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Infectious Diseases

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 11.

Update: July 16, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 13 to July 16, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (9 updates) 9 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (419 updates) 42 Diseases377 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 16, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Will Your Mind Still Be Sharp At 95? The Chances Are Improving All The Time
People are living longer than ever before—often into their 90s—but can the mind keep up? Although our bodies might still be (sort of) working as we approach 100-years-old,  many wonder whether their minds will be sharp enough to appreciate life. A new Danish study has looked at this by comparing the brainpower of two groups of nonagenarians (Christensen et al., 2013): The first group were born in 1905 and assessed at 93-years-old. The second group were born in 1915 and assessed at 95-years-old. To see how dramatically lifespan is increasing, the chances of people in this study reaching 90 increased by almost 30% in ...
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - July 16, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Update: July 13, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 10 to July 13, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (11 updates) 11 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (219 updates) 74 Diseases145 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 13, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 26-year-old man with fever and lower abdominal pain
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 26-year-old man is evaluated for a 3-day history of fever, lower abdominal pain, tenesmus, hematochezia, and watery diarrhea. Seven months ago, he underwent a cadaveric kidney transplantation. At the time of transplantation, the transplant donor was seropositive for cytomegalovirus, and the patient was seronegative for this virus. Current medications are tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, prednisone, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Valganciclovir was discontinued 1 month ago after 6 months of prophylaxis as ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 13, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Nephrology Source Type: blogs

Free Continuing Education Resources for Safety Net Health Professionals from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Friday, July 12, 2013, 2 PM ET The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) are hosting a webinar to announce an exciting new HRSA Website http://1.usa.gov/14M5jFp  that provides HRSA grantees and safety net providers, such as health center providers, rural health providers, physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and other safety net health professionals with free, clinically relevant modules to support continuing education and workforce training.  These free, accredited continuing education resources are based on the comparative effectiveness research from...
Source: BHIC - July 11, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Monica Rogers Tags: Conferences Public Health Websites Source Type: blogs

Pulmonary mucormycosis
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - July 10, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease pulmonary Source Type: blogs

Fever, Friend or Foe?
The audio and slides for this SMACC talk are at the bottom of this blog post Fever is so hot right now… ‘Humanity has but three great enemies: fever, famine and war; of these by far the greatest, by far the most terrible, is fever’ — William Osler1 Fever is one of the cardinal signs of infection and — nearly 120 years after William Osler’s statement in his address to the 47th annual meeting of the American Medical Association on The Study of the Fevers of the South1 — infectious diseases remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality2. Despite this, it is unclear whether fever itself is truly the enemy or w...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 10, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Paul Young Tags: Emergency Medicine Featured Infectious Disease Intensive Care critical care Fever Friend or Foe ICU paul young SEPSIS SMACC Source Type: blogs

Update: July 10, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 4 to July 10, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (8 updates) 8 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (492 updates) 83 Diseases409 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 10, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Stop blanket animal antibiotics now - before it's too late
Factory Farm Workers Are Carrying An Antibiotic-Resistant Pig BacteriaBy Aviva Shen on Jul 9, 2013 at 3:50 pmhttp://thinkprogress.org/health/2013/07/09/2270181/factory-farm-workers-drug-resistant-bugs/?mobile=wt(Credit: AP)Shortly before Americans fired up their grills for Independence Day, researchersannounced that industrial farm workers have been contaminated with “pig MRSA,” an antibiotic resistant bacteria that is increasingly found in American hogs. According to a new study, workers at factory hog farms that use antibiotics are far more likely to contract the drug-resistant bacteria from ...
Source: PharmaGossip - July 10, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Notifiable diseases in the US for 2011
The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released a summary of notifiable diseases in the US for the year 2011. These statistics are collected and compiled from reports sent by state health departments and territories to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS). According to the CDC, a notifiable disease is one for which regular, frequent, and timely information regarding individual cases is considered necessary for the prevention and control of the disease. The list of nationally notifiable infectious diseases is dynamic, as new diseases are added and others deleted as incidence declines...
Source: virology blog - July 9, 2013 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Information CDC centers for disease control notifiable disease viral virology virus Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 07-09-2013
More updates available tomorrow on my other blog at DrWhitecoat.com Why does an $11,596 emergency department visit cost $1,100? A spokesperson for the California Hospital Association says that it is because of government regulation. I want to know what doctor ever gets paid $4,242 for a Level 4 emergency department visit. California attorneys are trying to raise the cap on damages under California’s Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act. Caps are currently $250,000 and haven’t been raised in more than 35 years. The article says that many attorneys won’t take medical malpractice cases in California because they are t...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - July 9, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

VisualDx Mobile: a Quick App Review and a Q&A with Noah Craft, CMO of VisualDx
We had the chance to take a look at the VisualDx mobile app, the mobile version of VisualDx Health, a website that helps in clinical decision making of dermatologic, infectious, genetic, metabolic, nutritional and occupational diseases, benign and malignant growths, drug-induced conditions, and other injuries. The app is available for iOS in the iTunes Store and through Google Play for Android devices. It features a trial period of 15 days, but requires a license after it’s over. This will cost you between $99.99 and $299.99 for one year, depending on which content you want access to. However, a cheaper license is av...
Source: Medgadget - July 9, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Stanley Darma Tags: Dermatology Diagnostics Informatics Medgadget Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Family Sues After Dangerous Flu Vaccine Causes Child to Become Severely Brain Damaged
Conclusion After reading realms of information about the flu shot and the many tragic cases of vaccine-injured children, including the sad case of Saba Button, in my opinion, a child is far more likely to suffer serious side effects from the flu vaccine than from the flu itself. However, despite the many children who have become seriously ill after various flu vaccines, the governments around the world continue to portray the flu vaccine as safe and effective. Many flu vaccines still contain thimerosal, an ingredient that is said to have been removed from vaccines from as far back as 2007. [9] Since that time, this dangero...
Source: vactruth.com - July 9, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Christina England Tags: Christina England Top Stories Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) Afluria Brain Damage Centers for Disease Control (CDC) CSL Fluvax Thimerosal Vaccine Side Effects Source Type: blogs

Federal funding for science research
Margaret K. Offermann, MD, PhD, President of FASEB, sent the following email: The Senate Appropriations Committee is expected to consider the Labor, Health and Human Services (LHHS) bill that will provide fiscal year (FY) 2014 funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Although we don’t know when the House Appropriations Committee will vote on NIH funding, the spending limits in the House Budget Resolution could mean another 18 percent cut for biomedical research – below sequestration! NIH needs $32 billion in FY 2014 to prevent further erosion of the nation’s capacity for biomedical research and provi...
Source: virology blog - July 8, 2013 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Information Federal support of research grant NIH science funding sequestration viral virology virus Source Type: blogs

An Interview With Vladimir Skulachev
I recently noticed a two-part interview with researcher Vladimir Skulachev on a Russian language medical news site. Long-time readers will recognize the name in connection with work on plastoquinone-based mitochondrially targeted antioxidants: Skulachev's group produces the SkQ series of compounds that in recent years have been shown to generate benefits and extend life in mice. These are noteworthy for working though dietary intake, rather than requiring injection like the SS class of mitochondrially targeted antioxidants. Mitochondrially targeted antioxidants are thought to work by soaking up a usefully large portion of...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 8, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

It’s hard to grasp the experience of being a patient
My time as a medical student has quickly come to an end. This past winter, with nearly four years of arduous study, countless examinations and numerous clinical rotations under my belt, I couldn’t help but think, Yes, I’m ready to be a doctor. And then I became a patient. I’d always thought I knew what it’s like to be the patient. For much of my childhood, my father suffered from chronic fatigue syndrome, a multifaceted, disabling illness whose cause is unclear. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out h...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 7, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Education Infectious disease Primary care Source Type: blogs

My Dad on Exercise
Bullseye has walked four to six miles for exercise almost every day, for 25 years. When home, he’ll walk the same route around the neighborhood or on the treadmill if the weather is poor. He’ll also walk the same route when he’s on vacation at the beach (at the same hotel every year). At the last job he held for over 30 years, he walked the same blocks, or the same hallways if the weather was poor. Despite spending more time in Washington, D.C., than almost any other location throughout his life, he couldn’t tell me about his surroundings, where landmarks are, or how to get anywhere. “What do I care where you y...
Source: I've Still Got Both My Nuts: A True Cancer Blog - July 6, 2013 Category: Cancer Tags: family Source Type: blogs

Breaking Down the Myths about Substance Abuse Treatment
The efficacy of substance abuse treatment and the need for treatment is an interesting topic of discussion. Some believe that substance abusers cannot truly recover without treatment, while others feel treatment is unnecessary. We also see treatment displayed in various ways in the media, adding to the widely-varying perspectives about what it’s all about and what it really looks like. Maybe you or someone you love has made the first step by acknowledging your substance use has gotten out of hand and you are ready to get help. However, you’ve heard several things about attending treatment, some good and some bad. Wha...
Source: World of Psychology - July 6, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Donna M. White, LPCI, CACP Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Brain and Behavior Disorders General Habits Self-Help Substance Abuse Treatment Abstinence Best Fit Brain Chemistry Common Myths Doctors Drugs Efficacy Love Perspectives Rock Bottom Short Periods Source Type: blogs

Update: July 4, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 30 to July 4, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (8 updates) 8 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (382 updates) 90 Diseases292 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 4, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Sex and the Sleepless Night
I want to make sex better. That’s what gets me up in the morning. Part of making sex better is doing what I can to eradicate sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).  I particularly focus on chlamydia and gonorrhea because I consider these really stupid infections. It’s crazy that they still exist. We know how to prevent them (condoms) and how to diagnose them (very specific and sensitive tests). We can completely cure these STDs. So then, why do these diseases infect over 3 million new Americans every year, half of whom are ages 15-25? One of the reasons these diseases are still around is because Americans are really ba...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - July 1, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Access Consumer Health Care Innovation Patients Patients' Rights Publc Health Social Media Technology Source Type: blogs

Update: June 30, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 26 to June 30, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (3 updates) 3 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (424 updates) 1 Clinical note71 Diseases352 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 30, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 52-year-old man with fatigue and fever
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 52-year-old man is admitted to the hospital with fatigue and fever of 3 days’ duration. He is a health care worker and has a bicuspid aortic valve. He takes no medications. Blood cultures are obtained at the time of admission, and he is started on empiric vancomycin for possible endocarditis. On hospital day 2, his initial blood cultures become positive for gram-positive cocci in clusters, and on hospital day 3, his blood cultures grow methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Susceptibility to vancomy...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 29, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

A Senate Bill To Limit Antibiotics In Food-Producing Animals
In the latest effort to combat the spread of superbugs that are resistant to antibiotics, a bill was introduced in the US Senate that would direct the FDA to prohibit the use of these treatments in the livestock if it would jeopardize human health. The ‘Preventing Antibiotic Resistance Act’ would require drugmakers and agricultural producers to demonstrate that antibiotics are used to treat clinically diagnosable disease and not just fatten farm animals. Overuse of antibiotics has been cited for causing superbugs to develop. “When antibiotics are fed in low doses to animals, only the strongest, most resistant bacteri...
Source: Pharmalot - June 28, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Drug Shortages Remain in 2013
While Congress and federal health agencies have been constantly busy enacting new healthcare and drug legislation and implementing various regulations, one key issue has remained at the forefront—drug shortages. For example, the University of Utah Drug Information Service counted 300 "active" -- or ongoing -- drug shortages at the end of April, just about the same as it did at the end of December 2012 (299 shortages) and September 2012 (282 shortages), as reported by Medpage Today. On the brighter side, the number of new shortages is well off its pace from years past, with 54 so far this year, Erin Fox, PharmD, dire...
Source: Policy and Medicine - June 28, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Hemopurifier to be Studied as Treatment Option for Hepatitis C
Aethlon Medical out of San Diego, CA has been investigating its Hemopurifier extracorporeal blood filtration device that has the potential to help manage a number of infectious diseases, as well as remove tumor-derived exosomes related to certain cancers. Now the company has announced that its technology has been given an FDA Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) to be tested in human feasibility studies for treatment of Hepatitis C. The first phase will involve ten patients with end stage renal disease that are infected with Hep. C who’ll receive treatment with the Hemopurifier. Once the safety of the procedure is...
Source: Medgadget - June 26, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: in the news... Source Type: blogs

bioMérieux VIDAS 3 Immunoassay Platform Receives CE Mark
bioMérieux (Marcy l’Etoile, France) received the CE Mark for the firm’s third generation VIDAS immunoassay system. Many laboratories in the world run their automated immunoassays on a VIDAS system. All kind of biomolecules can be detected with this diagnostics platform, like infectious disease serology, but also cardiac, thyroid and cancer markers. A Solid Phase Receptacle (SPR) is pre-coated with antigens or antibodies and serves as the pipetting device itself. At each stage of the reaction, it aspirates the reagents in and out. This original concept prevents any inter-reagent or inter-sample contamination...
Source: Medgadget - June 26, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Jan Sinnige Tags: Diagnostics Pathology Source Type: blogs

Cardiac risk after pneumonia
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - June 26, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: hospital medicine infectious disease cardiovascular Source Type: blogs

Update: June 26, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 23 to June 26, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (8 updates) 8 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (122 updates) 44 Diseases78 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (5 updates) 5 Antibiotic testing standards – Update (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 26, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

The Immigration Bill and Public Health: Less Rhetoric More Facts
The Senate is expected to vote this week to pass its sweeping immigration bill, the latest step in the highly-watched push for comprehensive immigration reform that began in full force earlier this year. With reports that the House is working on its own version of a reform bill, it appears that Congress may be poised to pass the biggest piece of legislation since the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Debates on immigration reform have inspired comparisons to the latter, another extensive, controversial measure on an often emotionally-charged topic. As members of Congress debate a path to legalization for undocumented immigrants, ...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - June 25, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Advocacy Cost Coverage Policy Health Reform Politics Source Type: blogs

HHS OIG Reports Small Percentage of Prescribers May be Overutilizing Part D Drugs
This report is a view into things to come under the Sunshine Act, as OIG relied on several of the same factors CMS will rely on including: (1) NPI #; (2) name as reported in the NPPES database; (3) National Drug Code (NDC); and (4) specialty. For example, OIG explained that it identified each prescriber's specialty based on the primary taxonomy code that he or she reported in the NPPES. The taxonomy code indicates a provider's specialty and subspecialty, if any. For example, it may indicate that a prescriber is a family-medicine physician specializing in geriatric medicine. OIG then grouped the taxonomy codes for simila...
Source: Policy and Medicine - June 25, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Update: June 23, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 17 to June 23, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (12 updates) 12 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (516 updates) 1 Clinical note94 Diseases421 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 23, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Healthcare social media #HCSM - top articles
Here are my suggestions for some of the top articles related to healthcare social media (#HCSM) in the past 4-5 weeks: Twitter and Facebook: Potentially inappropriate attitudes towards professionalism were found among pharmacy students http://buff.ly/136KLJZ Harnessing the cloud of patient experience: using social media to detect poor quality healthcare http://buff.ly/136KRkO Social media and you: what every physician needs to know - J Med Pract Manage. http://buff.ly/ZFKvvw How to Get RSS Feeds for Twitter http://bit.ly/Yp4VHq Effectiveness of Mobile-Health Technologies to Improve Health Care Service: Not much benfit...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - June 22, 2013 Category: Professors and Educators Tags: #HCSM Source Type: blogs

Can the fight against healthcare disparities be won?
The summer before starting medical school I had the fortune of traveling to both Southeast Asia and Central America on humanitarian medical relief mission trips. I was initially exhilarated by the idea that I soon too will acquire the skills honed by the doctors, nurses, and other health care providers I was working with. The idea of mastering the science of healing had inspired me for so long, yet the vision was quickly becoming somber. As a team, health care providers attended to patients from sunrise to sunset each day but the lines never got shorter. The patients just kept showing up, day after day and the lines were j...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 20, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Education Infectious disease Medical school Primary care Source Type: blogs

HPV Vaccines Are Lowering Infection Rates Among Teenage Girls
The HPV vaccines may be controversial, but they are proving effective. A new study finds that the prevalence of the human papillomavirus, which can lead to cervical cancer, dropped by roughly half among teenage girls between the ages of 14 and 19 years old during the four years following the 2006 introduction of the first vaccine, the Gardasil shot that is sold by Merck (MRK). The findings, which were published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, are significant not only because it signals the vaccination campaign is apparently succeeding, but has also done so amid continual debate over the safety and veracity of the va...
Source: Pharmalot - June 20, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Gonorrhea in Sweden
Notwithstanding a slight resurgence during the past 5 years, rates of gonorrhea in Sweden and other Scandinavian countries have decreased dramatically since 1980 and continue to be strikingly similar [1,2] – See graph [3] : References: 1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of Sweden, 2013. 458 pages, 135 graphs, 2059 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-sweden/ 2. Berger SA. Gonococcal infection: Global Status, 2013. 180 pages, 243 graphs, 1075 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/gonococcal-infection-global-status/ 3. Gideon Gr...
Source: GIDEON blog - June 19, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Graphs ProMED Gonorrhea Sweden Source Type: blogs

Ensure health care workers have sick leave to reduce presenteeism
Like hand hygiene, getting workers to stay home when sick is an example of a horizontal infection prevention strategy. Horizontal strategies are multipotent (not aimed at a single pathogen), generally simple methods. While most humans inherently know that it’s not a good idea to come to work with fever or diarrhea, many either can’t or won’t stay home and risk infecting co-workers, customers, or patients. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 19, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

A procalcitonin guided algorithm to guide antibiotic therapy in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - June 19, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: critical care infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, June 19, 2013
Brought to you by MedPage Today. 1. Organ Donors Will Sign Up on Facebook. Despite years of media and public service campaigns appealing for organ donations, donor rates remained static while demand increased — until Facebook. 2. MRI May Spot Meningitis from Tainted Steroids. A screening MRI may provide early warning of spinal or paraspinal meningitis in patients who received contaminated steroid injections. 3. Red Meat Hikes Diabetes Risk. Eating more beef, pork, and lamb may raise diabetes risk, whereas reducing intake appears to trim risk. Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online re...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 19, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Diabetes Endocrinology Facebook Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Bernard Munos on The Last Twelve Years of Pharma
Bernard Munos (ex-Lilly, now consulting) is out with a paper reviewing the approved drugs from 2000 to 2012. What's the current state of the industry? Is the upturn in drug approvals over the last two years real, or an artifact? And is it enough to keep things going? Over that twelve-year span, the average drug approvals ran at 27 per year. Half of all the new drugs were in three therapeutic areas: cancer, infectious disease, and CNS. And as far as mechanisms go, there were about 190 different ones, by Munos' count. The most crowded category was (as might have been guessed) the 17 tyrosine kinase inhibitors, but 85% of th...
Source: In the Pipeline - June 18, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Drug Development Source Type: blogs

Update: June 17, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 15 to June 17, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (14 updates) 14 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (534 updates) 1 Clinical note111 Diseases419 Country notes2 New Disease Synonyms Added1 New Country Synonyms AddedMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 17, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Image of the Day: HIV
False-colored scanning electron micrograph of HIV particles (yellow) infecting a human H9 T cell (blue, turquoise) Image of the Day: HIV | The Scientist Magazine®. (Source: Biosingularity)
Source: Biosingularity - June 16, 2013 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Derya Tags: AIDS HIV Infection infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: June 15, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 12 to June 15, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (15 updates) 15 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (2,112 updates) 1 Clinical note100 Diseases2,010 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym AddedMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (2 updates) 2 Interacting drugs – New (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 15, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Electrocardiographic abnormalities in pneumonia
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - June 14, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease cardiovascular pulmonary Source Type: blogs

These Tricks Are Played to Get You to Vaccinate Your Child
Conclusion Despite the fact that study after study confirms that vaccinated children are no more protected than their unvaccinated peers, governments from around the world, hand-in-hand with Big Pharma and the medical professionals, keep coming up with more elaborate ways to force parents into vaccinating their children. I find it very sad that governments are so keen to boost vaccination targets that they are denying parents the ability to earn a livelihood by denying their children’s admittance into day care. This seems to me to be over the top and completely unnecessary. How do governments expect parents to be abl...
Source: vactruth.com - June 13, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Christina England Tags: Christina England Top Stories Dr. Viera Schreibner Mandatory Vaccination measles outbreak Pertussis Whooping Cough Source Type: blogs

Update: June 12, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 5 to June 12, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (15 updates) 15 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (2,112 updates) 1 Clinical note100 Diseases2,010 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym AddedMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (2 updates) 2 Interacting drugs – New (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 12, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

HPV and oral sex: Is Michael Douglas correct?
I’ve invented a new medical term. The Michael Douglas Factor: When a celebrity, even one with good intentions, uses his or her own condition to disseminate incomplete, misleading, or incorrect medical information. I could have called this phenomenon “The Gilda Radner Factor,” in recollection of efforts by Radner’s husband Gene Wilder to encourage women to ask their doctors for the CA 125 blood test –which, to this day, is not considered a good screening test for ovarian cancer–after Radner’s death in 1989. But, likely, more people are now familiar with Douglas and also, his recent ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 9, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

An important step toward cost transparency
How much to treat this pneumonia? The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid took a step towards answering such questions by publicly releasing how much each of 3000+ U.S. hospitals charged Medicare for 100 common medical issues in 2011 and how much Medicare actually paid them. The charges were remarkably variable, even among hospitals that share a zip code. Massachusetts hospitals tended to charge below the national average (eg. for pneumonia with complications, $14,686 compared to $51,726 nationally), though teaching hospitals like mine were more expensive (Massachusetts General Hospital charged $49,883 on average for pneumon...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 7, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Policy Hospital Infectious disease Source Type: blogs