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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 11.

Update: July 17, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 16 to July 17, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (5 updates) 5 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (365 updates) 1 Clinical note70 Diseases294 Country notesMap Microbiology – Bacteria (2 updates) 2 New Bacteria Added (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 17, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Update: July 15, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 13 to July 15, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (2 updates) 2 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (60 updates) 2 Clinical notes24 Diseases34 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (2 updates) 2 Interacting drugs – New Infectious Diseases – Vaccines (1 updates) 1 New Vaccine Synonyms Added (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 15, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Visiting biosafety level-4 laboratories
Experiments with the most dangerous human viruses, such as Ebola virus and Lassa virus, are carried out in biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) laboratories. Since visiting the Northeast Infectious Diseases Laboratory BSL-4 and releasing the documentary video Threading the NEIDL, I was given the opportunity to tour three BSL-4 laboratories in the United States and Australia. My impressions of each facility might be of interest to readers of this blog. Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, Montana Rocky Mountain Laboratory (RML) is located in the small and sleepy town of Hamilton, Montana (population 4,508), in the Bitterroot Vally t...
Source: virology blog - July 15, 2014 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Information Australian Animal Health Laboratory biosecurity BSL-3 BSL-4 Doherty Institute NEIDL RML Rocky Mountain Laboratory viral virus Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 039
Welcome to the 39th edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media to allow some of the best and brightest emergency medicine and critical care clinicians from all over the world tell us what they think is worth reading from the published literature. This edition contains 13 recommended reads. The R&R Editorial Team includes Jeremy Fried, Nudrat Rashid, Soren Rudolph, Anand Swaminathan and, of course, Chris Nickson. Find more R&R in the Fastlane reviews in the R&R Archive, read more about the R&R project or check out the f...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 14, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Soren Rudolph Tags: Anaesthetics Cardiology Emergency Medicine Emergency Medicine Update Featured Infectious Disease Intensive Care Pre-hospital / Retrieval Resuscitation critical care literature R&R in the FASTLANE recommendations research and revi Source Type: blogs

Update: July 13, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 11 to July 13, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (3 updates) 3 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (112 updates) 3 Clinical notes44 Diseases65 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 13, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Update: July 11, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 8 to July 11, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (171 updates) 47 Diseases124 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 11, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 038
This study, however, has major flaws and biases that question the validity of their conclusions. Only 19% of centers that were contacted agreed to contribute data to the Consortium. Additionally, the researchers do not assess the quality of the studies included in their meta-analysis. Regardless, observational data should not be used to trump the RCT data included in the recent, Cochrane review. Finally, Roche pharmaceuticals was a major sponsor of this research team. The accompanying editorial is a must-read. Recommended by: Anand Swaminathan Infection Control, Hand hygiene D’Egidio G et al. A study of the ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 10, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nudrat Rashid Tags: Anaesthetics Cardiology Emergency Medicine Featured Infectious Disease Intensive Care Neurology Palliative care R&R in the FASTLANE Radiology Resuscitation Trauma critical care literature recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Update: July 8, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 6 to July 8, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (3 updates) 3 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (352 updates) 1 Clinical note62 Diseases289 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 8, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Advocate Groups Reach Out to President's Science Advisors Ahead of Antibiotics Meeting | Food Safety News
The President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) will meet Friday to discuss its work on antibiotic resistance and nanotechnology and to hear from speakers about oceans policy.A group of public health, consumer, and environmental protection organizations have sent a letter to PCAST expressing concern that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Guidance for Industry #213 and a proposed Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) rule do not go far enough in addressing antibiotic overuse on farms.By March, FDA had heard from 25 of the 26 drug manufacturers affected by Guidance #213...
Source: PharmaGossip - July 8, 2014 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Update: July 6, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 2 to July 6, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (8 updates) 8 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (78 updates) 29 Diseases49 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 6, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

CIHR results...so depressing
The results have been released for the latest competition for operating grants from the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (Canada's equivalent of NIH).  Our proposal was ranked 13/72 by its assessment committee (Microbiology and Infectious Disease), but they only funded 11.This is our 7th failed CIHR proposal in a row.  They all had good scores, and several, like this one, were very close to being funded.  The scores show that our proposals do keep getting better (this time 4.5/5), but the funding cutoffs also keep rising and we're never quite good enough.Will I try again?  Perhaps not.  This...
Source: RRResearch - July 4, 2014 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Rosie Redfield Source Type: blogs

The importance of recognizing immunodeficiency
On a cold, blustery Cleveland day when I was a resident, a forty-year-old man walked into our infectious disease clinic at the Cleveland Clinic. The patient was undergoing routine visits in preparation for a kidney transplant. This poor man had been hospitalized six months earlier at another hospital where he caught a terrible infection and was readmitted in septic shock and multi-organ failure. Luckily he survived, but in the process lost some of his toes as well as his kidney function. Thus, he was now on dialysis and awaiting a new kidney. The organism to blame was streptococcus pneumoniae, which causes pneumonias and e...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 3, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Specialist Source Type: blogs

Update: July 2, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 29 to July 2, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (9 updates) 9 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (179 updates) 54 Diseases125 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 2, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 037
Conclusion: Use of an age-adjusted d-dimer threshold reduces imaging among patients age <50 years with a Revised Geneva Score ≤ 10. While the adoption of an age-adjusted d-dimer threshold is probably safe, the confidence intervals surrounding the additional 1.5% of PE that was missed using an age-adjusted threshold necessitate a prospective study before this practice can be adopted into routine clinical care. Recommended by: Salim R. Rezaie,  Jeremy Fried Read More: The Adventure of the Golden Standard (Rory Spiegel) Resuscitation Wik L et al. Manual vs. integrated automatic load-distributing band CPR with equal ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 2, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nudrat Rashid Tags: Anaesthetics Cardiology Emergency Medicine Featured General Surgery Health Infectious Disease Intensive Care Neurology Neurosurgery Radiology Resuscitation Trauma critical care literature R&R in the FASTLANE recommendations Source Type: blogs

Molecular Diagnostics review
Excerpt from a book review of Molecular Diagnostics: Current Research and Applications"This book provides a broad overview of today's clinical applications of molecular diagnostics ... an abundance of wise advice and cautionary notes regarding establishing and clinically validating molecular diagnostic assays ... I would highly recommend this book ... one of the best reviews and guidelines for development of point of care testing devices using molecular diagnostics." from Valerie L. Ng (Alameda County Medical Center, Highland Hospital, California, USA) writing in Doodys (2014) read more ...Molecular Diagnostics: Current Re...
Source: Microbiology Blog: The weblog for microbiologists. - July 1, 2014 Category: Microbiology Source Type: blogs

The Omega Man?
I wrote recently that I was losing no more than an hour of sleep each night over the prospect of a horrific global pandemic, mostly because we supposedly know what we are doing more so than the medieval folks who were decimated by the Black Death.Well, maybe, but three essays in the new BMJ should give us pause. The problem is that scientific understanding of infectious disease isn't enough if we don't have global mechanisms for putting that knowledge to work in an emergency. I think you'll only get the first paragraphs, but it isn't hard for me to hit the high points for you.First, Ilona Kickbusch (yeah yeah) and Mathias ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - June 30, 2014 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Update: June 29, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 27 to June 29, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Diagnosis (2 updates) 2 Countries Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (4 updates) 4 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (429 updates) 83 Diseases346 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 29, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Deaths from Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
During 1961 to 1970, 207 deaths were ascribed to Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF); and an estimated 612 patients died of the disease during 1983 to 1998. The highest mortality, 50 cases, was reported in 1970. In recent years, the case-fatality rate for RMSF has remained fairly constant at 0.4% to 0.8%. Among the tick-borne infections, Lyme disease has now eclipsed RMSF as a cause of death in the United States – see graph [1, 2] References: 1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of the United States, 2014. 1145 pages, 478 graphs, 12294 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-d...
Source: GIDEON blog - June 28, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Graphs ProMED Rocky Mountain spotted fever united states Source Type: blogs

Fact vs. Fiction: Judge Upholds Barring Unvaccinated Children from Public Schools
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Vaccination is one of the great success stories of public health. People who receive vaccinations against disease are far less likely to contract that disease. In 1900, 30.4% of all deaths from infectious disease were to children under the age of 5 and the top three causes of death were pneumonia, tuberculosis and diarrhea-enteritis. By 2010, the only infectious disease in the top ten list was influenza and pneumonia at 9th place. In 2012, 91.4% of adolescents are immunized for measles, mumps & rubella, 92.8% for Hep B, and many others.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 27, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Cultural Featured Posts Health Regulation & Law Pediatrics Philosophy & Ethics Politics Public Health vaccination Source Type: blogs

Update: June 27, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 24 to June 27, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (437 updates) 85 Diseases352 Country notesMap Microbiology – Yeasts (1 updates) 1 Yeasts (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 27, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 036
This study found that a high percentage (49%) of patients with serious adverse outcomes after an ED visit for COPD were not initially admitted to the hospital. The authors used logistic regression to derive a decision instrument to aid in determining which patients with COPD exacerbation should be admitted based on risk stratification. The study does not show that admission improves outcomes but the instrument may prove useful for risk stratification if it is prospectively validated. Recommended by: Anand Swaminathan Emergency Medicine, Critical care, Anaesthetics Barends CRM ,Absalom AR. Tied up in science: unknotting ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 25, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nudrat Rashid Tags: Anaesthetics Emergency Medicine Evidence Based Medicine Featured Health Infectious Disease Intensive Care Respiratory Resuscitation critical care literature R&R in the FASTLANE recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Definition of Rare Disease
In June, 2014, my book, entitled Rare Diseases and Orphan Drugs: Keys to Understanding and Treating the Common Diseases was published by Elsevier. The book builds the argument that our best chance of curing the common diseases will come from studying and curing the rare diseases. Short excerpt from the Introduction chapter: “The beginnings and endings of all human undertakings are untidy.”—John Galsworthy In the U.S., Public Law 107-280, the Rare Diseases Act of 2002 states: “Rare diseases and disorders are those which affect small patient populations, typically populations smaller than 200,000 individuals in the U...
Source: Specified Life - June 24, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: common diseases definition of rare diseases genetic disease organizations for rare diseases orphan diseases orphan drugs rare disease organizations rare disease research Source Type: blogs

Update: June 24, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 22 to June 24, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (6 updates) 6 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (188 updates) 67 Diseases121 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 24, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

"End of the World" plague
I happened across this today and it inspired me to write a post I've been thinking about for a while. The link is to a story about the so-called Cyprian plague of the Third Century, possibly an outbreak of smallpox, which is said to have given a boost to Christianity.A couple of decades back there was a virologist or epidemiologist, whose name I forget, who firmly predicted that at some time in the coming decades, an emerging infectious disease would explode and decimate the global population. He generated immense controversy in part because it kind of sounded like he was hoping for it, part of his premise being that there...
Source: Stayin' Alive - June 23, 2014 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, June 23, 2014
From MedPage Today: FDA: Testosterone Carries VTE Risk. Testosterone products can cause venous thromboembolism (VTE) even in patients without polycythemia, the FDA warned amidst ongoing cardiovascular risk assessment. Safety Foul-Up Exposes CDC Staff to Anthrax. A breakdown in safety procedures has exposed 84 CDC staffers in Atlanta to live anthrax. In Knee OA, Keep on Walkin’. Patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) can decrease their likelihood of developing functional limitations by walking more. Depression-Heart Risk Link Strongest in Younger Women. Among patients undergoing coronary angiography, younger women a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 23, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Heart Infectious disease Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

The SENS View on Cell Loss in Aging and How To Reverse It
Jason Hope is one of the more generous philanthropists to have funded projects in rejuvenation biotechnology carried by under the auspices of the SENS Research Foundation. His funds went towards making a start on breaking down glucosepane cross-links in old tissues, thereby removing its contribution to loss of skin elasticity, arterial stiffening, and other forms of degeneration caused when sugar compounds link proteins together in ways that hamper tissue function. This buildup of cross-links is an important aspect of numerous age-related medical conditions, but in principal it and its effects are reversible - if the gluco...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 23, 2014 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Activism, Advocacy and Education Source Type: blogs

Guidelines should rarely become rules
Five thirty eight has this wonderful provocative article – Patients Can Face Grave Risks When Doctors Stick to the Rules Too Much The subsequent comments have debates over the value of guidelines. Guidelines are like a box of chocolate, you never know what you are going to get. Many clinical questions yield “competing guidelines”. We all know the controversies over breast cancer screening and prostate cancer screening. Recently BP targets and lipid management have become controversial. Pharyngitis (a personal research interest) has multiple varied guidelines. In the movie, Pirates of the Caribbean, this c...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - June 22, 2014 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

We should value quality when we shop for health care
Over the years, my husband’s parents, Helen and Dave, have both suffered unnecessarily from bad medical care. They are not alone. A botched cataract surgery left Helen with a torn iris. One of her eyes can’t adjust to light, and for the last several years she’s worn sunglasses indoors. Her urologist kept treating her with the same antibiotic for urinary tract infections without testing to see what bacteria she had. When her symptoms persisted for months, I finally intervened. I ordered urine testing myself — I’m an internist and infectious disease specialist — and prescribed the right antibiotic. Contin...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 21, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Update: June 21, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 19 to June 21, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (2 updates) 2 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (360 updates) 64 Diseases296 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 21, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

How to End Aging: Aubrey de Grey at TEDxOxbridge
When it comes to extending the healthy human life span and eliminating the suffering caused by age-related disease - and indeed by aging in general - the overwhelming majority of the world's population lie somewhere in the midst of disinterest, disbelief, and ignorance. To a first approximation no-one really cares about medical science, for all that they owe their health to this field of research and development. Similarly despite living in the midst of an age of radical change, with completely new technologies and medical therapies turning up every few years, people generally assume that the rest of their lives will take ...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 20, 2014 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Activism, Advocacy and Education Source Type: blogs

Update: June 19, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 18 to June 19, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (5 updates) 5 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (149 updates) 54 Diseases95 Country notesMap Microbiology – Bacteria (3 updates) 1 New Bacteria Added2 Microbes – New (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 19, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 035
This study suggests that antiemetics are not nearly as potent as widely believed. These drugs have been shown to be effective in preventing nausea (i.e. pretreatment for chemo) but it’s appears that the mechanism for halting nausea is different than that for preventing it. Recommended by: Anand Swaminathan Read More: Nausea? We’ve Got Placebo for That The Best of the Rest Emergency Medicine, Pulmonary 1. Kew KM, Kirtchuk L, Michell C. Intravenous magnesium sulfate for treating adults with acute asthma in the emergency department. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014 May 28;5 PubMed ID: 24865567 This Cochr...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 18, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Anand Swaminathan Tags: Anaesthetics Cardiology Emergency Medicine Evidence Based Medicine General Surgery Intensive Care Palliative care Pediatrics Respiratory Resuscitation Trauma critical care literature R&R in the FASTLANE recommendations resear Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 035
This study suggests that antiemetics are not nearly as potent as widely believed. These drugs have been shown to be effective in preventing nausea (i.e. pretreatment for chemo) but it’s appears that the mechanism for halting nausea is different than that for preventing it. Recommended by: Anand Swaminathan Read More: Nausea? We’ve Got Placebo for That The Best of the Rest Emergency Medicine, Pulmonary 1. Kew KM, Kirtchuk L, Michell C. Intravenous magnesium sulfate for treating adults with acute asthma in the emergency department. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014 May 28;5 PubMed ID: 24865...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 18, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Anand Swaminathan Tags: Anaesthetics Cardiology Emergency Medicine Evidence Based Medicine Featured General Surgery Intensive Care Palliative care Pediatrics Respiratory Resuscitation Trauma critical care literature R&R in the FASTLANE recommendatio Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, June 18, 2014
From MedPage Today: Is There an Rx for High Drug Prices? In the U.S., rising prescription drug prices are the law — at least that’s the way it looks to Leonard Saltz, MD, chief of gastrointestinal oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. Targets Tightened for Kids’ Type 1 Diabetes. Tiered treatment targets in pediatric type 1 diabetes have been eliminated by the American Diabetes Association in favor of a single, lower goal. MERS: Serious But Not an Emergency. The Middle East coronavirus (MERS) remains a serious concern but is still not a global public health emergency, a Wor...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 18, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Diabetes Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Considering Atherosclerosis
Atherosclerosis is a fearsome age-related condition, as it is quite possible to suffer the progressive build up of arterial plaque with few or no apparent symptoms all the way up until some of it suddenly ruptures to cause the catastrophic blockage of blood flow known as an infarction, and that either cripples you or kills you over the course of an exceedingly painful few minutes. If this affects your heart or your brain you will be lucky to survive, and luckier to recover. The various contributing causes of atherosclerosis are numerous, each layer of cause and effect feeding into the one above. An incomplete list might i...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 18, 2014 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Update: June 17, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 14 to June 17, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (8 updates) 8 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (250 updates) 78 Diseases172 Country notesMap Microbiology – Bacteria (2 updates) 1 Bacteria1 Microbes – New (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 17, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Should Premature Babies Be Included In The One-Size-Fits-All Vaccination Policy?
Conclusion Clearly, the one-size-fits-all vaccination policy does not fit premature babies. How can it be considered lawful or indeed moral to vaccinate premature babies with the same vaccinations that are administered to adults? We can see from the studies undertaken by Dr. Viera Scheibner and her late husband Leif Karlsson that many of the routine vaccinations used on premature babies today can cause them to suffer stress-induced breathing patterns. These studies are irrefutable and have been used worldwide to demonstrate the link between vaccinations and breathing difficulties in young babies. Despite this information, ...
Source: vactruth.com - June 17, 2014 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Christina England Tags: Christina England Top Stories premature birth truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs

Medical futility, then and now
by Barron H. Lerner, M.D., Ph.D. When an article promoting the idea of medical futility appeared in the Annals of Internal Medicine in 1990, my father was thrilled.  He believed the term was an apt description of the end-stage cases he too often saw as an infectious diseases consultant, in which he was expected to prescribe progressively more complicated antibiotic regimens to severely ill patients with no hope of recovery. The concept of medical futility has achieved mixed success.  Advocates have promoted it as a way to discourage aggressive treatment of medical conditions that are not reversible. … (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 16, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Barron Lerner Tags: Cultural End of Life Care Featured Posts Informed Consent medical history Source Type: blogs

Update: June 14, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 12 to June 14, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (6 updates) 6 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (374 updates) 43 Diseases331 Country notesMap Microbiology – Bacteria (1 updates) 1 Bacteria (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 14, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Books received this week
Bell's oral and facial pain /Jeffrey P. Okeson. 7th ed., Hanover Park, IL: Quintessence Publishing Co. Inc., 2014. Pain, especially chronic pain, is a major health care problem, a fact that has precipitated a recent dramatic expansion in pain-related research efforts. This revised edition of Dr Welden Bell’s classic text has been updated to incorporate the latest findings from these studies, including advanced understanding of the neurophysiology and central processing of pain and the resulting changes to diagnostic, classification, and treatment guidelines. The oral-systemic health connection: a guide to patient care /...
Source: DentistryLibrary@Sydney - June 12, 2014 Category: Dentists Tags: New books Source Type: blogs

Update: June 12, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 10 to June 12, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (5 updates) 5 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (362 updates) 1 Clinical note62 Diseases299 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (2 updates) 2 Susceptibility database – New Microbiology – Bacteria (17 updates) 2 New Bacteria Added13 Bacteria1 Microbes – New1 Microbes – Update Microbiology – Mycobacteria (2 updates) 1 New Mycobacteria Added1 Mycobacteria (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 12, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Pharmacists and GPs complement each other – Keith Ridge
Dr Keith Ridge CBE, the Chief Pharmaceutical Officer for NHS England, gives his views on best practice in action: One of the privileges of my job is being able to get out and about to see great clinical practice up close. Last week was one of those opportunities arose when, together with the Chief Executive of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, Helen Gordon, I spent an enthralling few hours at the Old School Surgery in Fishponds, Bristol. It’s a modern GP practice with a growing list of 15,000 situated in the heart of the local community. Two things make the practice a bit different from the norm. Firstly, an independen...
Source: Fade Library - June 10, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: NHS England Tags: Chief Pharmaceutical Officer gp Guest blogs Home keith ridge News Pharmacists Source Type: blogs

Update: June 10, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 8 to June 10, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Diagnosis (1 updates) 1 Country Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (5 updates) 5 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (88 updates) 32 Diseases56 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 10, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, June 9, 2014
From MedPage Today: Surgeons Not Very Involved in ACOs, Survey Says. Accountable Care Organizations have given little attention to surgery in the early years of the Medicare program, choosing to focus instead on managing chronic conditions and reducing hospital readmissions. Early Allergen Exposure Cuts Wheeze Risk. A new study confirmed that when inner-city kids were exposed to allergens they had an increased risk of recurrent wheezing and sensitivity to allergens. Death Risk Down With Pneumonia Antibiotic. Taking into account both death and myocardial infarction (MI), use of antibiotic regimens that included azithromyc...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 9, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Diabetes Endocrinology Infectious disease Surgery Source Type: blogs

Update: June 8, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 6 to June 8, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (6 updates) 6 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (139 updates) 53 Diseases85 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym AddedMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 8, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Update: June 6, 2014
GIDEON what’s new summary: June 4 to June 6, 2014 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (8 updates) 8 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (359 updates) 74 Diseases285 Country notesMap Microbiology – Bacteria (9 updates) 6 Bacteria1 New Bacteria Synonyms Added1 Microbes – New1 Microbes – Update (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - June 6, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Find yourself a physician who is stingy with prescriptions
Antibiotic use is the direct cause of the rise of untreatable superbugs that are killing people. Antibiotic use is also the cause of most cases of C. diff colitis in kids, a potentially life-threatening, difficult-to-treat gut disorder. Antibiotics have also been linked with recurrent wheezing  in infants and inflammatory bowel disease. They can also trigger allergic reactions that can be severe or life-threatening. (I was going to link to photos of Stevens Johnson Syndrome, but decided not to be cruel. Go ahead and Google at your risk. Don’t say I didn’t warn you.) Continue reading ... Your patients are ratin...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 5, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Meds Medications Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Eat Pooideae
Pooideae is a subfamily within the biological family of grasses, Poaceae. Grasses within the Pooideae subfamily include wheat, rye, barley, corn, and rice, as well as the rye grass and Kentucky bluegrass in your back yard and wild grasses in fields near your home. Pooideae grasses can be promiscuous. Some of the grasses in this subfamily are able to cross-fertilize and mate with each other. This is how, for instance, einkorn wheat from 10,000 years ago evolved to create emmer wheat, the 28-chromosome of the Bible. Emmer is the product of the natural mating of 14-chromosome einkorn with a 14-chromosome wild grass, Aegilops ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 4, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Grasses Source Type: blogs

Eat Pooideae (A Problem For Hungry Humans)
Pooideae is a subfamily within the biological family of grasses, Poaceae. Grasses within the Pooideae subfamily include wheat, rye, barley, corn, and rice, as well as the rye grass and Kentucky bluegrass in your back yard and wild grasses in fields near your home. Pooideae grasses can be promiscuous. Some of the grasses in this subfamily are able to cross-fertilize and mate with each other. This is how, for instance, einkorn wheat from 10,000 years ago evolved to create emmer wheat, the 28-chromosome of the Bible. Emmer is the product of the natural mating of 14-chromosome einkorn with a 14-chromosome wild grass, Aegilops ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 4, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Grasses Source Type: blogs

Eat Pooideae (A Problem For Hungry Humans)
Pooideae is a subfamily within the biological family of grasses, Poaceae. Grasses within the Pooideae subfamily include wheat, rye, barley, corn, and rice, as well as the rye grass and Kentucky bluegrass in your back yard and wild grasses in fields near your home. Pooideae grasses can be promiscuous. Some of the grasses in this subfamily are able to cross-fertilize and mate with each other. This is how, for instance, einkorn wheat from 10,000 years ago evolved to create emmer wheat, the 28-chromosome of the Bible. Emmer is the product of the natural mating of 14-chromosome einkorn with a 14-chromosome wild grass, Aegilops ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 4, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Grasses Source Type: blogs