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Infectious Diseases

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 11.

Update: May 8, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: May 6 to May 8, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (4 updates) 4 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (379 updates) 62 Diseases317 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - May 8, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Another Germ Theory Victory - Back Pain?
The "New Germ Theory" people may have notched up another one: a pair of reports out from a team in Denmark strongly suggest that many cases of chronic low back pain are due to low-grade bacterial infection. They've identified causative agents (Propionibacterium acnes) by isolating them from tissue, and showed impressive success in the clinic by treating back pain patients with a lengthy course of antibiotics. Paul Ewald is surely smiling about this news, although (as mentioned here) he has some ideas about the drug industry that I can't endorse. So first we find out that stomach ulcers are not due to over-dominant mothers...
Source: In the Pipeline - May 7, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Infectious Diseases Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, May 7, 2013
Brought to you by MedPage Today. 1. FDA Wants Cancer Warnings on Tanning Beds. Indoor tanning beds must must carry prominent warning labels indicating that children younger than 18 should not use them and that people who do use them need regular cancer screening. 2. Religion Powers End-of-Life Care. Terminal cancer patients with strong religious support were more likely to receive invasive treatments when near death than those without such connections. 3. Docs Don’t Test Kids for STDs, HIV. Despite guidelines calling for universal testing for HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), physicians administered...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 7, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Cancer Infectious disease Palliative care Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Typhoid Fever Outbreaks in the United States
The following background data are abstracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series. [1,2] 60 outbreaks of typhoid were reported during 1960 to 1999 – 54 of these (total 957 cases, 4 fatal) following exposure within the United States. Five drinking water-associated outbreaks of typhoid were reported during 1971 to 2006. The best known clusters of typhoid fever in history were those ascribed to Mary Mallon (“Typhoid Mary”), a chronic carrier who was responsible for 9 outbreaks (54 cases, 4 fatal) in the New York area during 1900 to 1915. A chronology of notable outbreaks: 1843 &#...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 7, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Outbreaks ProMED Typhoid united states Source Type: blogs

Psittacosis in Argentina
Rates of psittacosis in Argentina have been increasing in recent years, with current levels similar to those encountered in the United States during the outbreaks of 1954 to 1956. [1,2] See graph [3]: References: 1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of Argentna, 2013. 447 pages, 103 graphs, 2145 references. Gideon e-book series, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-argentina/ 2. Berger SA. Ornithosis: Global Status, 2013. 38 pages, 30 graphs, 212 references. Gideon e-book series, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/ornithosis-global-status/ 3. Gideon Graph Tool, see tutorial at http://www....
Source: GIDEON blog - May 6, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Graphs ProMED argentina Ornithosis Psittacosis Source Type: blogs

Update: May 6, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: May 3 to May 6, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (8 updates) 8 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (279 updates) 34 Diseases245 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - May 6, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

May 2013 Update on Medical Innovation
 As the weeks go by, we try to collect stories and news coverage regarding physician-industry collaboration and the breakthroughs and successes that come from such relationships.  Below is a short summary of some recent physician-industry-academic-government collaborations and the impact they have had on individual patients, the U.S. healthcare system, and beyond. In light of the recently proposed budgets for FY 2014, numerous scientific and medical groups have urged Congress and the Obama Administration to increase funding for research.  The Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Researchers of America (PhRMA) recently note...
Source: Policy and Medicine - May 6, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

It's not over yet, just some links for May day
A Dog’s Best Friend Instinct And Loyalty Activist Post The New Conquistadors A Technological Divide Threatens Our Survival america #1 In Fear, Stress, Anger, Divorce, Obesity, Anti-Depressants America land of opportunity for illegals America Stands Upon the Precipice of Brutal Martial Law AOL On Janet Porter Presents Heather Has Two Cigarettes satire on heather has 2 mommies banned in many online sites Arvo Part Salve Regina (Full) Arvo Pärt Sanctus Bertrand Russell Great Minds on Race Boston Bombing What You Aren't Being Told Boston Smoke And Mirrors Spooked America - Morris Candyman theme song It was always...
Source: Nightmare Hall - Welcome to my nightmare - May 4, 2013 Category: HIV AIDS Source Type: blogs

Q-fever in Spain
The following background data on Q-fever in Spain are abstracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series. [1,2] Time and Place: The first cases of Q-fever in Spain were reported in 1950. Q-fever rates are highest in the Basque region (accounting for 60% of community-acquired pneumonias) and Navarre. Pneumonia is the predominant clinical presentation in the north, and hepatitis in the south. Ten outbreaks were registered during 1981 to 1985. 130 cases of Q-fever were reported in the Basque Country during 1981 to 1984; and 1,261 cases in Gipuzkoa (Basque Country) during 1984 to 2004. Rates of Q-fever i...
Source: GIDEON blog - May 4, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Graphs ProMED Q-fever Spain Source Type: blogs

Update: May 3, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: May 1 to May 3, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (1 updates) 1 DiseaseMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (501 updates) 95 Diseases406 Country notesMap Microbiology – Bacteria (1 updates) 1 New Bacteria Added (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - May 3, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

The revulsion about feces: Get over it
I have been struggling with a certain degree of cognitive dissonance following the announcement this winter of a study in the New England Journal of Medicine on the efficacy of fecal transplants as a therapy for clostridium difficile (C. diff) infections. While the study is the first to demonstrate the effectiveness of fecal transplants in treating recurrent C. diff infections (15 of the 16 patients in the group were cured versus 4 of 13 in a comparison group), much of the press attention to the report reinforces the taboo of discussing our bowel movements. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 2, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions GI Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, May 2, 2013
Brought to you by MedPage Today. 1. Study Eases Some Azithromycin Fears. Danish patients taking azithromycin were at no greater risk of cardiovascular death, relative to those using penicillin, when pretreatment mortality risk was taken into account. 2. Study: Medicaid Expansion Won’t Help All Aspects of Health. Expanding Medicaid coverage improves mental health but doesn’t tackle some basic measures of physical health, like blood pressure, judging by the experience seen with a Medicaid lottery in Oregon. 3. On-Call Pay Varies Widely by Specialty. Surgeons commanded more than $1,000 a day for being on-call at t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 2, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Health reform Infectious disease Medicare Medications Source Type: blogs

Gonorrhea Superbug Said To Be More Dangerous Than AIDS
Health officials around the world are becoming increasingly concerned about the emergent of a strain of gonorrhea that is resistant to all antibiotics. Physicians are concerned that contracting the infection could result in a gram negative sepsis and mortality within 24 hours. To date, the superbug gonorrhea has been found in Japanese sex workers, California, and Norway. The post Gonorrhea Superbug Said To Be More Dangerous Than AIDS appeared first on InsideSurgery Medical Information Blog. (Source: Inside Surgery)
Source: Inside Surgery - May 2, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Medical News Wire gonorrhea resistant superbug Source Type: blogs

IVF success story for couple from Bangalore
Each of our patient's success stories provides us with the motivation and burning desire to keep on improving the services we offer . Sharing their joy is an immense source of personal satisfaction - and makes all the hard work we put in so worthwhile ! ----- I always envied but enjoyed reading success stories on infertility struggles. Longed I would be writing one and help someone believe in their dream during this struggle. We were already nearing our 30s when we got married. And I had always thought like many of us that as soon as we want we will have babies. But we were not so lucky after all. So after a few months I...
Source: The Patient's Doctor - May 2, 2013 Category: Obstetricians and Gynecologists Tags: IVF success story Source Type: blogs

Research that Transfusion of "Older" Blood May Be Harmful to Patients
There was a time when I, in a previous incarnation as a blood banker, spent a lot of time thinking about the shelf life of blood and how to increase the utilization of blood in blood bank inventory. Hence, a recent article about this topic caught my eye, partly out of a sense of nostalgia (see: The Shelf Life of Donor Blood). Here is an excerpt from it: For decades, the Food and Drug Administration has limited storage of refrigerated red blood cells to 42 days. But it has been clear for some time that stored blood degrades in various ways long before that six-week limit, and some research suggests that the chan...
Source: Lab Soft News - May 1, 2013 Category: Pathologists Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Blood Banking Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Hospitals and Healthcare Delivery Lab Processes and Procedures Laboratory Industry Trends Medical Research Source Type: blogs

Update: May 1, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: April 29 to May 1, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (1 updates) 1 DiseaseMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (385 updates) 72 Diseases312 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym AddedMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - May 1, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, April 30, 2013
Brought to you by MedPage Today. 1. SERMs Still Have Value for Breast Ca Prevention. Treatment with selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) led to long-term protection against breast cancer. 2. C. Diff Infection Eludes European Hospitals. Infection with Clostridium difficile – a dangerous and potentially deadly condition – appears to be substantially under-diagnosed in European hospitals. 3. Medicare Panel to Mull Genetic Cancer Tests. Genetic tests to help oncologists determine the previously unknown origin of metastatic tumors work moderately well, members of a Medicare coverage advisory committee were told. Y...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 30, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Cancer Endocrinology Genetics Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Highlights from TEDMED 2013
This post was originally published on Rock Health’s blog.  Rock Health is powering the future of the digital health ecosystem, bringing together the brightest minds in health and technology to build better solutions. Rock Health supports digital health entrepreneurs through a startup accelerator, public events, and open-source research. TEDMED 2013 in Washington DC was an unforgettable experience. The Rock Health team joined 1,800 thought leaders from across the country to hear brilliant short talks, experience imaginative art performances, and connect with others seeking to change health care. Here are some of o...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - April 29, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Events TEDMED Source Type: blogs

Government Funded Phone App Tracks “Vaccine Refusers”
Conclusion George Washington can be quoted as saying, “Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; it is force. Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master.” What happens if we take the intention of the Vaccine Refused phone application and Immunization Information System to its conclusion? Will these technologies be used to track you down and forcibly vaccinate you and your children? It sure seems that way to me.   References http://compepi.cs.uiowa.edu/vacref/ http://www.int-med.uiowa.edu/divisions/id/Directory/PhilipPolgreen.html http://ein.idsociety.org/ http://compepi.cs.uiowa.edu/index.php/M...
Source: vactruth.com - April 29, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Jeffry John Aufderheide Tags: Jeffry John Aufderheide Top Stories Emerging Infections Network (EIN) Health Privacy Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Philip Polgreen University of Iowa Vaccine Refused Source Type: blogs

Update: April 29, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: April 26 to April 29, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (5 updates) 5 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (146 updates) 47 Diseases98 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym AddedMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - April 29, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Sad, Mad, or Bad?*
Until the last century, and really to any large extent not until somewhere around the middle of it, people were lucky if their physicians did them more good than harm. But then medicine achieved great triumphs and claimed immense cultural authority and prestige. This happened when biological science enabled physicians to identify specific disease processes and offer targeted, effective treatment.The huge win was antibiotics, which became widely available and effective around the time of World War II. People can argue about whether streptococci or mycobateria are really the ultimate cause of disease, or if it isn't the stre...
Source: Stayin' Alive - April 28, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Source Type: blogs

Long term central venous catheter related infections: what to do?
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - April 27, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Trying to sort out all the STEM and STEM related departments, graduate programs , at #UCDavis
Well, I was in a meeting yesterday for the UC Davis ADVANCE program.  This program is an NSF funded project to improve presence of women and underrepresented minorities on the faculty in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM).  So I decided to see - how many departments at UC Davis might participate in such an initiative.  And, well, wow.  I knew there were a lot of STEM or STEM-related departments at UC Davis but I did not know there were this many. Here is a list I compiled of UC Davis STEM or STEM-related Departments.  I included medical departments here since many people in such...
Source: The Tree of Life - April 27, 2013 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs

Basidiobolus! – genus of the month at ATCC
ATCC sent out this email with the Genus of the month as Basidiobolus. It is worth noting they call out B. ranarum as inhabitant of bat and rodent guts but it is mainly known (and named) for being associated with frogs (hence the ‘rana’). It has some quite cool biology, it grows dimorphically as a yeast or hyphae, and is reported to have a large genome (Henk and Fisher PLoS One 2012). Note that the genome and transcriptome of B. meristosporus is being sequenced as part of the 1000 Fungal genomes project from samples Andrii Gryganski prepared. Don’t forget that YOU can propose genomes to this project by ...
Source: Fungal Genomes and Comparative Genomics - April 26, 2013 Category: Geneticists and Genetics Commentators Authors: Jason Stajich Tags: 1000 Fungal Genomes zygomycete andrii basidiobolus Basidiobolus ranarum fungal 1000 genomes Source Type: blogs

Update: April 26, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: April 24 to April 26, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (3 updates) 3 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (107 updates) 1 Clinical note41 Diseases65 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (1 updates) 1 Interacting drugs – New Microbiology – Bacteria (2 updates) 1 New Bacteria Added1 Microbes – New (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - April 26, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

H7N9 influenza: the next pandemic?
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - April 26, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

12 tips to stay safe in hospitals
Hospitals can save you, but they can also harm you. So how can you stay safe in hospitals? Follow these 12 life-saving tips: 1. Never go alone. Always bring someone else—a trusted family member or friend—with you. That person will be your primary advocate, and can serve as an extra set of eyes and ears to help make sure you are safe. (This tip applies to routine doctors’ appointments too; always bring your advocate with you.) 2. Determine, in advance, the goals of the hospitalization. Before you go to the hospital, ask your doctor why you need to be hospitalized. Is it necessary, or is outpatient care possible? What ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 25, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Hospital Infectious disease Patients Source Type: blogs

Why violence is an infectious disease
Newtown. Aurora. Oak Creek. A year ago, I’d never even heard of these places, and now those names are permanently imbedded in my mind along with the graphic images of suffering and death. And now, people are finally talking about it. What can we do to prevent these tragedies? How can we protect our society from senseless bloodshed? I can’t help but think, though, that all of the arguing over guns misses the point a little bit. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 24, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Patient Primary care Source Type: blogs

Update: April 24, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: April 22 to April 24, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (2 updates) 2 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (81 updates) 36 Diseases45 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - April 24, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

What are the 6 Most Germ-infested Places in Your Office?
A study by the producer of Kleenex, Kimberly-Clark, found that the 6 "Dirtiest Places" in Your Office are: - break room sink-faucet handles - microwave door handles - keyboards - refrigerator door handles - water fountain buttons - vending machine buttons And don't forget that the "Five Second Rule" doesn't work, says Dr. Susan Rhem, an infectious disease specialist from the Cleveland Clinic: A common superstition, the five-second rule states that food dropped on the ground will not be contaminated with bacteria if it is picked up within five seconds of being dropped (Wikipedia). References: Office Germs: The 6 Dirt...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - April 24, 2013 Category: Professors and Educators Tags: Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

PhRMA Report: Over 5400 Medicines in Development and 70% are First in Class
According to report released by PhRMA, companies have more than 5,400 medicines in development globally, and more than 70% of therapies in the pipeline are potentially first-in-class and could offer patients new treatment options, and a notable number of potential therapies target diseases with limited treatment options such as ALS and rare diseases.  A breakdown of their report offers insight into the various medicines in development for different diseases and populations.    Older Americans  America’s biopharmaceutical research companies are developing 465 new medicines that target the 10 leading chronic conditi...
Source: Policy and Medicine - April 24, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Why Big Pharma Can’t Battle Big Bugs
A critical shortage of antibiotic drugs threatens to "derail efforts to fight the so called superbugs," according to a new report by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), reports CNBC (here). You can find the IDSA report here.New systemic antibacterial agents approved by the US Food and Drug Administration per 5-year period, through 2012, is shown in the chart below:"At one time," reports CNBC, "11 big pharmaceutical companies were involved in antibiotic research and development. But the ISDA report says that figure is down to four: GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, AstraZeneca and Merck... Johnson & Johnson has go...
Source: Pharma Marketing Blog - April 23, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Tags: R and D Profits before patients Antibiotics Source Type: blogs

Does widespread ertapenem use breed resistance to the broader spectrum carbapenems?
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - April 23, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: April 22, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: April 19 to April 22, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (173 updates) 61 Diseases112 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (1 updates) 1 Drug (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - April 22, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Marilyn Roberts explains about antibiotics in animal feed
Antibiotics in animal feed encourages drug-resistant bacteria I HAVE spent my professional life discovering how disease-causing bacteria resist antibiotic treatment. The public should understand that antibiotics can treat bacterial infections, but not viruses, and the full prescription must be taken. Everyone using antibiotics shares the responsibility for increased bacterial resistance, so they must also take a role in using these important resources responsibly. Yet drug-resistant bacteria emerge not only because people take the drugs, but also from the drugs’ use in agriculture. Worldwide, the livestock industry con...
Source: PharmaGossip - April 21, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Aspirin: should we add it to our pneumonia order sets?
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - April 20, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease cardiovascular pulmonary Source Type: blogs

Update: April 19, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: April 17 to April 19, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (3 updates) 3 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (332 updates) 49 Diseases283 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - April 19, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Precious bodily fluids honors William Stone
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - April 18, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: medical education infectious disease nephrology Source Type: blogs

Sterilized Dogs Live Longer
A range of research in laboratory animals associates alterations to the reproductive system with alterations in longevity. Nematode worms live longer if you remove their germ cells, for example. Transplanting younger ovaries into older mice extends life as well. There is some thought that these varied approaches work through common longevity mechanisms such as insulin-like signaling pathways, but that's by no means certain. Here is another set of data to add to the existing research on this topic: Reproduction is a risky affair; a lifespan cost of maintaining reproductive capability, and of reproduction itself, has been ...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 18, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Update: April 17, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: April 15 to April 17, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (1 updates) 1 DiseaseMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (121 updates) 53 Diseases68 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - April 17, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Barmah Forest Disease in Australia
The following background on Barmah Forest Disease in Australia is abstracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series. [1,2] Barmah Forest disease virus was first isolated from mosquitoes (Culex annulirostris) in the Barmah Forest, Northern Victoria in 1974. Human infection was subsequently reported along the south coast of New South Wales during the mid-1980′s; in Queensland during 1988 to 1989; in the Northern Territory in 1992 ; and in southwestern Western Australia in 1993. A new focus was described in Gippsland (Victoria) during 1993 to 1994. The number of localities reporting Barmah Forest ...
Source: GIDEON blog - April 17, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks General Graphs ProMED australia Barmah Forest Source Type: blogs

A Rich Focus
The grey arrow is pointing to a Rich focusA Rich focus is a tuberculoma in the cerebral cortex that ruptures into the subarachnoid space, causing tuberculous meningitis. It is named for Johns Hopkins pathologist Dr. Arnold Rice Rich (1893-1968), who first described it. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - April 16, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: infectious disease history Source Type: blogs

Nanosponges Absorb Pore-forming Toxins from Snakes and Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (w/video)
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a nanosponge, a small particle that acts as a decoy for a wide variety of toxins that create pores in the cell membrane. This includes toxins produced by bacteria such as MRSA and E. coli, poisonous snakes, sea anemones, scorpions and bees. Unlike most other antitoxins, the nanosponges work regardless of the molecular structure of the toxin and thus do not need to be custom synthesized for individual toxins.Pore-forming toxins create pores in the cell membrane (with red blood cells being a prime target), disrupting the normal tight regulation of the pass...
Source: Medgadget - April 16, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Wouter Stomp Tags: Medicine Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Substandard Drugs And The Fight Against TB: The Challenge And The Opportunity
Poorly manufactured and fraudulent medicines kill thousands of people around the world each year. For infectious diseases like malaria and HIV, shoddy medicines also accelerate drug resistance and dramatically alter the course of epidemics. With few new drugs under development, recent progress against these major killers in the poorest countries is precarious. Bad drugs have become a big problem for one major infectious disease in particular: tuberculosis. If we don’t solve this issue, we may see the gains we’ve made against TB slip away. According to the World Health Organization, global TB cases continued on a slow...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 15, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Agnes Binagwaho Tags: All Categories Blog Effectiveness Global Health Nonmedical Determinants Pharma Policy Public Health Source Type: blogs

Update: April 15, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: April 12 to April 15, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (2 updates) 2 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (126 updates) 41 Diseases83 Country notes2 New Disease Synonyms AddedMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - April 15, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

MKSAP 16 on an iPad – a grand slam
I have subscribed to many versions of MKSAP in my career. While the content always impresses, the books were large and clumsy. The tests required mailing in a sheet of pencilled ovals. All so 1980s. We on the Board of Regents of ACP encouraged and exhorted the IT folks to work with the education folks to develop a digital version that met the expectations of what such a program should achieve. They exceeded expectations. Friday I was with a former President of the ACP and began touting the iPad version of MKSAP. He was skeptical. I demonstrated the key features and convinced him that he would use MKSAP more with the iPad v...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - April 14, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Update: April 12, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: April 10 to April 12, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (2 updates) 2 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (578 updates) 1 Clinical note82 Diseases494 Country notes1 New Country Synonyms AddedMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - April 12, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

The Validation of Real-time PCR Assays for Infectious Diseases
from Melvyn Smith writing in Real-Time PCR: Advanced Technologies and Applications:The real-time polymerase chain reaction is now established as one of the core technologies for diagnosing infectious diseases. The early stages of the technique's development were followed by a dramatic increase in the number of diagnostic assays being published, together with the introduction of commercially produced tests. Each of the numerous publications showed a number of differences in the approach to validating the newly-produced assays and in the quality and quantity of the data supporting their validation. As a result, many workers ...
Source: Microbiology Blog: The weblog for microbiologists. - April 12, 2013 Category: Microbiology Source Type: blogs

Wall Street traders: how trading affects your hormones…and vice versa.
Paying attention to your hormones pays off. Literally. If you’re a trader on Wall Street, you know how stressful it can be. But did you know that the stress caused by the market’s ups and downs can affect your hormones? And your hormones can affect your health…and your wins and losses. Research shows that when your trades are profitable, your body releases testosterone. Testosterone can make you feel euphoric and dominant—like you can conquer the world. But when the market is volatile, your body releases cortisol, a stress hormone. (Pressure from upper management also contributes to cortisol production; that’s pr...
Source: Doctor Kalitenko antiaging blog - April 11, 2013 Category: Physicians With Health Advice Authors: admin Source Type: blogs