed care organizations Medicaid out-sourcing UnitedHealth Source Type: blogs

23andMe Genetic Testing: What's the Deal?
Curious about what the future might hold for your health? After reading a great post on DNA testing by Charlotte at The Great Fitness Experiment, I became curious about 23andMe, a direct-to-consumer genetic testing outfit that's been getting quite a bit of buzz. As a former hypochondriac, and as someone with a family medical history that doesn't inspire much optimism for a long and healthy life, I knew this was a bit of a psychological gamble. Did I really want to know how screwed I might be genetically? Mightn't I be better off thinking happy thoughts, trying to be reasonably conscientious about diet and exercise, and h...
Source: Cranky Fitness - September 16, 2013 Category: Eating Disorders Authors: Crabby McSlacker Source Type: blogs

Concierge Medicine: Opening the Door to Better Medicine?
Discussion Blog)
Source: Bioethics Discussion Blog - September 14, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Source Type: blogs