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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 11.

What to Eat and How to Live: Government as Your Nanny?
Discussion Blog)
Source: Bioethics Discussion Blog - December 22, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 70-year-old man with night sweats, weight loss, and cough
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 70-year-old man is evaluated for a 3-month history of night sweats, weight loss, and increasing cough. He is a retired miner, and his medical history is significant for a diagnosis of pulmonary silicosis made 15 years ago based on exposure history and characteristic chest radiographic findings. He is a lifelong nonsmoker. On physical examination, temperature is 37.9 °C (100.2 °F), blood pressure is 120/65 mm Hg, pulse rate is 84/min, and respiration rate is 22/min. Pulmonary examination reveals diffuse inspi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 21, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Pulmonology Source Type: blogs

Pitt Research Program Receives $70 Million To Develop Hiv Prevention Products
Based out of the University of Pittsburgh and the Magee-Womens Research Institute, the Microbicide Trials Network (MTN) is one of five HIV/AIDS clinical trial networks sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Since 2006, the MTN has completed 13 clinical trials, and 11 more trials are in progress or will commence within 12 months. The MTN is focusing research on the development of microbicide devices applied inside the vagina or rectum to prevent HIV transmission. Although progress in the field of HIV prevention and treatment has been nothing short of breathtaking over the last decade, there ...
Source: aids-write.org - December 21, 2013 Category: HIV AIDS Authors: aidswrite Tags: current news aids Source Type: blogs

Twin U.s. Studies Unlock Mystery Of How Hiv Causes Aids
Dr Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, said the papers offer an “elegant” solution to a question that has eluded scientists since the virus was first identified in 1983. Greene said for years, scientists had thought that HIV killed immune system cells by infecting them directly, hijacking their DNA machinery and turning them into virus-producing factories. But this only happens to a small portion of CD4 T cells. In a series of experiments in human spleen, tonsil and lymph node tissues from HIV-infected patients, the Gladstone scientists discovered that the real d...
Source: aids-write.org - December 21, 2013 Category: HIV AIDS Authors: aidswrite Tags: current news aids news Source Type: blogs

Medicine is like twenty questions
Adrian Bell didn’t look dehydrated, but his diarrhea had come and gone for a week and a half when I saw him a few weeks ago. “Is anyone else sick with the same thing?” I asked, beginning my usual line of questioning. “No,” answered Eleanor, his wife. “Have you had any water to drink from a new or unknown source, or have you traveled away from home?” “No,” both answered in unison. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 20, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions GI Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

INFOGRAPHIC: A Close Look at How Prepared We Are for the Next Outbreak
From the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation: From antibiotic-resistant superbugs to the seasonal flu to Salmonella, infectious diseases are a serious health threat that also cost individuals and the health care industry billions. A new report from Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Outbreaks: Protecting Americans from Infectious Diseases, assesses gaps in our public health system that could severely limit our ability to effectively respond to an outbreak. For the complete report, visit the Outbreaks report page: http://bit.ly/1bcG27m For the infographic, visit the RWJF website: http://bit.l...
Source: BHIC - December 20, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Naomi Gonzales Tags: Public Health Source Type: blogs

Update: December 19, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: December 17 to December 19, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Diagnosis (23 updates) 23 Signs and Symptoms Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (2 updates) 2 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (241 updates) 78 Diseases163 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (15 updates) 2 Drugs13 New Drug Synonyms Added Microbiology – Bacteria (3 updates) 2 Bacteria – Phenotypic tests1 Microbes – Update Microbiology – Yeasts (6 updates) 6 Yeasts – Phenotypic tests (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - December 19, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Hepatitis C in Egypt
The following background data on Hepatitis C in Egypt are abstracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series. [1,2] Primary references available on request. Incidence and Prevalence: Hepatitis C is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in Egypt. The nationwide carriage rate in 1997 was estimated at 6 to 8 million, or 18.1% of the population – the highest rate in the world. A study published in 2010 estimated the yearly rate at 500,000 new cases (0.7% of the population); while a study published in 2013 estimated the yearly rate at fewer than 150,000 cases. An analysis published in 2009...
Source: GIDEON blog - December 19, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology ProMED Egypt hepatitis c Source Type: blogs

Outbreak Week
It’s Outbreak Week on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s New Public Health website. Are the public health community and the rest of the nation prepared to handle the next big outbreak of infectious disease? See ideas, infographics, videos and more information on their website: http://bit.ly/1jiBOVI (Source: BHIC)
Source: BHIC - December 18, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Patricia Devine Tags: Public Health Source Type: blogs

Best Post of September 2013
The next in our "Best of the Month" series is from September 16, 2013Two UC Davis Neurosurgeons Resign After Intentionally Infecting Intracranial Glioblastomas with Bowel Bacteria The Sacramento Bee recently reported that two UC Davis neurosurgeons who intentionally infected three glioblastoma patients with bowel bacteria have resigned their posts after the university found they had "deliberately circumvented" internal policies, "defied directives" from top leaders and sidestepped federal regulations, according to newly released university documents.Neurosurgeon J. Paul Muizelaar, MDDr. J. Paul Muizelaar, 66, the former he...
Source: neuropathology blog - December 18, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: Best of the Month series therapies Source Type: blogs

Continuing Medical Education (CME): Flawed JAMA Report Blurs Line Between “Medical Communication Companies” and Accredited “Medical Education Companies”
Today, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) published a brief report (Medical Communication Companies and Industry Grants) as well as an editorial in order to explore "the financial relationships between MCCs and drug device companies." The authors use a mixture of outdated figures, hyperbole, and blatant untruths to piece together their articles, which, according to CME Coalition Senior Advisor, Andrew Rosenberg, contain "so many inaccuracies and examples of unfounded innuendo" that "it is a challenge to enumerate them all." JAMA has decided not to make the report available to the public, but we have c...
Source: Policy and Medicine - December 18, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, December 17, 2013
From MedPage Today: Breast Cancer: Adding Avastin Boosts Toxicity. Beleaguered bevacizumab (Avastin) has failed another test in breast cancer. FDA Wants Proof of Anti-Bacterial Soap Claims. Manufacturers of nonprescription anti-bacterial hand soaps and body washes will soon be required to show their products are safe for long-term daily use and are more effective than plain soap in stopping the spread of infections. AACE Rejects Heart Groups’ Guidelines. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists said it doesn’t endorse the latest lipid and obesity guidelines from the American Heart Association and...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 17, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Cancer Heart Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Hepatitis A in Asian Russia
Reprted rates of Hepatiis A for Uzbekistan and bordering countries are strinkingly similar, and somewhat higher of those for the Russian Federation. [1,2] See graph [3]: References: 1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of Uzbekistan, 2013. 354 pages, 74 graphs, 69 references. http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/hepatitis-a-global-status/ 2. Berger SA. Hepatitis A: Global Status, 2013. 169 pages, 182 graphs, 1274 references. http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/hepatitis-a-global-status/ 3. Gideon Graph Tool, see tutorial at http://www.GIDEONonline.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/Gideon-Graphs.pps (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - December 15, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Outbreaks ProMED Hapatitis A Uzekistan Source Type: blogs

Interview: Max Utter of Jawbone
Wearable technology that is able to track an individual’s daily activity is no longer novel or out of reach for consumers. In a world where individuals can collect immense amounts of personal health data, one must ask how these gadgets are enabling lifestyle changes and reshaping healthcare, and what will such personal health monitors offer in the future? I went to ask these questions to Max Utter, the Vice President of Wellness Product Research at Jawbone to find out what his company achieved with the UP24 band, and his aspirations for the future of mobile health. Tom Fowler, Medgadget: What led Jawbone into the fitnes...
Source: Medgadget - December 13, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Tom Fowler Tags: Medgadget Exclusive Sports Medicine exercise Mobile Health Personal Health Product Development technology Source Type: blogs

Salmonellosis Rates in Scandinavia
Reported rates of salmonellosis among the Scandinavian countries are similar, and consistently higher than those of the United States [1,2] – see graph [3] References: 1. Berger SA. Samonellosis: Global Status, 2013. 255 pages, 300 graphs, 2510 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/salmonellosis-global-status/ 2. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of the United States, 2013. 1119 pages, 470 graphs, 11030 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-the-united-states/ 3. Gideon Graph Tool, see tutorial at http://www.GIDEONonline.com/wp/wp-c...
Source: GIDEON blog - December 13, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Salmonellosis Scandinavia united states Source Type: blogs

Update: December 13, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: December 11 to December 13, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (3 updates) 3 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (211 updates) 48 Diseases163 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (5 updates) 4 Drugs1 Susceptibility database – Update Infectious Diseases – Vaccines (2 updates) 2 Vaccines Microbiology – Bacteria (96 updates) 96 Bacteria Microbiology – Mycobacteria (5 updates) 5 Mycobacteria Microbiology – Yeasts (14 updates) 14 Yeasts (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - December 13, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Kloss and Bruce Toxicology
Learning should be fun… I am always on the look out for new and innovative ways to learn and share medical education and recently I stumbled upon Pocket Toxicology Flashcards by Brian Kloss and Travis Bruce. Fantastic design and concept for learning, revising and cementing mnemonics and visual associations through the use of cartoon animations. Kloss manages to take a series of toxidromes, mnemonics and learning pearls and create an interesting visual feast to explore. Full of toxicological facts, and visual clues these initial sketches are brought to life by Travis Bruce as succinct, dark and humorous educational ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - December 13, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Mike Cadogan Tags: Book Review Education Emergency Medicine Envenomation Featured Health Reviews Toxicology Toxinology Brian Kloss Kloss and Bruce toxidromes Travis Bruce Source Type: blogs

N. meningitidis: Mother Nature is usually trying to kill us
Those of us who believe in the unvarying beneficence of Mother Nature have yet to contemplate Neisseria meningitidis. N. meningitidis is a bacterium that can live harmlessly in the throats of healthy people. But about 500 times a year in the US it causes bacterial meningitis, a life-threatening infection in which the membranes lining the brain and spinal cord become inflamed. Bacterial meningitis is treatable with antibiotics but even with treatment patients sometime suffer hearing loss or brain damage. And despite prompt treatment infection is sometimes fatal. When N. meningitidis gets into the blood stream it can ca...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 12, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: December 11, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: December 8 to December 11, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (190 updates) 62 Diseases128 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (12 updates) 1 New Drugs Added1 New Drug Synonyms Added9 Drug interactions – New1 Susceptibility database – New Infectious Diseases – Vaccines (2 updates) 2 New Vaccine Synonyms Added Microbiology – Bacteria (6 updates) 1 Bacteria4 New Bacteria Synonyms Added1 Microbes – Update (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - December 11, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Apocalypse maybe?
I can't remember the guy's name and I can't figure out a way to use your favorite on-line search engine to track it down, but many suns ago -- 20 years or so -- he was a highly controversial microbiologist who claimed it was a certainty -- not if but when -- that the global human population would be decimated by a global pandemic, or maybe several, of emerging infectious diseases.The controversy was not so much over whether this was true -- a lot of people in the public health field, of various disciplines, tended to think so. The controversy was because he gave the impression he thought this would be a good thing. The hum...
Source: Stayin' Alive - December 10, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Source Type: blogs

Free Hiv Screening For All Pregnant Women Soon
Fifteen new cases of HIV/Aids were detected in Qatar last year, taking the total cases in the country to 276, an expert at the Supreme Council of Health (SCH) disclosed at the seminar that marked World Aids Day. Speakers stressed the importance of HIV screening for pregnant women to prevent transmission of the disease to newborns. The event for doctors was organised by Hamad Medical Corporations (HMC) Infectious Disease Department in collaboration with SCH. HIV transmission appears to be very limited in Qatar with a low HIV prevalence rate of 0.02 percent, said Dr Al Mubasher Abu Baker from SCH. A total of 276 HIV cases ha...
Source: aids-write.org - December 10, 2013 Category: HIV AIDS Authors: aidswrite Tags: current news aids news Source Type: blogs

Death By Stubbornness: What’s A Doctor To Do?
Over the years that I’ve worked in acute inpatient rehab centers, I have been truly vexed by a particular type of patient. Namely, the stubborn patient (usually an elderly gentleman with a military or armed forces background). I know that it’s not completely fair to generalize about personality types, but it seems that the very nature of their work has either developed in them a steely resolve, or they were attracted to their profession because they possessed the right temperament for it. Either way, when they arrive in the rehab unit after some type of acute illness or traumatic event, it is very challenging t...
Source: Better Health - December 9, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Dr. Val Jones Tags: Opinion True Stories Acute Inpatient Rehab anorexia Downward Spiral Ex-military Infection Motivation Patient Autonomy Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation Physical Therapy Police Officers Psychiatry Stubbornness Veterans Wive Source Type: blogs

Medicine is a universal language
This past spring, I went to Dar es Salaam, Tanzania to do an internal medicine elective at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences. I rotated through two sub-divisions of internal medicine while I was there: infectious disease and cardiology. The medicine When I initially stepped onto the infectious disease ward, I saw the janitors mopping the cement floors with soap and water. The ward was crowded and the patients lying on the floor had their mattresses mobilized to the stairwell so their space could be cleaned. I noticed not all of the patients had mosquito nets and only about a quarter of the fans were on des...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 7, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Heart Infectious disease Residency Source Type: blogs

With vaccines…Is there no middle ground, no room for questions?
“We should be as demanding of ourselves as we are of those who challenge us.” Dr. Jerome Groopman, writing in the New Rupublic Writing about the medical decision-making surrounding vaccines proved to be sketchy. Yesterday’s post brought stinging criticism from both sides of the debate. A pediatrician felt the structure of the post was patronizing. Just an hour later, a skeptic sent me the same message–patronizing. This was educational. Criticism is taken seriously here, especially when it comes from both sides of an argument. The reflex: Perhaps its useful to write more on the matter? (It’s f...
Source: Dr John M - December 6, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

Overcoming EMR Implementation Barriers in Medically Underserved Areas
This post has been contributed by Alan Edwards who holds an MBA in Health Care and is a former hospital CEO and group practice administrator. He continues to be active in the field and often writes on health insurance and health policy. The world of medical care providers turned itself upside-down and inside out over implementation and meaningful use of electronic medical records also known as electronic health records. The industry uses the acronyms EHR or EMR to describe electronic medical records. Implementation of EMR is not part of the Affordable Care Act. Though President Obama is a major supporter of the EMR, implem...
Source: EMR EHR Blog for Physicians - December 4, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Shreya Iyer Source Type: blogs

Update: December 4, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: December 2 to December 4, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Diagnosis (1 updates) 1 Country Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (4 updates) 4 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (212 updates) 47 Diseases165 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - December 4, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

The vaccine debate — Could compassion and nuance be an antidote?
I’ve been thinking a lot about vaccines. As a learner, an observer of humans and our nature, a worshiper of the scientific method, a doctor, a new grandfather, and a member of society, few debates could be more compelling. The kerfuffle over vaccines has it all. It’s the Lance Armstrong story on steroids. (Grin.) The spark for writing on this matter came from reading a mother’s impassioned call for reason. (Link at the end.) The author is a young lawyer who writes (skillfully) about being married to a young doctor. Her vaccine post went viral, garnering 483 comments—which, for a blogger, is akin to nirvana. In ...
Source: Dr John M - December 4, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

Virology at Coursera
One of my goals as a science communicator is to be Earth’s virology professor. To do this I teach an undergraduate virology course at Columbia University and at iTunes University. This past summer I ported my undergraduate virology course to Coursera.org where I reached 26,000 students. My next virology course at Coursera, How viruses cause disease, begins on 9 January 2014. How viruses cause disease explores the interplay between viruses and their host organisms. The course begins with an overview of how infection is established in a host, then moves to a virologist’s view of immune defenses.  Next we consi...
Source: virology blog - December 3, 2013 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information course coursera infectious disease lecture microbiology online viral virus Source Type: blogs

Our most awaited gift has arrived!
So after our long wait – fertility treatment for 2 years and journey through pregnancy, our bundle of joy arrived earlier this month! Our earlier update (given below) was at the beginning of my second trimester. Everything was going as smooth as one could pray for. But towards the end of second trimester I failed the glucose tolerance test for Gestational Diabetes and with my numbers, history and precious pregnancy I was asked to start insulin immediately. The pricks for testing sugar levels and insulin shots were no joy - but we had no choice but go by the doctor’s advice. Though this bothered us for a while, things f...
Source: The Patient's Doctor - December 2, 2013 Category: Obstetricians and Gynecologists Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 33-year-old woman with whitish spots in the mouth and throat
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 33-year-old woman is evaluated for a 5-week history of whitish spots in the mouth and the back of the throat and discomfort with swallowing solid foods. This is her first episode of these symptoms. She has had no mouth pain, trouble ingesting liquids or pills, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, chills, sweats, or skin problems. She has a 3-year history of HIV infection and also has moderately severe asthma, which is now well controlled with inhaled medications that were recently prescribed. Her medications are...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 1, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Why IPAB is a good idea
IPAB – the independent payment advisory board is a key feature of the ACA. This board will do what many countries already do – have an independent expert panel to assess the effectiveness of procedures, imaging studies, pharmaceuticals, etc. Why do we need this board? We need careful assessments of new trends in medicine. Let me suggest two situations. We have read much about increasing colonoscopy costs. We have a controversy about anesthesia – conscious sedation versus a more standard anesthesia with propofol. The former only requires the gastroenterologist; the latter adds an anesthesiologist, and the...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - November 29, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Update: November 29, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: November 27 to November 29, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (2 updates) 2 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (512 updates) 69 Diseases443 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Vaccines (56 updates) 56 Vaccines Microbiology – Bacteria (84 updates) 84 Bacteria (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - November 29, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, November 27, 2013
From MedPage Today: Supreme Court to Consider Birth Control Mandate. The Supreme Court on Tuesday said it will hear a challenge to the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) mandate that employer health plans provide birth control at no cost to employees — even if an employer objects to contraceptives. FDA Clamps Down on Gene-Testing Company. The gene-testing firm 23andMe has not received approval for its product and must stop marketing its test for the time being. Avandia Decision a Moot Point for Prescribers? It’s unlikely that the FDA’s decision to loosen some of the restrictions on the controversial type...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 27, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Genetics Infectious disease OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

Update: November 27, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: November 24 to November 27, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (2 updates) 2 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (302 updates) 1 Clinical note37 Diseases264 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (33 updates) 33 Susceptibility database – Update Microbiology – Bacteria (823 updates) 762 Bacteria58 New Bacteria Synonyms Added3 Microbes – Update Microbiology – Mycobacteria (67 updates) 67 Mycobacteria Microbiology – Yeasts (51 updates) 1 New Yeasts Added50 Yeasts (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - November 27, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Bill Gates’ Polio Vaccine Program Eradicates Children, Not Polio
Conclusion With numbers of this size being reported about vaccine-induced polio, you would think that someone, somewhere, would have tried to stop the devastation. However, instead of stopping the vaccination program and trying to rein in Bill Gates, it appears that governments worldwide have given Gates the green light to do exactly what he wants. Many of the children affected with vaccine-induced polio will die as a result of their illness. This is not eradication of polio; this is eradication of the children of India, plain and simple. For eradication of a disease to be effective, you do not replace one disease for anot...
Source: vactruth.com - November 26, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Christina England Tags: Christina England Top Stories adverse reactions Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation OPV Polio truth about vaccines Vaccine-associated Polio Paralysis (VAPP) Source Type: blogs

Bet You Didn't Know That About The Flu (video)
From History channel: Get the full story behind the aches, pains and dangerous history of the flu. Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook. (Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog)
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - November 25, 2013 Category: Professors and Educators Tags: Infectious Diseases Video Source Type: blogs

Weekly Roundup – November 21, 2013
Happy almost Friday! Obamacare continues to get top billing in health care news. Below are some of the non-Obamacare health care stories that we hope you will find interesting. The medical profession has issued new guidelines for fighting the nation’s obesity epidemic. These guidelines recommend physicians be more aggressive about helping their patients lose unneeded pounds. The Washington Post has more on what this might mean for you at your next doctor’s appointment. The New York Times published an article about Jorge Odón, a car mechanic who developed a tool that eases births. The device whose idea came from a YouT...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - November 21, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Roundup American Academy of Pediatrics health new york times USA Today Wall Street Journal Washington Post Source Type: blogs

Fungal meningitis following epidural steroid injections
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - November 21, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

European Medicines Agency Accepts Marketing Authorization Application for The Medicines Company's Fibrocaps
PARSIPPANY, NJ--(Nov 21, 2013) - The Medicines Company (MDCO) today announced that the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has accepted for review a marketing authorization application (MAA) for the investigational hemostatic agent Fibrocaps (human plasma-derived fibrinogen and thrombin). Fibrocaps was studied in the 719-patient Phase III FINISH-3 clinical trial as an adjunct to hemostasis in patients undergoing surgical procedures when control of mild or moderate bleeding by conventional surgical techniques is ineffective or impractical. The acceptance of the MAA marks the beginning of the review process in the European ...
Source: Medical Hemostat - November 21, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: hemostatguy at gmail.com (hemostat guy) Source Type: blogs

Update: November 20, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: November 18 to November 20, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (10 updates) 10 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (531 updates) 99 Diseases431 Country notes1 New Country Synonyms AddedMap Microbiology – Bacteria (2 updates) 2 New Bacteria Added (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - November 20, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

A Historical Review Of The Toilet And Its Contribution To International Sanitation Efforts
November 19 is International Toilet Day. That may sound funny, but it is a serious event. It is a day to contemplate what we have and others don’t. As we sit in privacy on our comfortable flush toilets today, it is hard to imagine that a scant two hundred years ago sewage disposal meant emptying chamber pots into the nearest convenient place, which was often the street. If you were out for a walk in Britain in the 18th century and heard the cry “gardy-loo,” you had better scamper across the street because the contents of a chamber pot were set to be hurled your way from a window. The expression derives from the Fren...
Source: Better Health - November 19, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: admin Tags: Health Policy Health Tips Humor Chamber Pots Cholera Flush Toilets History Infectious Disease International Toilet Day Sanitation Source Type: blogs

Lessons from the polio outbreak in Syria
If you remember the 1950s you probably remember the terror of polio. Polio, short for poliomyelitis, is a disease caused by a virus which can cause severe inflammation of the spinal cord. Though most infected people have no symptoms, a small fraction of patients are left with permanent paralysis and deformities. The disease is sometimes fatal. In the US, the 1952 polio epidemic killed over 3,000 people and left over 20,000 with some paralysis. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 19, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Leprosy in Nigeria
Leprosy rates in Nigeria have been decreasing slowly since the 1990′s, and are similar to those of surrounding countries and Africa as a whole. [1,2] See graph [3]: References: 1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of Nigeria, 2013. 442 pages, 62 graphs, 2519 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-nigeria/ 2. Berger SA. Leprosy: Global status, 2013. 238 pages, 377 graphs, 276 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/leprosy-global-status/ 3. Gideon Graph Tool, see tutorial at http://www.GIDEONonline.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/Gideon-Grap...
Source: GIDEON blog - November 18, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Graphs Leprosy Nigeria Source Type: blogs

The antibiotics crisis
Why are antibiotics so important?Without them, modern medicine would not be possible. Arguably the most important factor in the 30-year jump in American life expectancy in the 20th century, these "wonder drugs" allow us to fight the whole gamut of bacterial illness, from everyday ear infections to diseases such as syphilis, typhoid, and tuberculosis that used to kill millions of people. Their discovery about 100 years ago also revolutionized the world of surgery: As antibiotics drastically reduced the number of post-operative infections, standard operations that used to be considered perilous — such as appendix removals ...
Source: PharmaGossip - November 18, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Update: November 17, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: November 15 to November 17, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (231 updates) 1 Clinical note83 Diseases147 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (1 updates) 1 Susceptibility database – New (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - November 17, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Doctor Offers Vaccines to Starving Children
Conclusion The effects of chronic malnutrition on the children and the economy of Guatemala are being turned into statistics by researchers, but common sense tells us what we already know:  there will be lifelong impairments to the citizens and the collective people of this country. Dr. Asturias’ plan may appear to be sound and noble when you read the headline in the mainstream media. However, when you consider the most pressing needs faced by the citizens of Guatemala, including lack of food, lack of clean water, and lack of education, vaccines (even if you are among the shrinking group of people who still believe ...
Source: vactruth.com - November 17, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Missy Fluegge Tags: Missy Fluegge Top Stories Dr. Edwin Asturias Vaccine Safety Source Type: blogs

Critical Care Compendium update
LITFL’s Critical Care Compendium is a comprehensive collection of pages concisely covering the core topics and controversies of critical care. Currently there are almost 1,500 entries with more in the works… Some pages are more developed than others, and all the pages are being constantly revised and improved. Links to new references and online resources are added daily, with an emphasis on those that are free and open access (FOAM!). These pages originated from the FCICM exam study notes created by Dr Jeremy Fernando in 2011, and have been updated, modified and added to since. As such will be particularly us...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 17, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: Critical Care Compendium Education eLearning Emergency Medicine Featured CCC LITFL collection Source Type: blogs

We are sheltered from global health diseases
“I don’t even know what I have.” Those were some of the first words that came out of the mouth of a 25-year-old Caucasian female at the county hospital. Amy, as I will hereby recall, presented with fever, malaise, chills, and sweats, supposedly from an unknown cause. She had recently come back from a trip to Africa with her boyfriend. Quite the exotic romantic getaway, but the only problem was that she had neglected to take her anti-malarial pills beforehand. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 16, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Nih Announces New Co-chairs Of Panel On Antiretroviral Guidelines
Bartlett, M.D. The following panel leadership changes were announced at a recent OARAC meeting: John G. Bartlett, M.D., will retire from his position as panel co-chair at the end of 2013, a position he has held since the panels creation in 1996. Dr. Bartlett was instrumental in the development of the Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents and in that capacity, helped to establish the nations first HIV treatment guidelines, said Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH. You will find the original content at this website http://w...
Source: aids-write.org - November 14, 2013 Category: HIV AIDS Authors: aidswrite Tags: current news Source Type: blogs

Former FDA Commishs To White House: Limit Antibiotics In Livestock
A pair of former FDA commissioners has written a letter to the White House Office of Management and Budget to urge the Obama administration to end the use of antibiotics in food-producing livestock for preventing disease and fattening the animals. The missive, which was sent today by David Kessler and Donald Kennedy, is the latest attempt to address concerns that the widespread and, allegedly, inappropriate use of these medications jeopardize human health by causing resistance to the drugs. As part of their overture, they want the White House to push the FDA to finalize a draft guidance issued last year that would create g...
Source: Pharmalot - November 12, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs