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Infectious Diseases

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 11.

Update: August 2, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 29 to August 2, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (8 updates) 8 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (255 updates) 76 Diseases179 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (1 updates) 1 Interacting drugs – New (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - August 2, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

A couple of drive-by insights from the Global Burden of Disease
The GBD is a project of the World Health Organization, started in 1991. It's a massive effort to put together comparable morbidity and mortality statistics for all the nations of the world. The numbers are more reliable in some places than in others, and have all sorts of conceptual and systematic weaknesses, but they're the best we've got and they do tell us quite a lot that's interesting and important.http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMra1201534, review the changes in the U.S. and the world from 1990 to 2010. It's a complicated story, which they perhaps could have made more clear than they do in some ways. Read it ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - August 1, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Source Type: blogs

Knockout Mice, In Detail
Everyone in biomedical research is familiar with "knockout" mice, animals that have had a particular gene silenced during their development. This can be a powerful way of figuring out what that gene's product actually does, although there are always other factors at work. The biggest one is how other proteins and pathways can sometimes compensate for the loss, a process often doesn't have a chance to kick in when you come right into an adult animal and block a pathway through other means. In some other cases, a gene knockout turns out to be embryonic-lethal, but can be tolerated in an adult animal, once some key developmen...
Source: In the Pipeline - August 1, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Biological News Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, August 1, 2013
Brought to you by MedPage Today. 1. Salad Mix Eyed in Cyclospora Outbreak. Health officials in Iowa and Nebraska said they had identified a prepackaged salad mix as the likely source of a multistate outbreak of Cyclospora cayetanensis infections. 2. Low Cost, Doc Relationship Key to BP Control. Minimizing out-of-pocket drug costs and having one provider are two factors that appear to improve blood pressure treatment. 3. Stroke Centers Don’t Drive Up Costs. Establishing a coordinated stroke center at a tertiary care community hospital did not increase the total direct and indirect costs of treating patients at one in...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 1, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Heart Infectious disease Neurology Source Type: blogs

Perhaps this meeting should be renamed "Of Microbiomes and Men" ....
Discussion – Pharma/Biotech/Food Industry Partnering Small Company Showcases www.globalengage.co.uk/microbiome.html Not interested in the Microbiome/Microbiota?Unsubscribe hereNick Noakes: nnoakes@globalengage.co.uk Tel +44 (0) 1865 849841Global Engage, The Kidlington Centre, Kidlington, Oxfordshire, OX5 2DL, UK. You might think that at some point some of the people organizing meetings -------- This is from the "Tree of Life Blog" of Jonathan Eisen, an evolutionary biologist and Open Access advocate at the University of California, Davis. For short updates, follow me on Twitter. --------...
Source: The Tree of Life - August 1, 2013 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs

What doctors wear: Do we care too much?
What would you prefer your doctor to be wearing when examining and treating you or your loved ones? Most would likely reply with something along the lines of “it doesn’t really matter, as long as they are competent and do a good job.“ Except it does matter, apparently. So much so that there have been hospital/nation-wide policies surrounding the issue, and a recent surge in publications studying this phenomenon – some of them hinting at the possibility that patients do care a great deal, even if they don’t consciously know it. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 30, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

The bar for becoming a stool donor just got higher
Recently, I have spent a lot of time talking to patients, trying to explain why I’ve had to cancel their upcoming fecal transplant. The FDA has ruled that stool is an investigational new drug (IND), which now imposes a huge bureaucratic hurdle to getting a much needed therapy for patients with recurrent or intractable C. difficile infection. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 29, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions GI Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: July 29, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 24 to July 29, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (594 updates) 117 Diseases477 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 29, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Infections due to Klebsiella Pneumoniae Carbapenemase (KPC) producing bacteria: a systematic review
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - July 28, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Why you should never order a herpes IgM blood test
Routine screening blood tests for herpes are not recommended by the Centers for Disease Control. When I say routine screening I mean a scenario such as, “I want to get checked for everything, ok?” Blood tests for herpes do have a place in specific clinical situations, but that’s for another post. But say you did get a herpes blood test (even though it’s not recommended many people seem to get it done) and it’s positive for something called IgM antibodies. Armed with these results your doctor proceeds to tell you that these results mean you caught herpes recently, so you start to freak out. Stop right there. Con...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 27, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: July 24, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 20 to July 24, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (8 updates) 8 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (251 updates) 1 Clinical note64 Diseases185 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym AddedMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 24, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Nature Podcast: 25 July 2013
This week, the superbugs resistant to the most powerful antibiotics, how flatworms regrow their heads and why the oil palm genome could be good news for sustainable crop breeding. Plus, the best science outside Nature. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - July 24, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Nature Publishing Group Source Type: blogs

August is National Immunization Awareness Month
Each year in August, National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM) provides an opportunity to highlight the need for improving national immunization coverage levels. Activities focus on encouraging all people to protect their health by being immunized against infectious diseases. In 2013, the National Public Health Information Coalition is coordinating NIAM activities. The following resources are available: Find CDC Resources for National Immunization Awareness Month <http://1.usa.gov/143jjGY> Get Toolkits to Help You Raise Awareness About Immunization (developed by NPHIC in collaboration with CDC) <http://bit.l...
Source: BHIC - July 24, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Michelle Burda Tags: General Public Health Source Type: blogs

Antimalarial Drug Linked to Sgt. Robert Bales Massacre - By SUSAN DONALDSON JAMES
U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, who is facing sentencing by a military court for killing 16 civilians on a rampage in Afghanistan last year, might have faced a perfect storm of stress, which included the use of mefloquine hydrochloride, an antimalarial drug given routinely to soldiers in that part of the world. Mefloquine was developed by the U.S. military and has been used for more than three decades by the government to prevent and to treat malaria among soldiers and Peace Corps workers. But the drug can cause varying neurological side effects 5 to 10 percent of the time, according to Dr. David Sullivan, an infectiou...
Source: PharmaGossip - July 23, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

How to reduce the risk of oral cancer
The fact that cunnilingus increases a man’s risk of developing oral cancer has been all over the Internet recently with Michael Douglas’ disclosure that he had an HPV-positive tumor. To recap: some strains of human papilloma virus (HPV) are oncogenic, meaning they induce changes in a cell’s DNA that can lead to cancer. The same strains of HPV that are oncogenic in the genital tract for women, causing both cervical cancer and anal cancer, can also wreak havoc on cells in the oral cavity. As an aside, HPV can also cause anal cancer for men. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Man...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 21, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

Update: July 20, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 16 to July 20, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (13 updates) 13 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (286 updates) 89 Diseases197 Country notesMap Microbiology – Mycobacteria (1 updates) 1 New Mycobacteria Added (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 20, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Parvovirus B19 in the United Kingdom
The following background data on Parvovirus B19 infection in the United Kingdom is abstracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series. [1,2] Parvovirus B19 (Erythrovirus B19) was first discovered in England in 1974, among serum specimens from healthy blood donors. – Highest rates are reported during spring and early summer. – Epidemics are reported every 4 to 5 years – the last occurring during 1997 to 1998. – Infection is estimated to occur in 1:512 pregnancies, and may account for as many as 150 fetal deaths annually (26% of viruses associated with fetal death).. The foll...
Source: GIDEON blog - July 20, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology ProMED Parvovirus B19 United Kingdom Source Type: blogs

Would C. Everett Koop be an effective Surgeon General today?
I have been thinking a lot about C. Everett Koop lately, ever since his death on February 25 at the ripe old age of 96 and more recently with the announcement that our current Surgeon General, Regina Benjamin, is planning to step down from that post. In particular, I have been pondering what made Koop such an effective Surgeon General, and what has made it so hard for his successors to approach even a portion of his impact. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 19, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Infectious disease Primary care Source Type: blogs

The Situation of Secret Pleasures (more on Dan Wegner’s Work)
This excerpt, which highlights some of the remarkable work by the late Dan Wegner, comes from an article written by Eric Jaffe in a 2006 edition of the APS’s Observer: “Freud’s Fundamental Rule of Psychoanalysis was for patients to be completely open with a therapist no matter how silly or embarrassing the thought,” says Anita Kelly, a researcher at the University of Notre Dame who published one of the first books on the formal study of secrets, The Psychology of Secrets, in 2002. Only since the late 1980s and early 1990s have researchers like Daniel Wegner and James Pennebaker put Freud through the empirical r...
Source: The Situationist - July 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Situationist Staff Tags: Emotions Life Morality Social Psychology Source Type: blogs

Early goal directed therapy: Patwari Academy video
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - July 17, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: critical care infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: July 16, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 13 to July 16, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (9 updates) 9 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (419 updates) 42 Diseases377 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 16, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Will Your Mind Still Be Sharp At 95? The Chances Are Improving All The Time
People are living longer than ever before—often into their 90s—but can the mind keep up? Although our bodies might still be (sort of) working as we approach 100-years-old,  many wonder whether their minds will be sharp enough to appreciate life. A new Danish study has looked at this by comparing the brainpower of two groups of nonagenarians (Christensen et al., 2013): The first group were born in 1905 and assessed at 93-years-old. The second group were born in 1915 and assessed at 95-years-old. To see how dramatically lifespan is increasing, the chances of people in this study reaching 90 increased by almost 30% in ...
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - July 16, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Update: July 13, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 10 to July 13, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (11 updates) 11 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (219 updates) 74 Diseases145 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 13, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 26-year-old man with fever and lower abdominal pain
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 26-year-old man is evaluated for a 3-day history of fever, lower abdominal pain, tenesmus, hematochezia, and watery diarrhea. Seven months ago, he underwent a cadaveric kidney transplantation. At the time of transplantation, the transplant donor was seropositive for cytomegalovirus, and the patient was seronegative for this virus. Current medications are tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, prednisone, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Valganciclovir was discontinued 1 month ago after 6 months of prophylaxis as ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 13, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Nephrology Source Type: blogs

Free Continuing Education Resources for Safety Net Health Professionals from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Friday, July 12, 2013, 2 PM ET The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) are hosting a webinar to announce an exciting new HRSA Website http://1.usa.gov/14M5jFp  that provides HRSA grantees and safety net providers, such as health center providers, rural health providers, physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and other safety net health professionals with free, clinically relevant modules to support continuing education and workforce training.  These free, accredited continuing education resources are based on the comparative effectiveness research from...
Source: BHIC - July 11, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Monica Rogers Tags: Conferences Public Health Websites Source Type: blogs

Pulmonary mucormycosis
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - July 10, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease pulmonary Source Type: blogs

Fever, Friend or Foe?
The audio and slides for this SMACC talk are at the bottom of this blog post Fever is so hot right now… ‘Humanity has but three great enemies: fever, famine and war; of these by far the greatest, by far the most terrible, is fever’ — William Osler1 Fever is one of the cardinal signs of infection and — nearly 120 years after William Osler’s statement in his address to the 47th annual meeting of the American Medical Association on The Study of the Fevers of the South1 — infectious diseases remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality2. Despite this, it is unclear whether fever itself is truly the enemy or w...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 10, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Paul Young Tags: Emergency Medicine Featured Infectious Disease Intensive Care critical care Fever Friend or Foe ICU paul young SEPSIS SMACC Source Type: blogs

Update: July 10, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 4 to July 10, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (8 updates) 8 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (492 updates) 83 Diseases409 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 10, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Stop blanket animal antibiotics now - before it's too late
Factory Farm Workers Are Carrying An Antibiotic-Resistant Pig BacteriaBy Aviva Shen on Jul 9, 2013 at 3:50 pmhttp://thinkprogress.org/health/2013/07/09/2270181/factory-farm-workers-drug-resistant-bugs/?mobile=wt(Credit: AP)Shortly before Americans fired up their grills for Independence Day, researchersannounced that industrial farm workers have been contaminated with “pig MRSA,” an antibiotic resistant bacteria that is increasingly found in American hogs. According to a new study, workers at factory hog farms that use antibiotics are far more likely to contract the drug-resistant bacteria from ...
Source: PharmaGossip - July 10, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Notifiable diseases in the US for 2011
The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released a summary of notifiable diseases in the US for the year 2011. These statistics are collected and compiled from reports sent by state health departments and territories to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS). According to the CDC, a notifiable disease is one for which regular, frequent, and timely information regarding individual cases is considered necessary for the prevention and control of the disease. The list of nationally notifiable infectious diseases is dynamic, as new diseases are added and others deleted as incidence declines...
Source: virology blog - July 9, 2013 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Information CDC centers for disease control notifiable disease viral virology virus Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 07-09-2013
More updates available tomorrow on my other blog at DrWhitecoat.com Why does an $11,596 emergency department visit cost $1,100? A spokesperson for the California Hospital Association says that it is because of government regulation. I want to know what doctor ever gets paid $4,242 for a Level 4 emergency department visit. California attorneys are trying to raise the cap on damages under California’s Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act. Caps are currently $250,000 and haven’t been raised in more than 35 years. The article says that many attorneys won’t take medical malpractice cases in California because they are t...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - July 9, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

VisualDx Mobile: a Quick App Review and a Q&A with Noah Craft, CMO of VisualDx
We had the chance to take a look at the VisualDx mobile app, the mobile version of VisualDx Health, a website that helps in clinical decision making of dermatologic, infectious, genetic, metabolic, nutritional and occupational diseases, benign and malignant growths, drug-induced conditions, and other injuries. The app is available for iOS in the iTunes Store and through Google Play for Android devices. It features a trial period of 15 days, but requires a license after it’s over. This will cost you between $99.99 and $299.99 for one year, depending on which content you want access to. However, a cheaper license is av...
Source: Medgadget - July 9, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Stanley Darma Tags: Dermatology Diagnostics Informatics Medgadget Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Family Sues After Dangerous Flu Vaccine Causes Child to Become Severely Brain Damaged
Conclusion After reading realms of information about the flu shot and the many tragic cases of vaccine-injured children, including the sad case of Saba Button, in my opinion, a child is far more likely to suffer serious side effects from the flu vaccine than from the flu itself. However, despite the many children who have become seriously ill after various flu vaccines, the governments around the world continue to portray the flu vaccine as safe and effective. Many flu vaccines still contain thimerosal, an ingredient that is said to have been removed from vaccines from as far back as 2007. [9] Since that time, this dangero...
Source: vactruth.com - July 9, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Christina England Tags: Christina England Top Stories Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) Afluria Brain Damage Centers for Disease Control (CDC) CSL Fluvax Thimerosal Vaccine Side Effects Source Type: blogs

Federal funding for science research
Margaret K. Offermann, MD, PhD, President of FASEB, sent the following email: The Senate Appropriations Committee is expected to consider the Labor, Health and Human Services (LHHS) bill that will provide fiscal year (FY) 2014 funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Although we don’t know when the House Appropriations Committee will vote on NIH funding, the spending limits in the House Budget Resolution could mean another 18 percent cut for biomedical research – below sequestration! NIH needs $32 billion in FY 2014 to prevent further erosion of the nation’s capacity for biomedical research and provi...
Source: virology blog - July 8, 2013 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Information Federal support of research grant NIH science funding sequestration viral virology virus Source Type: blogs

An Interview With Vladimir Skulachev
I recently noticed a two-part interview with researcher Vladimir Skulachev on a Russian language medical news site. Long-time readers will recognize the name in connection with work on plastoquinone-based mitochondrially targeted antioxidants: Skulachev's group produces the SkQ series of compounds that in recent years have been shown to generate benefits and extend life in mice. These are noteworthy for working though dietary intake, rather than requiring injection like the SS class of mitochondrially targeted antioxidants. Mitochondrially targeted antioxidants are thought to work by soaking up a usefully large portion of...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 8, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

It’s hard to grasp the experience of being a patient
My time as a medical student has quickly come to an end. This past winter, with nearly four years of arduous study, countless examinations and numerous clinical rotations under my belt, I couldn’t help but think, Yes, I’m ready to be a doctor. And then I became a patient. I’d always thought I knew what it’s like to be the patient. For much of my childhood, my father suffered from chronic fatigue syndrome, a multifaceted, disabling illness whose cause is unclear. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out h...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 7, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Education Infectious disease Primary care Source Type: blogs

My Dad on Exercise
Bullseye has walked four to six miles for exercise almost every day, for 25 years. When home, he’ll walk the same route around the neighborhood or on the treadmill if the weather is poor. He’ll also walk the same route when he’s on vacation at the beach (at the same hotel every year). At the last job he held for over 30 years, he walked the same blocks, or the same hallways if the weather was poor. Despite spending more time in Washington, D.C., than almost any other location throughout his life, he couldn’t tell me about his surroundings, where landmarks are, or how to get anywhere. “What do I care where you y...
Source: I've Still Got Both My Nuts: A True Cancer Blog - July 6, 2013 Category: Cancer Tags: family Source Type: blogs

Breaking Down the Myths about Substance Abuse Treatment
The efficacy of substance abuse treatment and the need for treatment is an interesting topic of discussion. Some believe that substance abusers cannot truly recover without treatment, while others feel treatment is unnecessary. We also see treatment displayed in various ways in the media, adding to the widely-varying perspectives about what it’s all about and what it really looks like. Maybe you or someone you love has made the first step by acknowledging your substance use has gotten out of hand and you are ready to get help. However, you’ve heard several things about attending treatment, some good and some bad. Wha...
Source: World of Psychology - July 6, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Donna M. White, LPCI, CACP Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Brain and Behavior Disorders General Habits Self-Help Substance Abuse Treatment Abstinence Best Fit Brain Chemistry Common Myths Doctors Drugs Efficacy Love Perspectives Rock Bottom Short Periods Source Type: blogs

Update: July 4, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 30 to July 4, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (8 updates) 8 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (382 updates) 90 Diseases292 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 4, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Sex and the Sleepless Night
I want to make sex better. That’s what gets me up in the morning. Part of making sex better is doing what I can to eradicate sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).  I particularly focus on chlamydia and gonorrhea because I consider these really stupid infections. It’s crazy that they still exist. We know how to prevent them (condoms) and how to diagnose them (very specific and sensitive tests). We can completely cure these STDs. So then, why do these diseases infect over 3 million new Americans every year, half of whom are ages 15-25? One of the reasons these diseases are still around is because Americans are really ba...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - July 1, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Access Consumer Health Care Innovation Patients Patients' Rights Publc Health Social Media Technology Source Type: blogs

Update: June 30, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 26 to June 30, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (3 updates) 3 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (424 updates) 1 Clinical note71 Diseases352 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 30, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 52-year-old man with fatigue and fever
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 52-year-old man is admitted to the hospital with fatigue and fever of 3 days’ duration. He is a health care worker and has a bicuspid aortic valve. He takes no medications. Blood cultures are obtained at the time of admission, and he is started on empiric vancomycin for possible endocarditis. On hospital day 2, his initial blood cultures become positive for gram-positive cocci in clusters, and on hospital day 3, his blood cultures grow methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Susceptibility to vancomy...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 29, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

A Senate Bill To Limit Antibiotics In Food-Producing Animals
In the latest effort to combat the spread of superbugs that are resistant to antibiotics, a bill was introduced in the US Senate that would direct the FDA to prohibit the use of these treatments in the livestock if it would jeopardize human health. The ‘Preventing Antibiotic Resistance Act’ would require drugmakers and agricultural producers to demonstrate that antibiotics are used to treat clinically diagnosable disease and not just fatten farm animals. Overuse of antibiotics has been cited for causing superbugs to develop. “When antibiotics are fed in low doses to animals, only the strongest, most resistant bacteri...
Source: Pharmalot - June 28, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Drug Shortages Remain in 2013
While Congress and federal health agencies have been constantly busy enacting new healthcare and drug legislation and implementing various regulations, one key issue has remained at the forefront—drug shortages. For example, the University of Utah Drug Information Service counted 300 "active" -- or ongoing -- drug shortages at the end of April, just about the same as it did at the end of December 2012 (299 shortages) and September 2012 (282 shortages), as reported by Medpage Today. On the brighter side, the number of new shortages is well off its pace from years past, with 54 so far this year, Erin Fox, PharmD, dire...
Source: Policy and Medicine - June 28, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Hemopurifier to be Studied as Treatment Option for Hepatitis C
Aethlon Medical out of San Diego, CA has been investigating its Hemopurifier extracorporeal blood filtration device that has the potential to help manage a number of infectious diseases, as well as remove tumor-derived exosomes related to certain cancers. Now the company has announced that its technology has been given an FDA Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) to be tested in human feasibility studies for treatment of Hepatitis C. The first phase will involve ten patients with end stage renal disease that are infected with Hep. C who’ll receive treatment with the Hemopurifier. Once the safety of the procedure is...
Source: Medgadget - June 26, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: in the news... Source Type: blogs

bioMérieux VIDAS 3 Immunoassay Platform Receives CE Mark
bioMérieux (Marcy l’Etoile, France) received the CE Mark for the firm’s third generation VIDAS immunoassay system. Many laboratories in the world run their automated immunoassays on a VIDAS system. All kind of biomolecules can be detected with this diagnostics platform, like infectious disease serology, but also cardiac, thyroid and cancer markers. A Solid Phase Receptacle (SPR) is pre-coated with antigens or antibodies and serves as the pipetting device itself. At each stage of the reaction, it aspirates the reagents in and out. This original concept prevents any inter-reagent or inter-sample contamination...
Source: Medgadget - June 26, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Jan Sinnige Tags: Diagnostics Pathology Source Type: blogs

Cardiac risk after pneumonia
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - June 26, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: hospital medicine infectious disease cardiovascular Source Type: blogs