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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 11.

The public’s lack of trust in science is alarming
Cynicism appears to have replaced idealism as America’s defining characteristic.  So many of us just don’t trust the government, scientists, the clergy, journalists, business CEOs, labor unions, lawyers, or just about anyone for that matter, to say or do the right thing. Two years ago, the National Journal reported that as a consequence of the Great Recession, “Americans are losing faith in the institutions that made this country great.”  The Pew Research Center finds that public trust in government has “reached an all time low;” in 1958, a whopping 73 percent of Americans expressed trust in the federal g...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 19, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: November 18, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: November 16 to November 18, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (4 updates) 4 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (264 updates) 62 Diseases202 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (1 updates) 1 Susceptibility database – Update Microbiology – Yeasts (5 updates) 1 New Yeasts Added1 Yeasts3 New Yeast Synonyms Added (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - November 18, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Ebola is yesterday’s news, but should the media move on?
Remember when we were trying not to panic about Ebola? Seems like that was only yesterday. Oh wait — it was only yesterday. But it already seems as if we are trying to remember that we were trying not to panic. I listened to my favorite news radio station out of New York City while driving to the office recently. They address all of the major news stories in the first eight minutes of every hour and half hour. I listened from the top of the hour for the full eight minutes, until traffic and weather rolled around again. Ebola did not make the cut; it was not mentioned. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating y...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 17, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, November 17, 2014
From MedPage Today: Ebola: Signs of Progress, CDC says. The response to the Ebola outbreak in Liberia is showing encouraging signs of progress, with downward trends in new cases especially in two regions of the country that had been hot spots. Millions Of Medicaid Kids Missing Regular Checkups. Millions of low-income children are failing to get the free preventive exams and screenings guaranteed by Medicaid, and the Obama administration is not doing enough to fix the problem. Some Pregnancy Risks for Young Kidney Donors. Young women who donate a kidney may be at higher risk of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia wh...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 17, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Cancer Infectious disease Nephrology Source Type: blogs

Update: November 16, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: November 14 to November 16, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (8 updates) 8 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (82 updates) 25 Diseases57 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - November 16, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Update: November 14, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: November 12 to November 14, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (2 updates) 2 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (135 updates) 39 Diseases95 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym AddedMap Microbiology – Bacteria (10 updates) 1 New Bacteria Added5 Bacteria2 New Bacteria Synonyms Added1 Microbes – New1 Microbes – Update (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - November 14, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Ebola collection: sharing critical information faster
Beat Ebola with better research sharing, says the discoverer of virus. Continue reading → (Source: Naturally Selected)
Source: Naturally Selected - November 13, 2014 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Adie Chan Tags: Biology Communication Disease Infectious diseases Open access Open data Open Science Ebola marburg virus Peter piot Source Type: blogs

Update: November 12, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: November 8 to November 12, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (6 updates) 6 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (372 updates) 1 New Diseases Added2 Clinical notes61 Diseases294 Country notes13 New Disease Synonyms Added1 New Agents AddedMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (1 updates) 1 Drug (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - November 12, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

The ethics of researching Ebola
As we learn of new suspected cases of Ebola infection in the United States, causing worries among the population and renewed efforts by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to contain the epidemic. A student in the postgraduate course in research ethics that I teach at Albert Einstein College of Medicine recently asked whether we could discuss the Ebola epidemic in class. Because I had prepared the syllabus for the course months ago, I hadn’t thought of including a discussion of ethics in research on Ebola. But the time was ripe, and I gratefully accepted the student’s suggestion. Continue reading ... Y...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 12, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, November 12, 2014
From MedPage Today: Ebola: ‘True Heroes’ in West Africa. Hailed as a hero after recovering from Ebola, Craig Spencer, MD, said the true heroes are those still on the front lines of the epidemic in West Africa. Closing the Cardiac Care Gender Gap. Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the U.S. In fact, more women than men die from heart disease every year. Changing Treatment Landscape in CLL. Therapeutic developments in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have given rise to new strategies that will continue to evolve with agents in the pipeline. New HCV Drugs Pass Muster in Real World. Clinical trials f...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 12, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Cancer GI Heart Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, November 10, 2014
From MedPage Today: CDC Stockpiling Protective Gear. The CDC is stockpiling personal protective equipment (PPE) that can be used by healthcare workers caring for Ebola patients. Distractions Diminish Food Cravings. Researchers have sharpened their focus on the brain’s reward centers with the hope of developing new strategies for dealing with obesity. Preemie Rates Drop as ACA Provisions Start Up. The percentage of babies born prematurely fell to 11.4% in 2013, its lowest level in 17 years, according to an annual March of Dimes report released this week. While many factors contributed to the decline, officials say t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 10, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Infectious disease Obesity Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

The Last Puzzle Piece
By: Vera P. Luther, MD, assistant professor, Department of Internal Medicine/Infectious Diseases, Wake Forest University School of Medicine My family has a tradition of working together on jigsaw puzzles during holidays and summer vacations. It’s a fun activity that involves teamwork. We enjoy the discovery of interesting shapes and making connections between pieces and groups, but it’s hard to deny that certain satisfaction in placing the last piece of a jigsaw puzzle, a special honor reserved for the youngest member of the family. The practice of medicine and working with people, each wonderfully complex and unique, ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - November 10, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective medical students TFA tolerance for ambiguity Source Type: blogs

Update: November 8, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: November 5 to November 8, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (12 updates) 12 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (223 updates) 69 Diseases154 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - November 8, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

The people treating Ebola patients should be volunteers
I was recently injecting anesthetic into a boil for incision and drainage. The abscess swelled and returned an arcing spray of lidocaine laden with blood and pus, soaking the thigh of my cotton scrub pants. A cheap plastic gown would have protected me — I usually wear one. But I couldn’t find one and had other tasks waiting. My mind went to Ebola and exposed nurse necks. What if this were my hospital’s first Ebola patient, who also happened to have an abscess in need of treatment? Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 7, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, November 7, 2014
From MedPage Today: Old COX-2 Inhibitors Tied to Stroke Mortality. New use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs of the first generation that selectively inhibits the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, such as diclofenac and etodolac, was associated with increased 30-day mortality following ischemic stroke in a Danish database analysis. Edoxaban Reversal Agent in the Works. A small molecule agent appeared promising as a reversal agent for the novel anticoagulant edoxaban (Savaysa), based on early-stage results. Speed Is Ebola Vaccine Trial Goal. Results from trials of Ebola vaccines and therapeutics will be analyzed cons...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 7, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Heart Infectious disease Neurology Source Type: blogs

Ebola Update: New Bill to Fast Track Ebola Treatment; FDA Focuses on Importance of "Randomized Trials"
On Wednesday, November 12, HHS Secretary Sylvia Burwell and Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson will appear before the Senate Appropriations Committee to testify on the government’s response to Ebola. CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci, as well as other officials from the State Department, Defense Department, USAID and the Joint Chiefs of Staff are also expected to testify.  Challenges and Incentives for Development The companies that are working to come up with vaccines and treatments for Ebola are faced with several challenges that...
Source: Policy and Medicine - November 7, 2014 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Addressing The Threat Of Antibiotic Resistance: Policy Solutions To Fix A Broken Pipeline
Recently, the White House released a major new national strategy to combat antibiotic resistance. As efforts begin to translate that unprecedented announcement into action, it is critical that any strategy to address resistance contain a plan to ensure an adequate antibiotic development pipeline. The overall number of antibiotics reaching the market has declined over time, with 29 and 23 new antibiotics approved in the U.S. in the 1980s and 1990s, respectively, but only nine between 2000 and 2010. Meanwhile, the evolution of drug-resistance has outpaced the development of new antibiotics. Doctors routinely encounter patien...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - November 6, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Rachel Zetts and Allan Coukell Tags: All Categories Pharma Policy Public Health Research Source Type: blogs

Update: November 5, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: November 3 to November 5, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (1 updates) 1 DiseaseMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (82 updates) 32 Diseases50 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - November 5, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Would you treat a patient with Ebola?
“If I get a call about smallpox from the ER I’m not coming in,” an infectious disease doctor said to a colleague in the hospital where I was working.  It was the early days of 9/11 and anything seemed possible. “Are you all OK with providing care for Ebola patients?” our section chief asked.  Our ICU is the designated unit to care for all adult patients suspected of having Ebola in our system.  We would be the ones donning the protective gear, following infection control protocols and caring for any potential patients. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your on...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 5, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 11-04-2014
Back with more of the Ebola Chronicles … Ebola fears causing discrimination problems all over the US. Thomas Duncan died from Ebola. Now his fiancee is having difficulty finding a place to live as landlords are refusing to rent to her. People of African descent are facing discrimination just because they are from Africa. Mothers of some school children told one African cafeteria worker to leave the school because she “might have Ebola.” In Liberia, bleeding patients are often refused medical care due to Ebola fears. The picture at the link shows a picture of a woman who was bleeding heavily from a miscarr...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - November 4, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

Why EMRs won’t prevent the spread of Ebola
According to IBM, there are 2.5 exabytes of data created every day, and most of it is unstructured. Imagine receiving all the words ever spoken by human beings on your doorstep each and every day. Now, imagine consuming that, making sense of it and trying to keep up with the ever-accelerating pace of data creation each day. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 4, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Tech Health IT Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 056
This article offers solutions in which he calls for a shift in the research mentality. The pearls: Focus on replication of research findings (and reward this) Broad collaboration and data sharing Altering the reward system for publication and academic advancement (i.e. reward not the number of publications but their impact; focus on the quality of peer review) Recommended by Lauren Westafer Resuscitation, Emergency MedicineSmekal D et al. CPR-related injuries after manual or mechanical chest compressions with the LUCAS™ device: A multicentre study of victims after unsuccessful resuscitation. Resuscitation 2014. PMID ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 4, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Soren Rudolph Tags: Cardiology Education Emergency Medicine Infectious Disease Intensive Care Neurology Neurosurgery R&R in the FASTLANE Resuscitation Wilderness Medicine acute coronary syndrome airway blood transfusion critical care ENT Review Source Type: blogs

Immunoglobulin deficiencies and its association with infectious disease
The largest challenge facing the infectious disease community in the 21st century is the increasing number of resistant organisms found in various disease processes.  The reason is much more complex than the over prescribing of oral antibiotics for sore throats.  This is not to say that good antibiotic stewardship is an important concept because it is but it must be recognized that the medical challenges of the human population today is much more complex than any other time in our history on Earth. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media gu...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 4, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Examining State Prison Health Care Spending: Cost Drivers And Policy Approaches
Health care and corrections have emerged as fiscal pressure points for states in recent years as rapid spending growth in each area has competed for finite revenue. Not surprisingly, health care spending for prison inmates—the intersection of these two spheres—also has risen swiftly. Yet this trend of rising health care costs for prisoners may have been reversed in many states, according to a new report by the State Health Care Spending Project, a collaboration between The Pew Charitable Trusts and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Total correctional health care expenditures and per-inmate spending inc...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - November 4, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Maria Schiff Tags: Aging All Categories Chronic Care Health Reform Long-Term Care Source Type: blogs

Ebola in Dallas: Failure to connect data and story
The tragic case of Thomas Eric Duncan represents a failure of communication with consequences that extend well beyond the current Ebola crisis. When Mr. Duncan first presented at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, his recent travel history from Liberia was reportedly ascertained and entered into the hospital’s electronic health record (EHR) system. Somehow, this critical piece of information never registered with the physician who diagnosed Mr. Duncan, and in the absence of this vital contextual framework, the list of symptoms was misinterpreted and did not seem to warrant hospitalization. Mr. Duncan was then ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 3, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: November 3, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: November 1 to November 3, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (2 updates) 2 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (247 updates) 41 Diseases206 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - November 3, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Ebola: A cause that can unite us
Whatever our individual belief systems, here is a cause that can unite us. Whatever our party affiliations, this can cause us to “reach across the aisle.” Whether or not we are religious, or believe in this life only or the next, this is a cause we can agree on, here and now. Conservative or liberal, right or left, theist or atheist, libertarian or green, male, female, gay, straight, we must surely admit our common interest. American or Saudi, Indian or Russian, Nigerian or Liberian, how can we dissent? If there is anything about the Ebola Virus that is beneficial, it must surely be this. Continue reading ... ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 3, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

How to talk to your kids about Ebola
Ebola is a scary topic; there’s no doubt about that. With the onslaught of media coverage that has no end in sight, it’s likely that older children have already heard of the Ebola outbreak or will hear about it in the near future. The question is, what can we do to help our kids work through the confusing and frightening messages they see on television? Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 2, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Update: November 1, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: October 31 to November 1, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (8 updates) 8 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (214 updates) 76 Diseases138 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (4 updates) 4 Drugs Microbiology – Bacteria (2 updates) 2 Bacteria (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - November 1, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

What’s the right way to think about Ebola?
Ebola has riveted our attention: It’s a deadly disease with no known cure, and as is true of most infectious diseases, it’s easy to imagine how it could become a global pandemic and threaten us directly. For what it’s worth, though, here is what the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tells us about Ebola: 1. The Ebola virus is not spread through: casual contact air water food grown or legally purchased in the U.S. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 1, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

The United States’ Misguided Self-Interest On Ebola
The Ebola epidemic in West Africa is spiraling out of control. The international community allowed a manageable outbreak to mushroom into a health and humanitarian crisis. The World Health Organization (WHO) has been enfeebled and largely sidelined. Belatedly, the United States sent military troops into Liberia and spearheaded a United Nations Security Council resolution. Yet since isolated Ebola cases have appeared on our shores, the US has begun to look inward, at risk of falling into a trap that I will call “misguided self-interest.” While the West African epidemic rages, the US delayed significant action until long...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - October 31, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Lawrence O. Gostin Tags: All Categories Global Health Health Law Policy Politics Public Health Science and Health States Source Type: blogs

Ebola: If Nigeria can do it, so can we
In June, a man became very ill during a flight into Lagos, Nigeria. On the plane, he developed vomiting and diarrhea, and he collapsed in the very busy airport. Contacts on the plane and on the ground had no idea that he had Ebola — initially, he was treated for malaria — and many health care workers and bystanders on the plane and in the airport were exposed to his infectious body fluids. One of his close contacts, while ill, flew across the country to consult with a private physician. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 31, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Ebola! But don’t forget about the flu.
Ebola virus has grabbed headlines since the epidemic started in West Africa nearly a year ago. The death toll is estimated at 4,500 people, and the epidemic continues to spread. One person infected in Liberia returned to Texas with the disease and died, infecting maybe 2 health care workers. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 31, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

TWiM 90: Think globally, act locally
I usually don’t post TWiM episodes here, but #90 has a lot of virology. In this episode, recorded in La Jolla, CA at the annual meeting of the Southern California Branch of the American Society for Microbiology, I first speak with Laurene Mascola, Chief of Acute Communicable Diseases at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. Dr. Mascola talks about how Los Angeles county has prepared for an outbreak of Ebola virus. Next up is David Persing, Executive Vice President and Chief Medical and Technology Officer at Cepheid. His company has developed an amazing, modular PCR machine that is brining rapid diagn...
Source: virology blog - October 30, 2014 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology This Week in Microbiology bacteria Cepheid diagnosis ebola virus GeneXPert infectious disease MERS microbe PCR polymerase chain reaction public health SARS tuberculosis Source Type: blogs

The New Heroin Epidemic - The Atlantic
In a beige conference room in Morgantown, West Virginia, Katie Chiasson-Downs, a slight, blond woman with a dimpled smile, read out the good news first. "Sarah is getting married next month, so I expect her to be a little stressed," she said to the room. "Rebecca is moving along with her pregnancy. This is Betty's last group with us.""Felicia is having difficulties with doctors following up with her care for what she thinks is MRSA," Chiasson-Downs continued. "Charlie wasn't here last time, he cancelled. Hank ...""Hank needs a sponsor, bad," said Carl Sullivan, a middle-aged man with auburn hair and a deep drawl. "It kind ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - October 30, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Diagnosis Support for Ebola through GIDEON
The Diagnosis module of Gideon is designed to generate a ranked differential diagnosis list for any Infectious Diseases scenario. In recent weeks, we’ve been running simulations of Ebola. The following link will access a Power Point “show” demonstrating one such scenario. Ebola case (Powerpoint) (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - October 30, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Cases Diagnosis Epidemiology Examples Outbreaks Ebola Source Type: blogs

Health Affairs Web First: Vietnam’s Health Care System, Explained By Its Minister Of Health
In August, Vietnam’s Minister of Health, Nguyen Thi Kim Tien, was interviewed for Health Affairs by Tsung-Mei Cheng, recently released as a Health Affairs Web First. Among the topics discussed was an overview of the unique characteristics of Vietnam’s health system; its strengths and weaknesses; health financing reform aimed at reaching the goal of universal health coverage; the prevention and control of infectious diseases; and how Vietnam has performed in achieving the Millennium Development Goals. Cheng is a health policy research analyst at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton U...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - October 30, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Chris Fleming Tags: All Categories Global Health Public Health Source Type: blogs

Update: October 30, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: October 29 to October 30, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (4 updates) 4 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (25 updates) 7 Diseases18 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - October 30, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

The lessons hospitals and physicians can learn from Ebola
Among reams of coverage on the Ebola outbreak, Politico just published a characteristic story with the headline, “In the world of Ebola, no room for error.” The only problem is that is as soon as you introduce a human element to any system, there will be error. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 30, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Emergency Hospital Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, October 30, 2014
From MedPage Today: Disease Activity Linked to Lipid Elevation in RA. Measures of disease activity at baseline and changes in those markers with tocilizumab (Actemra) treatment among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were independently associated with increased risk for major adverse cardiovascular events. Ebola: Vinson Thanks God and the Medics. Nurse Amber Vinson, thanking God and her medical team, has been released from Atlanta’s Emory University Hospital after a 14-day battle with Ebola. Healthcare Serial Killings Down in U.S. but Up Globally. The number of serial killings committed by healthcare provider...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 30, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Endocrinology Heart Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

The Ebola quarantine: Is 21 days enough?
A few weeks ago an emergency room doctor called our infectious disease physician group concerning a patient who had returned from Liberia and was having nausea and vomiting. Several of the patient’s family members had died of Ebola. As panic struck us, our decisive question was: When did he return from Liberia? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for screening and isolating patients for possible Ebola infection are clear: Any person who is presenting with symptoms (which include fever, headache, vomiting and stomach pain) along with a history of travel to West African countries including Liberia, G...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 29, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Instead of being hysterical about Ebola, respect it
Some years ago I was in Australia’s Northern Territory. The intrepid explorer that I was, I was croc-spotting from the comfortable heights of a bridge over the East Alligator River. The river derives its name because it is east of something. And because it’s croc-infested. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 29, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: October 29, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: October 27 to October 29, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (5 updates) 5 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (113 updates) 42 Diseases71 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - October 29, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, October 29, 2014
From MedPage Today: Add-on Tx Less Likely in T2D Patients on Metformin. Patients with type 2 diabetes who don’t start out on metformin may be at higher risk for needing additional therapy. Lung Donation After Cardiac Death Shows Promise. Lung transplantation after cardiac death achieved key endpoints comparable to those attained with grafts obtained from brain-dead donors. Doctors Making Housecalls: Better, Cheaper Care at Home? There was a time when Jerry Bell, 72, hadn’t seen a doctor in more than 2 decades. Despite having a pack-a-day smoking habit and critically high blood pressure, the Chapel Hill retire...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 29, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Diabetes Endocrinology Infectious disease Pulmonology Source Type: blogs

Lessons from Ebola: The Infectious Disease Era, And The Need To Prepare, Will Never Be Over
With the wall-to-wall news coverage of Ebola recently, it’s hard for many to distinguish fact from fiction and to really understand the risk the disease poses and how prepared we are to fight it. Fighting infectious diseases requires constant vigilance. Along with Ebola, health officials around the globe are closely watching other emerging threats: MERS-CoV, pandemic flu strains, Marburg, Chikungunya and Enterovirus D68. The best defense to all of these threats is a good offense — detecting, treating and containing as quickly and effectively as possible. And yet, we have consistently degraded our ability to respond...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - October 28, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Jeffrey Levi Tags: All Categories Global Health Hospitals Pharma Policy Prevention Public Health Research Workforce Source Type: blogs

Ebola: We suffer from unrealistic expectations
Oft expectation fails, and most oft there. Where most it promises. - Shakespeare, All’s Well That Ends Well It may seem a strange thing to say, but I believe the U.S. suffers from unrealistic expectations. We expect government, health, and hospital officials to get things right the first time around. This is unrealistic. People, and believe it or not, including politicians, are never perfectly competent in things they are never experienced before. Disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment are learning curves. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A so...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 28, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Ebola Deaths in Perspective
Recent events in West Africa have largely eclipsed several other ongoing outbreaks on the global stage. For example, over 780,000 cases of Chikungunya have been reported in the western hemisphere in recent months, including 1,371 cases in the United States (vs. only 4 of Ebola). Obviously, the severity of Ebola far outweighs that of Chikungunya; thus, the ratio of reported Chikungunya cases to Ebola cases (772,069 / 10,141) is 76-to-1, the ratio of Ebola deaths to Chikungunya deaths (4,922 / 118) is 73-to-1. Sadly, one ongoing epidemic which is more severe than Ebola in both disease numbers and mortality, receives little n...
Source: GIDEON blog - October 28, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Epidemiology Events General Outbreaks ProMED Ebola Influenza SARS Source Type: blogs

Ebola and the psychology of contagious disease
A month ago I published a post predicting that paramedics, emergency nurses, and emergency physicians would be exposed to patients with Ebola and have difficulty picking out these patients from the many other patients who present to the ED with similar symptoms. In light of the events in Dallas, Texas, this seems prophetic, but it is really not so difficult to explain (despite the finger-pointing from a horde of outraged reporters and their experts); and it points to one reason why it may not be so easy to control Ebola as it migrates into the U.S. and other developed countries. I am not trying to hype the danger here,...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 27, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

American College of Physicians Expresses Concern About Mandatory Quarantines of Clinicians Involved in Care of Ebola Patients
Attributable to: Robert M. Centor, MD, MACP Chair, Board of Regents,  American College of Physicians (ACP)   The American College of Physicians is strongly concerned about the approach being taken by some state health departments to impose strict, mandatory quarantines for all physicians, nurses, and other health professionals returning from West Africa, regardless of whether they are showing symptoms of Ebola virus infection. ACP agrees that physicians and other health professionals must take the necessary precautions to ensure the safety of others and prevent the spread of infection. However, the College maintains tha...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - October 27, 2014 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Ebola in the United States: Don’t forget the lessons we learned
Although I never disclosed this in my medical school interviews for fear of being just another cliche (“Hollywood sparks interest in medicine story”), I decided to become a doctor in 1997 at the age of 11 when I first saw the movie, Outbreak. For years and years, this was my favorite movie. The scene where they showed the electron micrograph image of the Ebola virus had me captivated. I was staring at a ruthless serial killer. Disease was a subject I wanted to know everything about. My parents were both working at research labs in Fort Deterick, Maryland at the time (some scenes of the movie are set there)...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 27, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Medical school Source Type: blogs