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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 13.

Bone loss prevention experiment on the last space shuttle flight
(University of North Carolina School of Medicine) Researchers in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill/North Carolina State University Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering will be at the Kennedy Space Center for the last space shuttle launch of the NASA program as Atlantis departs for its final mission into Earth's orbit. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 5, 2011 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The Engineering Structures Journal is pleased to announce REC2012
REC2012 - 5th International Conference on Reliable Engineering Computing June 13-15, 2012 Brno, Czech Republic http://rec2012.fce.vutbr.cz (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - June 30, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

The Engineering Structures Journal is pleased to announce REC2012Elsevier Engineering News
REC2012 - 5th International Conference on Reliable Engineering Computing June 13-15, 2012 Brno, Czech Republic http://rec2012.fce.vutbr.cz (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - June 30, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 15 JULY 2011 - Underground Infrastructure Research (UIR) Conference and Trenchless Technology Roadshow 2012Elsevier Engineering News
Municipal, Industrial and Environmental Applications Scotiabank Convention Centre, Niagara Falls, ON, Canada, June 4-6, 2012 (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - June 29, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS DEADLINE: 30 JUNE 2011 - Underground Infrastructure Research (UIR) Conference and Trenchless Technology Roadshow 2012Elsevier Engineering News
Municipal, Industrial and Environmental Applications Scotiabank Convention Centre, Niagara Falls, ON, Canada, June 4-6, 2012 (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - June 29, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

AAMI: Alarm fatigue, IT, interoperability among top 10 biomed challenges
SAN ANTONIO—In an Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) survey, clinical engineers and biomedical engineering technicians named interfacing devices and information systems the top challenge at their hospitals. Also ranked highly as challenging were maintaining computerized IT systems and managing alarm systems. (Source: CMIO.net: The News Weekly for Health IT Executives)
Source: CMIO.net: The News Weekly for Health IT Executives - June 28, 2011 Category: Information Technology Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

Internationally recognized BME professor to join University of Texas as visiting scholar
(University of Texas at Austin) Professor Ali Khademhosseini, a bioengineer who is internationally regarded for his research and contributions in the area of biomedical microdevices and biomaterials, will join the University of Texas at Austin's Department of Biomedical Engineering as a Donald D. Harrington Fellow and visiting scholar for the fall 2011 semester. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 27, 2011 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Tiny cell patterns reveal the progression of development and disease
(Columbia University) Researchers at Columbia Engineering School, led by biomedical engineering professor Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, has developed a new technique to evaluate human stem cells using cell micropatterning -- a simple but powerful in vitro tool that will enable scientists to study the initiation of left-right asymmetry during tissue formation, to diagnose disease, and to study factors that could lead to certain birth defects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 27, 2011 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

AAMI: Healthcare technology management dawns as a new profession
SAN ANTONIO—After an intensive two-day forum to better define the evolving role of clinical and biomedical engineering, industry leaders came to the conclusion that healthcare technology management is the new name for the profession, which was explained in a presentation at the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) conference & expo on June 26. (Source: CMIO.net: The News Weekly for Health IT Executives)
Source: CMIO.net: The News Weekly for Health IT Executives - June 26, 2011 Category: Information Technology Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

AAMI: Healthcare technology management dawns as a new profession
SAN ANTONIO—After an intensive two-day forum to better define the evolving role of clinical and biomedical engineering, industry leaders came to the conclusion that healthcare technology management is the new name for the profession, which was explained in a presentation at the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) conference & expo on June 26. (Source: Health Imaging News)
Source: Health Imaging News - June 26, 2011 Category: Radiology Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

The Brain Electric: Deep Brain Stimulation for Neurologic Disorders
Rigid posture, tremor, postural instability, shuffling gait. These are the technical terms you might apply to the man with advancing Parkinson’s disease as he struggles to descend the stairs outside his front door and staggers down his driveway, shoulders hunched, balancing himself precariously between his cane and the car door as he makes his way toward the mailbox at the end of the drive. The same man on the same day, with his brain stimulator turned on, can walk down the stairs while putting on his jacket, step easily into his car, and drive to the post office. If you saw him on the street, you wouldn’t know he was ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - June 25, 2011 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Neurological Disorders Source Type: news

