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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory.

UCF creates 3 new degrees to meet local workforce demand
Two new master's degrees and one new bachelor's degree are coming to the University of Central Florida to help meet the local workforce demand. They include a master of science in biomedical engineering, a master of science in data analytics and a bachelor of science in entertainment management. UCF's board of trustees approved the creation of the three new degrees at a March 24 meeting. Here's a breakdown of each new degree: Biomedical engineering: This will teach students about the development… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 24, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Rachel Williams Source Type: news

Microneedle patch delivers localized cancer immunotherapy to melanoma
Biomedical engineering researchers have developed a technique that uses a patch embedded with microneedles to deliver cancer immunotherapy treatment directly to the site of melanoma skin cancer. In animal studies, the technique more effectively targeted melanoma than other immunotherapy treatments. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 24, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Microneedle patch delivers localized cancer immunotherapy to melanoma
(North Carolina State University) Biomedical engineering researchers have developed a technique that uses a patch embedded with microneedles to deliver cancer immunotherapy treatment directly to the site of melanoma skin cancer. In animal studies, the technique more effectively targeted melanoma than other immunotherapy treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 24, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New paradigm in medicine: population health — a Q&A with Dr. Brita Roy
Dr. Brita Roy started her career in biomedical engineering, focusing on problems such as how to develop better artificial hearts or drugs. But with a desire to work more directly with patients, she switched to medicine where she started to see that the advanced medical technologies she’d studied as an engineer would have little impact if patients did not learn how to manage their own health and well-being. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 11, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Yale News Source Type: news

Louisiana Tech University, LSUHSC to host biomedical engineering conference
(Louisiana Tech University) Louisiana Tech University is joining forces with LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport to bring together biomedical researchers and experts from across the nation at the 32nd Annual Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference (SBEC 2016), March 11-13 at the Shreveport Convention Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

How Close We Are To A 3-D-Printed Human Heart
Last week, scientists announced that for the first time ever, they were able to 3-D print an organ, successfully transplant it into an animal and get it to work. If you’re unsure of whether that’s really as crazy as it sounds, it is. For years scientists have succeeded at 3-D printing “living” tissue, but that tissue has been too weak, too unstable and too small to implant into humans or animals. Getting the tissue to stay alive long enough to integrate with the body and fuse with its blood supply has been next to impossible. Because of those hurdles, some scientists are skeptical that printing orga...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

21st Century Skills: International Advancements and Recent Developments
Thinking Skills and Creativity, Volume 18, pages 1-90 (Publication: December 2015) Edited by Samuel Greiff, Christoph Niepel, Sascha Wustenberg (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - February 20, 2016 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

Louisiana Tech University lecture series welcomes distinguished chemist, chemical biologist
(Louisiana Tech University) Louisiana Tech University will host a presentation by Dr. Wilma K Olson, the Mary I. Bunting Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Rutgers University, on Feb. 15 for the next installment of its 2015-2016 New Frontiers in Biomedical Engineering seminar series. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Microscopic drug 'depots' boost efficacy against tumors in animal model
Biomedical engineering researchers have developed a technique for creating microscopic 'depots' for trapping drugs inside cancer tumors. In an animal model, these drug depots were 10 times more effective at shrinking tumors than the use of the same drugs without the depots. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 25, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Insiders' Guide To Winning In the Drug Delivery Device Market — Part 2: Regulatory Compliance
I recently sat down withDavid Amor, managing partner at MEDgineering, Inc., to discuss the challenges associated with bringing drug delivery devices to market, as well as emerging therapeutic areas and technologies. David’s background is in mechanical and biomedical engineering, with expertise in regulatory systems and compliance. (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - January 25, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Microscopic drug 'depots' boost efficacy against tumors in animal model
(North Carolina State University) Biomedical engineering researchers have developed a technique for creating microscopic 'depots' for trapping drugs inside cancer tumors. In an animal model, these drug depots were 10 times more effective at shrinking tumors than the use of the same drugs without the depots. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 25, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Prof Helen Lu wins $1.125M grant on new tissue engineering approach to rotator cuff repair
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Biomedical Engineering Professor Helen H. Lu has won a three-year $1.125 million grant from the Department of Defense for her research on tendon-to-bone integration for rotator cuff repair. Lu is collaborating with William Levine, chairman and Frank E. Stinchfield Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at Columbia University Medical Center. The funding will support preclinical trials to test the potential of a nanofiber-based device to enable biological healing between tendon and bone post rotator cuff surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 15, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Emerging role: How a CHIO harnesses data for population health
John Showalter, MD, is the chief health information officer at the University of Mississippi. He evolved into that role after studying biomedical engineering at Columbia, followed by combined residency and fellowship in clinical informatics at Penn State for medical school. Population Health read more (Source: Healthcare IT News)
Source: Healthcare IT News - December 7, 2015 Category: Information Technology Authors: Skip Snow Tags: Online Only Analytics Clinical Patient Engagement Population Health Quality and Safety Source Type: news

New Smart Devices May Soon Recognize & Interpret Sign Language
A smart device that translates sign language while being worn on the wrist could bridge the communications gap between the deaf and those who don't know sign language, says a Texas A&M University biomedical engineering researcher who is developing the technology. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - December 1, 2015 Category: Disability Tags: Deaf Communication Source Type: news

Prof Elizabeth Hillman wins BRAIN Initiative grant for high speed microscopy technique
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Biomedical Engineering Professor Elizabeth Hillman has won an NIH BRAIN Initiative grant, the first awarded to Columbia Engineering, for her work on SCAPE, a high-speed 3-D microscope she has developed for imaging the living brain. Whereas most modern microscopes can only image a single plane at up to 20 frames per second, Hillman's technique can over 100 planes within a 3-D volume in the same amount of time, enabling scientists to make exciting new discoveries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 1, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The language of learning mathematics
The Journal of Mathematical Behavior, Volume 40, Part A, pages 1-130 (Publication: December 2015) Edited by LOUISE C. WILKINSON (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - December 1, 2015 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

CCNY researchers open 'Golden Window' in deep brain imaging
(City College of New York) The neuroscience community is saluting the creation of a 'Golden Window' for deep brain imaging by researchers at The City College of New York led by biomedical engineer Lingyan Shi. This is a first for brain imaging, said Shi, a research associate in City College's Institute for Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Lasers, and the biology department. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 11, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Angiodynamics CFO Frost resigns, moves to Analogic | Personnel Moves
AngioDynamics (NSDQ:ANGO) said today its CFO and exec veep Mark Frost resigned from his position to join Analogic (NSDQ:ALOG) as senior veep, treasurer & CFO. AngioDynamic’s veep and global controller Michael Trimach will serve as Interim CFO as the company searches for a permanent replacement. The Albany, N.Y.-based company said Frost will stay on to facilitate a smooth transition of duties to the new CFO. “On behalf of the entire AngioDynamics team, I would like to extend my thanks and appreciation to Mark for his leadership over the past 3 years and wish him the best in his future endeavors,”...
Source: Mass Device - November 10, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Analogic Corp. AngioDynamics Inc. Asana Medical Battelle Baxter International Cardica Inc. Evolent Health Personnel Moves Rennova Health TransEnterix Source Type: news

Special Issue: The interface between task-based language teaching and content-based instruction
System, Volume 54, pages 1-110 (Publication: November 2015) Edited by Maria del Pilar Garcia Mayo (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - November 1, 2015 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

Naughty Or Nice? One Brain Scan Is Now All It Takes To Find Out
With a simple scan of your brain at rest, scientists can now guess whether — on average — you are naughty or nice. “We have now begun to see really strong evidence of a connection between measures of brain function, connectivity and many aspects of people’s lives and personality,” says lead author Dr. Stephen Smith, a biomedical engineer at the University of Oxford.   -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 12, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Informing Learning and Teaching in Social Studies Education through Quantitative Research
The Journal of Social Studies Research, Volume 39, Issue 4, pages 181-270 (Publication: October 2015) Edited by Paul Fitchett (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - October 9, 2015 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

Coding School For Girls In Afghanistan Also Teaches Confidence
The woman behind Afghanistan’s first coding school for girls and a Massachusetts Institute of Technology scientist took center stage Monday afternoon as astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson led a session on disruptive technology and innovation at the Clinton Global Initiative’s annual meeting in New York City. After alerting the audience to NASA’s announcement concerning liquid water on Mars and the previous night’s “blood” supermoon eclipse -- which “did exactly what we predicted and expected it would do,” Tyson introduced Code to Inspire founder and CEO Feresht...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

New tech automatically 'tunes' powered prosthetics while walking
When amputees receive powered prosthetic legs, the power of the prosthetic limbs needs to be tuned by a prosthetics expert so that a patient can move normally -- but the prosthetic often needs repeated re-tuning. Biomedical engineering researchers have developed software that allows powered prosthetics to tune themselves automatically, making the devices more functionally useful and lowering the costs associated with powered prosthetic use. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 28, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

New tech automatically 'tunes' powered prosthetics while walking
(North Carolina State University) When amputees receive powered prosthetic legs, the power of the prosthetic limbs needs to be tuned by a prosthetics expert so that a patient can move normally -- but the prosthetic often needs repeated re-tuning. Biomedical engineering researchers have developed software that allows powered prosthetics to tune themselves automatically, making the devices more functionally useful and lowering the costs associated with powered prosthetic use. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 28, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

How a Paralyzed Man Walked Again
Adam Fritz was just another 21-year-old kid back in 2008—about to enter his senior year of college, cruising home from work on his motorcycle near Diamond Bar, California—when his life changed forever: A table from a truck in front of him slipped off and struck him, flinging him off his motorcycle onto the freeway. “It’s what I called my ‘oh shit’ moment,” he told TIME. “I tried to sit up and get up on my feet. I remember the firefighters telling me not to move. Everything just hurt.” Two days later, Fritz was told he had a spinal cord injury—and that he’d n...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: tanyabasutime Tags: Uncategorized brain-computer interface neuroscience Paralysis public health Research spinal cord injuries Virtual Reality walking Source Type: news

CMU Researcher: "Smart Pills" Will Make Medications More Efficient, Cost-Effective
The FDA recently accepted an application for what could be the first digital medication marketed in the U.S. According to a biomedical engineer at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), the proliferation of similar technology will hinge upon the development of safe and effective ingestible batteries and circuitry. His evidence suggests that the next generation of “smart pills” will make medications more efficient and cost-effective. (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - September 23, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Evaluating Faculty Development
Studies in Educational Evaluation, Volume 46, pages 1-102 (Publication: September 2015) Edited by Ann Stes, Annemarieke Hoekstra (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - September 12, 2015 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

Wavelets improve medical imaging
(Inderscience Publishers) An approach to converting the data from MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) machines, mammograms and other medical equipment gives doctors a much clearer picture of your insides and a chance to detect disease and other problems earlier, according to research published in the International Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

How Can Biomedical Engineers Help in Global Crises?
The world witnessed the human face of the tragedy in Syria, with heart-breaking photos of a three-year old boy -- Aylan Kurdi -- washed ashore after being drowned, in an effort to escape devastation. My students and I, who had just started the new academic year, struggled to identify what can we do? Beyond occasional tweets and Facebook likes, what do we owe to society to tackle humanitarian crises? I teach in the department of biomedical engineering. The challenges we routinely discuss in the classroom are of a mathematical nature. Our questions are far removed from those seen by migrants outside the train station in Hu...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

How Can Biomedical Engineers Help in Global Crises?
The world witnessed the human face of the tragedy in Syria, with heart-breaking photos of a three-year old boy -- Aylan Kurdi -- washed ashore after being drowned, in an effort to escape devastation. My students and I, who had just started the new academic year, struggled to identify what can we do? Beyond occasional tweets and Facebook likes, what do we owe to society to tackle humanitarian crises? I teach in the department of biomedical engineering. The challenges we routinely discuss in the classroom are of a mathematical nature. Our questions are far removed from those seen by migrants outside the train station in Hun...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

New technology transforms cell phone into high-powered microscope
New technology that transforms a cell phone into a powerful, mobile microscope could significantly improve malaria diagnoses and treatment in developing countries that often lack the resources to address the life-threatening disease, says a biomedical engineer who has created the tool. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 2, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Wrist device translates sign language
A smart device that translates sign language while being worn on the wrist could bridge the communications gap between the deaf and those who don’t know sign language, says a biomedical engineering researcher who is developing the technology. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 1, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Undergrad biomedical engineering teams win NIH's DEBUT Challenge
(NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering) Three unique projects focused on improving global health won the National Institutes of Health's Design by Biomedical Undergraduate Teams Challenge. The winners showed exemplary initiative in designing tools for a less expensive, portable device to monitor HIV treatment, a new surgical clamp to treat drooping eyelids, and a low-cost patient monitor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 21, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Gender-Based Health Interventions in the United States: Issues in Evaluation and Program Planning
Evaluation and Program Planning, Volume 51, pages 1-88 (Publication: August 2015) Edited by Elaine M. Walker, Stephanie Alexander (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - August 11, 2015 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

