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Free NIH funded Medical Translation App
Communicate quickly with patients using translated medical phrases in Spanish, Chinese, Arabic, Hindi, Korean, Malay, Portuguese, Russian, Tagalog, Vietnamese, and more. Show phrases with text, and play with audio. When needed, call live medical interpreters from Canopy. Includes 1,500 common medical phrases created by medical professionals, available for 4 specialities: Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics & Gynecology, and General Surgery Phrases cover: Greeting and Goodbye, History, Physical Exam, Labs, Radiology, Procedures, Labor and Delivery, Gynecology, Reassessment, Plan, and more. — Canopy h...
Source: BHIC - April 17, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Monica Rogers Tags: Health Information Literacy Minority Health Concerns Multilingual Source Type: blogs

Anterior STEMI?
The patient presents to the emergency Department with complaints of substernal left-sided chest pain present for 4 days but worse in the last 24 hours.Here is his ED ECG:ED ECGThe computerized QTc is 451.  What do you think?  The previous ECG, with interpretation, is below.Here is the Previous ECG. My reading was printed on the ECG as "probable benign T-wave inversion."    I had discharged the patient at his previous visit.  His presentation had not been concerning for ACS and his ECG was, to me, a benign variant.The physicians were appropriately worried about the previous ECG and used the formula ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - April 14, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

An alternative guide to the urgent and emergency care system in England
The King's Fund  - A&E is often seen as a service in crisis and is the focus of much media and political interest. But A&E is just the tip of the iceberg – the whole urgent and emergency care system is complex, and surrounded by myth and confusion. Our brand new animation gives a whistle-stop tour of how the system fits together and busts some myths about what’s really going on  – explaining that the underlying causes go much deeper than just A&E and demand a joined-up response across all services. Animation  Urgent and emergency care mythbusters The King's Fund - topic page (So...
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - April 8, 2014 Category: UK Health Authors: The King's Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Changing configuration of health services Developments in primary and community care Integrated care Mental Health Patient involvement, experience and feedback Source Type: blogs

It’s Public Health Week
April 7-13, 2014 is National Public Health Week.  Each day this week has a theme with information and tips for improving the health of your community. Monday, April 7: Be Healthy From the Start (maternal and child health) http://bit.ly/1hd49v7 Tuesday, April 8: Don’t Panic (disaster preparedness) http://bit.ly/1i89XS2 Wednesday, April 9: Get Out Ahead (prevention) http://bit.ly/1gumQok Thursday, April 10: Eat Well (food safety and nutrition) http://bit.ly/1lG5c8P Friday, April 11: Be the Healthiest Nation in One Generation (public health policy) http://bit.ly/1efH1Gv   (Source: BHIC)
Source: BHIC - April 7, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kate Flewelling Tags: Children and Teens Emergency Preparedness Public Health Source Type: blogs

High-Sensitivity Troponin Test Could Identify Low Risk Chest Pain Patients In The ED
Approximately 15-20 million people in Europe and the United States go to the emergency department every year with chest pain. Many can be discharged early if they are not having an acute coronary syndrome. A large new single-center observational study, presented at the American College of Cardiology meeting in Washington, DC and published simultaneously in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, provides fresh evidence that high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) may be useful in helping identify chest pain patients in the emergency department who do not need to be admitted to the hospital. … Cl...
Source: CardioBrief - March 30, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Larry Husten Tags: MI/ACS Prevention, Epidemiology & Outcomes biomarkers Chest pain emergency department heart attack troponin Source Type: blogs

The ECG told the whole story, but no one listened: ECG interpretation skills are critical to patient outcomes.
Preface This was sent by a medical student somewhere in the world who will remain anonymous. But it happened at a prestigious cardiac center.  Details are scant so that it cannot be recognized.The minute this medical student saw the first ECG, he knew the diagnosis without any further information.  Reading ECGs is hard, but can be done with commitment to learning, which comes from an awareness of its importance.  My most talented blog readers are paramedics because they have to put themselves on the line every time they activate the cath lab.  And they teach me a lot.  One of my most talented reade...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - March 30, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

What's the story? Branding Hurley Medical Center
by Andrea J. Simon I have had several requests to share my experiences as interim senior vice president of branding, marketing, physician services at Hurley Medical Center in Flint, Mich., from 2008-2009, and again from 2010-2012. To help you in your own efforts to brand, market and build your organization, I've segmented the story into four blog posts, each with a specific focus. This post explains how you find the key essence of an institution and turn it into a real advantage--that brand story that answers the question "Why You." The next two posts focus on online experiences to build the brand story in an inbound ma...
Source: hospital impact - March 26, 2014 Category: Health Managers Authors: Wendy Johnson Source Type: blogs

Contraceptive services with a focus on young people up to the age of 25
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) -This guidance recommends that doctors, nurses and pharmacists provide information about the full range of contraceptives available, including emergency contraception and long-acting reversible contraception, and the benefits and side effects for young people up to the age of 25. It also states that all young people in England should be given access to contraception and advice at convenient locations so no-one is denied services because of where they live. Guidance NICE - news (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - March 26, 2014 Category: UK Health Authors: The King's Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Commissioning Quality of care and clinical outcomes Source Type: blogs

The LITFL Review 130
The LITFL Review is your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peaks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the best and brightest from the blogosphere, the podcast video/audiosphere and the rest of the Web 2.0 social media jungle to find the most fantastic EM/CC FOAM (Free Open Access Meducation) around. Welcome to the 130th edition, brought to you by: Kane Guthrie [KG] from LITFL Tessa Davis [TRD] from LITFL and Don’t Forget The Bubbles Brent Thoma [BT] from BoringEM, and ALiEM Chris Ni...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 25, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Kane Guthrie Tags: Education eLearning Emergency Medicine Featured Health Intensive Care LITFL review Toxicology LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 03-25-2014
Patients gone wild. Really wild. 70 year old Brookdale Hospital nurse Evelyn Lynch gets knocked to the ground by patient Kwincii Jones and has her head stomped. She was knocked unconscious and suffered severe facial fractures. Also underwent brain surgery, so it is likely she suffered a brain bleed or has brain swelling as well. Congratulations to the antivaccination movement for increasing the worldwide incidence of pertussis and measles. Measles and mumps are now “crushing” the UK. Patients with “religious exemptions” to receiving vaccinations were reportedly the source of one recent California p...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - March 25, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

Patients do not always arrive with diagnoses
I recently presented my diagnostic talk — Learning to Think Like a Clinician — at the Virginia ACP meeting.  Afterwards several physicians wanted to discuss the reasons for diagnostic challenges.  They convinced me that many regulations from CMS and other insurers have influenced policies that increase anchoring and diagnostic inertia. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 24, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Emergency Hospital Source Type: blogs

Another Tobacco Control Practitioner Tells Public that Smoking May Be No More Harmful than Vaping
Adding to the long list of tobacco control practitioners who have publicly declared that smoking may be no more harmful than vaping - which involves no tobacco and no combustion - a South Carolina respiratory therapist is telling patients that they should not quit smoking using electronic cigarettes because these devices may be more dangerous than tobacco cigarettes, which kills more than 400,000 Americans each year.On the Greenville Health System blog, a respiratory therapist writes: "I strongly oppose the use of e-cigarettes. It is unregulated and could potentially be more dangerous than a regular cigarette."This respira...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - March 24, 2014 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Source Type: blogs

Approach to the Poisoned Patient
I chose to use the board game Operation as the foundation for this flashcard. A good physical exam for a toxic patient includes: Vital Signs, Eyes, Mucous Membranes, Breath Sounds, Bowel Sounds, Skin Assessment, Reflexes, and EKG. Abnormalities of each system should be noted and a constellation of signs and symptoms will help the clinician discern possible toxidromes. For the second edition of the flashcard set I will add a reflex hammer over one of Mo’s knees and add: Hyperreflexia / Normal / Hyporeflexia as key aspects of the exam. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6MAkLJ79LE The post Approach to the Poisoned Patient ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 24, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Brian Kloss Tags: Education eLearning Emergency Medicine Featured Flashcards operation Poisoned Patient tox in a box Toxicology Source Type: blogs

Elderly woman in Shock. EKG from #smaccGOLD pre-conference EKG workshop.
We had a great pre-smaccGOLD EKG conference, with Louise Cullen moderating and featuring Ed Burns, Hussam Tayib, John Larkin, Roger Harris, Trevor Jackson. The smaccGOLD conference was incredible and the conference will be in Chicago next year!!  May 20-22, and I suspect there will be another EKG workshop the day before (May 19).  I will be proposing an Emergency Cardiology workshop as well, so stay tuned for more.Here is a great description of the conference:  http://rebelem.com/social-media-critical-care-smacc/Participants brought there own ECGs, and this was one: An elderly woman smoker with a couple...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - March 24, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Ketamine - A Professor Writes
For the past six months, I've fielded increasingly more questions about ketamine.My patients: "Will ketamine help me?" My colleagues: "Is ketamine safe for my patients?"Ketamine is an FDA- (Food and Drug Administration) approved drug for anesthesia during surgery and for pain relief -- in adults and children. Several studies (including one report published recently) have shown its rapid, positive effects in depression as well as rapid effects in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) -- a persistent and often disabling disorder in which individuals have repetitive thoughts and behaviors.Because ketami...
Source: PharmaGossip - March 24, 2014 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Can psychology help solve the MH370 mystery?
As relatives and friends endure the agonising wait for news of their loved ones, more than a fortnight after the disappearance of Flight MH370, could psychology have anything to offer? Today we turn to the Digest and The Psychologist archive to see whether research can help in understanding what might have happened or finding the missing plane.In last month's cover feature of The Psychologist on aircraft safety, Don Harris explained that as the reliability and structural integrity of aircraft has improved, human error is now the principal threat to flight safety: it is estimated that up to 75 per cent of all aircraft accid...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 24, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Research Digest Source Type: blogs

The End is just the Beginning… smaccGOLD
Unbelievably, smaccGOLD has come and gone. Thankfully, the end is just the beginning… Many thanks to all who made it happen: the organisers, the people behind the scenes, the speakers and, most of all, all of you who came from across the globe to make it the event you wanted it to be. Critical care rocks! (#grillmycorn) Special thanks go to my great mates Roger Harris and Oli Flower. When these guys first approached me to start brainstorming and working towards a FOAM-led critical care conference I had no idea that from those humble beginnings something truly amazing would grow. Photo courtesy of SMACC I’m alre...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 23, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Emergency Medicine Featured Intensive Care SMACC Video chicago opening ceremony podcast smaccGOLD Source Type: blogs

101 Things We Should Teach Every New EMT
1) You aren’t required to know everything. 2) You are required to know the foundational knowledge and skills of your job. No excuses. 3) Always be nice. It’s a force multiplier. 4) Their is no greater act of trust than being handed a sick child. 5) Earn that trust. 6) Don’t ever lie to your patient. If something is awkward to say, learn to say it without lying. 7) Read Thom Dick’s, People Care. Then read it again. 8) You can fake competence with the public, but not with your coworkers. 9) Own your mistakes. We all make them, but only the best of us own them. 10) Only when you’ve learned to own...
Source: The EMT Spot - March 22, 2014 Category: Ambulance Crew Authors: administrator Tags: The Big Get It slider Source Type: blogs

Mobile Learning in Healthcare: How Augmented Reality Learning is Saving Lives
Mobile learning is becoming quite ubiquitous, and nowhere is it becoming more successful than in the health care industry. With new augmented reality learning adding a new layer, it's giving medical staff a better sense of reality for emergencies.Contributor: Greg BrianPublished: Mar 21, 2014 (Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content)
Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content - March 21, 2014 Category: Other Conditions Source Type: blogs

Memorial Healthcare's Frank Fear: Federal initiatives strain our workforce
by Dan Bowman, FierceHealthIT For emergency room doctors at Lansing, Mich.-based Memorial Healthcare, the implementation of virtual desktops helped to dramatically improve workflow, according to CIO Frank Fear. "What really drove our push to implement [for virtual desktops] was a need for quick access to patient data," Fear (pictured) told FierceHealthIT in an interview at HIMSS14 in Orlando, Fla. "We trialed a lot of different technologies like laptops and tablets, but the doctors soon found out that the idea of carrying around a tablet with them just wasn't really effective workflow-wise for them." In addition to talk...
Source: hospital impact - March 21, 2014 Category: Health Managers Authors: Wendy Johnson Source Type: blogs

Three Better Bipartisan Health Policies To Pay For Repealing Medicare’s SGR
After months of House and Senate negotiations on legislation to replace the Medicare Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) formula for updating Medicare physician payment, members of Congress are relieved to finally have an agreement. It is perfectly understandable that they, as well as professional medical organizations, want to act quickly. The danger is that even normally staid and stern budget hawks are prepared to move quickly to get this unworkable payment system permanently off the national agenda. Of course, the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) should be repealed and replaced. Congressional leaders point out that since 2003...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 21, 2014 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Robert Moffit Tags: All Categories Health Reform Medicare Payment Physicians Policy Politics Spending Source Type: blogs

Google Glass and Emergency Medicine
At the lovely week that was #smaccGOLD I was lucky enough to get some time playing with Google Glass. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1uyQZNg2vE Although Google Glass isn’t commercially available yet, it is being beta tested in various sites around the world for numerous potential applications. Here’s what I thought…  What does it look like? As you can see from the picture it’s basically a head/faceband with small screen in the top right corner of your right eye. It did fit over my glasses but it’s really made for people without. As time goes on, I guess this will become smaller and more adapted. It fitted ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 21, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Tessa Davis Tags: Emergency Medicine Equipment / Technology Featured Gadget Health Informatics Reviews TechTool Google Glass Source Type: blogs

Choose Emergency Medicine
One of my favourite tweets from #smaccGOLD was the re-invigoration of the Emergency Medicine mission statement and recruitment flyer (via @4hrEmergencyDoc) …which is a slight reworking of the original Aussie Emergency medicine mission statement used in the 2007 UCEM recruitment campaign (via @wgbrook and @fratdoozle) …the matching scrubs hit a cord but as @jilltomlinson espoused…surgeons even get to wear matching hats as well!! This is what @JoeLex5 thinks of that idea! (I assume the non-compliant soul on the ground is an emergency physician…) The post Choose Emergency Medicine appeared first o...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 21, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Mike Cadogan Tags: Emergency Medicine Featured Medical Humor UCEM Utopian Medicine choose emergency mission statement Source Type: blogs

Emergency departments should embrace clinically integrated networks
In my near-decade of practicing emergency medicine I have yet to receive a letter from a hospital congratulating me on how few CT scans I’ve ordered. Nor have I ever received a special award for diverting a potential admission to an outpatient referral instead. Rather, the push has always been the opposite. Fee-for-service models encourage the opposite behavior, and trying to do the most evidenced-based or cost-effective thing is not only not rewarded, but in many cases financially penalized. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Fi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 20, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Policy Emergency Source Type: blogs

Health Information Exchange In NYC Jails: Early Policy Challenges
Editor's note: This post is published in conjunction with the March issue of Health Affairs, which features a cluster of articles on jails and health. For more on jails and health information technology in particular, see here, here, and here. New York City has the second largest jail system in the United States, with an average daily census of approximately 12,000 and 80,000 annual admissions. It is well documented that the population that cycles in and out of US jails each year is statistically sicker than the general population and therefore would benefit from greater care coordination between correctional and commun...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 20, 2014 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Michelle Martelle Tags: All Categories Chronic Care Disparities Health IT Health Reform Medicaid Nonmedical Determinants Policy States Source Type: blogs

This is why doctors practice cover your ass medicine
A small case with big implications almost escaped my notice this week.  The Boston Globe reported a case in which a family sued after a 23-year-old man died after being diagnosed with a lung infection. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 20, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Emergency Heart Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Foot, meet mouth
My 2:00 patient yesterday was obviously blind. She had the long white cane, and a guide dog. Mary filled out forms for her. She held onto my arm as I led her back to my office.Dr. Grumpy: "So what can I do for you?"Mrs. Two: "I was at the emergency room this weekend. I had a seizure on Sunday, and bit my tongue."Dr. Grumpy: "Good heavens. Have you ever had a seizure before?"Mrs. Two: "No. They told me I had another one in the ER after I got there."Dr. Grumpy: "Where did the first one happen?"Mrs. Two: "I was in the car."Dr. Grumpy: "Were you driving?" Pause.Dr. Grumpy: "That was a really stupid question, wasn't it?"She cra...
Source: Doctor Grumpy in the House - March 20, 2014 Category: Neurologists Authors: Grumpy, M.D. Source Type: blogs

Waiting: A Tough Skill to Master
Who wants to learn how to wait well? Nobody I know. We want not to wait! We are busy people. We’ve got things to do, places to go. We don’t want to waste our time on the phone, in waiting rooms or in traffic. We can’t even wait for winter to be over with. Because the digital age had made our life faster and easier, by contrast, the times we are forced to wait have become more annoying. Two examples: “Your call is very important to us. It will be taken in the order in which it was received. Thank you for your patience!” Who are they kidding? Not only is our call not very important to them (or they wouldn’t keep...
Source: World of Psychology - March 19, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: General LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Self-Help Stress Frustration hate waiting Patience Waiting Room Source Type: blogs

The logistics behind Google Glass in the ER
Over the past few months, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has been exploring the use of wearable computing. In the emergency department we’ve been evaluating an early unit of Google Glass, a high tech pair of glasses that includes a video camera, video screen, speaker, microphone, touch pad, and motion sensor. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 19, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Tech Emergency Source Type: blogs

Toxicology Trio
Taking a break from the amazing #SMACCgold education stream to present some Tox teasers Test your toxicology knowledge and contribute to emergency medicine research… Then, weep at your failure and support the Toxicology in a Box project to re-educate And finally rejoice that more educational #FOAMtox conundrums are on the way soon… Toxicology Presentation Survey Ethics approved, online survey designed to assess the knowledge and confidence of emergency medicine doctors in managing toxicological presentations. Designed by emergency docs…for emergency docs 15 minute multiple choice roller-coaster p...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 19, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Mike Cadogan Tags: Education eLearning Emergency Medicine Evidence Based Medicine Featured Medical Humor Medical Illustration Toxicology Toxicology Quiz #FOAMtox Brian Kloss managing toxicological presentations research tox test Toxicological Pre Source Type: blogs

The act of doing surgery will always be honorable
In my core, I always loved doing surgery, and being surgeon to my patients. As I hope I’ve made clear in my blog, I was always amazed that I was allowed to do it, and awed at the mysterious beauty of it all. As much of a responsibility as it is, it’s also an inexplicably wondrous honor and privilege. Those words aren’t lightly written. But in a diabolical combination of being constitutionally unable to cut back, being hyper-demanding of perfection in myself and only slightly less so in those who touched my patients, mixed with a certain degree of paranoia which made me see any imperfection as an accusatio...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 19, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Surgery Source Type: blogs

Doctors need to earn their cynicism
You have to earn your cynicism.  That’s my rule.  Young pre-med and medical students, even some residents don’t have the same right to cyncism as the rest of us who have labored in emergency departments for years, for decades.  The same goes for nurses fresh on the job from training, and ward secretaries who so recently were high school kids. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 18, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Emergency Source Type: blogs

Patients who come with a family member doctor
“Never sign anything without me reading it first.” Cautionary words from my husband, an attorney, whose ability to read and interpret the fine print has saved my life, so to speak, on more than one occasion. That all-in-the-family attitude toward a profession is something almost every doctor also knows well. Through me, my husband, relatives, friends, and sometimes acquaintances can get what I call a “healthcare quickie,” a free, two-minute sideline. They can also have the full boat: a thoughtful, comprehensive consultation that serves to either allay an irrational fear or as guidance for legitimate health concer...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 17, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Emergency Source Type: blogs

The Night Shift
About six weeks ago I started working in the Emergency Department at one of our hospitals. I work up front, greeting patients and doing the first step of triage. In a nutshell, that is the core of the job. It is not that difficult, but the key skill someone in this position has to have is the ability to discern who is really sick and needs immediate care as opposed to those who can wait. Most of the time it isn't difficult. Sometimes it is; it depends on the volume and the circumstances.Most of my scheduled shifts are overnight, from 10PM to 8AM. Occasionally, however, I'll pick up other shifts as well. I work approximatel...
Source: Life in Manch Vegas - March 17, 2014 Category: Ambulance Crew Source Type: blogs

3 concerns about the legalization of marijuana
It was like watching the news footage of shoppers trampling each other to get through the doors of a Filene’s Basement sale or witnessing people standing outside all night for the new iPhone even though it isn’t a sale and it will be made in mass production for months or years to come.  I am talking about seeing people line up in the dark of pre-dawn to get their fingers on some of that new-fangled recreational marijuana.  Similar to the iPhone craze, recreational marijuana is not a sales bargain and it is not going away anytime real soon, so these people waiting in long lines really are being a bit over zeal...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 15, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Meds Emergency Medications Source Type: blogs

How safety net ERs can save health care reform
Safety net emergency departments are frequently blamed for being the source of rising health care costs. After all, they care for the millions of underserved and un-insured Americans forced by a variety of circumstances to visit ERs for their primary care and low-acuity concerns. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 15, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Policy Emergency Health reform Source Type: blogs

CT in neck trauma: Changing the culture in the ED
Schuur and colleagues in JAMA Internal Medicine listed five low value services in the emergency department (ED). Although compilation was not solicited by the American College of Emergency Physicians as part of the Choosing Wisely program, it has its ethos. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 15, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Emergency orthopedics Radiology Source Type: blogs

Google Glass Coming to Rhode Island Emergency Room to Help Diagnose Skin Conditions
Google Glass is a controversial technology when used in public, but it’s intriguing to see how it can be put to practice in professional applications. One pilot project being initiated at the Rhode Island Hospital involves using Google Glass in the emergency room to connect with live remote dermatologists whenever their expertise is needed. An ER doc will wear Google Glass while talking to the dermatologist who will be seeing a live picture of what the ER doc is seeing. The dermatologist will be able to guide any appropriate exams and will have the opportunity to make a diagnosis or determine a further course of acti...
Source: Medgadget - March 14, 2014 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: Dermatology Net News Source Type: blogs

eResponder Personal Emergency Response System (PERS): it doesn’t get much simpler than this
eResponder, cellular based Personal Emergency Response System (PERS) Typical Personal Emergency Response System (PERS) work well around the house. They communicate reliably with a base station that’s connected to a landline and the units have long battery life. The technology is old but reliable, and the systems provide peace of mind for those who are living alone and for their kids. A greater challenge arises when trying to develop a system that works well for people who want to leave their homes and get out of range of their base stations. The obvious solution is to use cellular technology. But cellphones are compl...
Source: Health Business Blog - March 14, 2014 Category: Health Managers Authors: David Williams Tags: Devices Patients Source Type: blogs

Communicating with patients: Stick with the tried and true
by Nancy Cawley Jean Over the years, the way we communicate with patients has changed drastically. I remember the days when, working for a health plan, we would coordinate postal mailings. Then email came along and then text messaging. And of course, there's always been traditional media outlets--television, newspaper and radio. We've all seen the statistics about how many people are on social media: Seventy-three percent of adults online use a social network and 42 percent use multiple networks. On top of that, reports show at least 50 percent of people get their national and international news from the Internet. Folks...
Source: hospital impact - March 14, 2014 Category: Health Managers Authors: Wendy Johnson Source Type: blogs

Learn from HealthCare.gov failure to survive healthcare change
by Kent Bottles Healthcare leaders need to read "Code Red: Inside the nightmare launch of HealthCare.gov and the team that figured out how to fix it." Steven Brill's article in the March 10, 2014, issue of Time is a must-read for several reasons. Every hospital system leader can learn valuable lessons about what to do and what not to do when leading large organizations in an industry that has rarely encountered so much complexity and change in such a short period of time. In my experience, planning for such an important and complicated project--such as the launch of the Affordable Care Act's exchange website--requires ...
Source: hospital impact - March 14, 2014 Category: Health Managers Authors: Wendy Johnson Source Type: blogs

Night Shift, Paying it Forward – Follow Up
Firstly, no, I won’t do your night shifts for you. But thank you for asking. To all those who have taken the time to comment or contact me, to share your own stories of critically ill children and at times heartbreaking loss,  my husband and I have read each and every one of them and are touched beyond words. Around the clock availability of experienced doctors, nurses and paramedics is essential to providing quality emergent heath care. This in no way, however,  diminishes  the significant physical, mental and social burden of working medium to long term night shift. My article was intended not as an exhortati...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 14, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Kristin Boyle Tags: Emergency Medicine Featured Health health and well being night-shift Source Type: blogs

HHS OIG 2014 Work Plan
The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services ("HHS") Office of Inspector General ("OIG") released its annual 2014 Work Plan. In addition, the OIG has posted a 25-minute video vignette featuring senior OIG executives discussing the OIG's top priorities for fiscal year 2014. The OIG annually publishes a Work Plan that summarizes new and ongoing reviews and activities that OIG plans to pursue during the applicable fiscal year.  As noted by The Beat at Cooley Health: The inclusion of an item in the OIG Work Plan does not necessarily mean that OIG will seek enforcement with regard to that item, or that all interest...
Source: Policy and Medicine - March 14, 2014 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Why isn’t tranexamic acid used more often in routine practice?
The other day at an interdisciplinary rounds meeting at the hospital, one of our nurses who is also an emergency medical technician mentioned that in Britain injured patients receive tranexamic acid before arriving at the hospital because it reduces death from bleeding. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 13, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Meds Emergency Hospital Medications Source Type: blogs

Continuous Coverage Improves Costs And Quality For Children And Low-Income Adults
The termination of Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) coverage due to short-term income changes or frequent reapplication requirements increases overall health care costs and negatively affects quality of care and quality measurement and improvement efforts. This may have a significant yet commonly overlooked impact on income-related health care disparities. By requiring at least twelve months of continuous coverage, we could prevent avoidable complications, reduce administrative burden, improve quality measurement and improvements efforts, and ultimately, reduce costs. Current Medicaid Coverage Cos...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 13, 2014 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Paul Cotton Tags: Access All Categories Children Coverage Disparities Health Reform Insurance Medicaid Policy States Source Type: blogs

Transcript of podcast interview with Juliette Kayyem, candidate for Governor of Massachusetts
This is the transcript of my recent podcast interview with Juliette Kayyem, Democratic candidate for Governor of Massachusetts. Visit the original post to listen to the podcast and read a summary. This is part of a series of interviews with all nine candidates for Governor. The full schedule is available here. David E. Williams: This is David Williams from the Health Business Blog. I’m speaking today with Juliettte Kayyem, candidate for Governor of Massachusetts. Juliette, thanks for your time today. Juliette Kayyem: Thanks for having me, David. Williams: Juliette, does Chapter 224 represent the right approach to ...
Source: Health Business Blog - March 13, 2014 Category: Health Managers Authors: David Williams Tags: Podcast Policy and politics community hospitals election Governor health care health care reform health information technology healthcare Juliette Kayyem Massachusetts Source Type: blogs

Wearable computing at BIDMC
Over the past few months, Beth Israel Deaconess has been the pilot site for a new approach to clinical information technology, wearable computing. In the Emergency Department, we’ve developed a prototype of a new information system using Google Glass, a high tech pair of glasses that includes a video camera, video screen, speaker, microphone, touch pad, and motion sensor. read more (Source: Healthcare IT News Blog)
Source: Healthcare IT News Blog - March 12, 2014 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: John Halamka Tags: Mobile/Wireless Source Type: blogs

Wearable Computing at BIDMC
Over the past few months, Beth Israel Deaconess has been exploring the use of wearable computing.In the Emergency Department we’ve been evaluating an early unit of Google Glass, a high tech pair of glasses that includes a video camera, video screen, speaker, microphone, touch pad, and motion sensor.We have been able to access our internal web-based ED Dashboard on Glass, in a secure manner that ensures all data stays within the BIDMC firewall.  Clinicians can now speak with the patient, examine them, and perform procedures while simultaneously seeing data from the ED Dashboard in their field of view.Beyond the techn...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - March 12, 2014 Category: Technology Consultants Source Type: blogs

Repurposing Abandoned Hospitals in New Jersey as Medical Malls
Seeking profits, developers are converting abandoned hospitals in New Jersey into medical malls. This turns out to be a good news, bad news story as described in a recent article (see: Repurposing Closed Hospitals as For-Profit Medical Malls). Below is an excerpt from it: New Jersey has been losing hospitals for more than two decades....But in recent years, a few developers have purchased some of these abandoned structures, reopening them as private medical complexes that offer many of the services the hospitals once provided. For struggling cities like Paterson, N.J., the new use removes blight from the street...
Source: Lab Soft News - March 12, 2014 Category: Pathologists Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Healthcare Business Healthcare Delivery Medical Consumerism Medical Ethics Source Type: blogs

Do regulations predispose to diagnostic errors?
Last week I presented my diagnostic talk – Learning to Think Like a Clinician – at the Virginia ACP meeting.  Afterwards several physicians wanted to discuss the reasons for diagnostic challenges.  They convinced me that many regulations from CMS and other insurers have influenced policies that increase anchoring and diagnostic inertia. When the emergency department physicians admit to the hospital, they have to give an admission diagnosis.  At least in the United States, I believe they cannot admit for abnormal chest X-ray, or fever, but rather they must postulate a diagnosis.  That diagnosis then drives c...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - March 11, 2014 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs