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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory.

The Patient Access Imperative: A Potential Triple Win For Payors, Providers, And Patients
Long patient wait times, frustratingly high no-show rates, lack-luster call center performance, and under-utilized physicians. Does any of this sound familiar? Although a small set of health systems have boldly declared that their physicians guarantee their outpatients same- or next-day appointments, across the United States patients more typically face long wait times to both make and get appointments, as well as poor access to care. To succeed in the future, health systems will need to have the customer orientation of a five-star hotel and the operational discipline of a factory floor. Our experience suggests that many s...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - February 26, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Pooja Kumar, Vaneesh Soni, and Saum Sutaria Tags: Access All Categories Health Care Delivery Physicians Primary Care Quality Source Type: blogs

Attention New Jersey Volunteer EMS Peeps
How healthy is your squad? Problems with staffing, recruitment and retention? Problems meeting your response time standards? Financial instability? Does your next equipment purchase depend on the proceeds from the next fish fry or bake sale? The folks at Emergency Resource Management, LLC might be able to help you find workable answers to those problems. ... (Source: A Day In the Life of An Ambulance Driver)
Source: A Day In the Life of An Ambulance Driver - February 26, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ambulancedriverfiles Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 072
Welcome to the 72th edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature.This edition contains 6 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid, Soren Rudolph, Anand Swaminathan and, of course, Chris Nickson. Find more R&R in the Fastlane reviews in the R&R Archive, read more about the R&R project or check out ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 25, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Soren Rudolph Tags: Education Emergency Medicine Intensive Care Neurosurgery Pediatrics Resuscitation Trauma critical care examination R&R in the FASTLANE research and reviews Source Type: blogs

New York City Ebola Doctor Slams Media And Governors Christie And Cuomo
The response in the US to the Ebola crisis last year brought out the worst in the media and our politicians. By comparison, our response to the recent measles crisis– by no means a model for public health communication– had the sophistication and intelligence of a debate at the Oxford Union. One of the chief victims of the hysteria was Craig Spencer, a New York City emergency room physician who caught Ebola while volunteering in Africa. When he first developed Ebola symptoms after his return to New York City he went straight to the hospital, where he eventually recovered after a harrowing More… (Source: CardioBrief)
Source: CardioBrief - February 25, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Larry Husten Tags: People, Places & Events Policy & Ethics Prevention, Epidemiology & Outcomes ebola media Source Type: blogs

Top 5 Health Care Trends to Watch in 2015
With a new Congress, health care is once again an issue of tremendous scrutiny and debate. Many of the federal policy debates in 2015 will be largely symbolic, resulting in little more than tweaks to existing law. However, health care policy is not just a matter for Congress to consider. A range of issues will play out in the states and the private sector, effectively shaping the future. Below are the top trends we’re watching this year. The Year of Living Interoperably From electronic health records (EHRs) to clinical measures and decision support tools, providers are inundated with new technologies that automate proces...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - February 25, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Susan DeVore Tags: All Categories Big Data Health Care Costs Health IT Innovation Payment Pharma Policy Quality Spending States Source Type: blogs

Medical credentialing: Explaining yourself when you’re off the grid
The non-medical reader may wonder what I am complaining about.  Of course, many of you have to be credentialed in your fields as well, whether law or accounting, law enforcement or public service, education, nursing or a trade.  But those of you in medicine know how difficult it can be to become credentialed as a physician, either by a state for purposes of a license, or by a hospital in order to be on staff.  As a locums provider, this is one of the true banes of my existence, as every new state, every new facility has to ensure that I am not now, nor have I ever been an axe murderer, drug addict, drug dealer, sexual ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 25, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Education Emergency Hospital Source Type: blogs

DHS Shutdown
Chris Edwards Policymakers are battling over a funding bill for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and its agencies, including the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The disagreement over the bill involves the funding of President Obama’s recent immigration actions. If a DHS funding bill is not approved, the department will partially shut down. The administration has been highlighting the negative effects of that possibility, but the battle illustrates how the government has grown far too large. Federal shutdowns may cause disruption, but that is because the government has extended its tentacles into act...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 24, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Edwards Source Type: blogs

Timing Discharges to Maximize Revenue - "Corruption" of Corporate Long-Term Hospitals?
A recent Wall Street Journal article that focused on a quirk in US Medicare payment rules that may be gamed by long-term hospitals also revealed the plight of physicians employed by such hospitals, and worse, the danger posed by such gaming to patients.Discharging Patients at Particular Times Maximizes Hospital RevenueHere is how the rule works: Under Medicare rules, long-term acute-care hospitals like Kindred’s typically receive smaller payments for what is considered a short stay, until a patient hits a threshold. After that threshold, payment jumps to a lump sum meant to cover the full course of long-term treatment.Th...
Source: Health Care Renewal - February 23, 2015 Category: Health Management Tags: corporate physician health care corruption Kindred Health mission-hostile management Select Medical Source Type: blogs

How Has NLM Made a Difference to You
NIH Director, Dr Francis Collins, announce the appointment of an Advisory Committee charged to “evaluate the mission and functions of NLM to ensure this critical component of NIH continues to leverage technological advances in information sciences to facilitate scientific breakthroughs and a better understanding of health issues and disease.” The charge focuses on reviewing “current mission, organization, and programmatic priorities of the NLM and to articulate a strategic vision for the NLM to ensure that it remains an international leader in biomedical and health information.” To support the work of the Advisory ...
Source: The Krafty Librarian - February 23, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: KraftyLibrarian Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

DL Terminated
Of all the things that emergency physicians do, rapid sequence induction has to be the most sinister.To paralyse a man, or a woman, or a child, with a lethal serum – and then bring them back, from the point of death, with seconds to spare! With nothing more than a trusty metal blade, held in the left hand, and air blown through a tube!It is an amazing magic trick. Surely some sort of voodoo. And frightening, very frightening, when it goes wrong. About 1% of rapid sequence inductions, conducted in the ED, kill the patient within 10 minutes. Which makes RSI about 25 times more dangerous than BASE jumping.This is why so...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 23, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jo Deverill Tags: Emergency Medicine Medical Humor Video intubation rapid sequence induction RSI video laryngoscope Source Type: blogs

The Wolves Are Licking Their Lips
There is much sacred in the hallowed halls of medicine. As any other secret society, this fraternal order of health care professionals has its own language, costumes, and humor. The pathway from pre-medical student, medical student, resident, and finally to attending is heavily marked with ritual and ever-expanding responsibilities. The world opens and unfolds before the eyes of the novice.There is no more enduring symbol of membership in this group than the modern-day hospital. For those who don’t belong, only fear and wonder lie behind the sliding glass doors of the entry to the emergency room. For the initiated, howev...
Source: In My Humble Opinion - February 23, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Jordan Grumet Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review #170
Welcome to the 170th LITFL Review. Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chuck of FOAM.The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the WeekRory Spiegel offers an in-depth look at the endovascular study triad recently released (MR CLEAN, EXTEND-IA and ESCAPE) to treat acute ischemic strokes, and why we should be cautiously optimistic that a small subset of patients have been identified i...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 22, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 170
Welcome to the 170th LITFL Review. Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chuck of FOAM.The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the WeekRory Spiegel offers an in-depth look at the endovascular study triad recently released (MR CLEAN, EXTEND-IA and ESCAPE) to treat acute ischemic strokes, and why we should be cautiously optimistic that a small subset of patients have been identified i...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 22, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

Thank you for treating me like a person
I went down with the resident to the emergency department to hear the patient’s story (aka “Take a history”) and perform a physical exam as part of the patient’s admission to the hospital. As we were getting ready to leave, the patient said, “Thank you for treating me like a person.” What does it say about our medical system when “treating someone like a person”... // Read More » (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 20, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Joe Gibes Tags: Health Care bioethics Health Care Practice human dignity medicine patient-physician relationship syndicated Source Type: blogs

I am proud of our society. We provide care to everyone.
She is always a difficult admission. The long chart review. The vague complaints. The entitled attitude. The misdirection. These are expected. As is the cake at her bedside after a diabetic crisis. The two-liter soda after an emergent fluid dialysis. The urine toxicology was positive for cocaine. The staff knows her well. I know her well. I give her the attention, kindness and empathy that I give to every patient. In abundance. But admitting her overnight on an ICU shift was especially unpleasant. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide....
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 20, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Diabetes Emergency Hospital Source Type: blogs

CrowdOptic Hopes to Improve EP, EMT Communication
CrowdOptic allows emergency physicians to observe patients inside an ambulance en route to a hospital by sharing the perspective of an EMT broadcasting in real-time through a wearable device like Google Glass. CrowdOptic is one of five official Google Glass partners.   “Through 4G on the ambulance, he’ll upload high-definition 1080p video that streams to the Cloud and can be accessed through a secure link by a computer or a tablet or even an iPhone by personnel in the receiving hospital,” said Jim Kovach, MD, JD, CrowdOptic’s vice president of business development.   “An emergency physician can talk through t...
Source: Technology & Inventions - February 20, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Driving advice from a trauma surgeon
No one ever wants to meet me.  Well, at least inside of a hospital.  If you are meeting me in a hospital, it is likely because you have been stabbed, shot, assaulted, or in a car accident.  Although the only advice I have about avoiding the first three mechanisms of injury is to stay away from “two dudes” and not try to sell Bibles on the street at 2 a.m., I do have some more specific advice when it comes to car accidents. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 19, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Emergency Surgery Source Type: blogs

What Fed Officials Really Don't Want You to Know (Hint: They Are Telling You)
George Selgin Yesterday morning I had a query from someone asking me to share my thoughts about the Federal Reserve Transparency Act, better known as the bill to “Audit the Fed.” Having given him a brief answer, I thought I might say a little more here. Although Rand Paul promises that his measure will shed much-needed light on the Fed’s undertakings (the Senate version of his measure was even called “The Federal Reserve Sunshine Act”), the truth is that it’s unlikely to reveal anything of importance beyond what existing Fed audits–including those provided by Title XI of the Dodd-Frank Act (which...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 19, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: George Selgin Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 071
This study looks at the effect of institution of duty hour restrictions on the outcome of Medicare patients. Although the study is retrospective and derived from large database information, it gives us a peak into the bigger picture of duty hours regulations: patient outcomes. The study authors found no difference in any important outcomes. It is similarly unclear whether these restrictions have improved resident quality of education or quality of life. Large system wide changes duty hour restrictions should, in the future, be implemented not based on theory but actual data of improved outcomes. An accompanying editorial d...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 18, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Soren Rudolph Tags: Education Emergency Medicine Neurosurgery Pediatrics Resuscitation Trauma critical care examination Intensive Care R&R in the FASTLANE research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Making it as a Midlevel among the Wolves
This spring, more advanced providers will be graduating from nurse practitioner and physician assistant programs than ever before. With that in mind, we want to take a break from procedures and focus on transitioning to becoming a provider.   If it were easy, everyone would be doing it. Always let the patient be your guide when you work in the emergency department. Don’t get hung up on workplace drama or fear of making a mistake. No one is perfect, and it will take time to find your niche. It is up to you to do a good job and seize the day, each and every day from here on out. We only hope we can help you find success i...
Source: The Procedural Pause - February 18, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Pay 'em When They're Up, Pay 'em When They're Down - CEO Value Extraction Even at Small Non-Profit Hospitals
To the tune of "Dirty Laundry," by Don Henley, some more of health care's dirty laundry...We have frequently discussed the seemingly unstoppable rise of compensation given to top hired managers of health care organizations.  Their compensation seems to rise regardless of the financial status of their organizations, much less how well their organizations are caring for patients or otherwise fulfilling the mission.  Top hired managers of other organizations, particularly big for-profit corporations, have seen similar enhancements of their personal wealth, leading to the charge that they are acting as "value extract...
Source: Health Care Renewal - February 17, 2015 Category: Health Management Tags: executive compensation hospital systems hospitals St Luke ' s Health System West Georgia Health Source Type: blogs

Federal Judge Stops Obama's Executive Action on Immigration
Ilya Shapiro Late last night, as the DC area braced for a snowstorm, a federal judge in Brownsville, Texas granted a temporary injunction to the executive action that President Obama announced in November. The expanded Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) was set to go into effect tomorrow, with the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) starting up in May, so a quick ruling was expected after Judge Andrew Hanen held a hearing last month. And based on how that hearing went, it’s no surprise that Texas and the 25 other states suing the federal government succeeded in ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 17, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Ilya Shapiro Source Type: blogs

NHS indicators: February 2015
House of Commons Library - This paper provides a range of summary statistical indicators for NHS England in the following areas: accident and emergency attendance and performance; ambulance call volume and response times; waiting times for routine treatment; waiting times for cancer diagnosis and treatment; cancelled operations; delayed transfers of care; diagnostic waiting times and activity; waiting times for mental health treatment; workforce numbers for doctors, nurses and other staff; hospital activity, referrals and admissions; and bed availability and occupancy. In each case, trends are given over several year...
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - February 17, 2015 Category: UK Health Authors: The King's Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: NHS finances and productivity NHS measurement and performance Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 169
Welcome to the 169th LITFL Review. Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chuck of FOAM.The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week EMOttawa shares their top EBM papers from 2014 in this really useful blog post. [SL]A fantastic resource of Paediatric Trauma Pearls and Pitfalls from emDocs. [SL]The Best of #FOAMed Emergency MedicineGreat new Procedurette video from Whit Fisher on...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 15, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

The documentation solution your patients want you to adopt
Remember the Latin phrase “Primum non nocere”? It means “First, do no harm.” Most of us physicians committed to it when reciting the Hippocratic Oath, back when we were first embarking on our careers in medicine. Sadly, today’s technology threatens this sacred physician-patient relationship. Electronic health records (EHRs), although much-needed, have created perverse, unintended consequences for the patient experience. To be clear, EHRs are inherently good.  They’re the backbone of better-coordinated care, more structured health data, and improved health outcomes. But it’s now a well-documented fact that ph...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 13, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Tech Emergency Health IT Source Type: blogs

It’s time for medical practices to own their billing mistakes
This article was originally published in Pulse — voices from the heart of medicine, and is reprinted with permission. Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 13, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Primary care Radiology Source Type: blogs

The Prospect of Using Antioxidants to Suppress Damage Following Stroke or Other Brain Injury
Much of the damage done following an ischemic stroke occurs when blood flow returns: there is a sudden and overwhelming production of reactive molecules and cells die as a result. Given sufficiently potent and safe antioxidants, this harmful process could be suppressed provided a treatment is delivered rapidly: Injectable nanoparticles that could protect an injured person from further damage due to oxidative stress have proven to be astoundingly effective in tests to study their mechanism. Combined polyethylene glycol-hydrophilic carbon clusters - known as PEG-HCCs - could quickly stem the process of overoxidation that ca...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 13, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Oregon Bridges The Gap Between Health Care And Community-Based Health
It is now commonly accepted that to achieve health, the U.S. health system must address the social determinants of health. While the integration of health care with social services and public health is happening relatively infrequently across the country, one bright spot can be found in Oregon, where an innovative Medicaid health system model, referred to as the coordinated care model, is showing early signs of success in bridging the gap between the community and the health care system. Under Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber’s leadership, newly created coordinated care organizations (CCOs)—partnerships between physical,...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - February 12, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Chris DeMars Tags: All Categories Effectiveness Health Care Costs Health Care Delivery Health Reform Innovation Medicaid Nonmedical Determinants Prevention Primary Care Public Health Quality States Source Type: blogs

Abscess Basics: The Setup and Anesthesia
Part 1 in a Series   We are pleased to bring you our first full-length tutorial on abscess drainage. Part 1 of this series focuses on set up and basics for all beginners.   It is important to note that you should practice on injection techniques and how to properly hold instruments before draining your first abscess. No one likes a shaky, unsure hand. We also believe in the “see one, do one, teach one” mentality. Be sure to check out the stockroom at your facility so you, too, can become familiar with all of the equipment used to drain an abscess properly.   Stay tuned for next month’s blog when we get down to dra...
Source: The Procedural Pause - February 12, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

The relevance of drugs and alcohol in sexual assault
When I was in residency, sexual assault exams were part of our training.  We spent a lot of time learning how to ask the right questions, how to be gentle and empathetic, how to gather evidence appropriately and thoroughly. While many hospitals now have SANE programs (Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner), I have never enjoyed the privilege of working with one of them.  I have, for two decades, performed sexual assault exams on my own. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 12, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Emergency Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 070
This study demonstrated a high sensitivity (86%) and very high specificity (97%) when looking for consolidations > 1 cm on US compared to chest X-ray as the standard. The study was done quickly (mean 7 minutes) and by non-experts (1 hour of training) increasing the likelihood that the findings can be generalized to non-study settings.Recommended by: Anand SwaminathanThe Best of the RestResuscitationOlaussen A, et al. Return of consciousness during ongoing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A systematic review, Resuscitation 2014; 86: 44-48. PMID 25447435After introduction of mechanical CPR device CPR induced consciousnes...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 11, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Soren Rudolph Tags: Education Emergency Medicine Neurosurgery Pediatrics Resuscitation Trauma critical care examination Intensive Care R&R in the FASTLANE research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Our New Cybersecurity Strategy: An Acronym Firewall
Julian Sanchez A couple weeks ago, I had a brief tour of the Department of Homeland Security’s National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center, which probably isn’t quite as snazzy as U.S. Cyber Command’s Star Trek–inspired bridge, but looks more or less like the movies have programmed you to expect: A long wall filled with enormous screens displaying maps with each state’s self-assessed “cyber threat level”; the volume of traffic to various government networks, and even one for NCCIC’s Twitter feed. It’s not clear that this setup serves much functional purpose given ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 11, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Julian Sanchez Source Type: blogs

Saving the Healthcare Dollar
The cost of healthcare is rising. New and expensive treatments, longer life expectancy and an ageing population are developing into a tsunami which threatens to flatten the health budget of first world economies.Already we are feeling the effects of this.WA health budget cuts will hit system struggling to meet demandAt the coalface in the emergency department we are being told by our hospital administrators that the health budget cuts must be passed on. We are to find increased productivity and efficiency with no increase in staffing numbers – in fact staff must be cut to achieve budgets constraints. Do more with les...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 11, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: James Winton Tags: Administration Emergency Medicine Medical Humor Administrators Healthcare Dollar Source Type: blogs

New Left Bundle Branch Block (LBBB) and Dyspnea
It is important to remember that the latest (2013) ACC/AHA STEMI guidelines removed New Left Bundle Branch Block (LBBB) as an indication for emergent reperfusion because there are too many false positives.A reader sent this:An elderly female presented with dyspnea, nausea, diaphoresis, and indigestion at 2am.  She had a history of CAD with stents, and no history left bundle branch block.There is sinus rhythm and Left Bundle Branch Block.  There is not a lot of ST elevation, nowhere near 5 mm.  Lead V5 possibly has some concordant STE, but there is a wandering baseline and it certainly does not come to 1 mm.H...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - February 11, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 02-10-2015
This article calls testosterone the “drug of the future” and compares its use to estrogen – which isn’t a controlled substance. One person interviewed for the article noted that “almost everything we treat in medicine is age-related. Aging is related to bad eyesight, bad hearing, bad joints, bad hearts, bad blood vessels, and cancer. We treat all of these without trying to minimize or diminish them that they are age related.” Why pick on testosterone use? Damn. Boyfriend secretly records himself having sex with his 17 year old girlfriend. Video “somehow” gets uploaded to inte...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - February 10, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, February 10, 2015
From MedPage Today: Anthem Data Breach: Potential Game Changer for Healthcare. Anthem Health’s massive data breach announced Thursday sent shock waves through the healthcare information technology sector. As many as 80 million people may have had personal data compromised, placing them at risk of identity fraud, Anthem reported. No Link Between Oxytocin and ADHD. No association was found between children who developed ADHD and mothers who had their labor medically augmented with oxytocin. Frostbite: How to Classify and Treat It. You find yourself working the overnight shift on subzero night in February. You stop ou...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 10, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Emergency OB/GYN Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger
unless it’s the tail rotor. They will straight up kill you. Buy the t-shirt! Related posts: EVD: ebola virus disease; kills 70% of the patients and makes those unaffected into paranoid zombies. EVD: ebola virus disease; kills 70% of the patients and... RT @kidney_boy: I didn’t get how horrific Ebola is in Sierra Leone. This proposed triage system makes it clear. pfmhcolumbia.wordpress.com/2014/10/12/les… … RT @kidney_boy: I didn’t get how horrific Ebola is in... YARPP powered by AdBistroPowered by (Source: GruntDoc)
Source: GruntDoc - February 10, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: GruntDoc Tags: Amusements Aviation Emergency Medical Source Type: blogs

After The Worst In Liberia And Sierra Leone
From January 19-27, we traveled to Liberia and Sierra Leone to engage with national leaders, health workers, citizens, non-governmental organization (NGO) implementers, international organizations, and United States, United Kingdom (UK), and other officials, including the African Union (AU), Chinese, and Cuban medical delegations. It was a moment of hope and nervous adjustment, as Ebola cases dropped suddenly and unexpectedly in Liberia, followed by reductions in Sierra Leone and Guinea. We listened to the reflections of those who lived through and led the mobilization to roll back the unprecedented Ebola emergency, as it ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - February 9, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: J. Stephen Morrison and Cathryn Streifel Tags: All Categories Global Health Health Care Delivery Policy Prevention Public Health Workforce Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 168
Welcome to the 168th LITFL Review. Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chuck of FOAM.The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Those awesome Swedes. Not only do they host an excellent emergency ultrasound conference (SonoSweden), they livestream it free, and then save all the archives for all to see. That’s hours and hours of FREE ultrasound tutorial videos featuring Matt...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 9, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Stop clinging to tradition in medicine
Walking around the ER in Tiny Community Hospital, I had a few realizations.  In medicine, we hold onto some things very tightly.  We love tradition; we love the known.  We don’t always know why, but we choose “the devil we know,” almost every time, no matter how pointy his horns. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 9, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Emergency Source Type: blogs

A Relatively Narrow Complex Tachycardia at a Rate of 180.
I received a text message with this image: "Cardioversion didn't work.  Any thoughts?" What do you think?  The heart rate is 180.I was viewing this on my phone, but I saw what I thought were P-waves.  I could barely see them in lead II:There are probable P-waves at the arrows, but I wasn't certainI texted back: "Could be very fast sinus."There is also a wide QRS at 113 ms and a large R-wave in aVR, so sodium channel blockade is likely.   Common culprits in this situation are tricyclic overdose and cocaine toxicity (remember cocaine not only increases dopamine in central synapses, but is also a...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - February 8, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Remember when Bobby Jindal claimed to be the non-stupid Republican?
Baton Rouge Hospital will be closing its Emergency Department. The linked story doesn't entirely explain why this is happening. It says that Jindal didn't come up with money he had promised to keep it open, which I presume is true. But why did it need state money in the first place?Here's why. Because Louisiana refused the Medicaid expansion. Prior to the ACA, hospitals that served large numbers of uninsured people, who otherwise would have had to eat the cost, got extra federal money. (Called Disprportionate Share, or DISH payments.) But with the ACA, all those poor people were supposed to have Medicaid, so DISH wouldn't ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - February 6, 2015 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Rethinking the Global Response to Public Health Emergencies
Members of the Presidential Commission on the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) are considering possible recommendations for future engagements in public health emergencies, including ethical approaches to conducting research in affected countries even in the midst of a crisis. Yesterday’s deliberations touched on a wide range of issues generated by the ongoing Ebola epidemic in western […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 6, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Matthew Davis Tags: Health Care ebola liveblog Liveblog Coverage Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Health e-MedRecord
Emergency Medicine News spoke with Carlo Reyes, MD, JD, the vice chief of staff and the assistant medical director of emergency medicine at Los Robles Hospital in Thousand Oaks, CA, and the founder and CEO of Health e-MedRecord, a patient-centered and emergency physician-designed EMR solution. He discussed the difference between his EMR and every other product available, the emphasis on patient involvement, and how his product is HIPAA-secure. Below is an abbreviated transcript of the interview. Read Dr. Reyes’ past columns at http://bit.ly/ReyesAtYourDefense.     Why is the Health e-MedRecord different from every oth...
Source: Technology & Inventions - February 6, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

New Narrative Matters: How Access, Knowledge, And Attitudes Shaped My Sister’s Care
Health Affairs‘ February Narrative Matters essay features a woman who helps her sister get the care she needs when a tooth infection turns into a health emergency. Elizabeth Piatt’s article is freely available to all readers, or you can listen to the podcast. Don’t forget to visit the free Narrative Matters essay archive, which offers written and oral versions of current and past essays. Narrative Matters is published with support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. (Source: Health Affairs Blog)
Source: Health Affairs Blog - February 6, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Tracy Gnadinger Tags: Access All Categories Coverage Dental Care Disparities Emergency Medicine Medicaid Narrative Matters Personal Experience Policy Public Health Source Type: blogs

Be kind to your doctor
Shared with permission from the FB wall of a GP Some six years ago, this lady X was brought to me. she has very bad case of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. I still recall how she used to struggle for breath each time she came. Thank goodness she would quickly recover after nebulization as intra-muscular injection because her case would usually be a narrow decision between admitting and the risk of treating her as out-patient. After a few visits, her symptoms were controlled. Among the things I gave her was Spiriva inhaler, and off label use of Singulair, which worked pretty well on her. I remember one day on my way ...
Source: Malaysian Medical Resources - February 6, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Authors: palmdoc Tags: - Ethics Source Type: blogs