This Device Can Zap Your Brain Into A State Of Zen. Is That A Good Thing?
What if you could zap your brain into a state of calm or energy with only the push of a button? It may sound like the stuff of sci-fi, but it's now the promise of a new class of tech wearables created by teams of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs and neuroscientists. Several devices have come onto the market claiming to use brain stimulation to alter an individual's mental state. One of the latest is Thync Vibes ($299), a stick-on device that delivers low-grade electrical pulses ("vibes") into the scalp to cause a change in automatic nervous system activity.  How does it actually work? Those who are brave en...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 30, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Mind the Gap! Studies on the Development of the Rational Number Concept
Learning and Instruction, Volume 37, pages 1-62 (Jun-15) Edited by Wim Van Dooren, Erno Lehtinen, Lieven Verschaffel (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - July 24, 2015 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

Here's how OHSU is breaking new ground in finding a cure for Alzheimer's
Dr. Jeffrey Kaye is one of a dozen Oregon Health & Science University researchers heading to Washington, D.C., to attend the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference. Kaye, a professor of neurology and biomedical engineering, shared some news on the latest developments in finding a cure for Alzheimer’s, the sixth-leading cause of death in the U.S. Kaye has some major chops when it comes to research on Alzheimer's. He is director of the OHSU Layton Aging & Alzheimer’s Disease Center,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 20, 2015 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Rivkela Brodsky Source Type: news

Here's how OHSU is breaking new ground in finding a cure for Alzheimer's
Dr. Jeffrey Kaye is one of a dozen Oregon Health & Science University researchers heading to Washington, D.C., to attend the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference. Kaye, a professor of neurology and biomedical engineering, shared some news on the latest developments in finding a cure for Alzheimer’s, the sixth-leading cause of death in the U.S. Kaye has some major chops when it comes to research on Alzheimer's. He is director of the OHSU Layton Aging & Alzheimer’s Disease Center,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Hospitals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Hospitals headlines - July 20, 2015 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Rivkela Brodsky Source Type: news

bb7 expands into new territory
bb7, a comprehensive product development firm headquartered in Madison, Wisconsin, announces its expansion to Boston, Massachusetts. This new presence is part of a committed growth strategy aimed at better supporting the East Coast Medical and Scientific Equipment markets. bb7’s operations in this region include two new business development professionals with offices in Boston. bb7 will better serve its current and future clients on the East Coast with more in-person meetings, which streamline and personalize the product development process. “Allowing our clients to interact face-to-face with our people and our...
Source: Mass Device - July 14, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well bb7 Source Type: news

Couples Are Getting Paid To Have Sex To Try And Curb Spread Of HIV
We're inching closer to getting a condom that's actually enjoyable to wear. The Guardian reported earlier this month on some of the lucky couples that are being paid by research-and-design teams to take new condom prototypes out for a test drive. "It slips in and out," one tester told the Guardian of an unfortunate romp using a female condom. "It leaves an unsightly baggy ring outside you. There is nothing erotic about it.” The testing is connected to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s challenge, announced about a year and a half ago, for scientists and designers to come together to create a "next generation condo...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Brain imaging technique receives NIH grant
(University of Texas at Austin) A biomedical engineer at the Cockrell School of Engineering has received a $1.8 million NIH grant to advance his light-based technique for imaging blood flow across the brain. The device could be used to help with aneurysm surgery, or when treating other malformations in the brain. The grant will allow the engineering team and a partner physician to continue to develop the device, and test it in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

UTSA grads notch another win for animal stem cell startup
A pair of UTSA graduate students took top honors in an immigrant-founded startup competition on Friday, June 12, at Cafe Commerce. Ramon Coronado and Tony Yuan, graduate students in the UTSA College of Engineering’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, walked away with $1,500 in the first SATX Global Innovators Pitch Challenge. The pair won for their Mobile Stem Care firm that continues to impress judges and investors alike. Coronado and Yuan had previously taken first place at the 2015 Emerging… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Hospitals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Hospitals headlines - June 12, 2015 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Mike W. Thomas Source Type: news

UTSA grads notch another win for animal stem cell startup
A pair of UTSA graduate students took top honors in an immigrant-founded startup competition on Friday, June 12, at Cafe Commerce. Ramon Coronado and Tony Yuan, graduate students in the UTSA College of Engineering’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, walked away with $1,500 in the first SATX Global Innovators Pitch Challenge. The pair won for their Mobile Stem Care firm that continues to impress judges and investors alike. Coronado and Yuan had previously taken first place at the 2015 Emerging… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 12, 2015 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Mike W. Thomas Source Type: news

Seattle in Deep Sleep This Week
Seattle wasn't sleepless this week. Not after more than 4,000 sleep experts from around the world descended upon the Emerald City for SLEEP 2015, an annual conference sponsored by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society. Topics and research on all things related to sleep -- how much we need, how much we don't get, how much is disrupted by undiagnosed sleep disorders and how a better, cheaper, less obtrusive way to detect sleep apnea is needed -- were discussed. "Right now we don't have enough sleep clinics, sleep laboratories and sleep specialists in the country to address all the sleep apn...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news

Seminars in Oncology: "Finding the Forms of Cancer with Integrated Genomics Maps"
Guest Speaker: Josh Stuart, PhD Professor, Biomedical Engineering Department University of California Santa Cruz Santa Cruz, CA Tuesday, June 9, 2015 4PM Jimmy Fund Auditorium No Registration Required!  All Are Welcome! If you would like to join the Seminars in Oncology email list, please email: claudia_steele@dfci.harvard.edu (Source: DF/HCC: Latest News)
Source: DF/HCC: Latest News - June 4, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Announcements Source Type: news

Winship Cancer Center researchers get $3.5M NCI award
The National Cancer Institute gave two researchers at Emory University’s Winship Cancer Center a total of $3.5 award for their work in informatics technology. Dr. David Gutman and Lee Cooper, assistant professors in the departments of Neurology, Biomedical Informatics and Biomedical Engineering, won the Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR) U24 award for their work, which is focused on digital microscopy images of tissue slides that have traditionally been used by pathologists for… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 4, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ellie Hensley Source Type: news

Grad Students Create Device That Could Detect Marijuana Use Among Drivers
AKRON, Ohio (AP) -- Two Ohio graduate students have invented a device that would allow law enforcement officers to determine how much THC - the active ingredient in marijuana - is in a motorist's system during traffic stops. The Plain Dealer reports (http://bit.ly/1E8IUUn ) that two biomedical engineering graduate students at the University of Akron hope to market their roadside testing device to states where marijuana use has been legalized. Mariam Crow and Kathleen Stitzlein's device tests saliva to determine the concentration of pot's active chemical in the bloodstream. Police must now wait weeks to get results from b...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 27, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

NIH funds WPI study aimed at engineering more natural and durable replacement heart valves
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) With a $450,000, three-year award from the National Institutes of Health, a team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute led by Kristen Billiar, Ph.D., professor of biomedical engineering, will analyze how mechanical forces and cellular growth factors affect the growth and development of human heart valves to advance the long-term goal of developing a new class of tissue-engineered heart valves that are more natural and longer-lasting than current replacement valves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Stimulating Brain Waves May Boost Creativity And Ease Depression
The secret to stimulating creativity may be to literally stimulate the brain. In a new study, scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill were able to measurably increase creativity by altering electrical activity in the brain -- a finding that may have significant implications for the treatment of depression. The researchers stimulated the brains of 20 healthy individuals with a low dose of electric currents, transmitted safely and non-invasively through electrodes attached to the scalp. Afterward, the participants performed an average of 7.4 percent better on a test of creative thinking. The elect...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 18, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Stimulating Brain Waves May Boost Creativity And Ease Depression
The secret to stimulating creativity may be to literally stimulate the brain. In a new study, scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill were able to measurably increase creativity by altering electrical activity in the brain -- a finding that may have significant implications for the treatment of depression. The researchers stimulated the brains of 20 healthy individuals with a low dose of electric currents, transmitted safely and non-invasively through electrodes attached to the scalp. Afterward, the participants performed an average of 7.4 percent better on a test of creative thinking. The elect...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health Advice Source Type: news