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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 9.

Effects of a domain selective ACE inhibitor in a mouse model of chronic angiotensin II-dependent hypertension
The somatic isozyme of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) is comprised of two distinct, zinc-dependent catalytic domains with different substrate specificities for angiotensin I (cleaved selectively by the C- domain) and bradykinin (cleaved equally efficiently by both the N and C- domains). Classical ACE inhibitors (ACEI) target both domains, with side effects such as cough and angioedema being attributed, in part, to N- domain inhibition, likely through bradykinin accumulation. We questioned whether a novel C-domain selective ACEI (lisW-S) has anti-hypertensive effects without influencing bradykinin status. Ang II-depe...
Source: Clinical Science - February 10, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: D Burger, T L. Reudelhuber, A Mahajan, K Chibale, E D. Sturrock, R M. Touyz Source Type: research

Thrombin induces ICAM-1 expression in human lung epithelial cells via c-Src/PDGFR/PI3K/Akt-dependent NF-{kappa}B/p300 activation
Up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is frequently implicated in lung inflammation and lung diseases, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Thrombin has been shown to play a key role in inflammation via adhesion molecules induction, and then causes lung injury. However, the mechanisms underlying thrombin-induced ICAM-1 expression in human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (HPAEpiCs) remain unclear. We showed that thrombin induced ICAM-1 expression in HPAEpiCs. Pretreatment with the inhibitor of thrombin (PPACK), c-Src (PP1), PDGFR (AG1296), PI3K (LY294002), NF-κB (Bay11-7082), or p300...
Source: Clinical Science - February 10, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: S Cheng, I Lee, C Lin, L Hsiao, C Yang Source Type: research

Can we use DNA triple helices as treatment for systemic lupus erythematosus?
Abstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic disease characterized by a variable clinical course and is associated with the presence of numerous autoantibodies. Autoantibodies against double-stranded DNA are highly specific for SLE and are directly associated with distinct clinical manifestations of the disease, specifically lupus nephritis. Examination of the sequences and the three-dimensional structures of autoantibodies specific for nucleic acids, confirms the presence of positively charged amino acids which could interact with the phosphate groups of self DNA. We hypothesize that DNA triple-helices, which...
Source: Medical Hypotheses - February 10, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Cecilia P. Mikita, Eduardo A. Padlan Tags: Articles Source Type: research

Biology and Regulation of Blood‑Tissue Barriers
series:Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. (Source: Springer Biomedical Sciences titles)
Source: Springer Biomedical Sciences titles - February 9, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Molecular Medicine Source Type: news

Nature online: February 9, 2014
L-Myc expression by dendritic cells is required for optimal T-cell priming Wumesh KC, Ansuman T. Satpathy, Aaron S. Rapaport, Carlos G.  Briseño, Xiaodi Wu, Jörn C. Albring, Emilie V. Russler-Germain, Nicole M. Kretzer, Vivek Durai, … More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - February 9, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: pubaff Tags: Research Update Source Type: news

A decadentate Gd(III)-coordinating paramagnetic cosolvent for protein relaxation enhancement measurement.
Abstract Solvent paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (sPRE) arises from random collisions between paramagnetic cosolvent and protein of interest. The sPRE can be readily measured, affording protein structure information. However, lack of an inert cosolvent probe may yield sPRE values that are not consistent with protein structure. Here we synthesized a new sPRE probe, triethylenetetraamine hexaacetate trimethylamide gadolinium, or Gd(III)-TTHA-TMA. With a total of 10 coordination sites, this paramagnetic cosovlent eliminates an inner-sphere water molecule that can otherwise transfer relaxation to protein through ex...
Source: Journal of Bimolecular NMR - February 9, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Gu XH, Gong Z, Guo DC, Zhang WP, Tang C Tags: J Biomol NMR Source Type: research

Household income and LDL-C goal attainment in patients with diabetes and dyslipidemia in a Canadian dataset.
Conclusion: This study demonstrates that household income was not a factor to achieve therapeutic goals for LDL-C for patients with diabetes in this dataset, although goal attainment was less than ideal overall. Future studies should address limitations of this work including small sample size, recruitment bias and lack of data on third party insurance coverage. PMID: 24502811 [PubMed - in process] (Source: Clinical and Investigative Medicine)
Source: Clinical and Investigative Medicine - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Farahani P, Levine M Tags: Clin Invest Med Source Type: research

Noninvasive prediction of large esophageal varices in liver cirrhosis patients.
Conclusions: No single variable offers self-sufficient predictive function for large esophageal varices. A comprehensive model using multiple variables significantly improves the predictive accuracy in screening the most at risk patients with potential variceal hemorrhage. PMID: 24502810 [PubMed - in process] (Source: Clinical and Investigative Medicine)
Source: Clinical and Investigative Medicine - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wang L, Hu J, Dong S, Jian YC, Hu L, Yang G, Wang J, Xiong W Tags: Clin Invest Med Source Type: research

PI3K-Akt/eNOS in remote postconditioning induced by brief pulmonary ischemia.
Conclusion: Our results suggest a role for Akt in remote postconditioning-induced myocardial protection, but do not support an involvement of eNOS in Akt-mediated action. PMID: 24502809 [PubMed - in process] (Source: Clinical and Investigative Medicine)
Source: Clinical and Investigative Medicine - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tang YH, Yang JS, Xiang HY, Xu JJ Tags: Clin Invest Med Source Type: research

Carvacrol prevents methotrexate-induced renal oxidative injury and renal damage in rats.
Conclusions: MTX treatment results in oxidative damage to the rat kidney; damage which is partially abrogated by the administration of CAR. PMID: 24502808 [PubMed - in process] (Source: Clinical and Investigative Medicine)
Source: Clinical and Investigative Medicine - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Bozkurt M, Em S, Oktayoglu P, Turkcu G, Yuksel H, Sarıyıldız MA, Caglayan M, Batmaz I, Nas K, Bozkurt Y, Kuyumcu M Tags: Clin Invest Med Source Type: research

Suppression of CUGBP1 inhibits growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.
Conclusion: These results suggest that CUGBP1 is essential for the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Knockdown of CUGBP1 might be a potential therapeutic approach for human hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID: 24502807 [PubMed - in process] (Source: Clinical and Investigative Medicine)
Source: Clinical and Investigative Medicine - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Liu Y, Huang H, Yuan B, Luo T, Li J, Qin X Tags: Clin Invest Med Source Type: research

Tetramethylpyrazine improves oxazolone-induced colitis by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway.
Conclusion: TMP improved the colitis induced by oxazoline, and its activity was associated with inhibition of NF-κB translocation, and subsequent inhibition of pro-inflammatory factor production and oxidative stress. PMID: 24502806 [PubMed - in process] (Source: Clinical and Investigative Medicine)
Source: Clinical and Investigative Medicine - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Lu Y, Zhu M, Chen W, Yin L, Zhu J, Chen N, Chen W Tags: Clin Invest Med Source Type: research

Lesser models.
PMID: 24499784 [PubMed - in process] (Source: Journal of Biosciences)
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Kasbekar DP Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

From fission to fusion: A perspective on the research that won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 2013.
PMID: 24499785 [PubMed - in process] (Source: Journal of Biosciences)
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Ray K Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

Biochemistry and evolutionary biology: Two disciplines that need each other?
Abstract Biochemical information has been crucial for the development of evolutionary biology. On the one hand, the sequence information now appearing is producing a huge increase in the amount of data available for phylogenetic analysis; on the other hand, and perhaps more fundamentally, it allows understanding of the mechanisms that make evolution possible. Less well recognized, but just as important, understanding evolutionary biology is essential for understanding many details of biochemistry that would otherwise be mysterious, such as why the structures of NAD and other coenzymes are far more complicated than ...
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Cornish-Bowden A, Pereto J, Cardenas ML Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

What history tells us XXXIII. Molecular hybridization: A problematic tool for the study of differentiation and development (1960-1980).
PMID: 24499787 [PubMed - in process] (Source: Journal of Biosciences)
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Morange M Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

Metabolic engineering of chloroplasts for artemisinic acid biosynthesis and impact on plant growth.
Abstract Chloroplasts offer high-level transgene expression and transgene containment due to maternal inheritance, and are ideal hosts for biopharmaceutical biosynthesis via multigene engineering. To exploit these advantages, we have expressed 12 enzymes in chloroplasts for the biosynthesis of artemisinic acid (precursor of artemisinin, antimalarial drug) in an alternative plant system. Integration of transgenes into the tobacco chloroplast genome via homologous recombination was confirmed by molecular analysis, and biosynthesis of artemisinic acid in plant leaf tissues was detected with the help of 13C NMR and ESI...
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Saxena B, Subramaniyan M, Malhotra K, Bhavesh NS, Potlakayala SD, Kumar S Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

On the possible involvement of bovine serum albumin precursor in lipofection pathway.
Abstract Protein factors involved in lipofection pathways remain elusive. Using avidin-biotin affinity chromatography and mass finger printing analysis technique, herein we report the identification of a 70 kDa size protein (bovine serum albumin precursor, BSAP) which binds strongly with lipoplexes and may play role in lipofection pathway. Using multiple cultured animal cells and three structurally different cationic transfection lipids, we show that the efficiencies of liposomal transfection vectors get significantly enhanced (by ~2.5- to 5.0-fold) in cells pre-transfected with lipoplexes of reporter plasmid const...
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Mukherjee A, Bhattacharyya J, Chaudhuri A Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

Screening of cellular proteins that interact with the classical swine fever virus non-structural protein 5A by yeast two-hybrid analysis.
Abstract Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), the pathogen of classical swine fever (CSF), causes severe hemorrhagic fever and vascular necrosis in domestic pigs and wild boar. A large number of evidence has proven that non-structural 5A (NS5A) is not only a very important part of viral replication complex, but also can regulate host cell's function; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the current study, aiming to find more clues in understanding the molecular mechanisms of CSFV NS5A's function, the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system was adopted to screen for CSFV NS5A interactive proteins in ...
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Zhang C, He L, Kang K, Chen H, Xu L, Zhang Y Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

Inhibition of factor-dependent transcription termination in Escherichia coli might relieve xenogene silencing by abrogating H-NS-DNA interactions in vivo.
Abstract Many horizontally acquired genes (xenogenes) in the bacterium Escherichia coli are maintained in a silent transcriptional state by the nucleoid-associated transcription regulatory protein H-NS. Recent evidence has shown that antibiotic-mediated inhibition of the transcription terminator protein Rho leads to de-repression of horizontally acquired genes, akin to a deletion of hns. The mechanism behind this similarity in outcomes between the perturbations of two distinct processes remains unclear. Using ChIP-seq of H-NS in wild-type cells, in addition to that in cells treated with bicyclomycin - a specific in...
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Chandraprakash D, Seshasayee AS Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

FKBP12 regulates the localization and processing of amyloid precursor protein in human cell lines.
Abstract One of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease is the presence of insoluble extracellular amyloid plaques. These plaques are mainly constituted of amyloid beta peptide (A beta), a proteolytic product of amyloid precursor protein (APP). APP processing also generates the APP intracellular domain (AICD). We have previously demonstrated that AICD interacts with FKBP12, a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) ubiquitous in nerve systems. This interaction was interfered by FK506, a clinically used immunosuppressant that has recently been reported to be neuroprotective. To elucidate the roles of ...
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Liu FL, Liu TY, Kung FL Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

Analysis of Rheb in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum: Cellular localization, spatial expression and overexpression.
Abstract Dictyostelium discoideum encodes a single Rheb protein showing sequence similarity to human homologues of Rheb. The DdRheb protein shares 52 percent identity and 100 percent similarity with the human Rheb1 protein. Fluorescence of Rheb yellow fluorescent protein fusion was detected in the D. discoideum cytoplasm. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and whole-mount in situ hybridization analyses showed that rheb is expressed at all stages of development and in prestalk cells in the multicellular structures developed. When the expression of rheb as a fusion with lacZ was driven under its own prom...
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Swer PB, Bhadoriya P, Saran S Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

Three-dimensional analysis of abnormal ultrastructural alteration in mitochondria of hippocampus of APP/PSEN1 transgenic mouse.
Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The deterioration of subcellular organelles, including the mitochondria, is another major ultrastructural characteristic of AD pathogenesis, in addition to amyloid plaque deposition. However, the three-dimensional (3-D) study of mitochondrial structural alteration in AD remains poorly understood. Therefore, ultrastructural analysis, 3-D electron tomography, and immunogold electron microscopy were performed in the present study to clarify the abnormal structural alterations in mitochondria caused by the progression of AD in APP/PSEN1 tran...
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Choi KJ, Kim MJ, Je AR, Jun S, Lee C, Lee E, Jo M, Huh YH, Kweon HS Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

Prenatal music stimulation facilitates the postnatal functional development of the auditory as well as visual system in chicks (Gallus domesticus).
Abstract Rhythmic sound or music is known to improve cognition in animals and humans. We wanted to evaluate the effects of prenatal repetitive music stimulation on the remodelling of the auditory cortex and visual Wulst in chicks. Fertilized eggs (0 day) of white leghorn chicken (Gallus domesticus) during incubation were exposed either to music or no sound from embryonic day 10 until hatching. Auditory and visual perceptual learning and synaptic plasticity, as evident by synaptophysin and PSD-95 expression, were done at posthatch days (PH) 1, 2 and 3. The number of responders was significantly higher in the music s...
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Roy S, Nag TC, Upadhyay AD, Mathur R, Jain S Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS D influences systemic-acquiredresistance- induced expression and histone modifications of WRKY genes.
Abstract A plant that is in part infected by a pathogen is more resistant throughout its whole body to subsequent infections - a phenomenon known as systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Mobile signals are synthesized at the site of infection and distributed throughout the plant through vascular tissues. Mechanism of SAR development subsequent to reaching the mobile signal in the distal tissue is largely unknown. Recently we showed that FLOWERING LOCUS D (FLD) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana is required in the distal tissue to activate SAR. FLD codes for a homologue of human-lysinespecific histone demethylase. Here we s...
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Singh V, Roy S, Singh D, Nandi AK Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

Hpa1 harpin needs nitroxyl terminus to promote vegetative growth and leaf photosynthesis in Arabidopsis.
Abstract Hpa1 is a harpin protein produced by Xanthomonas oryzae, an important bacterial pathogen of rice, and has the growth-promoting activity in plants. To understand the molecular basis for the function of Hpa1, we generated an inactive variant protein, Hpa1 delta NT, by deleting the nitroxyl-terminal region of the Hpa1 sequence and compared Hpa1 delta NT with the full-length protein in terms of the effects on vegetative growth and related physiological responses in Arabidopsis. When Hpa1 was applied to plants, it acted to enhance the vegetative growth but did not affect the floral development. Enhanced plant g...
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Li X, Han L, Zhao Y, You Z, Dong H, Zhang C Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

Pharmaceutical and pharmacological approaches for bioavailability enhancement of etoposide.
Abstract Etoposide, a semi-synthetic derivative of podophyllotoxin, is one of the most active and useful antineoplastic agent used routinely in firstline combination chemotherapy of testicular cancer, small-cell lung cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Etoposide displays narrow therapeutic index, erratic pharmacokinetics and dose individualization that needs to be achieved for overcoming inter- and intra-patient variability (25-80 percent), so as to maintain proper drug exposure within a therapeutic range. Etoposide posses high plasma protein binding (97 percent) and is degraded via complex metabolic pathways. The m...
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Najar IA, Johri RK Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

Apico-basal polarity complex and cancer.
Abstract Apico-basal polarity is a cardinal molecular feature of adult eukaryotic epithelial cells and appears to be involved in several key cellular processes including polarized cell migration and maintenance of tissue architecture. Epithelial cell polarity is maintained by three well-conserved polarity complexes, namely, PAR, Crumbs and SCRIB. The location and interaction between the components of these complexes defines distinct structural domains of epithelial cells. Establishment and maintenance of apico-basal polarity is regulated through various conserved cell signalling pathways including TGF beta, Integri...
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Khursheed M, Bashyam MD Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

In vitro and in vivo neurogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from different sources.
Abstract Regenerative medicine is an evolving interdisciplinary topic of research involving numerous technological methods that utilize stem cells to repair damaged tissues. Particularly, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a great tool in regenerative medicine because of their lack of tumorogenicity, immunogenicity and ability to perform immunomodulatory as well as anti-inflammatory functions. Numerous studies have investigated the role of MSCs in tissue repair and modulation of allogeneic immune responses. MSCs derived from different sources hold unique regenerative potential as they are selfrenewing and can differ...
Source: Journal of Biosciences - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Taran R, Mamidi MK, Singh G, Dutta S, Parhar IS, John JP, Bhonde R, Pal R, Das AK Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research

Noncanonical NF-κB Signaling Is Limited by Classical NF-κB Activity.
Abstract Precise regulation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling is crucial for normal immune responses, and defective NF-κB activity underlies a range of immunodeficiencies. NF-κB is activated through two signaling cascades: the classical and noncanonical pathways. The classical pathway requires inhibitor of κB kinase β (IKKβ) and NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO), and hypomorphic mutations in the gene encoding NEMO (ikbkg) lead to inherited immunodeficiencies, collectively termed NEMO-ID. Noncanonical NF-κB activation requires NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) and IKKα, but not NEMO. We found that noncanoni...
Source: Science Signaling - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Gray CM, Remouchamps C, McCorkell KA, Solt LA, Dejardin E, Orange JS, May MJ Tags: Sci Signal Source Type: research

Interconnected network motifs control podocyte morphology and kidney function.
Abstract Podocytes are kidney cells with specialized morphology that is required for glomerular filtration. Diseases, such as diabetes, or drug exposure that causes disruption of the podocyte foot process morphology results in kidney pathophysiology. Proteomic analysis of glomeruli isolated from rats with puromycin-induced kidney disease and control rats indicated that protein kinase A (PKA), which is activated by adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), is a key regulator of podocyte morphology and function. In podocytes, cAMP signaling activates cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) to enhance expression of t...
Source: Science Signaling - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Azeloglu EU, Hardy SV, Eungdamrong NJ, Chen Y, Jayaraman G, Chuang PY, Fang W, Xiong H, Neves SR, Jain MR, Li H, Ma'ayan A, Gordon RE, He JC, Iyengar R Tags: Sci Signal Source Type: research

STAT3 Induction of miR-146b Forms a Feedback Loop to Inhibit the NF-κB to IL-6 Signaling Axis and STAT3-Driven Cancer Phenotypes.
Abstract Interleukin-6 (IL-6)-mediated activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a mechanism by which chronic inflammation can contribute to cancer and is a common oncogenic event. We discovered a pathway, the loss of which is associated with persistent STAT3 activation in human cancer. We found that the gene encoding the tumor suppressor microRNA miR-146b is a direct STAT3 target gene, and its expression was increased in normal breast epithelial cells but decreased in tumor cells. Methylation of the miR-146b promoter, which inhibited STAT3-mediated induction of expression, was inc...
Source: Science Signaling - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Xiang M, Birkbak NJ, Vafaizadeh V, Walker SR, Yeh JE, Liu S, Kroll Y, Boldin M, Taganov K, Groner B, Richardson AL, Frank DA Tags: Sci Signal Source Type: research

ROMO1 Is an Essential Redox-Dependent Regulator of Mitochondrial Dynamics.
Abstract The dynamics of mitochondria undergoing fusion and fragmentation govern many mitochondrial functions, including the regulation of cell survival. Although the machinery that catalyzes fusion and fragmentation has been well described, less is known about the signaling components that regulate these phenomena. We performed a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen and identified reactive oxygen species modulator 1 (ROMO1) as a redox-regulated protein required for mitochondrial fusion and normal cristae morphology. We showed that oxidative stress promoted the formation of high-molecular weight ROMO1 complex...
Source: Science Signaling - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Norton M, Ng AC, Baird S, Dumoulin A, Shutt T, Mah N, Andrade-Navarro MA, McBride HM, Screaton RA Tags: Sci Signal Source Type: research

Biasing GPCR Signaling from Inside.
Abstract The discovery of "functional selectivity" or "biased signaling" through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has redefined the classical GPCR signaling paradigm. Moreover, the therapeutic potential of biased signaling by and biased ligands for GPCRs is changing the landscape of GPCR drug discovery. The concept of biased signaling has primarily been developed and discussed in the context of ligands that bind to the extracellular regions of GPCRs. However, two recent reports demonstrate that it is also possible to bias GPCR signaling from inside the cell by targeting intracellular regions of these receptors. ...
Source: Science Signaling - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Shukla AK Tags: Sci Signal Source Type: research

O ROM(e)O1, ROM(e)O1, Wherefore Art Thou ROM(e)O1?
Abstract Mitochondria are not only a source but also a target of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the molecular mechanisms by which ROS affect mitochondrial function are poorly defined. In this issue, Screaton and colleagues report that ROS modulator protein 1 (ROMO1) links ROS and mitochondrial morphology and ultrastructure by modulating cristae remodeling and mitochondrial fusion that depends on the guanosine triphosphatase Opa1. Their work indicates how the oxidative milieu triggers mitochondrial shape changes. PMID: 24473193 [PubMed - in process] (Source: Science Signaling)
Source: Science Signaling - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Semenzato M, Scorrano L Tags: Sci Signal Source Type: research

"Pak J Biol Sci"[ta]; +107 new citations
107 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: "Pak J Biol Sci"[ta] These pubmed results were generated on 2014/02/08PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine, includes over 15 million citations for biomedical articles back to the 1950's. These citations are from MEDLINE and additional life science journals. PubMed includes links to many sites providing full text articles and other related resources. (Source: Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences: PJBS)
Source: Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences: PJBS - February 8, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Report Source Type: research

Engineering the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa for lipid production from lignocellulosic biomass
Abstract Microbially‐produced triacylglycerol (TAG) is a potential feedstock for the production of biodiesel, but its commercialization will require high yields from low‐cost renewable feedstocks such as lignocellulose. The present study employs a multi‐gene approach to increasing TAG biosynthesis in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We demonstrate the redirection of carbon flux from glycogen biosynthesis towards fatty acid biosynthesis in a glycogen synthase deletion strain (Δgsy‐1). Furthermore, combining Δgsy‐1 with an enhanced TAG biosynthetic strain (acyl‐Coenzyme A synthase; Δacs‐3) of N. cra...
Source: Biotechnology and Bioengineering - February 7, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Christine M. Roche, N. Louise Glass, Harvey W. Blanch, Douglas S. Clark Tags: Article Source Type: research

Achievements in postgraduate urologic education in iran: a quantitative study.
Conclusion: The current urology training is successful to improve urology health care. Along with expansion of urology and fellowship training, the number of Iranian female urologists significantly increased. To our knowledge Iran had the greatest growth rate of female urologist training in the Middle East, and is comparable with those in the most progressed countries in the world.  PMID: 24469660 [PubMed - in process] (Source: Urology Journal)
Source: Urology Journal - February 7, 2014 Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Simforoosh N, Tabatabai S, Ziaee SA Tags: Urol J Source Type: research

Chronic oral administration of Ang-(1-7) improves skeletal muscle, autonomic, and locomotor phenotypes in muscular dystrophy
Muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic disorders that cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting, dilated cardiomyopathy and early mortality. There are different types of muscular dystrophies with varying etiologies but they all have a common hallmark of myofiber degeneration, atrophy and decreased mobility. Mutation in sarcoglycan-delta (Sgcd), a subunit of dystrophin glycoprotein complex, causes Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2F (LGMD2F). Previously we have reported that Sgcd deficient (Sgcd-/-) mice exhibit angiotensin II (Ang II) induced autonomic and skeletal muscle dysfunction at a young age whi...
Source: Clinical Science - February 7, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: R Sabharwal, M Z. Cicha, R D. M. Sinisterra, F B. de Sousa, R Augusto Souza Santos, M W. Chapleau Source Type: research

Uniaxial tensile testing approaches for characterisation of atherosclerotic plaques
Abstract: The pathological changes associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques within arterial vessels result in significant alterations to the mechanical properties of the diseased arterial wall. There are several methods available to characterise the mechanical behaviour of atherosclerotic plaque tissue, and it is the aim of this paper to review the use of uniaxial mechanical testing. In the case of atherosclerotic plaques, there are nine studies that employ uniaxial testing to characterise mechanical behaviour. A primary concern regarding this limited cohort of published studies is the wide range of testi...
Source: Journal of Biomechanics - February 7, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: M.T. Walsh, E.M. Cunnane, J.J. Mulvihill, A.C. Akyildiz, F.J.H. Gijsen, G.A. Holzapfel Source Type: research

Psoriasis researchers identify molecular changes responsible for skin discoloration
Two immune system molecules — interleukin-17 and tumor necrosis factor — are increased in psoriasis, leading the immune system to attack a person’s own skin cells. Scientists found that these molecules disrupt the pigment production of patients’ melanocytes, and are responsible for the dark spots that psoriasis leaves behind. The results could bring about new treatments for pigmentation changes in this and other skin conditions such as eczema and acne. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - February 6, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: pubaff Tags: Science News eczema IL-17 James G. Krueger psoriasis TNF Source Type: news

Integrating mitosis, toxicity, and transgene expression in a telecommunications packet‐switched network model of lipoplex‐mediated gene delivery
ABSTRACT Gene delivery systems transport exogenous genetic information to cells or biological systems with the potential to directly alter endogenous gene expression and behavior with applications in functional genomics, tissue engineering, medical devices, and gene therapy. Nonviral systems offer advantages over viral systems because of their low immunogenicity, inexpensive synthesis, and easy modification but suffer from lower transfection levels. The representation of gene transfer using models offers perspective and interpretation of complex cellular mechanisms, including nonviral gene delivery where exact mechanisms a...
Source: Biotechnology and Bioengineering - February 6, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Timothy M. Martin, Beata J. Wysocki, Jared P. Beyersdorf, Tadeusz A. Wysocki, Angela K. Pannier Tags: Article Source Type: research

Understanding the function of conserved variations in the catalytic loops of fungal glycoside hydrolase family 12
ABSTRACT Enzymes that cleave the xyloglucan backbone at unbranched glucose residues have been identified in GH families 5, 7, 12, 16, 44 and 74. Fungi produce enzymes that populate 20 of 22 families that are considered critical for plant biomass deconstruction. We searched for GH12‐encoding genes in 27 Eurotiomycetes genomes. After analyzing 50 GH12‐related sequences, the conserved variations of the amino acid sequences were examined. Compared to the endoglucanases, the endo‐xyloglucanase‐associated YSG deletion at the negative subsites of the catalytic cleft with a SST insertion at the reducing end of the substrat...
Source: Biotechnology and Bioengineering - February 6, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: André R. L. Damásio, Marcelo V. Rubio, Leandro C. Oliveira, Fernando Segato, Bruno A. Dias, Ana P. Citadini, Douglas A. Paixão, Fabio M. Squina Tags: Article Source Type: research

Optimization of Liquid Overlay Technique to formulate heterogenic 3D co‐cultures models
ABSTRACT Three‐dimensional (3D) cell culture models of solid tumors are currently having a tremendous impact in the in vitro screening of candidate anti‐tumoral therapies. These 3D models provide more reliable results than those provided by standard 2D in vitro cell cultures. However, 3D manufacturing techniques need to be further optimized in order to increase the robustness of these models and provide data that can be properly correlated with the in vivo situation. Therefore, in the present study the parameters used for producing multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) by Liquid Overlay Technique (LOT) were optimized in...
Source: Biotechnology and Bioengineering - February 6, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Elisabete C. Costa, Vítor M. Gaspar, Paula Coutinho, Ilídio J. Correia Tags: Article Source Type: research

Manufacturing of bioreactive nanofibers for bioremediation
Abstract Recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells were successfully encapsulated in reactive membranes comprised of electrospun nanofibers that have biocompatible polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)‐based cores entrapping the E. coli and silica‐based, mechanically sturdy porous shells. The reactive membranes were produced in a continuous fashion using a coaxial electrospinning system coupled to a microfluidic timer that mixed and regulated the reaction time of the silica precursor and the PVA solution streams. A factorial design method was employed to investigate the effects of the three critical design parameters of the syste...
Source: Biotechnology and Bioengineering - February 6, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Ho‐Wang Tong, Baris R. Mutlu, Lawrence P. Wackett, Alptekin Aksan Tags: Article Source Type: research

High‐throughput biosensor discriminates between different algal H2‐photoproducing strains
Abstract A number of species of microalgae and cyanobacteria photosynthetically produce H2 gas by coupling water oxidation with the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen, generating renewable energy from sunlight and water. Photosynthetic H2 production, however, is transitory, and there is considerable interest in increasing and extending it for commercial applications. Here we report a Petri‐plate version of our previous, microplate‐based assay that detects photosynthetic H2 production by algae. The assay consists of an agar overlay of H2‐sensing Rhodobacter capsulatus bacteria carrying a green fluorescent prot...
Source: Biotechnology and Bioengineering - February 6, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Matt S.A. Wecker, Maria L. Ghirardi Tags: Article Source Type: research

Optimization and enhancement of H&E stained microscopical images by applying bilinear interpolation method on lab color mode
Conclusions: Non-uniform illumination problems in H&E microscopical images can be corrected without compromising crucial details that are essential for revealing the features of tissue samples. (Source: Theoretical Biology and Medical Modelling)
Source: Theoretical Biology and Medical Modelling - February 6, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Kaya Kuru Source Type: research

Chemerin reduces vascular nitric oxide - cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling: a link to vascular dysfunction in obesity?
The adipokine chemerin has been implicated in cardiovascular complications associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Chemerin has direct effects in the vasculature, augmenting vascular responses to contractile stimuli. Since nitric oxide (NO)–cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling plays a role in vascular dysfunction associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, we hypothesized that chemerin induces vascular dysfunction by decreasing NO-cGMP signaling. Aortic rings from male Wistar rats (10-12 weeks-old) were incubated with chemerin (0.5 ng/mL or 5 ng/mL, 1 hour) or vehicle, and isometric tension wa...
Source: Clinical Science - February 6, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: K Bianca Neves, N S. Lobato, R Alves Moreira Lopes, F P. Filgueira, C Ziliotto Zanotto, A Oliveira, R C. Tostes Source Type: research

The kinin B1 receptor regulates muscle specific E3 ligases expression and is involved in skeletal muscle mass control
Regulation of muscle mass depends on the balance between synthesis and degradation of proteins, which is under control of different signaling pathways regulated by hormonal, neural and nutritional stimuli. Such stimuli are altered in several pathologies such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, AIDS and cancer (cachexia), as well as in some conditions such as immobilization and aging (sarcopenia), leading to muscle atrophy, which represents a significant contribution to patient morbidity. The kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) is composed of the enzymes kallikreins, which generate active peptides called kinins th...
Source: Clinical Science - February 6, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: L T. Parreiras-e-Silva, R I. Reis, G A. Santos, M Pires-Oliveira, J B. Pesquero, M D. Gomes, R O. Godinho, C M. Costa-Neto Source Type: research

Determining cell division symmetry through the dissection of dividing cells using single-cell expression analysis
Nature Protocols 9, 505 (2014). doi:10.1038/nprot.2014.032 Authors: Lukasz Jasnos & Tomoyuki Sawado Symmetric cell divisions give rise to two sister cells that are identical to each other, whereas asymmetric divisions produce two sister cells with distinctive phenotypes. Although cell division symmetry is usually determined on the basis of a few markers or biological functions, the overall similarity (Source: Nature Protocols)
Source: Nature Protocols - February 6, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Lukasz JasnosTomoyuki Sawado Tags: Protocol Source Type: research