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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 11.

Nih Announces New Co-chairs Of Panel On Antiretroviral Guidelines
Bartlett, M.D. The following panel leadership changes were announced at a recent OARAC meeting: John G. Bartlett, M.D., will retire from his position as panel co-chair at the end of 2013, a position he has held since the panels creation in 1996. Dr. Bartlett was instrumental in the development of the Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents and in that capacity, helped to establish the nations first HIV treatment guidelines, said Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH. You will find the original content at this website http://w...
Source: aids-write.org - November 14, 2013 Category: HIV AIDS Authors: aidswrite Tags: current news Source Type: blogs

Former FDA Commishs To White House: Limit Antibiotics In Livestock
A pair of former FDA commissioners has written a letter to the White House Office of Management and Budget to urge the Obama administration to end the use of antibiotics in food-producing livestock for preventing disease and fattening the animals. The missive, which was sent today by David Kessler and Donald Kennedy, is the latest attempt to address concerns that the widespread and, allegedly, inappropriate use of these medications jeopardize human health by causing resistance to the drugs. As part of their overture, they want the White House to push the FDA to finalize a draft guidance issued last year that would create g...
Source: Pharmalot - November 12, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Leaving Antibiotics: An Interview
Here's the (edited) transcript of an interview that Pfizer's VP of clinical research, Charles Knirsch, gave to PBS's Frontline program. The subject was the rise of resistant bacteria - which is a therapeutic area that Pfizer is no longer active in. And that's the subject of the interview, or one of its main subjects. I get the impression that the interviewer would very much like to tell a story about how big companies walked away to let people die because they couldn't make enough money off of them: . . .If you look at the course of a therapeutic to treat pneumonia, OK, … we make something, a macrolide, that does that....
Source: In the Pipeline - November 12, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Infectious Diseases Source Type: blogs

New books received this week
A clinical guide to oral diagnosis and treatment planning /Kevin H.K. Yip(ed). London: British Dental Association, 2012. This new Clinical Guide provides a succinct summary of the contemporary approach to oral diagnosis and treatment planning for general dental practitioners and dental students. Oral diagnostic and dental treatment procedures continue to evolve and this book takes the reader through the logical and sequential steps required to create a successful dental treatment plan to meet the biological, functional and aesthetic needs and reasltic expectations of the patient. A clinical guide to oral medi...
Source: DentistryLibrary@Sydney - November 12, 2013 Category: Dentists Tags: New books Source Type: blogs

Update: November 11, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: November 9 to November 11, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (3 updates) 3 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (196 updates) 73 Diseases123 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - November 11, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

What do pus cells in the semen mean ?
Infectious diseases were common in India in the past. Smallpox, for instance, used to result in azoospermia and this infection injured the epididymis, leading to ductal obstruction. Tuberculosis can also affect the epididymis, causing azoospermia. Gonorrhea, chlamydia and syphilis, along with other STDs (sexually transmitted diseases), are also capable of damaging the man's genital system, resulting in irreparable injury. Mumps is another viral disease which could cause inflammation of the testis - particularly when young men are afflicted with it. This could even result in testicular failure if it damages both testes. Th...
Source: The Patient's Doctor - November 11, 2013 Category: Obstetricians and Gynecologists Tags: pyospermia Semen leucocytospermia pus cells Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 32-year-old woman with progressive jaundice
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 32-year-old woman is evaluated for a 10-day history of malaise, right upper quadrant discomfort, and progressive jaundice. She has had no recent travel outside of the United States, does not drink alcohol, and has no recent ingestions of drugs, including acetaminophen or herbal remedies. Up until this time, she has been healthy. She has a history of type 1 diabetes mellitus for which she takes insulin glargine and insulin detemir. She has no other medical problems. On physical examination, temperature is 37.5 ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 9, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions GI Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Emerging echinocandin resistance in Candida glabrata
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - November 8, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

FDA: A Parents’ Guide to Kids’ Vaccines
The FDA has unveiled a "A Parents' Guide to Kids' Vaccines" on its website. The website outlines several key areas: Vaccines for Children – A Guide for Parents and Caregivers; Benefits and Risks; Types of Routinely Administered Vaccines for Children; Steps to Take When Your Child is Vaccinated; Routinely Administered Vaccines for Children; and Parents and Caregivers are Asking. We have previously covered vaccine issues before. From the FDA's website: Vaccines for Children – A Guide for Parents and Caregivers; Benefits and Risks FDA: Vaccines have contributed to a significant reduction in many childhood infec...
Source: Policy and Medicine - November 8, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

The end of antibiotics, period?
Twenty years ago, I wrote a paper for my high school biology class on the not-much-discussed topic of antibiotic resistance. What I learned seemed like science fiction; due to overuse and improper use of antibiotics, we faced a return to the dark ages before penicillin, when a chance infection could easily spell death and doctors were largely helpless in the face of them. But after writing my essay, life went on. When I got sick, antibiotics were readily available. I remained wary of antibacterial cleansers and other bacteria-bashing products, but essentially, it seemed that I’d been a bit alarmist. And yet, over the yea...
Source: Open Medicine Blog - - November 8, 2013 Category: Medical Publishers Authors: Carlyn Zwarenstein Source Type: blogs

Update: November 5, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: November 2 to November 5, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (6 updates) 6 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (363 updates) 1 Clinical note51 Diseases311 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - November 5, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Pharmalot... Pharmalittle... Good Morning
Good morning and welcome to another working week. We hope the weekend was refreshing and you had a chance to enjoy. Now, though, that familiar routine of meetings and deadlines is upon us once again. You know what this means - a cup of stimulation is at hand. So please join us as we gear up for a busy day. And we can tell already that this will be a particularly busy one. Better than being bored, of course. Anyway, here are some tidbits. Have a grand day and do stay in touch...   Roche To Pay Up To $548M For Superbug Antibiotic (Bloomberg News) Merck Oral Hepatitis C Drugs Show High Cure Rates In Study (Reuters) Bristol F...
Source: Pharmalot - November 4, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Update: November 2, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: October 31 to November 2, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (113 updates) 42 Diseases70 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym AddedMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - November 2, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Update: October 31, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: October 29 to October 31, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (382 updates) 110 Diseases272 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - October 31, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

H7N9 influenza: are we close to a pandemic?
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - October 31, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Combining esmolol and nor epi in septic shock?
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - October 30, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: cardiovascular critical care infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: October 29, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: October 22 to October 29, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (700 updates) 1 Clinical note97 Diseases601 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym AddedMap Microbiology – Bacteria (1 updates) 1 New Bacteria Added (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - October 29, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

6 Reasons Why I Wish I Was a Medical Student Now
When I was a medical student between 2003 and 2009, I studied from mostly old books, I didn’t have access to much e-learning materials or lectures from other medical schools; it was particularly hard to collaborate with fellow medical students worldwide in the early days. Now, we are living extraordinary times and when I realized I wish I was a medical student these days, I thought I would share my reasons for that. 1) Social Media: The networks I’ve been creating in my fields of interest on Twitter, Google+, Facebook and the blogosphere are capable of filtering the most relevant news for me; helping me crowdso...
Source: ScienceRoll - October 28, 2013 Category: Geneticists and Genetics Commentators Authors: Dr. Bertalan Meskó Tags: Google Health 2.0 Medical education Medicine Medicine 2.0 Web 2.0 crowdsourcing social media Source Type: blogs

H7N9 influenza: what we know so far
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - October 27, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Molecular Diagnostics
Jim Huggett and Justin O'Grady present a new book on Molecular Diagnostics: Current Research and Applications The editors of this book have commissioned an excellent series of chapters representing two key molecular diagnostic areas: cancer and infectious diseases. The cancer section deals with the challenges in identifying genetic, epigenetic and transcriptomic biomarkers. The infectious disease section describes the current clinical applications of molecular diagnostics for the detection of viral, bacterial and fungal pathogens as well as an example of the use of molecular diagnostics outside the clinic environment. A ca...
Source: Microbiology Blog: The weblog for microbiologists. - October 26, 2013 Category: Microbiology Source Type: blogs

Demand for Banked Blood Dwindles; Regional Blood Centers Cut Staff
I was a blood banker for nine years back in the 70's. For all that time, I was engaged in a constant struggle to increase the blood and blood product inventory while simultaneously tamping down demand, mainly from surgeons. One of the ways that I helped to reduce blood utilization and also increase useful shelf life of blood was with the maximum surgical blood order schedule (MSBOS) that placed limits on the number of units of crossmatched blood that surgeons could order preoperatively and store in the OR refrigerators (see: Hospitals Seek to Limit Blood Transfusions as a Cost-Saving Measure). Now, some four decades la...
Source: Lab Soft News - October 25, 2013 Category: Pathologists Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Blood Banking Clinical Lab Industry News Healthcare Delivery Laboratory Industry Trends Medical Consumerism Medical Education Source Type: blogs

The antibiotic development pipeline for gram negative infections: how's it going?
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - October 25, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

"What would you do if it were your kid?" - An Invitation for Empathy
(Ed. - Please welcome Jennifer Linebarger, MD, MPH, FAAP to Pallimed.  Jennifer joins us and will be helping beef up our pediatrics focus here at Pallimed. We are thrilled to have her! - Sinclair) I had just begun reading Dr. Danielle Ofri's latest book, "What Doctors Feel: How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine", when I opened The New England Journal of Medicine to find David Korones' essay "What would you do if it were your kid?" As he points out, nearly all of us have been asked, have heard this "plea to share with them, as a partner, the heavy burden of decision making." And nearly all of us have squir...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - October 24, 2013 Category: Palliative Carer Workers Authors: Jenni Linebarger Source Type: blogs

What fertility tests should couples do before marriage ?
Premarital testing is now becoming increasingly common. This makes sense for genetic diseases such as thalassemia ; and for infectious diseases such as AIDS. If we are going to do medical tests,then why not test for the couple's fertility as well ? Won't this prevent lots of potential problems for the future ?Why should they waste time waiting for a year to find out if they have a fertility problem ? And isn't prevention better than cure ? In reality, this kind of universal testing to screen for infertility is not a good idea because it will end up opening a can of worms.  For most young couples, there’s no need t...
Source: The Patient's Doctor - October 24, 2013 Category: Obstetricians and Gynecologists Source Type: blogs

Size Doesn't Matter. Does Anything?
There's a new paper in Nature Reviews Drug Discovery that tries to find out what factors about a company influence its research productivity. This is a worthy goal, but one that's absolutely mined with problems in gathering and interpreting the data. The biggest one is the high failure rate that afflicts everyone in the clinic: you could have a company that generates a lot of solid ideas, turns out good molecules, gets them into humans with alacrity, and still ends up looking like a failure because of mechanistic problems or unexpected toxicity. You can shorten those odds, for sure (or lengthen them!), but you can never re...
Source: In the Pipeline - October 22, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Business and Markets Source Type: blogs

Not all sore throats are self-limited – the role of antibiotics
This article is written in French, but the translate button allowed me to read the article clearly. These ENTs note increasing numbers of peritonsillar abscess. They argue that sore patients deserve more than a rapid test. They argue for a history and physical done by a physician who looks for complications and explains red flags to the patient. Long time readers know that I lament the term “just a sore throat”. While most sore throats are self-limited, we still should respect the possibilities for either suppurative or non-suppurative complications. I argue regularly that our sore throat treatment nihilism can...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - October 22, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, October 21, 2013
From MedPage Today: HIV Dual Therapy Matches Standard Triple Cocktail.A two-drug regimen (lopinavir/ritonavir plus lamivudine) for HIV did as well in controlling the virus as a standard triple-drug cocktail. Cognitive Therapy Eases Unfounded Health Fears. Patients who worried excessively about their health showed reduced anxiety after cognitive behavioral therapy compared with simple reassurance in a randomized trial. Formula as Good as Breastmilk for Iodine Levels. Newborns have sufficient iodine levels whether they’re breastfed or formula-fed. CT, MRI Overused for Headache, Study Finds. Despite current guidelines...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 21, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Infectious disease Neurology Source Type: blogs

The use of biomarkers to guide antimicrobial therapy
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - October 19, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: October 18, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: October 15 to October 18, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (3 updates) 3 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (203 updates) 44 Diseases159 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (1 updates) 1 New Drug Synonyms Added (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - October 18, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

The Human Cost of Yellow fever in America: A Chronology
[1,2] (primary references available on request). 1793 to 1900 – An estimated 500,000 cases of yellow fever occurred in the United States. 1693 to 1905- An estimated 100,000 to 150,000 died of yellow fever in the United States. These figures included 14,217 deaths in Philadelphia during 1699 to 1803. 1904 to 1914 – The death rate among American personnel involved in constructing the Panama Canal was 15.8 per 1,000. Chronology: 1668 – Yellow fever was first reported in North America – including 370 fatal cases in New York City 1803 – 606 fatal cases were reported in New York City. 1856 – 538 fatal cases...
Source: GIDEON blog - October 18, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology VIPatients united states Yellow fever Source Type: blogs

Will the attempt to police HIV transmission be effective?
At gay bathhouses in the Bay Area, monitors pop in on the “playroom” irregularly — “every 20 minutes, every 40 minutes, every hour,” one manager says, trying to make sure patrons are having sex safely. “You put the condom on or get the hell out,” a monitor at one such club said, upon discovering a couple violating the rules. William Woods and his colleagues talked to these bathhouse monitors, as well as managers and patrons, about their safer sex monitoring programs, detailed in a recent article in the academic journal Sexuality Research and Social Policy. Some bathhouses enacted aggressive monitoring ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 18, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Forthcoming conferences
November 2013 November 03 - 05, 2013   Cancer GenomicsHeidelberg, Germany   Further informationEMBL Conference. This conference will provide an opportunity to learn about, and keep up-to-date with, the rapidly progressing area of cancer genomics.Suggested reading:     Genomics books November 03 - 07, 2013   Cell-cell fusionKibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel   Further informationEMBO Workshop November 04 - 07, 2013   EMBO Laboratory Management Course for Group LeadersLeimen , Germany   Further informationEMBO Laboratory Management Course November 05 - 09, 2013   Cell Biology of YeastsCold ...
Source: Microbiology Blog: The weblog for microbiologists. - October 18, 2013 Category: Microbiology Source Type: blogs

Carter Center study highlights efficiency gains using Android tablet for public health
Researchers from the Carter Center evaluate the use of Android tablet & app for a surveillance program in Ethiopia. In comparison to a traditional paper-based program they found significant efficiency gains and potential for major cost savings. (Source: The Palmdoc Chronicles)
Source: The Palmdoc Chronicles - October 17, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Satish Misra, MD Tags: android medical Android Medical App android medical apps apps for ID apps for infectious disease apps for public health Carter Center Commentary Endocrinology Family Practice global health apps global health tablets Government Ho Source Type: blogs

Holding Back Experimental Details, With Reason
There's a lot of worry these days about the reproducibility of scientific papers (a topic that's come up here many times). And there's reason to believe that the sharing of data, protocols, and materials is not going so well, either. . . . authors seem less willing to share these additional details about their study protocols than they have been in the past, according to a survey of 389 authors who published studies in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The findings, presented on 9 September at the International Congress on Peer Review and Biomedical Publication in Chicago, found that over the five years studied the percent...
Source: In the Pipeline - October 16, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: The Scientific Literature Source Type: blogs

ACP: Making the most of opportunities to get people immunized
A guest column by the American College of Physicians, exclusive to KevinMD.com. It seems to begin earlier and earlier each year — displays are up in stores in late July, newspaper and radio ads start appearing in August, and the media reports on it before the kids even go back to school. Yes, flu vaccine season is in full motion. Last year I shared with you a few pointers to increase your practice’s immunization rate. This year I would like to add some more helpful tips and discuss some common barriers to vaccinating your patients. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 16, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Primary care Source Type: blogs

Update: October 15, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: October 11 to October 15, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (6 updates) 6 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (438 updates) 78 Diseases360 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - October 15, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Borrelia miyamotoi
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - October 15, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

HHS Issues 2014-2018 Draft Strategic Plan
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently published its draft of the Fiscal Year 2014-2018 Strategic plan. Every 4 years, HHS updates its strategic plan, which describes its work to address complex, multifaceted, and ever-evolving health and human service issues, including:  Health Care Research and Innovation Prevention and Wellness An agency strategic plan is one of three main elements required by the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) of 1993 (P.L. 103-62) and the GPRA Modernization Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-352).  An agency strategic plan defines its mission, goals, and th...
Source: Policy and Medicine - October 14, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Update: October 11, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: October 8 to October 11, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (5 updates) 5 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (215 updates) 1 Clinical note70 Diseases144 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - October 13, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Vaccines prevent this: Infant girl with whooping cough (Mayo Clinic video)
While the pertussis infection can be mild in adults (often it is quite severe though), if a baby who hasn't received a full course of vaccinations is infected, whooping cough can be extremely serious. Mayo Clinic News reporter has more on how to recognize and treat this potentially deadly disease: Infant girl with whooping cough -- Mother holding infant girl in Intensive Care Unit. The baby has pertussis (whooping cough) and is coughing severely. Warning: the video is hard to watch. Everyone should receive the indicated vaccines to prevent potentially deadly diseases such as pertussis. Posted at Clinical Cases and...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - October 9, 2013 Category: Professors and Educators Tags: Mayo Clinic Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, October 9, 2013
From MedPage Today: Size a Key Factor in ACO Formation. Accountable care organizations (ACOs) tend to form around larger integrated hospital systems and larger primary care physician groups, and in areas with a higher prevalence of hospital risk-sharing. Malaria Vaccine Candidate Has Protective Effect. A candidate vaccine against malaria had significant efficacy in a randomized controlled phase III trial in Africa. Bisphosphonates Raise Afib Risk. Bisphosphonate use was associated with significantly increased risks of atrial fibrillation and serious atrial fibrillation. Hypothermia Has No Benefit in Meningitis. Patients ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 9, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Endocrinology Heart Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Gowns and gloves in the ICU: Part of the infection control solution
It’s good to see health care providers continue to work on strategies to reduce health care acquired infections. Handwashing is a key component —but hospitals struggle to achieve compliance and are now turning to patients to be the bad cop, much to my dismay. A simple new strategy in intensive care units is showing promise: having doctors and nurses where gloves and gowns with all patients, not just those who are known to have antibiotic resistant bacteria. It takes more time and costs a bit of money, but seems to cut down dramatically on MRSA infections without generating adverse events. The study is important...
Source: Health Business Blog - October 8, 2013 Category: Health Managers Authors: dewe67 Tags: Research antibiotic resistant bacteria intensive care units MRSA infections Source Type: blogs

Pay-to-play at FDA: A setback for true collaborative efforts
I was disappointed to read about meetings between pharmaceutical companies and the FDA regarding clinical trials for pain. It seems these panels were brokered by entrepreneurial academics more intent on making a buck for themselves rather than advancing the cause of patient care. We’ll see what comes out about it in the future, but the initial reports and email trail revealed by the Washington Post (Pharmaceutical firms paid to attend meetings of panel that advises FDA) don’t look good. Don’t get me wrong. I think the FDA should seek external input on clinical trial design and that pharmaceutical companie...
Source: Health Business Blog - October 7, 2013 Category: Health Managers Authors: dewe67 Tags: Policy and politics Research Source Type: blogs

More information on azithromycin and the risk of sudden cardiac death
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - October 4, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: pharmacology infectious disease cardiovascular Source Type: blogs

Next-Gen Nanotech Breath Sensor Could Change How We Monitor Health
The medical industry is full of repackaged ideas in the sphere of health tracking and mobile sensors. For a change of pace, however, nanotech sensor start-up Adamant Technologies is developing a chemical sensor, akin to the human nose, to track chemical markers in your breath. Sam Khamis started Adamant 2 years ago with the goal of developing a sensor capable of providing consumer functions (metabolic rate estimation), chronic disease management (asthma tracking), and monitoring early warning signs for infectious disease. Khamis tells Medgadget that the technology is intended to be a passive monitoring system, employed ...
Source: Medgadget - October 4, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Yona Gidalevitz Tags: Diagnostics Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Fear of disease needs to overcome the fear of vaccines
One of the reasons I love social media is that it keeps me up to date on breaking news stories. Here are two stories that came through my social media channels recently. Both of these have to do with immunizations, which, of course, is a healthcare and social media hot topic, especially among pediatricians. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 4, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, October 4, 2013
From MedPage Today: ‘Meaningful Use’ Still on Target During Shutdown. The government shutdown may be slowing or halting a number of health-related activities, but federal incentives for electronic health records aren’t one of them. Inappropriate Antibiotic Use Still High. Despite years of persuasion and publicity, antibiotics are still drastically overprescribed for two common complaints — sore throat and bronchitis. Fecal Transplant, Now in Pill Form. Gel caps containing concentrated fecal microbes stopped recurrent Clostridium difficile infection and were well-tolerated by recipients. Higher Vit...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 4, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News GI Health IT Infectious disease Neurology Source Type: blogs

NIH and Other Public Private Partnerships to Research Treatments for Multiple Diseases
Over the past few weeks, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has made a number of important announcements regarding collaborations with industry as well as the funding of several new research initiatives. Below is a summary of these stories. NIH Partners With Eli Lilly and Others on Rare Diseases FierceBiotechResearch reported that NIH selected four (4) new preclinical drug development studies to uncover new therapies for rare diseases. The projects will be funded through the Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases (TRND) program under NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NCATS, which ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - October 4, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Funny Bone, Serious Problem
Part 2 in a Series   Elbow dislocations are quite painful and often times accompanied by other injuries. ED providers caring for a patient with an elbow dislocation must be sure to properly examine and x-ray patients prior to putting an elbow back in place. Be wary of the associated complications to dislocations including fractures and nerve or artery injury. Soft tissue damage and swelling are also very common.   Acute elbow dislocation.Photo by Martha Roberts   Like many relocations, slow and steady traction and countertraction with your magical and carefully calculated combination of sedation and analgesia is the hal...
Source: The Procedural Pause - October 3, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Update: October 2, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: September 29 to October 2, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (3 updates) 3 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (403 updates) 100 Diseases303 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (3 updates) 2 Interacting drugs – New1 Drug interactions – New (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - October 2, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs