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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 11.

Maintenance of Certification Debate Goes Mainstream
Last week, Newsweek published an article entitled “The Ugly Civil War in American Medicine,” in which the author derided the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) certification process for doctors. The author accused the ABIM of requiring unnecessary testing requirements “to fatten the board’s bloated coffers.” The ABIM quickly fired back that the Newsweek article contained "numerous and serious misstatements, selective omissions, inaccurate information and erroneous reporting.” Newsweek writer Kurt Eichenwald framed the problem like this: For decades, doctors took one exam, usually just after finishin...
Source: Policy and Medicine - March 20, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 075
This study further defends the pathway of early discharge from the ED without evocative testing in subsets of patients with low risk chest pain.Recommended by Anand SwaminathanNeurology Edwards C, et al. Residency Training: A failed lumbar puncture is more about obesity than lack of ability. Neurology 2015; 84(10):e69-72. PMID: 25754807This is an interesting article exploring the reasons for LP failure. The authors reviewed all elective LPs done by Neurology residents in a LP clinic. They recorded all the demographic of the patient and the characteristics of the proceduralist. The overall LP failure rate was 19% and it w...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 19, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeremy Fried Tags: Cardiology Emergency Medicine Infectious Disease Neurology R&R in the FASTLANE Respiratory Toxicology and Toxinology literature recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Tissue Engineering of Lung and Gut Sections
The first practical outcome of tissue engineering research is not therapies, but rather improved tools for further scientific work in this and other fields. At present the structured tissue sections created in the laboratory are largely too small or too dissimilar from natural organs for use in treatments, but these engineered tissues can nonetheless be very useful in drug testing, investigation of disease mechanisms, and many other aspects of medical research. Real tissue is a vast improvement over cells in a dish and animal models, and real tissue grown from patient cells is a tremendous step forward for work on genetic ...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 19, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Update: March 18, 2015
GIDEON what’s new summary: March 16 to March 18, 2015 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (493 updates) 86 Diseases405 Country notes2 New Disease Synonyms AddedMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - March 18, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

We need an honest discussion of appropriate antibiotic use in the ICU
Many readers know that I favor empiric antibiotic treatment for adolescent/young adult pharyngitis when the clinical signs and symptoms strongly suggest a bacterial infection. I favor narrow target antibiotics and only in the patients with Centor scores of 3 or 4 (and perhaps some 2s when the patient looks very ill). This would exclude over 50 percent of patients from antibiotics. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 18, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Hospital Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: March 16, 2015
GIDEON what’s new summary: March 14 to March 16, 2015 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (6 updates) 6 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (110 updates) 40 Diseases69 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym AddedMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - March 16, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Enterococcus faecalis
is a gram positive, catalase negative bacteria that is an increasing worry for clinicians as a cause of hospital-acquired infections. It is a normally occurring bacteria in the intestines, bile ducts, and genitourinary system. However, when there is local overgrowth due to other flora being suppressed (especially by cephalosporins) it causes clinically important urinary and biliary tract infections. Interestingly, Enterococcus faecalis has an outer capsule that prevents it from being degraded by bile salts. Of particular worry is the ability of Enterococcus faecalis to enter the bloodstrean and colonize heart valves in su...
Source: Inside Surgery - March 15, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Editor Tags: Infectious Disease cephalosporins enterococcus UTI vancomycin resistant Source Type: blogs

Update: March 14, 2015
GIDEON what’s new summary: March 12 to March 14, 2015 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (2 updates) 2 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (119 updates) 45 Diseases74 Country notesMap Microbiology – Bacteria (4 updates) 3 Bacteria1 Microbes – New Microbiology – Mycobacteria (1 updates) 1 Mycobacteria (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - March 14, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Walmart Rounds Helping Train Nation's Young Doctors.
Little Rock, AK - Doctors at the University of Arkansas Medical Center celebrated the three year anniversary of Walmart Rounds on Friday, a one-of-a-kind initiative exposing student doctors to a wide variety of conditions rarely seen anywhere else in the world.Attending physicians, residents, interns and medical students  from most specialities have donned their white coats and headed to their favorite local Walmart isle for the last three years to observe the stunning pathology of Walmartians in their natural environment."During Walmart rounds, we try and tell our students to be as discrete as possible when...
Source: The Happy Hospitalist - March 14, 2015 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tamer Mahrous Source Type: blogs

5 Reasons Biologists Love Math
Biologists use math in a variety of ways, from designing experiments to mapping complex biological systems. Credit: Stock image. On Saturday (at 9:26:53 to be exact), math lovers and others around the world will celebrate Pi—that really long number that represents the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. I asked our scientific experts why math is important to biomedical research. Here are a few reasons. Math allows biologists to describe how molecules move in and out of cells, how bacteria shuttle through blood vessels, how drugs get broken down in the body and many other physiological processes. Stu...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - March 13, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Emily Carlson Tags: Cell Biology Genetics Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, March 13, 2015
From MedPage Today: Opioid Abuse Drops, Then Levels Off. Making an abuse-deterrent formulation of OxyContin (oxycodone ) diminished abuse in the short term, but the reductions eventually hit a plateau. After Ebola, Measles Death Toll Could Be High. The death toll from post-Ebola measles outbreaks in three West African countries could rival that of Ebola itself. Time Is Right for E-Cig Regulation. Reducing the risks of e-cigarettes to smokers, encouraging the smoking-cessation potential, and restricting access by nonsmokers offer a regulatory trifecta that can be implemented immediately. Risky Business: Working Where Viol...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 13, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Emergency Infectious disease Pain management Source Type: blogs

Work and wellbeing in the NHS: why staff health matters to patient care
This report shows that staff health and wellbeing in the NHS is often seen as an optional extra - as less than two thirds of trusts have a staff health and wellbeing plan in place. It says that high quality patient care relies on skilled staff who are not only physically and mentally well enough to do their jobs, but also feel valued, supported and engaged. It also states that good staff health, wellbeing and engagement can reap significant benefits for patient safety including reduced MRSA infection rates and lower patient mortality rates. Report Royal College of Physicians - press release (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - March 13, 2015 Category: UK Health Authors: The King's Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Workforce and employment Source Type: blogs

Update: March 12, 2015
GIDEON what’s new summary: March 10 to March 12, 2015 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (5 updates) 5 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (421 updates) 71 Diseases350 Country notesMap Microbiology – Bacteria (1 updates) 1 Bacteria (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - March 12, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, March 12, 2015
From MedPage Today: MedPage Today at 10: Where We Have Been. Sometimes things go so right, that you get nervous. Really nervous. That’s pretty much what happened when MedPage Today launched 10 years ago. Sepsis Readmissions May Be Correctable. It might be possible to prevent many of the hospital readmissions that occur after treatment for severe sepsis. Medicare Launching New ACO Program. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is launching a “Next Generation” accountable care organization (ACO) that the agency hopes will be more attractive to Medicare providers. Hospitals Struggling To I...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 12, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Infectious disease Medicare Source Type: blogs

With vaccines, pediatricians walk a thin line
It’s 2015, and we’re talking about measles. Not Enterovirus. Not Ebola. Not RSV. Not influenza. Instead, we’re talking about a historical virus that was declared eradicated from the United States in 2000. Most pediatricians who began practicing within the last 15 years have never even seen the disease. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 11, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Infectious disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Update: March 10, 2015
GIDEON what’s new summary: March 7 to March 10, 2015 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (2 updates) 2 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (2,691 updates) 1 New Diseases Added27 Clinical notes109 Diseases2,549 Country notes4 New Disease Synonyms Added1 New Agents AddedMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - March 10, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Update: March 7, 2015
GIDEON what’s new summary: March 5 to March 7, 2015 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (183 updates) 63 Diseases120 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (14 updates) 1 New Drugs Added3 Drugs5 New Drug Synonyms Added2 Antibiotic testing standards – New3 Drug interactions – New Microbiology – Yeasts (1 updates) 1 Yeasts (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - March 7, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

What to Expect in Aging
Everything we know about the way in which people fall apart with age is based on what happened in the past. The research community has access to centuries of good epidemiological data to demonstrate what to expect in old age both with and without modern medicine. Though when you stop to think about the old today, bear in mind that the oldest old spent most of their old age in a time prior to genetic testing, highly effective heart therapies, and many other developments of the past twenty years. Those who are merely elderly still lived half their lives in a medical environment that would appear extremely primitive to anyone...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 6, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Update: March 5, 2015
GIDEON what’s new summary: March 3 to March 5, 2015 Infectious Diseases – Diagnosis (1 updates) 1 Country Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (5 updates) 5 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (203 updates) 71 Diseases132 Country notesMap Microbiology – Bacteria (9 updates) 1 New Bacteria Added3 Bacteria5 New Bacteria Synonyms Added Microbiology – Mycobacteria (2 updates) 2 New Mycobacteria Added (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - March 5, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, March 5, 2015
From MedPage Today: Flu Vaccine: A Matter of Time. The flu vaccine was about 23% effective this season. Supreme Court Spars With Both Sides in Subsidies Case. The Supreme Court pummeled both sides with questions during Wednesday’s oral arguments over the fate of the subsidies granted to people enrolling in health insurance through federally run insurance exchanges. Combo Regimens Active in Advanced Kidney Cancer. A fourth of patients with advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) responded to treatment that simultaneously targeted two pathways involved in the disease’s pathogenesis. AAMC: Big $$ Needed t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 5, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Cancer Infectious disease Nephrology Source Type: blogs

Dad Has the Flu and There’s a Baby at Home
By PHILIP LEDERER, MD At 6:30 AM, I kissed my 14-week-old son Joe on the forehead and headed off to work at the hospital. By 3 PM I was back in bed with a hacking cough and a fever.  I had influenza. As a doctor training in infectious diseases, I knew that the flu can be […] (Source: The Health Care Blog)
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 4, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: THCB CDC CDC Foundation infectious diseases Lenzer Pediatrics Philip Lederer Tamiflu Source Type: blogs

Eliminating personal belief exemptions will save lives
My father’s sister Mary died from measles when she was six years old. Her death haunted my grandparents for the rest of their lives. She was one of the thousands who died each year from measles before there was a vaccine to prevent this life-threatening disease. Her story has always stayed with me — from my days as a child to my years in medical school. And once again I’m reminded of our family’s loss as the largest U.S. measles outbreak of the 21st century widens its reach in California, where I serve as CEO of the nation’s largest physician group. Our group is responsible for the health of 3.6 million peop...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 3, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Antibiotic resistance – should we blame primary care or ICU physicians?
The title of the post poses a somewhat silly question. But I hope my explication clarifies the point. Many readers know that I favor empiric antibiotic treatment for adolescent/young adult pharyngitis when the clinical signs and symptoms strongly suggest a bacterial infection. I favor narrow target antibiotics and only in the patients with Centor scores of 3 or 4 (and perhaps some 2s when the patient looks very ill). This would exclude over 50% of patients from antibiotics. Most organisms already have developed resistance to penicillin, amoxicillin and first generation cephalosporins. Macrolides should not be used for phar...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - March 3, 2015 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

How to create a measles outbreak in 5 easy steps
There’s been a lot written about the measles outbreak and antivaccine parents. Fact is, the current situation is a direct and predictable result of many social/political trends that have emerged in America over the last generation. I am sharing five easy steps to take if you want to create an epidemic just like this. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 3, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: March 3, 2015
GIDEON what’s new summary: March 1 to March 3, 2015 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (1 updates) 1 DiseaseMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (119 updates) 46 Diseases73 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - March 3, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, March 2, 2015
From MedPage Today: Statin Therapy Suppresses Coronary Plaques in HIV Patients. Treatment with potent statin medication appears to reduce plaque burden in coronary arteries of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) while untreated patients experienced expansion of plaques. Few Women Qualify for 3-Person IVF. Close to 800 women of childbearing age in the U.S. each year and more than 150 in the U.K. would appear to be candidates for mitochondrial transfer. Fat, Lean Mass Grows With Raltegravir and Protease Inhibitors. Patients with HIV who undergo treatment with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir (Isent...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 2, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Infectious disease OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 171
Welcome to the 171th LITFL Review. Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chuck of FOAM.The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the WeekInterested in Free Ultrasound Ebooks? Not sure where to find them? Kasia Hampton from Sonokids has an entire list for you right here! [SO]The Best of #FOAMed Emergency MedicineShould we treat all sore throats with antibiotics in fear of Fusobacterium...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 2, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

The measles outbreak and vaccines: We need civil discourse
There has been an outbreak of measles, a vaccine preventable disease, along with an outbreak of people yelling at each other. There have been angry exchanges between people who would like all children vaccinated according to the recommended guidelines and people who support the rights of parents to choose which vaccines to give their children, if any, and when to give them. There has been much focus on the assertion, particularly, that the measles/mumps/rubella vaccination (MMR) might cause autism. There is no believable evidence to support that assertion, but the questions of whether vaccination is safe and whether it sho...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 1, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Meds Infectious disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Is a doctor allowed to become sick?
I awoke one Saturday morning to a terribly familiar feeling — a tight, barky cough, fast breathing, severe shortness of breath and burning in my chest. Another severe asthma attack. I knew I was in trouble. Twenty-three years ago, when I was an internal medicine resident, I went to be evaluated for recurrent pneumonia. I wound up being diagnosed with cough variant asthma. Most asthmatic patients wheeze; when my asthma is bad, I cough. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 1, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: March 1, 2015
GIDEON what’s new summary: February 26 to March 1, 2015 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (5 updates) 5 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (277 updates) 88 Diseases188 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym AddedMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - March 1, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

It’s the year 2015: Why are we still debating vaccines?
Recently, as I juggled work, family and shoveling, I prepared a lecture on promoting equity in health delivery. My first slide is a picture of the Ebola virus, and as of this morning, my last slide is a map of the ongoing measles outbreak. That’s because this week, we’ve heard a clear public health message from both President Obama and Surgeon General Vivek Murthy: Vaccines are safe and effective. Why is this message being repeated in 2015? Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 1, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Meds Infectious disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Update: February 26, 2015
GIDEON what’s new summary: February 26 to February 26, 2015 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (5 updates) 5 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (209 updates) 77 Diseases132 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - February 26, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, February 26, 2015
From MedPage Today: Studies Cement Value of HIV Prophylaxis. re-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with a single pill prevented HIV infection among more than 85% of two groups of men who have sex with men. NSAIDs: A Risky Addition to Post-MI Antithrombotics. Adding a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) to antithrombotic therapy after a heart attack might boost bleeding risk, even if taken briefly as a painkiller. How Perinatal Hospice Helps Parents Cope. When a baby is given a prenatal diagnosis of a life-limiting illness, providers often suggest termination. Patients Opt for Stronger Opioids. More patients are using s...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 26, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Heart Infectious disease Palliative care Source Type: blogs

Why the Disney measles outbreak could be a game-changer
Cases of measles linked to an exposure at Disneyland continue to spread, not just in California, but in several other states and in Mexico. The numbers of cases are climbing — and so are the number of exposed people who might get sick — and expose more people before they realize they are sick. Measles is extremely contagious; if someone has it, they will infect 90 percent of the people around them who aren’t immunized. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 24, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

What doctors must learn from the anti-vaccination movement
A cartoon of an angry looking physician, a spotted boy, and some anxious parents in The New Yorker reads, “If you connect the measles, it spells out, ‘My parents are idiots’.” A facetious article in GomerBlog announces, “Big Pharma Admits They’re Just Trying to Kill Everyone with Vaccines.” Even television host Stephen Colbert gets in on the make-fun-of-anti-vaxxers act, recently declaring, “The anti-vax movement has a lot of things that I love: Star power, science denial, and hipster appeal. ‘Cause penny-farthings and handlebar mustaches are cool, but nothing is more vintage than dying of rubella.” Con...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 24, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Answers to your questions about the measles outbreak
Many parents around the U.S. are asking what to do about a possible measles exposure with a baby at home who is too young to be immunized. Should they stay home? Can they travel? Should they cancel that trip to Utah or to Vermont or even to Disney next month? Can they head out to the store without worry? Are they “safe”? Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 24, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Update: February 24, 2015
GIDEON what’s new summary: February 22 to February 24, 2015 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (3 updates) 3 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (164 updates) 22 Diseases140 Country notes2 New Disease Synonyms AddedMap Microbiology – Bacteria (5 updates) 3 New Bacteria Added1 Bacteria1 Microbes – New (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - February 24, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Timing Discharges to Maximize Revenue - "Corruption" of Corporate Long-Term Hospitals?
A recent Wall Street Journal article that focused on a quirk in US Medicare payment rules that may be gamed by long-term hospitals also revealed the plight of physicians employed by such hospitals, and worse, the danger posed by such gaming to patients.Discharging Patients at Particular Times Maximizes Hospital RevenueHere is how the rule works: Under Medicare rules, long-term acute-care hospitals like Kindred’s typically receive smaller payments for what is considered a short stay, until a patient hits a threshold. After that threshold, payment jumps to a lump sum meant to cover the full course of long-term treatment.Th...
Source: Health Care Renewal - February 23, 2015 Category: Health Management Tags: corporate physician health care corruption Kindred Health mission-hostile management Select Medical Source Type: blogs

Interpreting the new sore throat article
First, this study required the work of a large team. The main work happened in two places – a research microbiology laboratory and our college health clinic. They took an idea and translated it into an opportunity to collect and analyze data. Second, the accompanying editorial (written by a friend and excellent researcher Dr. Jeffrey Linder) raises some questions that I will work to answer. He writes that we do not have enough evidence to change practice yet. He postulates that Fusobacterium necrophorum might not actually cause pharyngitis and that linking positive PCR testing to the risk of suppurative complications...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - February 23, 2015 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, February 23, 2015
From MedPage Today: U.S. Still Poorly Prepared to Treat Obesity. Health professionals are poorly prepared to treat obesity, and they have biases and unfounded assumptions about the disease. Fibromyalgia: Need to Nap Increases as Symptoms Worsen. Daytime napping is associated with greater symptom severity in patients with fibromyalgia, supporting the notion that people nap in the daytime in order to cope with the condition. States Improve Response to Measles Outbreaks. In 2008, it took doctors at an Arizona hospital 3 days to diagnose measles in a European patient who was admitted with respiratory problems and a rash. By ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 23, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Infectious disease Obesity Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

We have the power to prevent disease. But we’re not using it.
We all know them. We see them on TV. We read about them in the paper. And, with the explosion of social media, you hear about it from people you know. If you have a Facebook account with a sizable enough network of friends, you’ve probably seen at least one negative comment about vaccines. On one end of the spectrum, there are the seemingly innocent people who claim that they don’t get a flu shot because every time they’ve gotten one in the past it has made them sick. On the other end, there are the more conspiracy-prone “anti-vaxxers” who believe that vaccines harm — for example, causing autism — rat...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 22, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Update: February 22, 2015
GIDEON what’s new summary: February 20 to February 22, 2015 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (4 updates) 4 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (71 updates) 1 Clinical note27 Diseases43 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - February 22, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

The measles outbreak: Let’s look at the bigger picture
As the measles outbreak gathers worrisome steam in parallel to the explosion of passionate rants both pro and anti-vaccination, I find myself wondering; what is this really about? Rather than get bogged down in the myriad of issues on either side- though at the outset I will say that as a pediatrician I unequivocally recommend vaccination; I will aim to look at the bigger picture. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 21, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

A tale of two strep throats: Retail clinic vs. PCP
Six years ago, just after arriving in Baltimore for a winter conference, I fell sick with fever and a bad sore throat. After a night of feeling awful, I went looking for help. I found it at a Minute Clinic in a CVS near the hotel. I was seen right away by a friendly NP, who did a rapid strep test and prescribed me medication. I picked up my medication at the pharmacy there. The visit cost something like $85 and took maybe 30 minutes. They gave me forms to submit to my California insurance. And I was well enough to present my research as planned by day 3 of the conference. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 21, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Primary care Source Type: blogs

When should parents be vaccinated against measles?
“Nervous.” I’ve heard that word a lot lately. It keeps falling from the mouths of my families in clinic, landing on the floor with a silent thud. I mean, we have a right to be. We should be. It is one of the most infectious diseases on the planet, today about 400 people worldwide will have died of it, and the number of infected people in the U.S. is climbing. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 21, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Update: February 20, 2015
GIDEON what’s new summary: February 18 to February 20, 2015 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (6 updates) 6 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (154 updates) 45 Diseases109 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (1 updates) 1 Drug Microbiology – Bacteria (3 updates) 2 New Bacteria Added1 Bacteria Microbiology – Mycobacteria (1 updates) 1 Mycobacteria (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - February 20, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Does Tamiflu work and what are the side effects?
The flu season has really gotten into gear now with 46 of our 50 states reporting widespread influenza activity as of January 3, 2015. Influenza is a virus that infects the respiratory tract, causing sore throat, runny nose, fever, and cough. Rarely people with the flu will have nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, but this is not “stomach flu” which is a term some of us use to describe any one of a number of viruses that give us intestinal symptoms. Influenza is the one where you hurt all over, you have a high fever and cold symptoms, then you start coughing and you can barely get out of bed for days. Sometimes it&#...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 20, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Meds Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Ross River Virus in Queensland
Queensland accounts for approximately 50% of Ross River virus infections reported in Australia. Notwithstanding an increase in incidence during January to February 2015, rates in Queensland have remained fairly constant for over two decades. [1,2] See graph References: 1. Berger S. Infectious Diseases of Australia, 2015. 616 pages, 165 graphs, 3,941 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-australia/ 2. Berger S. Australo-Pacific Arboviruses: Global Status, 2015. http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/australo-pacific-arboviruses-global-status/ 3. http://www.gideon...
Source: GIDEON blog - February 19, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Graphs ProMED ross river virus Source Type: blogs

An Examination of Recent Historical Variability in Life Spans
The long upward trend in human life expectancy derives from progress in medicine in its broadest definition. The varied technologies and techniques involved have very different contributions to the shape of life expectancy, however. To pick the obvious examples: control of infectious disease improves the proportion of the population who can expect to reach adulthood, while better treatments for age-related disease improve the quality and remaining length of life of the old. In a number of past studies, researchers have worked through data sets on human life span to quantify the effects of various facets of medical progress...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 19, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

So what’s the big deal about measles?
In a recent post (“Dear Anti-Vax Parents: We’re Not Mad At You“), I wrote about the critical need for better education and communication between doctors and vaccine-hesitant parents. It was far more popular than I would have imagined, and I appreciate all of you who shared it. And in the spirit of providing reliable information about vaccine-preventable illnesses, I wanted to take the time to write about why measles matters. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 18, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs