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Infectious Diseases

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 11.

Update: June 23, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 17 to June 23, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (12 updates) 12 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (516 updates) 1 Clinical note94 Diseases421 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 23, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Healthcare social media #HCSM - top articles
Here are my suggestions for some of the top articles related to healthcare social media (#HCSM) in the past 4-5 weeks: Twitter and Facebook: Potentially inappropriate attitudes towards professionalism were found among pharmacy students http://buff.ly/136KLJZ Harnessing the cloud of patient experience: using social media to detect poor quality healthcare http://buff.ly/136KRkO Social media and you: what every physician needs to know - J Med Pract Manage. http://buff.ly/ZFKvvw How to Get RSS Feeds for Twitter http://bit.ly/Yp4VHq Effectiveness of Mobile-Health Technologies to Improve Health Care Service: Not much benfit...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - June 22, 2013 Category: Professors and Educators Tags: #HCSM Source Type: blogs

Can the fight against healthcare disparities be won?
The summer before starting medical school I had the fortune of traveling to both Southeast Asia and Central America on humanitarian medical relief mission trips. I was initially exhilarated by the idea that I soon too will acquire the skills honed by the doctors, nurses, and other health care providers I was working with. The idea of mastering the science of healing had inspired me for so long, yet the vision was quickly becoming somber. As a team, health care providers attended to patients from sunrise to sunset each day but the lines never got shorter. The patients just kept showing up, day after day and the lines were j...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 20, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Education Infectious disease Medical school Primary care Source Type: blogs

HPV Vaccines Are Lowering Infection Rates Among Teenage Girls
The HPV vaccines may be controversial, but they are proving effective. A new study finds that the prevalence of the human papillomavirus, which can lead to cervical cancer, dropped by roughly half among teenage girls between the ages of 14 and 19 years old during the four years following the 2006 introduction of the first vaccine, the Gardasil shot that is sold by Merck (MRK). The findings, which were published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, are significant not only because it signals the vaccination campaign is apparently succeeding, but has also done so amid continual debate over the safety and veracity of the va...
Source: Pharmalot - June 20, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Gonorrhea in Sweden
Notwithstanding a slight resurgence during the past 5 years, rates of gonorrhea in Sweden and other Scandinavian countries have decreased dramatically since 1980 and continue to be strikingly similar [1,2] – See graph [3] : References: 1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of Sweden, 2013. 458 pages, 135 graphs, 2059 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-sweden/ 2. Berger SA. Gonococcal infection: Global Status, 2013. 180 pages, 243 graphs, 1075 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/gonococcal-infection-global-status/ 3. Gideon Gr...
Source: GIDEON blog - June 19, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Graphs ProMED Gonorrhea Sweden Source Type: blogs

Ensure health care workers have sick leave to reduce presenteeism
Like hand hygiene, getting workers to stay home when sick is an example of a horizontal infection prevention strategy. Horizontal strategies are multipotent (not aimed at a single pathogen), generally simple methods. While most humans inherently know that it’s not a good idea to come to work with fever or diarrhea, many either can’t or won’t stay home and risk infecting co-workers, customers, or patients. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 19, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

A procalcitonin guided algorithm to guide antibiotic therapy in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - June 19, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: critical care infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, June 19, 2013
Brought to you by MedPage Today. 1. Organ Donors Will Sign Up on Facebook. Despite years of media and public service campaigns appealing for organ donations, donor rates remained static while demand increased — until Facebook. 2. MRI May Spot Meningitis from Tainted Steroids. A screening MRI may provide early warning of spinal or paraspinal meningitis in patients who received contaminated steroid injections. 3. Red Meat Hikes Diabetes Risk. Eating more beef, pork, and lamb may raise diabetes risk, whereas reducing intake appears to trim risk. Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online re...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 19, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Diabetes Endocrinology Facebook Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Bernard Munos on The Last Twelve Years of Pharma
Bernard Munos (ex-Lilly, now consulting) is out with a paper reviewing the approved drugs from 2000 to 2012. What's the current state of the industry? Is the upturn in drug approvals over the last two years real, or an artifact? And is it enough to keep things going? Over that twelve-year span, the average drug approvals ran at 27 per year. Half of all the new drugs were in three therapeutic areas: cancer, infectious disease, and CNS. And as far as mechanisms go, there were about 190 different ones, by Munos' count. The most crowded category was (as might have been guessed) the 17 tyrosine kinase inhibitors, but 85% of th...
Source: In the Pipeline - June 18, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Drug Development Source Type: blogs

Update: June 17, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 15 to June 17, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (14 updates) 14 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (534 updates) 1 Clinical note111 Diseases419 Country notes2 New Disease Synonyms Added1 New Country Synonyms AddedMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 17, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Image of the Day: HIV
False-colored scanning electron micrograph of HIV particles (yellow) infecting a human H9 T cell (blue, turquoise) Image of the Day: HIV | The Scientist Magazine®. (Source: Biosingularity)
Source: Biosingularity - June 16, 2013 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Derya Tags: AIDS HIV Infection infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: June 15, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 12 to June 15, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (15 updates) 15 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (2,112 updates) 1 Clinical note100 Diseases2,010 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym AddedMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (2 updates) 2 Interacting drugs – New (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 15, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Electrocardiographic abnormalities in pneumonia
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - June 14, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease cardiovascular pulmonary Source Type: blogs

These Tricks Are Played to Get You to Vaccinate Your Child
Conclusion Despite the fact that study after study confirms that vaccinated children are no more protected than their unvaccinated peers, governments from around the world, hand-in-hand with Big Pharma and the medical professionals, keep coming up with more elaborate ways to force parents into vaccinating their children. I find it very sad that governments are so keen to boost vaccination targets that they are denying parents the ability to earn a livelihood by denying their children’s admittance into day care. This seems to me to be over the top and completely unnecessary. How do governments expect parents to be abl...
Source: vactruth.com - June 13, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Christina England Tags: Christina England Top Stories Dr. Viera Schreibner Mandatory Vaccination measles outbreak Pertussis Whooping Cough Source Type: blogs

Update: June 12, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 5 to June 12, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (15 updates) 15 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (2,112 updates) 1 Clinical note100 Diseases2,010 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym AddedMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (2 updates) 2 Interacting drugs – New (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 12, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

HPV and oral sex: Is Michael Douglas correct?
I’ve invented a new medical term. The Michael Douglas Factor: When a celebrity, even one with good intentions, uses his or her own condition to disseminate incomplete, misleading, or incorrect medical information. I could have called this phenomenon “The Gilda Radner Factor,” in recollection of efforts by Radner’s husband Gene Wilder to encourage women to ask their doctors for the CA 125 blood test –which, to this day, is not considered a good screening test for ovarian cancer–after Radner’s death in 1989. But, likely, more people are now familiar with Douglas and also, his recent ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 9, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

An important step toward cost transparency
How much to treat this pneumonia? The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid took a step towards answering such questions by publicly releasing how much each of 3000+ U.S. hospitals charged Medicare for 100 common medical issues in 2011 and how much Medicare actually paid them. The charges were remarkably variable, even among hospitals that share a zip code. Massachusetts hospitals tended to charge below the national average (eg. for pneumonia with complications, $14,686 compared to $51,726 nationally), though teaching hospitals like mine were more expensive (Massachusetts General Hospital charged $49,883 on average for pneumon...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 7, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Policy Hospital Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Lyme disease misconceptions
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - June 7, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: pseudoscience infectious disease rheumatology Source Type: blogs

Applications in Clinical Microbiology
from Andrew D. Sails writing in Real-Time PCR: Advanced Technologies and Applications:The introduction of real-time PCR technology to diagnostic clinical microbiology laboratories has led to significant improvements in the diagnosis of infectious disease. It has been particularly useful to detect slow growing or difficult to grow infectious agents therefore much of its initial impact was in diagnostic virology. However, in more recent years real-time PCR-based methods have been introduced in diagnostic bacteriology, mycology and parasitology and there are few areas of clinical microbiology which remain unaffected by real-t...
Source: Microbiology Blog: The weblog for microbiologists. - June 6, 2013 Category: Microbiology Source Type: blogs

Update: June 5, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 3 to June 5, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (6 updates) 6 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (121 updates) 48 Diseases73 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 5, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 100: Getting Old
This week, FFFF is getting old – with its hundredth edition. The jokes are starting to sag, the factual reliability gave way long ago, but there is still a glimmer in its ancient roving eye. And this week the funtabulously frivolous focus is on… old things. Question 1. What is the world’s oldest surviving medical text? Reveal the funtabulous answer! expand(document.getElementById('ddet626372142'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink626372142')) Even in 1900BC, legal disclaimers were amazingly convoluted. The Kahun Gynaecological Papyrus. The Kahun Papyri were discovered near El-Lahun, Egypt in 1889 By ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 5, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Jo Deverill Tags: Arcanum Veritas Education Featured Frivolous Friday Five Health Medical Humor FFFF old Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 100: Getting Old
This week, FFFF is getting old – with its hundredth edition. The jokes are starting to sag, the factual reliability gave way long ago, but there is still a glimmer in its ancient roving eye. And this week the funtabulously frivolous focus is on… old things. Question 1. What is the world’s oldest surviving medical text? Reveal the funtabulous answer! expand(document.getElementById('ddet1416813207'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink1416813207')) Even in 1900BC, legal disclaimers were amazingly convoluted. The Kahun Gynaecological Papyrus. The Kahun Papyri were discovered near El-Lahun, Egypt in 1889 B...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 5, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Jo Deverill Tags: Arcanum Veritas Education Featured Frivolous Friday Five Health Medical Humor FFFF old Source Type: blogs

User Interface Refresh
Over the years GIDEON has added new features and now we’re making changes to improve access and simplify the interface. We are rolling out a refresh of the GIDEON web app user interface that focuses on simplification. These changes include: Improved search Type down: Search terms appear as you type. Suggestions: Subjects related to the items you’re typing appear to easily reach the content you want. Unified search and diagnosis: Specify if you’re looking for a diagnosis by choosing a sign or symptom from the Clinical Presentation list.     Enhanced User Interface Screen size utilization: Con...
Source: GIDEON blog - June 4, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Uri Blackman Tags: Features Tech Source Type: blogs

It's Guns vs. Butter (Again): How Do We Reconcile Expensive Cancer Treatments With The Need To Improve The Basics Of Cancer Care?
As we walk the halls and sit in the lectures at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, there's an elephant in the room. It is right there in front of us, but not many of us seem willing to talk about it. Fewer still are making any commitments to do something about it. So what is this ubiquitous juxtaposition that is right in front of us but we can't seem to see? It is the contrast between incredibly sophisticated science and computer data that will help us understand cancer and its treatment vs. the reality that we can't have medical records that really work. It is the fact that we have million do...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - June 3, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Breast Cancer Cancer Care Cervical Cancer Colon Cancer Early detection Prevention Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy Rectal Cancer Research Screening Tobacco Treatment Source Type: blogs

More on psychiatric diagnosis
Now that we've laid out some foundational issues, this seems a good time to go back to the DSM and finish constructing our deconstruction. Various categories of psychiatric diagnosis present quite different sets of issues. My friend Gary, in The Book of Woe, raises most of them in one way or another but he doesn't march us through them systematically -- it's not that kind of book. I'm a more boring sort of writer, however, so I'll just put the ducks in a row and knock them down.There are indeed various things that can go wrong with our brains which have all the right stuff to be called a specific disease, and treated like ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - June 3, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Source Type: blogs

Will FDA Plans To Thwart Superbugs Create A Thorny Conundrum?
Faced with an urgent need for new antibiotics, the FDA, drugmakers and some lawmakers are take steps to speed development, but the moves are causing controversy. In recent weeks, the US Department of Health and Human Services awarded a $40 million contract to GlaxoSmithKline (look here) and two US Senators wrote the FDA that they intend to introduce legislation to accelerate antibiotic developmen (read this). At issue is a plan proposed by the Infectious Disease Society of America, which is championing the creation of what it calls the Limited Population Antibacterial Drug pathway for approving new antibiotics. The IDSA, w...
Source: Pharmalot - June 3, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Update: June 3, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: May 31 to June 3, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (314 updates) 49 Diseases265 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 3, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Gouging 101 spotted by Dr Judy Stone
Summer is Lyme Disease Season. The Price Of The Drug To Treat It Just Exploded. By Maryn McKenna If you’ve been reading for a while, you might remember someposts about nationwide shortages of drugs. The Food and Drug Administration was concerned, and so were very senior physicians working in infectious disease, cancer, everyday emergency medicine and even veterinary care.The crisis faded from view, as they do. So it wasn’t much noticed that back in March, the American Academy of Pediatrics warned of an FDA alert over an apparent shortage of doxycycline, an old and inexpensive drug that is used mostly for...
Source: PharmaGossip - June 2, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

“You Have MRSA!” “Say What?” How I Got MRSA
MRSA can be deadly if not caught and treated in a timely manner. How my diagnosis of MRSA ravaged my body and damn near killed me!Contributor: James SiroisPublished: May 31, 2013 (Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content)
Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content - May 31, 2013 Category: Other Conditions Source Type: blogs

Update: May 31, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: May 29 to May 31, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (2 updates) 2 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (131 updates) 1 Clinical note50 Diseases80 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - May 31, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, May 31, 2013
Brought to you by MedPage Today. 1. Mid-East Coronavirus Not Easily Spread. The novel coronavirus emerging from the Middle East can be transmitted between people, but not easily. 2. As ‘Emergency’ Doors Close More Seek Care. One in five adults in the U.S. sought emergency department treatment at least once during 2011. 3. ACA: And Now for the Details. With the final pieces of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) getting underway, the next step for a better healthcare system should be increased transparency, health reform advocates said. Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 31, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Emergency Health reform Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Screening inpatients for MRSA—case closed.
It isn't often that you see a headline like this in the medical world.  But such are the conclusions reached by Michael B. Edmond, M.D., M.P.H., and Richard P. Wenzel, M.D.in an editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine.  The editorial commented on the results of an extensive study by Susan S. Huang et al published by NEJM, entitled, "Targeted versus Universal Decolonization to Prevent ICU Infection."This is a big deal. For a number of years, people have been arguing over the issue of whether screening patients for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, with subsequent isolation, would be be...
Source: Running a hospital - May 30, 2013 Category: Health Managers Source Type: blogs

Sulfa Side Effects, Decades Later
You'd think that by now we'd know all there is to know about the side effects of sulfa drugs, wouldn't you? These were the top-flight antibiotics about 80 years ago, remember, and they've been in use (in one form or another) ever since. But some people have had pronounced CNS side effects from their use, and it's never been clear why. Until now, that is. Here's a new paper in Science that shows that this class of drugs inhibits the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, an essential cofactor for a number of hydroxylase and reductase enzymes. And that in turn interferes with neurotransmitter levels, specifically dopamine and se...
Source: In the Pipeline - May 29, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Infectious Diseases Source Type: blogs

First They Came for My Coke, Then They Came for My Jack
Ilya Shapiro Not satisfied with hounding smokers and purveyors of Big Gulp sodas – or even gun manufacturers – nanny-staters have reached way back into their historical toolkits to go after alcohol.  That’s right, in this the 90th year since the repeal of Prohibition, a new coalition has arisen to take on the scourge of demon rum. But these aren’t your great-granddaddy’s Baptists and bootleggers; instead we have a transnational alliance of “public health professionals” out to make the world a more sober place.  Not satisfied with the persuasiveness of their entreaties, however, ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 29, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Ilya Shapiro Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, May 29, 2013
Brought to you by MedPage Today. 1. Don’t Stop Warfarin for Dental Visits. Patients taking aspirin or warfarin (Coumadin) for prevention after a stroke don’t need to stop the drug for dental procedures and probably can stay on it for most other minor medical procedures. 2. Silent Afib Linked to Stroke in Diabetics. Asymptomatic atrial fibrillation might lie behind stroke of unknown origin in patients with type 2 diabetes. 3. Tamiflu Resistance Confirmed in H7N9 Flu Cases. Chinese researchers reported, for the first time, clinical evidence of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) resistance in patients infected with the novel a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 29, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Heart Infectious disease Neurology Source Type: blogs

Update: May 29, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: May 27 to May 29, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (2 updates) 2 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (96 updates) 1 Clinical note36 Diseases57 Country notes2 New Disease Synonyms AddedMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - May 29, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Update: May 27, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: May 25 to May 27, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (6 updates) 6 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (421 updates) 76 Diseases345 Country notesMap Microbiology – Bacteria (7 updates) 2 New Bacteria Added1 Bacteria2 New Bacteria Synonyms Added2 Microbes – New Microbiology – Mycobacteria (1 updates) 1 New Mycobacteria Added (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - May 27, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Inspired after seeing my 5-year-old patient
Off I go to work a few shifts at a desperately understaffed rural hospital in a state far away.  The rental car GPS leads me to the ED address and it’s not there.  All that is there is what looks like a small supermarket with a funeral home next door.  I see a security guard in the parking lot.  He has a lump in his cheek and a badge that says “Sam.”  I pull into the supermarket parking lot to ask for directions.  “Sir, do you know how I get to Bumtruck Valley Hospital?” Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find ou...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 26, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Emergency Infectious disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Update: May 25, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: May 15 to May 25, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (16 updates) 16 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (687 updates) 1 Clinical note127 Diseases554 Country notes5 New Disease Synonyms AddedMap Infectious Diseases – Vaccines (2 updates) 1 Vaccine1 New Vaccine Synonyms Added Microbiology – Mycobacteria (1 updates) 1 New Mycobacteria Added (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - May 26, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Clean Your Stuff
Alan starts each shift with a ritual of cleaning. I should be clear that I don’t use the word ritual as a literary device. Alan’s morning ambulance cleaning is as systematic and well thought out as any religious ceremony. Over the course of a few months of working together I learned the routine well. Checking through my medical kit I’d observe him start at the back doors of the rig, spraying and wiping the outside door handles and then opening the doors and wiping the insides. Then he would climb inside wiping handles, pram rails and anything people might habitually grab for support. The overhead rails al...
Source: The EMT Spot - May 24, 2013 Category: Ambulance Crew Authors: administrator Tags: Knowledge slider Source Type: blogs

Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - May 24, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease pulmonary Source Type: blogs

Early Mortality Rates Predict Late Mortality Rates
In past centuries exposure to infectious disease and malnutrition caused high mortality rates in children. Those who survived did so with a greater burden of various forms of low-level biological damage. Degenerative aging is caused by an accumulation of damage and thus remaining life expectancy is reduced. Researchers here dig up historical demographic data that supports this view, showing that people who survived high childhood mortality went on to live shorter lives on average: Early environmental influences on later life health and mortality are well recognized in the doubling of life expectancy since 1800. To further...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 24, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Pharmalot... Pharmalittle... Good Morning
Good morning, everyone, and welcome to another busy day. As usual, we are scrambling about on the Pharmalot corporate campus in order to deposit the short people at their schoolhouses and sorting out plans for the long weekend coming up. Meanwhile, though, there is much to do. The world has not stopped spinning, of course. So here are some tidbits. Hope your day is a success and do stay in touch... Wockhardt Says FDA Import Alert Could Hurt $100M In Sales (Business Standard)  J&J To Submit 17 New Drug Applications By 2017 (Dow Jones) FDA Panel Says Merck Sleeping Pill Is Safe At Low Doses (Bloomberg News) Glaxo Flu Sh...
Source: Pharmalot - May 23, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Top medicine articles for April-May 2013
Here are my suggestions for some of the top articles in medicine for April-May 2013: Antibiotics for COPD exacerbations: Further Evidence of Benefit http://buff.ly/WOANHG Diet does not work: substituting dietary linoleic acid in place of saturated fats increased the rates of death - BMJ http://buff.ly/WOAZH5 The Physician in US Cigarette Advertisements, 1930–1953 (illustrated review) http://1.usa.gov/VcuA7W via @Skepticscalpel Nearsighted kids may get worse in winter http://trib.in/VcvmC1 -- Myopia progression seem to decrease in periods with longer days and to increase in periods with shorter days. Children should ...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - May 22, 2013 Category: Professors and Educators Tags: Health News of the Day Source Type: blogs

Revealed Government Documents Show Vaccine Injured Children in Small African Village Used Like Lab Rats
Conclusion The parents’ requests are simple and the same as any other parent left in this impossible situation. They feel deserted and betrayed by the Chadian government, who have left their children to die, while at the same time announcing the vaccination program to be a success. All the parents are very angry and are pleading with the world to help. They state they need lawyers, doctors, medication and above all, support. This whole debacle has been a coverup from the very beginning. One of the children’s relatives has told me that there has never been a case of meningitis in this part of Africa. So, why vaccina...
Source: vactruth.com - May 19, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Christina England Tags: Christina England Top Stories Adverse Reaction MenAfriVac Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) PATH United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) World Health Organization (WHO) Source Type: blogs

Organizing principles: Classifying pain for healthcare, research | Pain Research Forum
Where does it hurt? How bad does it hurt? Why does it hurt? The many inconsistent and inadequate ways of sorting chronic pain by anatomy, severity, and associated medical conditions are impeding the health and well-being of patients, optimal medical care, and treatment advances, say pain experts who are calling for a change. This spring, two major efforts are taking shape to fill a widely perceived need for standardized worldwide diagnostic criteria to classify all chronic pain conditions (Finnerup et al., 2013; IOM, 2011; Rief et al., 2012; Rief et al., 2010; von Hehn et al., 2012)....
Source: Psychology of Pain - May 17, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

A Little Ranbaxy Example
Compare and contrast. Here we have Krishnan Ramalingam, from Ranbaxy's Corporate Communications department, in 2006: Being a global pharmaceutical major, Ranbaxy took a deliberate decision to pool its resources to fight neglected disease segments. . .Ranbaxy strongly felt that generic antiretrovirals are essential in fighting the world-wide struggle against HIV/AIDS, and therefore took a conscious decision to embark upon providing high quality affordable generics for patients around the world, specifically for the benefit of Least Developed Countries. . .Since 2001, Ranbaxy has been providing antiretroviral medicines of h...
Source: In the Pipeline - May 17, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Infectious Diseases Source Type: blogs

Microbes After Hours: West Nile virus
This discussion of West Nile virus was recorded at the headquarters of the American Society for Microbiology during a “Microbes After Hours” event on May 6, 2013. The speakers are Dr. Lyle Petersen Lyle R. Petersen, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Division of Vector-Borne Diseases at CDC, and Dr. Roberta DeBiasi, MD, FIDSA, Associate Professor of Pediatrics at George Washington University School of Medicine, Acting Chief and Attending Physician in the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Children’s National Medical Center, and investigator at Children’s Research Institute in the Center for...
Source: virology blog - May 16, 2013 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information encephalitis flavivirus mosquito paralysis vector viral West Nile virus Source Type: blogs

Antibiotics and the risk of sudden cardiac death
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - May 16, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: pharmacology hospital medicine infectious disease cardiovascular Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, May 16, 2013
Brought to you by MedPage Today. 1. Arts Therapy Has Benefits in Cancer. Cancer patients who participated in creative arts therapy derived significant clinical, psychological, and quality-of-life benefits, a meta-analysis of more than two dozen studies showed. 2. Fecal Transplant: FDA Wants Regulation. Researchers who have been reporting success with the use of fecal transplant to treat resistant C. difficile are likely to need an OK from the the FDA to continue that treatment. 3. Study: Embryonic Stem Cells Cloned. For the first time, researchers have efficiently produced human embryonic stem cells, using a process simila...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 16, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Cancer Infectious disease Source Type: blogs