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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 11.

Job Posting: Medical Officer
Medical Officer The Henry M. Jackson Foundation Bethesda, MD HJF is seeking a Medical Officer to provide support under the an NIH-funded contract to the Division of AIDS (DAIDS) at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), a component of NIH, located on Rockledge Drive in Bethesda, Maryland. Under the NIH Contract, HJF’s seperate operating division, HJF-DAIDS, provides scientific and operations support to DAIDS including the Therapeutics Research Program. The incumbent will provide clinical research support to the of as part of the HJF-DAIDS Program. Responsible for assisting DAIDS in the prep...
Source: Non-Clinical Physician Jobs, Careers, and Opportunities - February 7, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Joseph Kim, MD, MPH Source Type: blogs

Answers to common vaccine questions from patients
One of the true joys of being a primary care doctor is partnering and educating patients to make the best decision for themselves and their families. Though they may not always agree with what I have to say, at least I know I’ve done my best to give them the information they need to be informed. What follows are common conversations I have with patients. The bolded statements are what a few patients say when they first decline getting vaccinated.What reasons have you heard?Continue reading ... Manage your online reputation: A complete social media guide. Read the book by KevinMD. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 6, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Meds Infectious disease Primary care Source Type: blogs

Update: February 6, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: February 6 to February 6, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Diseases (2 updates) 1 Disease1 Country noteMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - February 6, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Clostridium difficile: A fecal transplant when all else fails
The bacteria that live in our healthy guts are a garden of cooperating and competing species that help to determine our intestinal health. When we take antibiotics, we kill countless bystander bacteria in our guts and sometimes develop changes in our digestion which can be severe. Clostridium difficile infection is one of these conditions, a superinfection with a bacterium which is pretty resistant to antibiotics and causes infection of the colon with diarrhea, sometimes fever, nausea and vomiting and occasionally death. We treat Clostridium difficile (C. diff) diarrhea with a couple of antibiotics to which it is sensitive...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 6, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions GI Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: February 6, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: February 6 to February 6, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Diseases (2 updates) 1 Disease1 Country noteMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - February 6, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Update: February 6, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: January 31 to February 6, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (10 updates) 10 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (513 updates) 104 Diseases409 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (2 updates) 1 Drug1 Interacting drugs – New (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - February 6, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Why doctors and nurses should be required to have flu shots
I was recently speaking to the clinical leaders of a mid-sized hospital, and a senior administrator posed the question, “should we require our doctors and nurses to get flu shots?” The answer, I said, is yes, and it isn’t just to prevent the flu. It’s to get into the habit of making our folks do the right thing when it comes to patient safety.Continue reading ... Manage your online reputation: A complete social media guide. Read the book by KevinMD. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 5, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Infectious disease Palliative care Source Type: blogs

Angiostrongyliasis in Taiwan
The following background on angiostrongyliasis in Taiwan was abstracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series. [1,2] =Time and Place: - Angiostrongyliasis was first reported in Taiwan in 1945. - The disease is most common among children, with highest rates during the summer rainy season. - Infection is often diagnosed among Thai laborers who ingest raw snails (Ampullarium canaliculatus, Achatina fulica). - Angiostrongyliasis has been reported in a child who raised snails (Ampullarium canaliculatus) as pets. - 125 cases of angiostrongyliasis were reported in southern Taiwan during 1968 to 1969, with ...
Source: GIDEON blog - February 5, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology ProMED angiostrongyliasis Taiwan Source Type: blogs

Towards a Goal that Can Never Be Attained
It is a polite fiction in some parts of the aging research community that the goal of the scientists' work is to improve health in the old without improving longevity. Like all the best polite fictions, it survives because many people have come to actually believe this line. It arose during the period when researchers couldn't talk openly about extending human life without risking their funding and their careers: proposing improvements to health in the old was the way to raise funds when you couldn't talk about extending healthy and overall life span. Sad to say, but the research and funding community was, up until compara...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 5, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

AMA News: Dangers of "EHR Sloppy and Paste" - And Why Was An Informatics Expert Apparently For "Anecdotes" Before He Was Against Them?
In the AMA News an article by Kevin O'Reilly appeared entitled "EHRs: “Sloppy and paste” endures despite patient safety risk."It addresses the dangers of a common feature of EHR's used recklessly:  copy-and-paste. EHRs: “Sloppy and paste” endures despite patient safety riskCopying and pasting information is common within EHRs, but the practice sometimes can lead to confusion and endanger patient care. By Kevin B. O'Reilly, amednews staff. Posted Feb. 4, 2013.During the winter holidays, a patient at Yale-New Haven Hospital in Connecticut had a large pressure ulcer with an abscess. A surgical intern made a note ...
Source: Health Care Renewal - February 4, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: AMA News healthcare IT note cloning healthcare IT note copying Kevin O'Reilly healthcare IT anecdote Bill Hersh healthcare IT risks Source Type: blogs

New report: Strategies to Move from Sick Care to Health Care in Four Years
The Trust for America’s Health has released a new report entitled A Healthier America 2013: Strategies to Move from Sick Care to Health Care in Four Years.  The report provides high-impact prevention recommendations in 10 public health areas. reversing the obesity epidemic preventing tobacco use and exposure encouraging healthy aging improving the health of low-income and minority communities strengthening healthy women, healthy babies reducing environmental health threats enhancing injury prevention preventing and controlling infectious diseases prioritizing health emergencies and bioterrorism preparedness fixing...
Source: BHIC - February 4, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kate Flewelling Tags: Articles Public Health Source Type: blogs

Continuous infusion Zosyn (Pip/Tazo)
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - February 3, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: pharmacology infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Expanding the Range of Low-Cost Molecular Diagnostics: Interview with Gregory Mouchka, Product Manager, Engineering & Applications, Rheonix Inc.
Here at Medgadget we’ve covered dozens of molecular and genetic diagnostics that utilize novel screening tools to identify disease. However, integrating these tools into the clinic is difficult: according to recent research by UnitedHealth, 77 percent of physicians say that the largest barrier to conducting genetic testing is the cost of tests for patients. Innovations cannot succeed on a large-scale unless they are affordable for patients. Thus, the push to develop lower-cost tests is more important than ever.Enter Rheonix, Inc., a maker of molecular diagnostic equipment based in Ithaca, N.Y. Rheonix has developed the...
Source: Medgadget - February 1, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Ravi Parikh Tags: Diagnostics Medgadget Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Gram Positive Cockeye vs Cocci Explained.
Here's a letter I wrote to the National Academy of Nursing Vocabulary last week regarding my concerns about an epidemic of gram positive cockeye sweeping our hospitals.  You think the flu was bad this year?  You think C diff is bad.  You have no idea how aggressive the cockeye has been. Dear Academy, I have been a practicing hospitalist now for ten years.  I want to commend your organization's mission to improve nursing vocabulary.  Helping nurses achieve proficiency in medical terminology is important for doctor-nurse and nurse-nurse communication of critical patient information.  Quite obvi...
Source: The Happy Hospitalist - February 1, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Authors: Tamer Mahrous Source Type: blogs

What is Killer Number 1 ?
If you ask people what the number one cause of death is, you will get a variety of answers. Some doctors will say it’s heart disease; others with a more global perspective will claim it’s infectious diseases; while social scists will say it’s poverty.However, I believe the single largest killer is health illiteracy. Let me explain. While some of us are fortunate enough to will die happily in our own beds of old age, most of us will suffer from an illness,  which will cause death as it progresses. When we are ill, we seek medical attention, and this means that the terminal event for most people in the developed w...
Source: The Patient's Doctor - February 1, 2013 Category: Obstetricians and Gynecologists Tags: Heart disease Health United States patient American Heart Association Conditions and Diseases List of causes of death by rate Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: January 31, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: January 31 to January 31, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Diseases (19 updates) 7 Diseases12 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (2 updates) 2 Susceptibility database – New Microbiology – Bacteria (2 updates) 2 New Bacteria Added (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - January 31, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Update: January 31, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: January 21 to January 31, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (13 updates) 13 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (767 updates) 141 Diseases626 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (1 updates) 1 Drug (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - January 31, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

7 reasons to boycott the Super Bowl from a medical standpoint
You’ve probably watched the Super Bowl as I have many times, faithfully, elevating the occasion to some kind of macabre family tradition. It is a spectacle of athletic agility, drama, and struggle; the pinnacle of American sporting contests. Despite the heavy onslaught of commercialism, faux halftime culture, and evident violence on the field, we suspend our awareness that this event may not be a magical moment worth our time and validation, even as its winners call out to some magical Disney kingdom.Continue reading ... Read KevinMD's book: Establishing, Managing and Protecting Your Online Reputation: A Social Media Gu...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 30, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Infectious disease Neurology Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, January 27, 2013
This series is brought to you by MedPage Today.1. Statins May Lower Death Risk in Liver Ca. Statin use seemed to reduce the risk of death in patients with hepatocellular cancer.2. FDA Panel Votes for Tighter Controls on Vicodin. An FDA advisory committee voted 19 to 10 on Friday in favor of moving hydrocodone combination drugs such as Vicodin, Lortab, and Norco into the more restrictive schedule II category of controlled substances.3. Chlorhexidine Baths in PICU Cut Infections. Scrubbing children in intensive care units with chlorhexidine daily cut the incidence of bacteremia by more than 35% in a randomized, crossover tri...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 28, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News GI Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Fossil perspective on economic growth
A paper from a researcher at Fukushima University caught my eye recently. Not least because it was from that university, but also because the city was in the news again because of proposals to plant a wind farm off the coast there. Moreover, the paper is about how fossil fuels drive economic growth…multiple ironies I’d say. Engineer Hazuki Ishida of the Faculty of Symbiotic Systems Science at the university begins his paper with the statement: “Fossil fuels are major sources of energy, and have several advantages over other primary energy sources. Without extensive dependence on fossil fuels, it is questi...
Source: Sciencebase Science Blog - January 27, 2013 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: David Bradley Tags: Science economic fossil growth perspective Source Type: blogs

Babesia Infection – Signs, Symptoms, and Treatment
Pathophysiology of Babesia Infection 1) Babesiosis is caused by the intracellular protozoan parasite Babesia microti and in Europe B. divergens 2) most severe symptoms occur in immunosuppressed, diabet6ic, splenectomized, and elderly 3) now clinically important in the USA and Candada as a coinfection of Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, and Bartonella (which are all transmitted via the bite of the Ixodes tick) Signs and Symptoms 1) acute flu-like symptoms – fever, chills, sweats, muscle pain, fatigue, arthralgias, and headache 2) petechiae 3) jaundice/dark urine 4) if occurs as coinfection with Lyme disease, the clinical ...
Source: Inside Surgery - January 27, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Infectious Disease atovaquone babesia babesiosis bartonella coinfection ixodes Lyme microti tick Source Type: blogs

IBM will save the planet with this magical hydrogel - NOT
Well, press releases can drive me crazy.  And this one is one of the worst I have seen in a while: IBM News room - 2013-01-24 IBM and The Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Develop New Antimicrobial Hydrogel to Fight Superbugs and Drug-Resistant Biofilms - United States This new fangled gel they have made they are very proud of.  That is good.  Pride in ones work is a good thing.  But getting the science wrong and making misleading statements is not.  Some statements I have issues with include Able to colonize on almost any tissue or surface, microbial biofilms - which are adhes...
Source: The Tree of Life - January 26, 2013 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs

Varicella-Zoster Virus Signs, Symptoms, and Treatment
Pathophysiology of Varicella-Zoster Virus Varicella-Zoster causes two separate disease 2) initial disease is chickenpox 3) after a latency period (can be decades) patients can develop zoster (shingles) Signs and Symptoms Chickenpox – 1) fever 2) malaise 3) painful vesicular rash, starting on head and spreading to limbs, mouth, vagina, and trunk that ulcerates and crusts over in 3-5 days 4) vesicles appear in crops (different areas of body have lesions in different stages) 5) in older children and adults, causes life-threatening interstitial (as opposed to a bacterial intra-alveolar) pneumonia with lung hemorrhage, co...
Source: Inside Surgery - January 25, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Big Joe: Living proof of our fallibility
When I think of Big Joe, I see his overalls, and how he filled them. And how a couple of months after I operated on him, there was room for both of us in there. Big Joe: farmer, salt of the earth, tough, stoic. On the day I met him, if it’d been Halloween, I might have tried to stick a candle in him. That’s how orange he was. My initial recommendation, while probably justified, damn near killed him.Continue reading ... Follow KevinMD.com on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and LinkedIn. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 25, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician GI Infectious disease Surgery Source Type: blogs

Three Rings in a Row
Here's a structure that caught me eye, in this paper from Georgia State and Purdue. That's a nice-looking group stuck on the side of their HIV protease inhibitor; I don't think I've ever seen three fused THF rings before, and if I have, it certainly wasn't in a drug candidate. From the X-ray structure, it seems to be making some beneficial interactions out in the P2 site. This is an analog these are analogs of darunavir, which has two THFs fused in similar fashion. That compound's behavior in vivo is well worked out - most of the metabolism is cleavage of the carbamate. Both with and without that, there's a bunch of scatt...
Source: In the Pipeline - January 24, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Infectious Diseases Source Type: blogs

The LITFL Review 092
Welcome to the mind-blowing  92nd edition! The LITFL Review is your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peaks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the best and brightest from the blogosphere, the podcast video/audiosphere and the rest of the Web 2.0 social media jungle to find the most fantastic EM/CC FOAM (Free Open Access Meducation) around. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beaut of the Week The Short Coat Top Spot this week is a ripper By Lauren looking at hypertension in the ED. Check our M...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 23, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Kane Guthrie Tags: Education Emergency Medicine Featured Intensive Care LITFL review Trauma LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

The LITFL Review 092
Welcome to the mind-blowing  92nd edition! The LITFL Review is your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peaks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the best and brightest from the blogosphere, the podcast video/audiosphere and the rest of the Web 2.0 social media jungle to find the most fantastic EM/CC FOAM (Free Open Access Meducation) around. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beaut of the Week The Short Coat Top Spot this week is a ripper By Lauren looking at hypertension in the ED. Check our M...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 23, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Kane Guthrie Tags: Education Emergency Medicine Featured Intensive Care LITFL review Trauma LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

We cannot be complacent about drug resistant bacteria
This little cartoon, courtesy of xkcd, highlights a problem we have had for some time, but which is getting worse–highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Soon after the first antibiotics appeared, especially penicillin, doctors noticed the phenomenon of developing bacterial resistance to them. The cause is evolution in action. The replication time for bacteria is extremely fast, as short as twenty minutes in some cases. So the process of evolution, of random mutation and passing new traits on to offspring, happens in minutes rather than years.Continue reading ... Follow KevinMD.com on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Li...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 22, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Viruses on Time
Poliovirus recently made the cover of Time magazine. Prompted by a reader question, I searched the Time archive to find out if there have been other virology-themed covers. I found fifteen in all, depicting poliovirus (3), herpesvirus (1), HIV/AIDS (4), influenza (5), and SARS coronavirus (2) (I did not distinguish between US and international editions). The earliest virus-themed cover that I found has Jonas Salk on the cover of the 29 March 1954 issue. Behind Salk is an image of poliovirus particles, probably drawn from an electron micrograph. Salk’s field trial of inactivated poliovirus vaccine had begun in 1954, a...
Source: virology blog - January 21, 2013 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Information AIDS H5N1 herpesvirus HIV influenza poliovirus SARS coronavirus Time magazine cover viral virology Source Type: blogs

Update: January 21, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: January 16 to January 21, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (4 updates) 4 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (636 updates) 7 Clinical notes122 Diseases505 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym Added1 New Vectors AddedMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (2 updates) 1 Drug1 Interacting drugs – New (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - January 21, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

That Many Compounds in Development? Really?
So PhRMA has a press release out on the state of drug research, but it's a little hard to believe. This part, especially: The report, developed by the Analysis Group and supported by PhRMA, reveals that more than 5,000 new medicines are in the pipeline globally. Of these medicines in various phases of clinical development, 70 percent are potential first-in-class medicines, which could provide exciting new approaches to treating disease for patients. This set off discussion on Twitter and elsewhere about how these number could have been arrived at. Here's the report itself (PDF), and looking through it provides a few more...
Source: In the Pipeline - January 21, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Drug Development Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, January 21, 2013
This series is brought to you by MedPage Today.1. Weight Stays Off Long Term After Bariatric Surgery. Obese patients maintained about 50% excess weight loss for as long as 15 years after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, (LAGB).2. Obama Take 2: Tobacco, Obesity Key in Second Term. The second term of an Obama administration will be marked for implementing key provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but the president also wants to focus on lowering tobacco use and obesity rates, a senior administration official said.3. Flu Epidemic: Fact or Fiction? Good hygiene might help keep the flu at bay, but there are some ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 21, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Infectious disease Obesity Source Type: blogs

Botulism Trends in the United States
Infants account for most cases of botulism reported in the United States. Although the ratio of infant / food-borne cases was fairly constant prior to 1999, subsequent trends appear to signal a parallel increase in infant and decrease in food-borne botulism. [1,2] See graph [3] References: 1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of the United States, 2012. 1089 pages, 467 graphs, 9760 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-the-united-states/ 2. Berger SA. Botulism: Global Status, 2012. 84 pages, 89 graphs, 599 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/...
Source: GIDEON blog - January 21, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Features Graphs ProMED Botulism Infant botulism united states Source Type: blogs

Rheumatic Fever
Pathophysiology 1) caued by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci infection 2) this organism produces anti-M protein antibodies, which cross-react with human heart tissue 3) most important long-term sequelae (Source: Inside Surgery)
Source: Inside Surgery - January 19, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Yachnis and Rivera-Zengotita team up to bring us some high-yield neuropathology
Who doesn't love the feel of a brand new textbook in your hands, and that first subtle crack of the binder as you open the cover releasing the synthetic fragrance of smooth new paper? We will get to re-live that feeling when Dr. Anthony Yachnis' Neuropathology: A Volume in the High-Yield Pathology Series is released. The book has a copyright year of 2014, so we may have to wait a while before it is released. But, if the good Dr. Yachnis is the principal author, it will surely be worth the wait. In his preface, written with co-author Dr. Marie L Rivera-Zengotita, Dr. Yachnis writes: "Our intent in producing this volume is n...
Source: neuropathology blog - January 17, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: books neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment Working Group: Call for Participants
Call for participants: Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment Working Group.  Details copied from the announcement pasted below: The Basics: We need your help. We are organizing the first working group aimed at understanding the evolutionary biology of the built environment—our bedrooms, our houses, our backyards and our cities. This working group will occur June 10 – 14, 2013, in Durham, North Carolina. We are now inviting applications for participants in the working group. Why: As recently as one hundred thousand years ago the indoor environment did not exist. Yet, this is now wher...
Source: The Tree of Life - January 17, 2013 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs

Should we artificially lower temperature in septic patients? It's complicated.
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - January 16, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: critical care infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: January 16, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: January 13 to January 16, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (4 updates) 4 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (549 updates) 88 Diseases461 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - January 16, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in South Africa
The following background data are abstracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series. [1,2] Time and Place: The first indigenous case of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) in South Africa was reported in 1981 – fatal infection acquired in Transvaal. - At the time of the report, 7% of persons in the area were found to be seropositive. - Highest incidence is reported in the Karoo, the Western Free State, the Northern Cape and North West Province. - Most patients are farmers, farm laborers, hunters or abattoir workers. - 101 cases were reported during 1981 to 1992; 81 during 1993 to 2010. - 16 ...
Source: GIDEON blog - January 16, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Graphs ProMED Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever South Africa Source Type: blogs

An Upcoming Workshop On Benefits Management In Health IT - Late February 2013.
Workshop Objective. To understand how to manage the benefits of health IT and the fact that this depends on understanding the dynamics of learning to improve health systems. Details. There are places available for the 2 day and 5 day workshop in Sydney. The title is: Dynamic Modelling: What, Why and How? Examples from New Technology Adoption, Infectious Disease and Health Care. Two world expert practitioners and trainers Nate Osgood, ex MIT, and Andrei Borshchev, from St Petersburg, will be visiting from 18th to 26th  Feb. They specialise in combining different dynamic modelling methods including Discrete event, ...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - January 16, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

Influenza resources
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - January 16, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Is Obesity An Infectious Disease?
Like many people, I have a weakness for "We've had it all wrong!" explanations. Here's another one, or part of one: is obesity an infectious disease? During our clinical studies, we found that Enterobacter, a genus of opportunistic, endotoxin-producing pathogens, made up 35% of the gut bacteria in a morbidly obese volunteer (weight 174.8 kg, body mass index 58.8 kg m−2) suffering from diabetes, hypertension and other serious metabolic deteriorations. . . . . .After 9 weeks on (a special diet), this Enterobacter population in the volunteer's gut reduced to 1.8%, and became undetectable by the end of the 23-week tr...
Source: In the Pipeline - January 15, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Diabetes and Obesity Source Type: blogs

New post up at theHeart.org: My Take of the Bystander Effect in Medicine
Healthcare looks much different than it did just a few years ago. When you let your mind wander about where we were, it’s shocking really. There’s cultural changes, including an explosion of complexity of care, an infusion of young doctors with different ideas about life, an evolving set of incentives, employment models and a heck of a lot more bureaucracy to muddle through, not just those dreaded computers. In-hospital care looks the most different. For starters, there’s many more people involved in the care of a patient in the hospital. Call them bystanders if you will. I live in this world everyday. To...
Source: Dr John M - January 15, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

Update: January 13, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: January 10 to January 13, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (4 updates) 4 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (698 updates) 111 Diseases587 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - January 13, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Avoiding Blood Transfusion as a Hospital Quality and Cost-Savings Measure
Tucked into a recent news article about the use of multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) at the Cleveland Clinic was the interesting mention of the goal of reducing blood transfusion as both a cost-savings measure and to reduce complications and survival after heart surgery (see: Approaching Illness as a Team). Below is the relevant paragraph: Data analysis to evaluate how well treatments work is also a big part of the [Cleveland Clinic] medical practice. For instance, the clinic analyzed outcomes for heart surgery patients and found that those who had received blood transfusions during surgery had higher complication rates...
Source: Lab Soft News - January 11, 2013 Category: Pathologists Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Blood Banking Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Medical Research Quality of Care Source Type: blogs

What patients can learn from the flu outbreak
Get your flu vaccine now, if you haven’t already.And in the future, be sure to get it early in the season.Read more in my column on CNN, In the future, get vaccinated earlier:One reason why the flu outbreak is so prevalent this year is that the predominant strain, H3N2, hasn’t been this widely circulated since 2002-03 and is associated with a more severe illness.But another reason is the relatively low percentage of patients who received a flu shot. This year’s vaccine is well matched to the circulating viruses and, while not perfect, provides good protection. Flu shots are about 60% effective. But more t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 11, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Potpourri Infectious disease Primary care Source Type: blogs

Gonorrhea Tx Fails at High Rate
In a report from Canada and on the CDC website, Cefixime treatment failure occurred in 6.77% of patients who returned for a test of cure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection in a retrospective cohort study. Note that this study was performed in a single sexual health center that treats high-risk individuals. Of 133 patients who returned for a test of cure following cefixime treatment, 6.77% had a treatment failure, defined as infection with a Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolate identical to the pretreatment isolate and a denial of re-exposure through sexual contact, according to Vanessa Allen, MD, MPH, of Public Health Ontario Lab...
Source: Dr. Buttery's Public Health BLOG - January 10, 2013 Category: Epidemiologists Authors: cbuttery Tags: Community Health infectious diseases Prevention Surveillance Source Type: blogs

Synthetic Stool Stymies Stubborn C. Difficile
A number of sources today reports that fake feces may fight Clostridium difficile infection just as well as the real thing, researchers found. In a small proof-of-concept trial, two patients with refractory C. difficile infection got back to regular bowel movements within 2 or 3 days of receiving a substitute stool mixture, and remained symptom-free at 6 months, Elaine Petrof, MD, of Kingston General Hospital in Ontario, and colleagues reported online in Microbiome. The synthetic stool was comprised of 33 bacterial strains cultured from the feces of a healthy donor. Compared with a standard fecal transplant, having a clean...
Source: Dr. Buttery's Public Health BLOG - January 10, 2013 Category: Epidemiologists Authors: cbuttery Tags: epidemiology infectious diseases Technology Translational Research Source Type: blogs

Update: January 10, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: January 2 to January 10, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (4 updates) 4 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (806 updates) 131 Diseases675 Country notesMap Microbiology – Bacteria (3 updates) 3 Bacteria (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - January 10, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Notes from talk by Stephen J. O'Brien at #UCDavis
Stephen O' Brien talked at UC Davis a few days ago. I met with him in the afternoon before his talk. It was one of the more interesting discussions I have had in a long time. He has done some very interesting and important work (e.g., comparative genomics, HIV, feline evolution) though most of what we talked about was not work per se (e.g., we talked a lot about baseball and big cats since my kids are obsessed with big cats). Anyway, below is a "Storification" of tweets from his talk. Best part - he signed a copy of his Tears of the Cheetah: The Genetic Secrets of Our Animal Ancestors book with a dedication to my kids. ...
Source: The Tree of Life - January 9, 2013 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs