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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory.

DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Mock Test 14
Please wait while the activity loads. If this activity does not load, try refreshing your browser. Also, this page requires javascript. Please visit using a browser with javascript enabled. If loading fails, click here to try again Click on the 'Start' button to begin the mock test. After answering all questions, click on the 'Get Results' button to display your score and the explanations. There is no time limit for this mock test. Start Congratulations - you have completed DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Mock Test 14. You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rat...
Source: Cardiophile MD - February 7, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Featured Source Type: blogs

Interoperability Form and Function: Interview with Doug Fridsma
By LEONARD KISH Leonard Kish talks to Douglas Fridsma, President and CEO at American Medical Informatics Association, about his work in the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, or ONC, and the barriers to implementing MIPS in the most useful and transparent way. In order to communicate the data, of course, we’ll need informatics; but how will that work? And which comes first, policy or technology? Leonard Kish: When you first began your studies in medical informatics, was there a sense that the field was a science? Doug Fridsma: After working on the Standards of Interoperability Framework...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: THCB Source Type: blogs

My patients’ pregnancy losses remind me why I became a doctor
I know we all bemoan the chief complaint of vaginal bleeding when it pops up on the board. Your heart sinks even more when it is followed by the dreaded home pregnancy test. No ED provider is going to love seeing patients with first trimester bleeding. More than anything, I loathe the drag it takes on my time and productivity. Labs, urine, moving them to the appropriate room for the GYN exam — all cumbersome tasks. But almost invariably each time, I am grateful for the lesson it provides me. Because in the franticness of my second year in residency, it reminds me why it is I became a doctor. It is the moment when I w...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 6, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Emergency OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

Communication with patients is a problem. How do we fix it?
In my practice of facilitating cancer support groups, all I do is listen to patients and their families. Consequently, I hear much about the nature of their care. They generally speak favorably about its technical aspects, and indeed these are often awesome. But when they complain, it’s uniformly — and I mean one hundred percent — about communication. One man has been trying to get an appointment with a pulmonologist for several weeks now. The required referral from his primary care doctor was sent long ago, by fax and also by snail mail, yet the specialist’s office claims it wasn’t received. ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 6, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Emergency Primary care Source Type: blogs

My Children are Vaccine-Damaged; are Yours?
Conclusion A growing number of today’s children suffer from vaccine damage. Most individuals do not make the connection between health problems and vaccines. When asked about the cause of autoimmune disorders, asthma, allergies, diabetes, learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder, autism, and other common childhood diseases and illness, the majority of health care providers advise patients that the causes are unknown. Doctors, including most integrative physicians, fail to make the connection to vaccines. It takes one moment to permanently damage the health of an adult or child, but takes a lifetime to t...
Source: vactruth.com - February 5, 2016 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Michelle Goldstein Tags: Logical Michelle Goldstein Top Stories autoimmune disorders gardasil HPV Vaccine Medical Authority vaccine injury Source Type: blogs

I became a physician when I took off my white coat
I walk out of a room filled with emotion and despair.  A battle lost but the war rages on.  I’ve seen miracles, often only a daily basis.  Life is precious but peculiarly fragile while resilient and strong. Every emergency provider understands the feeling after a patient has passed.  It’s the unexplainable reverence and daunting silence as I put on the white coat.  It’s the echoing footsteps that never go away on my path to the consultation room.  It’s the faces that we never forget as we have to deliver the news of a passing loved one.  As doctors and nurses, we must inform family and loved ones of untimely...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 5, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Emergency Source Type: blogs

Apparent Pseudo-STEMI patterns are not necessarily Pseudo. Beware.
This was contributed by an ECG enthusiast who wishes to remain anonymous.LVH is a well-described “mimic” of STEMI. However, a diagnosis of LVH does not exclude an acute coronary occlusion, and the clinical context, including symptoms and old ECGs, must be taken into account.A 50 year-old woman came to the ED with recent-onset chest pain.:She had a history of hypertension, as well as concentric LVH on a very recent echo. Furthermore, she had markedly elevated systolic BP > 200 mm Hg.Her initial ECG:There is STE in lead III, < 1 mm, as well as STD with inverted T waves in leads I and aVL. This pattern of STE and ST...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - February 5, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

The Search for the Elusive Elixir of Life
By TOM EMERICK Here’s the executive summary: Most disease and health spending is age-related. As we age we get infirmities ranging from dementia to cancer to vascular disease. Nothing can prevent aging. Period. For millennia mankind has been been on a futile search to prevent aging. Search for the Elusive Elixir of Life For 3500 or more years mankind has been searching for the mythological Elixir of Life, the fountain of youth, the philosophers stone, pool of nectar, etc, that will defeat aging and extend life, if not achieve immortality. According to Wiki, “The elixir of life, also known as the elixir of immortality a...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Simon Nath Tags: THCB Tom Emerick Source Type: blogs

BONUS VIDEO! Clinical Pearls: Mallet Finger Splint
Dr. James R. Roberts & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, bring you tips, tricks, and pearls for how to diagnose and treat a mallet finger. Everything you need to know is in this video. Click here to watch the video.​Tags: mallet finger splint, procedural pause, emergency medicinePublished: 2/4/2016 10:14:00 AM (Source: The Procedural Pause)
Source: The Procedural Pause - February 4, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

The doctor who stitched his glove to a patient’s head
x True confessions of an emergency physician. In this case, the UK’s Michael Mosley, host of BBC’s Trust Me, I’m a Doctor.   Part of the Guardian’s video series, Confessions from A&E. Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 4, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Video Emergency Source Type: blogs

Short-selling Private Practice
By KAREN SIBERT, MD Today is a remarkable day for me. I’m officially leaving private practice after almost 18 years, to return to academic medicine with a faculty position in a highly regarded California department of anesthesiology. Why would I do that? There are many positive reasons. I believe in the teaching mission of academic medicine:  to train the anesthesiologists of the future, and the scientists who will advance medical care. I enjoy teaching. The years I’ve spent at the head of the operating room table, anesthetizing patients every day, have given me a great deal of hands-on experience (and at least some ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Simon Nath Tags: THCB Karen Sibert Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 120
Welcome to the 120th edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. This edition contains 6 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid, Soren Rudolph, Anand Swaminathan and, of course, Chris Nickson. Find more R&R in the Fastlane reviews in the R&R Archive, read more about the R&R project or check ou...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 3, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Soren Rudolph Tags: Anaesthetics Clinical Research Education General Surgery Ophthalmology Pediatrics Pharmacology Pre-hospital / Retrieval R&R in the FASTLANE Resuscitation Trauma critical care emergency Emergency Medicine recommendations resea Source Type: blogs

Celebrate National Women Physicians Day #Iamblackwell #NWPD
It’s amazing what you can learn from the stranger sitting next to you on a flight. As I wait for my neighbor to grab her seat next to me, I secretly hope she embodies the qualities I hope for in a fellow passenger — keeping to herself and not requiring in-flight medical assistance. I make eye contact with a young woman who gives me the nod that she has the middle seat, and as I let her in, she unloads an anatomy book. With my interest piqued, I break one of my fundamental rules and ask her, “Are you in medical school?” My flight neighbor chuckles a bit and replies, “No, I am in school to be a physical therapi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 3, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Emergency Primary care Source Type: blogs

A kind word at bedside can be life-changing for patients
As a goal-oriented individual, I pack my days with appointments, deadlines, and to-do lists. Unfortunately, the time I spend getting from one task to the next gets lost in my focus on end results — a common blindness of Westerners who measure success or achievement by results and not by how one “plays the game.” As parents, we teach our children it’s not whether you win or lose, but how you played the game, yet we emulate a much different set of values. As health care providers, we are trained to focus on results. As it should be, our main goal is patient outcome, or improved health and longevity. We spend coun...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 2, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Emergency Source Type: blogs

Using The Intensive Outpatient Care Program To Lower Costs And Improve Care For High-Cost Patients
Improving care for patients with chronic diseases has long been a priority for both public and private sector purchasers of health care. A robust body of literature demonstrates that a significant proportion of health expenditures are concentrated among medically complex patients in both the Medicare and working-age adult population. Our general experience is no different — 40 percent of a typical Pacific Business Group on Health member’s health care spending goes towards caring for the 15 percent of their employees with multiple chronic conditions. Quality outcomes—particularly those related to care coordina...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - February 2, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Kristof Stremikis, Emma Hoo and Diane Stewart Tags: Costs and Spending Innovations in Care Delivery Insurance and Coverage Population Health Public Health culture of health High-Cost Patients out-patient care Source Type: blogs

Doctors: Feel like a fraud? You’re not alone.
The objective evidence helped, of course. I matched into emergency medicine, my speciality of choice, and graduated from medical school a few months later. I successfully completed a four-year residency program. I matched into an education fellowship, became board-certified, and accepted an assistant residency program director position straight out of fellowship. Markers of success. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 2, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Emergency Source Type: blogs

How can frontline expertise and new models of care best contribute to safely reducing avoidable acute admissions? A mixed-methods study of four acute hospitals
This study aims to investigate the interplay of service factors that influence decision-making about emergency patient admissions and to understand how the medical assessment process is experienced by patients, carers and medical staff. Report Summary Abstract (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - February 2, 2016 Category: UK Health Authors: The King's Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Patient safety Source Type: blogs

NICE indicators programme: consultation on potential new indicators
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) - This consultation seeks feedback on potential new indicators for inclusion in the NICE indicator menu. The proposed new indicators aim to improve the quality of care for a variety of conditions, including: waiting times for antenatal care; improved diagnosis of atrial fibrillation; targets for diabetes services; health assessments and prevention of emergency admissions for people with learning disabilities and autism. This consultation closes on 29th February 2016. Consultation Response form Press release (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - February 2, 2016 Category: UK Health Authors: The King's Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Consultations Source Type: blogs

Smartphone for All: Examples of using Apple Notes.app or Google Keep.app to extend memory and independence
A Smartphone for All: book excerpt, from a chapter on using Notes…————There are many ways to use Notes to extend an Explorer’s memory. The following table gives a few examples taken from real world experience. Many of these Notes hold non-sensitive or public information, but some require that both the Explorer’s smartphone and Cloud information are truly secure. We reviewed this in Setting up an Explorer’s Smartphone including an encrypted smartphone, long letter-number smartphone unlock codes, fingerprint identification, a responsible Explorer, short timeout auto-lock, and a strong Cloud password.  Some l...
Source: Be the Best You can Be - February 1, 2016 Category: Disability Tags: computer support technology Source Type: blogs

Don’t rely on Google for medical judgment
You see your gastroenterologist with long-standing stomach pain. You have undergone a reasonable evaluation and all the endoscopic bodily invasions, and imaging studies of your abdomen have been normal. Repeated lab work provides no clue explaining your distress. You have been twice to the emergency room and were sent home with prescriptions that didn’t work. You are frustrated and so is your gastro guy. You are convinced that there is a diagnosis that has been missed, and you have the Google search to prove it. Every physician has had patients who come into the office with reams of paper from an internet search. Usually...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 1, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician GI Source Type: blogs

A Trip to India
BY MICHAEL DAUM, MDI had the wonderful privilege of visiting three different cities in India for 16 days during my third year of residency. My original impression of India was, "Wow." This country could not be any more different from what I am used to.I am just a small-town boy from southern Indiana, but my medical training has given me the opportunity to visit poverty-stricken areas and witness different medical practices in Honduras, Guatemala, and Haiti. But India was just different. Name anything. From the obvious — language, food, population density, climate, dress, and religion — to the not-so obvious ...
Source: Going Global - February 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Alkalotics Anonymous
​A 50-year-old man with a past medical history of alcoholism presented to the ED with altered mental status, nausea, and vomiting. He is arousable but a poor historian. His girlfriend said he drinks a half-gallon of rum daily, and had his last drink two days earlier. She reported that he started to feel nauseous, vomit, and go through alcohol withdrawal. She said he also has been taking a lot of calcium carbonate for an upset stomach, but she was unable to say exactly how much. ​ His blood pressure was 146/70 mm Hg, heart rate was 110 bpm, respiratory rate was 14 bpm, PO2 was 96% on room air, and blood glucos...
Source: The Tox Cave - February 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Ear Cartilage Laceration Repair
I find the repair of eyelid and ear lacerations sometimes daunting. In fact, I often allow the ophthalmology service to take the lead with eyelid injuries and plastic surgery to manage severely lacerated ears. Not only are the repair of these unique skin-over-cartilage structures at risk of serious complications, they are also potentially time-consuming.Ear cartilage is completely dependent on the overlying skin for survival and has unique risks for infection. Perichondritis is a feared complication that is sometimes resistant to treatment and can result in disfiguring complications.This video allows us to review the basic...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - February 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

A Nefarious Character with an Agenda
Every new advanced nurse practitioner, physician assistant, or resident gets his fair share of complex emergency department procedures during training. Seasoned providers, however, are just as excited to place a central line in a septic patient, LP a "rule-out meningitis," or swiftly fix a nursemaid's elbow.This month we hope to remind you of a few sweet and satisfying procedures that take only moments to do. Your skill in completing these procedures is imperative. Not only will you amaze your patient, but you'll shorten your door to dispo-time.The StyeThe stye is a nefarious character with an agenda. It starts o...
Source: The Procedural Pause - February 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Eye Spy a Laceration
I tucked my backpack under the counter as I arrived for my night shift, and a palpable angst descended over my left shoulder. As I started to turn around, I panicked, thinking I'd hear something along the lines of, ""I want you to come now!" Instead, the triage nurse whispered, "Can you see this eyelid laceration I brought back?" ​A picture is worth a thousand words, or in this case, just one: Transfer.Clearly, the blow from a ringed fist caused more damage than our shop without ophthalmology could handle. The medial vertical laceration from orbital rim to orbital rim tearing through bot...
Source: Lions and Tigers and Bears - February 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

The critical medical and moral stakes for all patients in pain
We, as a society, can’t ignore these numbers: over 47,000 human lives lost prematurely in one year from drug overdoses, a 7 percent spike over the previous year, with opioid painkillers and heroin driving much of this tragic surge. If this trend isn’t disturbing enough, four out of five new heroin abusers began their habit by abusing painkillers. These numbers have faces. Caring for patients who abuse and overdose from opiates and other drugs are a growing constant in my practice. Meanwhile, pain is a common reason why patients come to the emergency department and alleviating their pain, or making it bearable, might re...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 1, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Pain management Source Type: blogs

And Now, Zika
I joked once that when – as quoted in Genesis – God said “Be fertile, then, and multiply; abound on the earth and subdue it” that command may have been directed at Noah and his family, but the viruses heard it, too. Since then, they’ve done well these many millennia. Some would say, better than we have. They’ve adapted to the climates of the globe, circumnavigated it as hitchhikers when we traveled or shipped our goods, and survived nearly all our attempts at eradication. My quip may have been funny in that moment, but the truth is this: viruses cause devastation that is no laughing matter. Zika is the latest r...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - February 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Publc Health Source Type: blogs

TOUGH CASES: Code of Ethics Now Available for Healthcare Ethics Consultants
Tarris Rosell, PhD, DMin    Consider the following hypothetical case scenarios:Case #1Jessica, APN, is a member of the Hospital Ethics Committee and serves also on the HEC’s ethics consultation team. Each week, one of eight volunteer consultants takes first call on the dedicated Ethics pager. Two other team members serve as back up to the on-call ethics consultant. One day, a consult request is forwarded to the Ethics pager, which Jessica is carrying. It involves a patient on the Medical ICU where Jessica is also a nurse manager. She knows the patient and family, and is all too aware of their conf...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 1, 2016 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Bioethics Tags: Health Care code of medical ethics Healthcare Ethics Consultants hospital ethics committee syndicated Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 217
Welcome to the 217th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chuck of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week How do we reach deep within to find empathy when we feel at our worst? By remembering the other side of the story, writes Phil Berry in his blog.“The trick at such times is to access the human in ourselves” [SO]   The Best of #FOAMed Em...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 31, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Doctors need to learn to say no. Here’s how to do it.
If you have a life where you never, ever say yes when you mean no, then you can stop reading right now. But I guess that you’re a lot like me. Now and then, you get caught off guard. And before you know it, you’re staying late to see that emergency patient. Bringing cupcakes for the second-grade class. Volunteering for the coffee meet-and-greet at church next Sunday. What’s up with that? We’re smart. We know how to communicate. But somehow we crumble when we’re face-to-face with someone who’s asking us to do something we don’t have time to do, or don’t want to do. Continue reading ... Your patients are rat...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 31, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Zika Virus, Microcephaly Risk, New Vaccines, Mosquito Extinction
Estimates in the press claim 3000-4000 microcephaly babies have been born in Brazil alone due to Zika virus infections in women while pregnant. Maybe. You might be surprised to learn that the Zika-microcephaly link has not yet been proven. Here are rough calculations on whether the threat is real. The scientific jury is still out. Do not panic. Suppose the threat is real. A BBC story puts a vaccine a decade away: Zika virus: US scientists say vaccine '10 years away' But a Reuters story has Inovio Pharmaceuticals ready to start testing an emergency vaccine in several months for use before year's end. Faced with the prospect...
Source: FuturePundit - January 30, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Randall Parker Source Type: blogs

The benefits of trauma-informed care in the NICU
When my twin sons were born prematurely at 26 weeks’ gestation, my family’s lives were thrust into the whirlwind of the NICU and living daily with the reality of the babies (William and Elliott) being on life support. Having had no prior intense and prolonged experiences with the hospital, and watching helplessly and fretfully as my tiny two-pounders fought for their lives, it’s almost impossible to put into language what the experience was like — it’s as though my memory, in the interest of making me functional again, took away the words to describe many of the sensory and emotionally overwhelming elements w...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 29, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Intensive care Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Zika virus
The rapid spread of Zika virus through the Americas, together with the association of infection with microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome, have propelled this previously ignored virus into the limelight. What is this virus and where did it come from? History Zika virus was first identified in 1947 in a sentinel monkey that was being used to monitor for the presence of yellow fever virus in the Zika Forest of Uganda. At this time cell lines were not available for studying viruses, so serum from the febrile monkey was inoculated intracerebrally into mice. All the mice became sick, and the virus isolated from their bra...
Source: virology blog - January 28, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information Brazil congenital defect Dengue flavivirus Guillain-Barré microcephaly mosquito vaccine viral viruses yellow fever virus Zika zika virus Source Type: blogs

Narrative Matters: On Our Reading List
Editor’s note: “Narrative Matters: On Our Reading List” is a monthly roundup where we share some of the most compelling health care narratives driving the news and conversation in recent weeks. Disability In STEM Jesse Shanahan, a master’s student in astronomy at Wesleyan University, has a physical disability. That makes her rare among students in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) fields, where only 9 percent to 10 percent of undergraduates, and only 1 percent of Ph.D. recipients, in the United States have disabilities. Beyond the physical barriers she faces—like inaccessible buildings...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - January 28, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Jessica Bylander Tags: Elsewhere@ Health Affairs Featured Narrative Matters clinical trials Disabilities On Our Reading List Source Type: blogs

Quoth Dave Mastio on the Flint water crisis: Don’t worry, be happy. Things were worse in the past
It’s been nearly three weeks since I wrote about how an imperative to save money at all costs combined with gross incompetence to poison Flint’s children with lead. In (very) brief, the city of Flint decided to switch from buying water from the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department (DWSD) to a new water source. Unfortunately,… (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - January 28, 2016 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Autism Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking blood lead levels David Mastio emergency manager Flint Flint water crisis lead poisoning Michigan Mona Hanna-Attisha USA Today Source Type: blogs

TechTool Thursday 066 MAP+EM
TechTool review – MAP+EM by Eola Holdings on iOS and Android MAP+EM (Manage and Prescribe Emergency Medicine) aims to deliver your local hospital guidelines and prescribing policies in one easy-to-find place on your phone. It has been developed by three junior doctors in the UK. Website: – iTunes – Google Play – Website Design Their website is lovely for a start, and gives a really clear overview of their aims and what the app offers. I don’t normally comment on app names, but I’m not sure why they chose the name MAP+EM. Their guidelines are for the whole hospital, not just the Emergency...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 28, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tessa Davis Tags: Review Tech Tool diary MAP EM roster techtool Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 119
This study examines the dose-relationship of oxygen therapy and infarct size assess by biomarkers. Excluding hypoxic patients and those with cardiogenic shocks 441 patients with STEMI were randomized to oxygen or room air. Every 100 L increase in oxygen exposure in the first 12 h was associated with significantly increased cTnI and CK of 1,4% and 1,2% respectively. As the median supplemental oxygen exposure was 1746 L this would result in a 21% increase in infarct size. Recommended by: Soren Rudolph Quirky, weird and wonderful Wood CD et al. Evaluation of sixteen anti-motion sickness drugs under controlled laborato...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 27, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Soren Rudolph Tags: Airway Anaesthetics Cardiology Education Emergency Medicine Gastroenterology Intensive Care Neurology Pre-hospital / Retrieval R&R in the FASTLANE Respiratory Resuscitation Toxicology Toxicology and Toxinology critical care r Source Type: blogs

Dying to Get an Education
Public policy and public health efforts are underway to help assure that people can be healthy where they live, work, and play.  As part of providing education, schools are supposed to protect the health and safety of students.   Various government and non-government organizations (NGOs) offer resources, toolkits and evidence-based resources to help school districts, schools, and school personnel deal with health emergencies, such as life threatening conditions like asthma.  Guidelines indicate that schools should have:  a policy or rule that allows students to carry and use their own asthma medicines; written emergen...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - January 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Children Patients' Rights Policy Source Type: blogs

“In Johannesburg’s townships, #pantsula isn’t just a...
"In Johannesburg's townships, #pantsula isn't just a dance, but a way of life. With precise and technical footwork, dancers use hectic city streets as their stage. "The guys are trying to spread a message of better living through the dance," said @mrmofosaunders, who has spent 6 years documenting pantsula #dancers — like the members of the Rea Iketsetsa, pictured here in #Soweto in their signature style. Like many art forms rooted in street culture, pantsula performances are typically responses to cultural and political issues. In the mid-1980s, when a state of emergency was declared in South Africa, pantsula — which w...
Source: Kidney Notes - January 27, 2016 Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Joshua Schwimmer Source Type: blogs

Should All Flyers Go First Class?
Anyone who flies, or, at least, anyone who isn’t rich who flies, probably wishes he or she had more leg room. Going “cattle class” isn’t fun. But for most people it still is better than not going. Which for most travelers is the real alternative. For decades the Civil Aeronautics Board regulated airfares. Airlines competed on service rather than price. Business travelers, whose companies paid the bill, enjoyed uncrowded luxury in the air. It wasn’t as grand for anyone on a budget. You were more likely to drive, especially if you had a family. Deregulation of the airlines transformed flying. Discount airlines emer...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 26, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Doug Bandow Source Type: blogs

The Mother of the Beast
Editor’s Note: This post is one of two pieces on the Introduction to Social Medicine and Global Health course at Harvard Medical School. Read the other piece here. By: Benjamin Oldfield, MD, a fourth-year resident in the urban health-focused combined internal medicine-pediatrics residency program at Johns Hopkins Hospital When asked about my medical school experience, I like to map my memories onto the arc of an epic poem. Both are lengthy, traversing vast ground, formative—the allegory seems to fit. First-year began in medias res, in the middle of things, as epics tend to do. Like the horrific storm at the beginni...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - January 26, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Trainee Perspective global health health disparities patient centered care patient's story social determinants of health social history social medicine Source Type: blogs

10 Things Med Students Shouldn’t Do
This is my first year of being a senior resident and it is only January; and yet I have seen all these things happen. Sadly, this has all led me to the grim realization of why I got such good evals as a medical student: it wasn’t because I was some sort of social genius. (And yes, I really thought I might have been a social genius.) No, it was because I did not do the following things, ALL OF WHICH I HAVE SEEN WITH MY OWN EYES. Seriously, if you don’t do these things, don’t worry. You will be fine. Your residents will love you. Do not claim to be late to rounds because you had a “Cat medical eme...
Source: Action Potential - January 26, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Action Potential Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

“In Case of Emergency” via xkcd.com
"In Case of Emergency" via xkcd.com Posted on infosnack. (Source: Kidney Notes)
Source: Kidney Notes - January 25, 2016 Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Joshua Schwimmer Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 216
Welcome to the 216th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chuck of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week All the talks from the recent UK Intensive Care Society Conference State of the Art Conference have been made freely and open accessible via the web site or by subscription via iTunes. A true smorgasboard of intensive care content, ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 24, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

The heartbreak of physician mommies. How this doctor learned to let it go.
After a stressful morning, a physician colleague receives a note from her 4 year old that read, “MOMYOUFORGOTTOGIVEMEAKISSTODAY” in classic large, space less toddler scrawl. She shared it knowing that other physician mommies can relate. We’ve all been there. The heartbreak that is a part of life as a physician mommy takes many forms. Whether a pout, a stare, a cry, a comment, a scowl or a note, no one can give the knife of mommy guilt the same twist as our own children do. When they do, just remember that you are not alone. Data from the Pew Research Center on social trends show that more than half (56 percent) of wo...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 24, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Emergency Source Type: blogs

Childhood aspiration on food is a public health issue
Recently, new dietary guidelines were released, recommending reducing sugar intake overall, and reducing meat intake in growing boys.  Last year, as we remain in the throes of a nationwide obesity epidemic, the FDA changed the nutritional labels we’ve become all-too-familiar with. The emphasis is now on calorie count of an “appropriate” serving size. So much for my pretending that the “appropriately served” pint of ice cream I just downed had 350 calories. What? That was per serving? From now on, we’ll be able to enjoy our 350 fat-filled calories in the microscopic “appropriate”  ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 22, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

“The photographer @george_etheredge captured 2 mannequins...
"The photographer @george_etheredge captured 2 mannequins keeping warm in downtown #Asheville, North Carolina. The city was covered in snow by the early morning — and hit by a mix that also included rain and sleet. The governors of Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina and Georgia declared states of emergency yesterday, as did Mayor @murielbowser of Washington, D.C. Meanwhile, a #blizzard watch for the New York area and parts of Long Island and New Jersey begins tomorrow morning and lasts until Sunday afternoon. #eastcoast #snowday #❄ #🎿" By nytimes on Instagram. Posted on infosnack. (Source: Kidney Notes)
Source: Kidney Notes - January 22, 2016 Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Joshua Schwimmer Source Type: blogs