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Dentistry

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 9.

Managing fearful or anxious patients
About one in every seven individuals is highly anxious about undergoing dental treatment. These patients require careful and considerate management by dental practitioners. Various nonpharmacologic or pharmacologic techniques can be used to reduce fear and anxiety for dental patients. These include behavioral and cognitive approaches that can be adapted for the dental clinic or surgery facility. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Fear and Anxiety Source Type: research

Frailty's impact on oral health
Among older adults, there are significant discrepancies between what they believe they need in terms of dental care and what dental professionals believe they need. In addition, older adults have patterns of dental care use that do not correspond to their actual dental needs as determined by the practice of dentistry. Often frailty, or the loss of one or more areas of function, seems to contribute to these discrepancies. Frail elderly have not been studied for the effects of their frailty on their oral health care. The motivation of frail people to apply oral care despite physical and cognitive impairment is also little un...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Geriatric Dentistry Source Type: research

To extract or implant?
Dental implants are often used to replace “hopeless” or missing teeth, which may lead clinicians to believe they are as good as natural teeth. As a result, teeth that are salvageable may be extracted as a matter of convenience rather than after an analysis of prognostic factors. During such an analysis, the clinician must determine the long-term effectiveness of dental implants and weigh it against that of tooth preservation. A literature review was done to find the long-term survival data for teeth and implants. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Implants Source Type: research

To treat or extract and implant
A hot debate rages concerning when teeth should be extracted and implants placed and when they should be retained and restored. Endodontically treated teeth tend to be seen as inferior to implants with respect to long-term stability and retention, but the process of extracting a tooth or teeth and placing an implant or several implants is not always simple or ethically defensible. The issues of retention versus replacement, misconceptions about endodontic therapy and implants, and current strategies for endodontic treatment planning related to long-term success and tooth retention were evaluated to develop a more evidence-...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Implants Source Type: research

Screw or cement retention
Endosseous implant therapy was first dominated by the screw-retained restoration, which was initially intended for edentulous patients, most of whom required a full-arch restoration. For the partially edentulous patient, a cement-retained restoration became more popular, then a screw-retained abutment with a cemented restoration increased the success of implants. Cement-retained crowns improved occlusal accuracy, esthetics, and the chance of achieving a passive fit while diminishing retention loss. These resemble fixed prosthodontics but are less expensive to make. The outcomes of screw- and cement-retained implant restora...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Implants Source Type: research

Prophylactic third molar removal
The most common oral surgical procedure done in the United States is the prophylactic extraction of unerupted asymptomatic third molars. The motivation for removing these teeth is the prevention of future disease in adjacent teeth, but the evidence supporting this approach is lacking. The available longitudinal data compiled from an observational cohort study of adult men in the United States were evaluated to determine if there is a relationship between third molars and prevalent and incident caries and periodontal outcomes in adjacent second molars. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Oral Medicine Source Type: research

Denture stomatitis treatment
Edentate persons who wear dentures can develop denture stomatitis, which is a chronic inflammatory response of the palatal mucosa to harmful stimuli. As the most common mucosal lesion associated with removable prostheses, it is often viewed as the determining factor for the oral health of those affected. Risk factors associated with denture stomatitis include trauma, poor oral hygiene, continuous and nocturnal denture wear, and fungal infections, especially those involving Candida albicans. Clinicians routinely manage cases of denture stomatitis with antifungal medications, but a cause-and-effect relationship between Candi...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Oral Medicine Source Type: research

Preemptive analgesia
Removing the mandibular third molar surgically is often associated with postoperative pain, swelling, and trismus, which increase the patient's suffering and anxiety and can disrupt the homeostasis of the circulatory and endocrine systems. Wound healing is also adversely affected by postoperative pain, so effective and fast-acting analgesia is desirable. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often used, but if severe pain develops, it is difficult to manage it with analgesics. NSAIDs can also produce serious side effects in some patients. Based on these considerations, preemptive analgesia has been used, based ...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Oral Surgery Source Type: research

Imaging to predict third molar extraction complications
Dentists and oral surgeons are called on to remove mandibular third molars often. This extraction carries the risk of complications such as postoperative pain, swelling, and trismus, but the most significant complication is neural damage, which can produce dysesthesia that affects the lingual nerve and inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). IAN damage is most likely with deeply impacted wisdom teeth, with persistence of the injury linked to age. Surgical technique and experience can also modify the risk of IAN injury. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) allows good visualization and the ability to predict IAN exposure during surg...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Oral Surgery Source Type: research

Midazolam sedation
Young children who need multiple procedures often cannot be managed using local anesthesia alone, and general anesthesia can be accompanied by significant morbidity and expense. Sedation can help to manage behavior in pediatric patients, but its use is not supported by a strong base of evidence. Midazolam given orally has been shown to be effective in dental procedures for children and offers not only oral administration but also anxiolytic and anterograde amnesic effects while remaining short acting. Side effects with midazolam are related to dose, route of administration, and patient age. Minor side effects include trans...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Pediatric Dentistry Source Type: research

Energy drinks impair troops
US Army and Marine combat troops deployed in Afghanistan in 2010 drank a lot of energy drinks. Random surveys conducted by the Joint Mental Health Advisory Team 7 and analyzed by researchers at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research revealed that 45% of the troops drank one or more energy drinks each day and 14% drank three or more daily. Overall, just 6% of non-combat troop US adolescents and young adults consume an energy drink daily. Some brands of these drinks contain the caffeine equivalent of three cups of coffee. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Extracts Source Type: research

Sugar-sweetened beverages
Between 1977 and 1996 the intake of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) increased dramatically for both adults and children. Children consume about 40% of their added sugar intake in the form of beverages, and adults consume about 55% of their added sugar intake in this form. Dietary recommendations for SSB intake remain unchanged, yet the marketing of some SSBs as healthier options is confusing. The carbohydrate composition of beverages commonly consumed in the United States was explained, the caries risk outlined, and guidelines offered for oral health care professionals who want to address this risk with their patients. (S...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Preventive Dentistry Source Type: research

Reinforced glass-ionomer restorations
Practice-based research delivers information about how effective treatments are in the real world, whereas research done in hospitals or academic settings may reveal the efficacy, or how things work in an ideal environment. If a technique or material is to be successful, it must be readily usable in dental practice situations. Glass-ionomer materials were designed for use mainly in non-load-bearing cavities. The glass-ionomer materials offer the advantages of good compressive strength, reliable adhesion to tooth substance, and the release of fluoride, which may inhibit caries development around restorations. However, these...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Restorative Dentistry Source Type: research

Repair of direct composite buildups
Increasingly, patients are demanding an attractive facial and dental appearance. They want a sound, highly esthetic dentition, but especially desire attractive maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth. With today's adhesive technology and minimally invasive direct resin composite restorations, it is possible to restore teeth without a significant loss of tooth substance. With the current finishing and polishing techniques for these restorations, surface roughness and color stability are enhanced. Repairs are both rapid and cost effective, extending the life of the original restoration if it is clinically satisfactory rather...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Restorative Dentistry Source Type: research

Interim therapeutic restorations via the virtual dental home
The virtual dental home (VDH) system developed by the Pacific Center for Special Care at the University of the Pacific is delivering oral health care to underserved and vulnerable populations. The VDH system uses geographically distributed, telehealth-enabled teams that work in community locations beyond the traditional dental care delivery system. It is designed to address significant access challenges and health disparities in California. It redefines the use of the term “dental home” to include the entire system and provides all the ingredients of a health home. This includes health education and promotion, help nav...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Teledentistry Source Type: research

Mouth cancer
Cancer of the mouth is the largest category of head and neck cancers and occurs in men more than women. Most patients are over age 50 years, but more than 10% of cases are diagnosed in younger individuals. In fact, there has been a significant increase in the number of cases among patients younger than age 45 years in the past 20 years. The two main factors associated with cancer in the mouth are tobacco and alcohol, but some cancers, particularly those found in the back of the mouth, are associated with exposure to human papillomavirus (HPV). Patients treated for mouth cancer are experiencing increasing quality of life, b...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Oral Cancer Source Type: research

Oral effects of cancer treatment
Cancer chemotherapy and adjunctive therapies come with oral side effects that can be distressing to patients. Dental professionals should be aware of the drugs and procedures used to manage cancer and their side effects, be able to educate patients about these effects, and help to reduce side effects when possible. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Oral Medicine Source Type: research

Nitrous oxide−oxygen sedation
Dental treatment of children often involves the use of nitrous oxide−oxygen (N2O/O2) inhalation as a sedative technique. An analgesic effect is often expected for N2O/O2 but the evidence supporting this is lacking. For children it is important to obtain pain control to reduce dental anxiety and behavior management problems and avoid causing long-term avoidance of dental care. The analgesic effect of N2O/O2 inhalation in children was investigated. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Pediatric Dentistry Source Type: research

First visits for children
The incidence of early childhood caries (ECC) appears to be increasing, and severe forms can adversely affect both overall health and the child's quality of life. The Canadian Dental Association has recommended that children first visit a dental professional by age 12 months. In 2010 the Manitoba Dental Association implemented the Free First Visit (FFV) program to encourage early visits to the dentist. It provides access to no-cost dental screenings for children up to age 36 months and was launched as a 3-year campaign. Dentists were then surveyed about their views on the FFV program, as well as their attitudes and practic...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Preventive Dentistry Source Type: research

Long-term preventive effects of xylitol
Dental caries remains a major oral health problem, but many areas lack resources and need cost-effective prevention strategies. For young children the presence of early mutans streptococci (MS) colonization appears to be a relevant marker of increased risk for caries development. MS is usually transmitted to infants by mothers, so the MS level in mothers is the target for preventive efforts. Reducing the MS mother-child transmission may offer long-term benefits for the child's dental health. In Finland in the early 1990s high-caries-risk mothers were studied for the effect of chewing xylitol gum on mother-child transmissio...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Preventive Dentistry Source Type: research

Fluoridated salt
Fewer than 1 billion of the world's 7 billion people have access to a proven community-based water or salt fluoridation program. Combining this with changing living conditions and eating habits, it is estimated that the global incidence of dental caries will increase. Salt fluoridation is designed to reach communities and regions where oral care prevention measures, especially fluoride toothpastes, are unavailable. The current status of salt fluoridation worldwide was evaluated. (Source: Dental Abstracts)
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Preventive Dentistry Source Type: research

When to change toothbrushes
Manual toothbrushes have been used for nearly 1000 years but have changed significantly. Today's brushes tend to have ergonomically shaped and curved handles, and the head shape, filament shape, and filament insertion method are quite different from those of the 1930s brushes whose designs are the most direct forerunners. It is recommended that subjects change their toothbrushes about every 3 to 4 months or when the bristles become frayed. However, the effective life of a toothbrush will vary depending on user habits, such as the frequency and duration of use, brushing force, and brushing technique. An investigation was un...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Preventive Dentistry Source Type: research

Power brushing
is designed to remove as much plaque as possible, especially from areas that are relatively inaccessible. The brushing-induced turbulence produced during power brushing drives fluid dynamic forces into interproximal spaces, removing the biofilm from these areas. Power brushes offer anti-plaque and anti-gingivitis benefits and help in the management of gingivitis. Dental plaque biofilms are an important contributor to periodontal disease development, with bacteria in sub-gingival biofilms influencing the environment in which they live as well as host inflammatory responses. Environmental stresses and genetics can add to th...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Preventive Dentistry Source Type: research

Dental hard tissue effects
The treatment of head and neck malignancies is technically challenging because of all the vital structures in this anatomical area. Among the most severe secondary consequences of radiotherapy is the destruction of tooth tissues and therefore oral function, which can seriously disrupt the patient's quality of life. Conventional fractionation is the most common approach used for head and neck cancer radiotherapy. A total dose of 65 to 72 Gy of high-energy x-ray radiation is given in daily fractions of 1.8 to 2 Gy 5 days a week over a period of 7 weeks. Most of the consequences associated with this approach are temporary and...
Source: Dental Abstracts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Tags: Radiotherapy Source Type: research

Does breathing type influence electromyographic activity of obligatory and accessory respiratory muscles?
Summary Craniomandibular electromyographic (EMG) studies frequently include several parameters, e.g. resting, chewing and tooth‐clenching. EMG activity during these parameters has been recorded in the elevator muscles, but little is known about the respiratory muscles. The aim of this study was to compare EMG activity in obligatory and accessory respiratory muscles between subjects with different breathing types. Forty male subjects were classified according to their breathing type into two groups of 20 each: costo‐diaphragmatic breathing type and upper costal breathing type. Bipolar surface electrodes were placed on t...
Source: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Authors: M. F. Gutiérrez, S. Valenzuela, R. Miralles, C. Portus, H. Santander, A. D. Fuentes, I. Celhay Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Cowden syndrome—a case report emphasizing the role of the dental surgeon in diagnosis
This report presents the case of a 36‐year‐old patient who looked for dental treatment for a gingival nodule. Current and past medical history and oral and facial manifestations led to the diagnosis of Cowden syndrome. This case report emphasizes the role of the dental surgeon in the diagnosis of this systemic disease, based on the analysis of medical history and manifestations in the oral cavity. (Source: Special Care in Dentistry)
Source: Special Care in Dentistry - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Authors: Liana Preto Webber, Manoela Domingues Martins, Vinícius Coelho Carrard, Marco Antônio Trevizani Martins, Maria Cristina Munerato Tags: CASE HISTORY REPORT Source Type: research

Dental care and oral health in Aagenaes syndrome/lymphedema cholestasis syndrome 1
Conclusion. Several patients with LCS1 have problems with periodontitis and tooth discoloration. Frequent dental checkups are therefore recommended. (Source: Special Care in Dentistry)
Source: Special Care in Dentistry - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Authors: Mats Bågesund, Zahra Shafiee, Monica Drivdal, Jan Berdén, Kari Storhaug Tags: ARTICLE Source Type: research

Prosthetic Reconstruction of a Patient with an Acquired Nasal Defect Using Extraoral Implants and a CAD/CAM Copy‐Milled Bar
Abstract Traditionally, patients with maxillofacial defects have been challenging to treat. A multitude of challenges associated with maxillofacial prosthetic treatment are not typically seen with patients who need conventional prosthodontic treatment. These types of patients generally require replacement of significant amounts of hard and soft tissues than do conventional prosthodontic patients. Most maxillofacial patients also warrant more emotional support than do conventional prosthodontic patients. Successful maxillofacial prosthetics still need to embrace the traditional goals of prosthodontic treatment: stability, s...
Source: Journal of Prosthodontics - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Authors: Carolina Vera, Carlos Barrero, William Shockley, Sandra Rothenberger, Glenn Minsley, Carl Drago Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Effect of Different Design Preparations on the Flexural and Fracture Strength of Fiber‐Reinforced Composite Fixed Partial Dentures: An In Vitro Study
ConclusionFull‐coverage design had significantly higher flexural and fracture strengths than box and tub‐shaped designs. Since both values were noted to be in the order of masticatory stresses, the full coverage design is a good alternative for the replacement of missing molar teeth; however, the framework veneering composite interface was the weakest phase of FRC FPDs, thus indicating that further improvement in veneering composite or fiber framework is needed to improve the compatibility of veneering composite with that of fiber framework for long‐term clinical implications. (Source: Journal of Prosthodontics)
Source: Journal of Prosthodontics - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Authors: Gulshan Kumar, Veena Jain, R. K. Pandey, Manju Gadwal Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Dental fear and expected effectiveness of destructive coping as predictors of children's uncooperative intentions in dental settings
ConclusionsChildren's expectations about the effectiveness of destructive coping behaviours can help explain variations in the use of these strategies in stressful dental situations. Dental fear as well as children's inadequate expectancies about coping alternatives should be explored and targeted to prevent and modify uncooperative behaviour intentions at the dentist. (Source: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry)
Source: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Authors: Antonio Crego, María Carrillo‐Diaz, Jason M. Armfield, Martín Romero Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Orthodontic care for the behavior‐challenged special needs patient
ABSTRACT Despite having a high prevalence of functionally compromising malocclusions, individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities do not regularly receive necessary orthodontic treatment. Patients with behavior challenges are unlikely to be offered this treatment option. However, with appropriate behavior management interventions and pharmacologic sedation, orthodontic treatment becomes a possibility for clinicians to consider. Parents will likely seek out clinicians who can provide this type of advanced orthodontic care. Additional training is now becoming available as accredited Fellowship Programs in Cr...
Source: Special Care in Dentistry - July 1, 2014 Category: Dentistry Authors: Robert Rada, Heba H Bakhsh, Carla Evans Tags: CASE HISTORY REPORT Source Type: research

Implant placed into extraction socket: thoughts?
I was wondering what the consensus opinion is here about placing an implant into an extraction socket that is 6 weeks old. (Source: Dental Implants Discussed by Experts)
Source: Dental Implants Discussed by Experts - June 30, 2014 Category: Dentistry Authors: osseonews Tags: Dental Implant Cases Source Type: news

Atrophied mandible: recommendations?
I'm planning a 2 implant overdenture for this patient and this is the ICAT scan. (Source: Dental Implants Discussed by Experts)
Source: Dental Implants Discussed by Experts - June 30, 2014 Category: Dentistry Authors: osseonews Tags: Dental Implant Cases Source Type: news