Patch Work: Building New Heart Tissue -- From Scratch to Patch
Imagine a patch -- made of fully functional cardiac tissue -- that could safely and effectively restore function to heart muscle injured by a heart attack or plagued by an arrhythmia. This is the work of Duke biomedical engineer Nenad Bursac, PhD, and his team in the Cardiac Electrophysiology and Tissue Engineering (CETE) lab. They’re using undifferentiated stem cells to build functioning patches of heart tissue that can directly replace damaged or malfunctioning heart-muscle cells (cardiomyocytes). The work offers a different approach than injecting stem cells into hearts, which is another experimental technique to achi...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - June 22, 2011 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Heart Services Research Source Type: news

Memory Restored In Rat Model
Scientists have developed a way to turn memories on and off - literally with the flip of a switch. Using an electronic system that duplicates the neural signals associated with memory, they managed to replicate the brain function in rats associated with long-term learned behavior, even when the rats had been drugged to forget. "Flip the switch on, and the rats remember. Flip it off, and the rats forget," said Theodore Berger of the USC Viterbi School of Engineering's Department of Biomedical Engineering... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 17, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

Researchers Measure Blood Pressure With Ultrasound Scanner
"Scientists have for years been looking for a non-invasive method to measure the blood pressure pulses at highly localized points in the body", explains TU/e researcher dr. Nathalie Bijnens of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. "The usual method is to insert a catheter with a pressure sensor. But that's an invasive procedure, and not suitable for preventive diagnostics. There's also the traditional method using an inflatable arm cuff. But that doesn't allow any conclusions to be drawn about for example the blood pressure in the carotid artery... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 15, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hypertension Source Type: news

Elsevier Launches new Article of the Future Prototypes
Discipline-specific, three-pane article design in line with the needs of the research community. The prototypes, available in seven disciplines, are based on feedback from researchers with whom Elsevier cooperated throughout the development of the Article of the Future format. The improved format will begin to be applied to SciVerse ScienceDirect towards the end of 2011. (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - June 10, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

Promising New Imaging Tech For Diagnosis Of Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes
Researchers have developed a new type of imaging technology to diagnose cardiovascular disease and other disorders by measuring ultrasound signals from molecules exposed to a fast-pulsing laser. The new method could be used to take precise three-dimensional images of plaques lining arteries, said Ji-Xin Cheng, an associate professor of biomedical engineering and chemistry at Purdue University... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 10, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Elsevier Launches new Article of the Future PrototypesInnovation Focus
Discipline-specific, three-pane article design in line with the needs of the research community. The prototypes, available in seven disciplines, are based on feedback from researchers with whom Elsevier cooperated throughout the development of the Article of the Future format. The improved format will begin to be applied to SciVerse ScienceDirect towards the end of 2011. (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - June 10, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

New Imaging Technique Promising for Diagnosing Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes
June 9, 2011 (Purdue University) — Researchers have developed a new type of imaging technology to diagnose cardiovascular disease and other disorders by measuring ultrasound signals from molecules exposed to a fast-pulsing laser. The new method could be used to take precise three-dimensional images of plaques lining arteries, said Ji-Xin Cheng, an associate professor of biomedical engineering and chemistry at Purdue University. read more (Source: Diabetes News from dLife.com)
Source: Diabetes News from dLife.com - June 9, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dlife Source Type: news

Biomedical engineering: All-encompassing degree for lucrative career
Biomedical engineering, or the application of engineering principals to medicine, is continuing to gain traction in both the hospital setting and the classroom, with top universities now offering degrees in the field and experts predicting that the job market will continue to grow at a fast pace. (Source: Health Imaging News)
Source: Health Imaging News - June 7, 2011 Category: Radiology Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

Biomedical engineering: All-encompassing degree for a lucrative career
Biomedical engineering, or the application of engineering principals to medicine, is continuing to gain traction in both the hospital setting and the classroom, with top universities now offering degrees in the field and experts predicting that the job market will continue to grow at a fast pace. (Source: CMIO.net: The News Weekly for Health IT Executives)
Source: CMIO.net: The News Weekly for Health IT Executives - June 7, 2011 Category: Information Technology Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

Biomedical engineering: All-encompassing degree for a lucrative career
Biomedical engineering, or the application of engineering principals to medicine, is continuing to gain traction in both the hospital setting and the classroom, with top universities now offering degrees in the field and experts predicting that the job market will continue to grow at a fast pace. (Source: Health Imaging News)
Source: Health Imaging News - June 7, 2011 Category: Radiology Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

Stem Cell Treatment May Offer Option For Broken Bones That Don't Heal
Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine have shown in an animal study that transplantation of adult stem cells enriched with a bone-regenerating hormone can help mend bone fractures that are not healing properly. The UNC study team led by Anna Spagnoli, MD, associate professor of pediatrics and biomedical engineering, demonstrated that stem cells manufactured with the regenerative hormone insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) become bone cells and also help the cells within broken bones repair the fracture, thereby speeding the healing... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 7, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Bones / Orthopedics Source Type: news

Fire Safety Journal at 10th International IAFSS Symposium, 19-24 June, University of Maryland, USAElsevier Engineering News
It’s not too late to register for the premier fire safety science meeting in the world. Six invited plenary lectures by some of the world’s top fire researchers, presentation of more than 100 papers during 3 parallel sessions, and presentations of more than 100 posters during 2 special sessions. Go to http://www.iafss.org/html/Maryland/marylandhome.htm (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - June 7, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

Stem Cell Treatment May Become Option To Treat Nonhealing Bone Fractures
Stem cell therapy enriched with a bone-regenerating hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), can help mend broken bones in fractures that are not healing normally, a new animal study finds. The Endocrine Society's 93rd Annual Meeting will host presentation of the results on Sunday in Boston. A deficiency of fracture healing is a common problem affecting an estimated 600,000 people annually in North America, according to the principal investigator, Anna Spagnoli, MD, associate professor of pediatrics and biomedical engineering at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 6, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Bones / Orthopedics Source Type: news

New Editor-in-Chief for Acta Astronautica, the journal of the International Academy of Astronautics
During the Acta Astronautica Editorial Board held at the 61st IAC, Prague September 2010, Editor-in-Chief Rupert Gerzer announced that due to his steadily and steeply increasing work load at the DLR, he felt it best to turn the reigns of Editor-in-Chief over to the very qualified and able (Rock) Jeng-Shing Chern who has served as Comission IV Editor since 2008. To read Rock's editorial, go to http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0094576511001020 (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - May 31, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

New Editor-in-Chief for Acta Astronautica, the journal of the International Academy of AstronauticsElsevier Engineering News
During the Acta Astronautica Editorial Board held at the 61st IAC, Prague September 2010, Editor-in-Chief Rupert Gerzer announced that due to his steadily and steeply increasing work load at the DLR, he felt it best to turn the reigns of Editor-in-Chief over to the very qualified and able (Rock) Jeng-Shing Chern who has served as Comission IV Editor since 2008. To read Rock's editorial, go to http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0094576511001020 (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - May 31, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

Stevens Thoracic Catheter Senior Design Team Takes 1st Place At Regional ISPE Competition
A Senior Design team at Stevens Institute of Technology is working to alleviate pain and other complications that often arise during thoracic surgeries. Five undergraduate Biomedical Engineering students have invented a novel thoracic catheter that overcomes issues of existing catheter design and introduces a potentially profitable new product for the marketplace... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 24, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Fighting Hypothermia On The Battlefield
A Biomedical Engineering Senior Design team at Stevens Institute of Technology is working with the U.S. Army and New Jersey physicians to develop a new device to combat hypothermia among wounded soldiers. Team "Heat Wave" is composed of seniors Walter Galvez, Amanda Mendez, Geoffrey Ng, and Dalia Shendi, in addition to Biomedical Engineering graduate student Maia Hadidi. The team's faculty advisor is Dr. Vikki Hazelwood and consulting physician is Dr. Herman Morchel from Hackensack University Medical Center... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 24, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Stevens biomedical engineering students fight hypothermia on the battlefield
(Stevens Institute of Technology) Team Heat Wave is developing a new device to combat hypothermia among wounded soldiers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2011 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Spoonful of sugar helps medicine go down
Bioengineer James Collins has discovered that taking antibiotics with sugar may increase their power to tackle persistent infectionsJames Collins is a professor of biomedical engineering at Boston University and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. A former Rhodes Scholar, he has been the recipient of many scientific honours including, in 2003, becoming the first bioengineer to receive a MacArthur Foundation "genius award".He recently published a paper that showed how taking antibiotics with certain sugars could improve their effectiveness against stubborn infections.Stubborn infections are caused by "persi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 22, 2011 Category: Science Authors: Ian Tucker Tags: Medical research Biochemistry and molecular biology Engineering Science The Observer Features Interviews Technology Source Type: news

New book explores stem cell therapies for heart disease
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) A new book edited by researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and the Stony Brook University School of Medicine provides a comprehensive look at the science and application of cellular therapies aimed at the leading cause of death -- heart disease. "Regenerating the Heart: Stem Cells and the Cardiovascular System" is edited by Glenn Gaudette, associate professor of biomedical engineering at WPI, and Ira Cohen, professor of physiology and biophysics at Stony Brook. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 17, 2011 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

U of Texas nets $950,000 grant to develop blood test for cancer
The National Institutes of Health's (NIH) National Cancer Institute has awarded John Zhang, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical engineering in the Cockrell School of Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, nearly $1 million for his research on early detection of cancer. (Source: Health Imaging News)
Source: Health Imaging News - May 16, 2011 Category: Radiology Tags: Latest News Source Type: news

The Rodney Hill Prize in Solid Mechanics
Elsevier Limited has established a prize named The Rodney Hill Prize in Solid Mechanics. This prize, which consists of a plaque and a check for $25,000 (twenty-five thousand US Dollars), is to be awarded in recognition of outstanding research in the field of solid mechanics. The prize is to be awarded every 4 years, to coincide with the quadrennial International Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (ICTAM). The first prize was awarded at ICTAM 2008 in Adelaide and the second will be awarded at the ICTAM 2012 in Beijing. To read more, go to http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/P10.cws_home/hillprize (Source: Elsevier ...
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - May 12, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

The Rodney Hill Prize in Solid MechanicsElsevier Engineering News
Elsevier Limited has established a prize named The Rodney Hill Prize in Solid Mechanics. This prize, which consists of a plaque and a check for $25,000 (twenty-five thousand US Dollars), is to be awarded in recognition of outstanding research in the field of solid mechanics. The prize is to be awarded every 4 years, to coincide with the quadrennial International Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (ICTAM). The first prize was awarded at ICTAM 2008 in Adelaide and the second will be awarded at the ICTAM 2012 in Beijing. To read more, go to http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/P10.cws_home/hillprize (Source: Elsevier ...
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - May 12, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

THE RODNEY HILL PRIZE IN SOLID MECHANICSElsevier Engineering News
Elsevier is delighted to announce that the first winner of the Rodney Hill Prize in Solid Mechanics was Professor Michael Ortiz, Dotty and Dick Hayman Professor of Aeronautics and Mechanical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA. Read more at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/P07.cws_home/hillprizewinner (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - May 12, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

New technology fuses MRI, ultrasound to achieve targeted biopsy of prostate cancer
  A new prostate-imaging technology that fuses MRI with real-time, three-dimensional ultrasound may offer a more exacting method to obtain biopsy specimens from suspicious areas within the organ.    Four UCLA departments — urology, radiology, pathology and biomedical engineering — collaborated with the medical device company Eigen Inc. to develop and test the technology. The team's early experiences with it are reported in the online May–June issue of Urologic Oncology.   "It's difficult to identify and target suspicious areas using two-dimensional, conventional ultrasound, so ur...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2011 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

ICoBT 2011 - Registration openElsevier Engineering News
Take advantage of the early bird rate! Register NOW for the International Conference on BioTribolgy, which will take place in London, Imperial College, 18-21 September 2011. For more information or to register, go to http://www.biotribologyconference.com (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - May 10, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

The Elsevier Webshop - Scientific illustration services
Visualise your research the way you want. Elsevier’s own illustrators will turn your sketches and ideas into high-quality color visualizations, maps or diagrams. Most jobs finished in 6 days or less! (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - May 3, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Source Type: news

The Elsevier Webshop - Scientific illustration servicesInnovation Focus
Visualise your research the way you want. Elsevier’s own illustrators will turn your sketches and ideas into high-quality color visualizations, maps or diagrams. Most jobs finished in 6 days or less! (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - May 3, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

Bioartificial kidney addition wins LEGO robot design awards
In fall 2010, a team of 8 school children won multiple awards in the Wisconsin regional and state FIRST® LEGO® League (FLL®) 2010 Body Forward™ Challenge, an international biomedical engineering competition involving a research project and robot games. Left to right, top to bottom: IRAD Warriors Drew, Keegan, Marcus, Mason, Matthew, Mikayla, Rachel, Seth. Known variously as VHS LEGO Buccaneers, IRAD Warriors, and iRADWarriors, the team envisioned a special device that would expand the function of a surgically implantable bioartificial kidney, which is now in development by a team of scientists from...
Source: UCSF School of Pharmacy News - April 28, 2011 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Overview of Healthcare Smartphone Apps
Read an overview of health and healthcare smartphone apps available today, including emerging trends. The article is entitled “How smartphones are changing the face of mobile and participatory healthcare: an overview, with example from eCAALYX/,” available from http://www.biomedical-engineering-online.com/content/10/1/24. [SD] (Source: Midcontinental Region News)
Source: Midcontinental Region News - April 21, 2011 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: liaison Tags: Technology Source Type: news

Discoveries On Medical Uses Of Ultrasound To Be Presented To London's Royal Society
Jamie Tyler, assistant professor in the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, has been invited to speak at a Royal Society of London high level workshop on May 11-12 on the security implications of advances in neuroscience. The workshop is part of a four-part policy study on neuroscience and society called 'Brain Waves'... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 20, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

Researchers construct RNA nanoparticles to safely deliver long-lasting therapy to cells
(University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center) Though RNA is viewed as a promising tool in nanotherapy, the difficulties of producing stable and long-lasting therapeutic RNA have posed challenges to research. In the journal Molecular Therapy, University of Cincinnati biomedical engineering professor Peixuan Guo, Ph.D., details the successful production of large RNA nanoparticles from smaller RNA segments. The nanoparticles had a half life of between five and 10 hours in animal models and targeted cancer cells in vivo to release therapeutics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 20, 2011 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

6th International Conference on Fracture of Polymers, Composites and Adhesives - Programme availableElsevier Engineering News
The programme is now available to view on the website. Go to http://www.tc4pca.elsevier.com (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - April 20, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

ICoBT 2011 - Abstract submission dealine extended to 29 AprilElsevier Engineering News
The abstract submission deadline has now been extended until 29 April. To submit your abstract, go to http://www.biotribologyconference.com/abstractsubmission.asp (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - April 18, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

4th International Conference on the Mechanics of Biomaterials and Tissues - Not too late to submit your abstractElsevier Engineering News
It is not too late to submit your abstract - submission page will remain open until 20 April 2011. Go to http://www.mechanicsofbiomaterials.com/submit-abstract.html (Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering)
Source: Elsevier Updates: Engineering - April 18, 2011 Category: Biomedical Engineering Authors: (author unknown) Source Type: news

How smartphones are changing the face of mobile and participatory healthcare: an overview, with example from eCAALYX
Source: Kamel Boulos MN et al, Biomedical Engineering Online, 10(1) Content: The latest generation of smartphones are increasingly viewed as handheld computers rather than as phones, due to their powerful on-board computing capability, capacious memories, large screens and open operating systems that encourage application development. This paper provides a brief state-of-the-art overview of health and [...] (Source: ICMCC: The International Council on Medical and Care Compunetics)
Source: ICMCC: The International Council on Medical and Care Compunetics - April 16, 2011 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lodewijk Tags: Bibliography Journal Article Science Applications mHealth participatory smartphone Source Type: news

Tufts Biomedical Engineer Fiorenzo Omenetto Named Guggenheim Fellow
Fiorenzo G. Omenetto, Ph.D., professor of biomedical engineering at Tufts University School of Engineering and adjunct professor of physics in the School of Arts and Sciences, has received a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Omenetto received the only Guggenheim fellowship in engineering and one of just 180 fellowships awarded to scholars, artists, and scientists chosen from almost 3,000 applicants in the United States and Canada... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 13, 2011 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Tufts biomedical engineer Fiorenzo Omenetto named Guggenheim Fellow
(Tufts University) Tufts University biomedical engineer Fiorenzo Omenetto has received the only Guggenheim Fellowship in engineering in 2011. The award will support his efforts to demonstrate the first implantable, fully bioresorbable optical and electronic components that seamlessly integrate into living tissue -- meeting medical, food safety and environmental needs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 12, 2011 Category: Biology Source Type: news