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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 11.

The use of biomarkers to guide antimicrobial therapy
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - October 19, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: October 18, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: October 15 to October 18, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (3 updates) 3 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (203 updates) 44 Diseases159 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (1 updates) 1 New Drug Synonyms Added (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - October 18, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

The Human Cost of Yellow fever in America: A Chronology
[1,2] (primary references available on request). 1793 to 1900 – An estimated 500,000 cases of yellow fever occurred in the United States. 1693 to 1905- An estimated 100,000 to 150,000 died of yellow fever in the United States. These figures included 14,217 deaths in Philadelphia during 1699 to 1803. 1904 to 1914 – The death rate among American personnel involved in constructing the Panama Canal was 15.8 per 1,000. Chronology: 1668 – Yellow fever was first reported in North America – including 370 fatal cases in New York City 1803 – 606 fatal cases were reported in New York City. 1856 – 538 fatal cases...
Source: GIDEON blog - October 18, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology VIPatients united states Yellow fever Source Type: blogs

Will the attempt to police HIV transmission be effective?
At gay bathhouses in the Bay Area, monitors pop in on the “playroom” irregularly — “every 20 minutes, every 40 minutes, every hour,” one manager says, trying to make sure patrons are having sex safely. “You put the condom on or get the hell out,” a monitor at one such club said, upon discovering a couple violating the rules. William Woods and his colleagues talked to these bathhouse monitors, as well as managers and patrons, about their safer sex monitoring programs, detailed in a recent article in the academic journal Sexuality Research and Social Policy. Some bathhouses enacted aggressive monitoring ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 18, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Forthcoming conferences
November 2013 November 03 - 05, 2013   Cancer GenomicsHeidelberg, Germany   Further informationEMBL Conference. This conference will provide an opportunity to learn about, and keep up-to-date with, the rapidly progressing area of cancer genomics.Suggested reading:     Genomics books November 03 - 07, 2013   Cell-cell fusionKibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel   Further informationEMBO Workshop November 04 - 07, 2013   EMBO Laboratory Management Course for Group LeadersLeimen , Germany   Further informationEMBO Laboratory Management Course November 05 - 09, 2013   Cell Biology of YeastsCold ...
Source: Microbiology Blog: The weblog for microbiologists. - October 18, 2013 Category: Microbiology Source Type: blogs

Carter Center study highlights efficiency gains using Android tablet for public health
Researchers from the Carter Center evaluate the use of Android tablet & app for a surveillance program in Ethiopia. In comparison to a traditional paper-based program they found significant efficiency gains and potential for major cost savings. (Source: The Palmdoc Chronicles)
Source: The Palmdoc Chronicles - October 17, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Satish Misra, MD Tags: android medical Android Medical App android medical apps apps for ID apps for infectious disease apps for public health Carter Center Commentary Endocrinology Family Practice global health apps global health tablets Government Ho Source Type: blogs

Holding Back Experimental Details, With Reason
There's a lot of worry these days about the reproducibility of scientific papers (a topic that's come up here many times). And there's reason to believe that the sharing of data, protocols, and materials is not going so well, either. . . . authors seem less willing to share these additional details about their study protocols than they have been in the past, according to a survey of 389 authors who published studies in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The findings, presented on 9 September at the International Congress on Peer Review and Biomedical Publication in Chicago, found that over the five years studied the percent...
Source: In the Pipeline - October 16, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: The Scientific Literature Source Type: blogs

ACP: Making the most of opportunities to get people immunized
A guest column by the American College of Physicians, exclusive to KevinMD.com. It seems to begin earlier and earlier each year — displays are up in stores in late July, newspaper and radio ads start appearing in August, and the media reports on it before the kids even go back to school. Yes, flu vaccine season is in full motion. Last year I shared with you a few pointers to increase your practice’s immunization rate. This year I would like to add some more helpful tips and discuss some common barriers to vaccinating your patients. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 16, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Primary care Source Type: blogs

Update: October 15, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: October 11 to October 15, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (6 updates) 6 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (438 updates) 78 Diseases360 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - October 15, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Borrelia miyamotoi
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - October 15, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

HHS Issues 2014-2018 Draft Strategic Plan
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently published its draft of the Fiscal Year 2014-2018 Strategic plan. Every 4 years, HHS updates its strategic plan, which describes its work to address complex, multifaceted, and ever-evolving health and human service issues, including:  Health Care Research and Innovation Prevention and Wellness An agency strategic plan is one of three main elements required by the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) of 1993 (P.L. 103-62) and the GPRA Modernization Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-352).  An agency strategic plan defines its mission, goals, and th...
Source: Policy and Medicine - October 14, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Update: October 11, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: October 8 to October 11, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (5 updates) 5 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (215 updates) 1 Clinical note70 Diseases144 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - October 13, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Vaccines prevent this: Infant girl with whooping cough (Mayo Clinic video)
While the pertussis infection can be mild in adults (often it is quite severe though), if a baby who hasn't received a full course of vaccinations is infected, whooping cough can be extremely serious. Mayo Clinic News reporter has more on how to recognize and treat this potentially deadly disease: Infant girl with whooping cough -- Mother holding infant girl in Intensive Care Unit. The baby has pertussis (whooping cough) and is coughing severely. Warning: the video is hard to watch. Everyone should receive the indicated vaccines to prevent potentially deadly diseases such as pertussis. Posted at Clinical Cases and...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - October 9, 2013 Category: Professors and Educators Tags: Mayo Clinic Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, October 9, 2013
From MedPage Today: Size a Key Factor in ACO Formation. Accountable care organizations (ACOs) tend to form around larger integrated hospital systems and larger primary care physician groups, and in areas with a higher prevalence of hospital risk-sharing. Malaria Vaccine Candidate Has Protective Effect. A candidate vaccine against malaria had significant efficacy in a randomized controlled phase III trial in Africa. Bisphosphonates Raise Afib Risk. Bisphosphonate use was associated with significantly increased risks of atrial fibrillation and serious atrial fibrillation. Hypothermia Has No Benefit in Meningitis. Patients ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 9, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Endocrinology Heart Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Gowns and gloves in the ICU: Part of the infection control solution
It’s good to see health care providers continue to work on strategies to reduce health care acquired infections. Handwashing is a key component —but hospitals struggle to achieve compliance and are now turning to patients to be the bad cop, much to my dismay. A simple new strategy in intensive care units is showing promise: having doctors and nurses where gloves and gowns with all patients, not just those who are known to have antibiotic resistant bacteria. It takes more time and costs a bit of money, but seems to cut down dramatically on MRSA infections without generating adverse events. The study is important...
Source: Health Business Blog - October 8, 2013 Category: Health Managers Authors: dewe67 Tags: Research antibiotic resistant bacteria intensive care units MRSA infections Source Type: blogs

Pay-to-play at FDA: A setback for true collaborative efforts
I was disappointed to read about meetings between pharmaceutical companies and the FDA regarding clinical trials for pain. It seems these panels were brokered by entrepreneurial academics more intent on making a buck for themselves rather than advancing the cause of patient care. We’ll see what comes out about it in the future, but the initial reports and email trail revealed by the Washington Post (Pharmaceutical firms paid to attend meetings of panel that advises FDA) don’t look good. Don’t get me wrong. I think the FDA should seek external input on clinical trial design and that pharmaceutical companie...
Source: Health Business Blog - October 7, 2013 Category: Health Managers Authors: dewe67 Tags: Policy and politics Research Source Type: blogs

More information on azithromycin and the risk of sudden cardiac death
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - October 4, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: pharmacology infectious disease cardiovascular Source Type: blogs

Next-Gen Nanotech Breath Sensor Could Change How We Monitor Health
The medical industry is full of repackaged ideas in the sphere of health tracking and mobile sensors. For a change of pace, however, nanotech sensor start-up Adamant Technologies is developing a chemical sensor, akin to the human nose, to track chemical markers in your breath. Sam Khamis started Adamant 2 years ago with the goal of developing a sensor capable of providing consumer functions (metabolic rate estimation), chronic disease management (asthma tracking), and monitoring early warning signs for infectious disease. Khamis tells Medgadget that the technology is intended to be a passive monitoring system, employed ...
Source: Medgadget - October 4, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Yona Gidalevitz Tags: Diagnostics Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Fear of disease needs to overcome the fear of vaccines
One of the reasons I love social media is that it keeps me up to date on breaking news stories. Here are two stories that came through my social media channels recently. Both of these have to do with immunizations, which, of course, is a healthcare and social media hot topic, especially among pediatricians. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 4, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, October 4, 2013
From MedPage Today: ‘Meaningful Use’ Still on Target During Shutdown. The government shutdown may be slowing or halting a number of health-related activities, but federal incentives for electronic health records aren’t one of them. Inappropriate Antibiotic Use Still High. Despite years of persuasion and publicity, antibiotics are still drastically overprescribed for two common complaints — sore throat and bronchitis. Fecal Transplant, Now in Pill Form. Gel caps containing concentrated fecal microbes stopped recurrent Clostridium difficile infection and were well-tolerated by recipients. Higher Vit...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 4, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News GI Health IT Infectious disease Neurology Source Type: blogs

NIH and Other Public Private Partnerships to Research Treatments for Multiple Diseases
Over the past few weeks, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has made a number of important announcements regarding collaborations with industry as well as the funding of several new research initiatives. Below is a summary of these stories. NIH Partners With Eli Lilly and Others on Rare Diseases FierceBiotechResearch reported that NIH selected four (4) new preclinical drug development studies to uncover new therapies for rare diseases. The projects will be funded through the Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases (TRND) program under NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NCATS, which ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - October 4, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Funny Bone, Serious Problem
Part 2 in a Series   Elbow dislocations are quite painful and often times accompanied by other injuries. ED providers caring for a patient with an elbow dislocation must be sure to properly examine and x-ray patients prior to putting an elbow back in place. Be wary of the associated complications to dislocations including fractures and nerve or artery injury. Soft tissue damage and swelling are also very common.   Acute elbow dislocation.Photo by Martha Roberts   Like many relocations, slow and steady traction and countertraction with your magical and carefully calculated combination of sedation and analgesia is the hal...
Source: The Procedural Pause - October 3, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Update: October 2, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: September 29 to October 2, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (3 updates) 3 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (403 updates) 100 Diseases303 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (3 updates) 2 Interacting drugs – New1 Drug interactions – New (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - October 2, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Medical Mispronunciations and Misspelled Words: The Definitive List.
Hearing medical mispronunciations and seeing misspelled words are an under appreciated  joy of working in healthcare.  Physicians often forget just how alien the language of medicine is to people who don't live it everyday.  The best part about being a physician is not helping people recover from critical illness. The best part is not  about  listening and understanding with compassion and empathy.  Nope, the best part about being a physician is hearing patients and other healthcare providers butcher the language of medicine and experiencing great entertainment in the process.   Doctors c...
Source: The Happy Hospitalist - October 2, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Authors: Tamer Mahrous Source Type: blogs

Epocrates launches Bugs and Drugs app #iOS
Epocrates has launched a free mobile app that is an antimicrobial susceptibility reference that provides geolocated bacterial resistance data sourced from athenahealth’s cloud-based EHR to support your clinical decision-making at the point of care. Press release: “Epocrates Bugs + Drugs is a game-changer in the clinical toolbox. Traditionally, hospitals have tracked resistance trends on inpatients. Now, Bugs + Drugs goes beyond the hospital setting, transforming lab results from athenahealth’s cloud-based EHR database of 15 million patients into geotargeted data to help physicians identify common and unco...
Source: The Palmdoc Chronicles - October 2, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: palmdoc Tags: Software News ePocrates Microbiology Source Type: blogs

Submit an Innovative Idea to Improve Hospital-Acquired Infection Rates
Hill-Rom, a leading manufacturer and provider of medical technologies, has partnered with Edison Nation Medical to identify new solutions for controlling hospital-acquired infections and they want to hear your BRIGHTEST ideas! When patients contract an infection while receiving medical treatment in a healthcare facility, it is called a hospital-acquired infection (HAI). These HAIs can cause extreme illness and disability for patients; approximately 100,000 patients die from an HAI every year in the United States alone. Licensed ideas will receive a $2,500 minimum advance on 20 years percentage of sales or buyout. They s...
Source: Medicine and Technology by Dr. Joseph Kim - September 30, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Tags: infection hospital infectious diseases Source Type: blogs

Update: September 29, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: September 27 to September 29, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (6 updates) 6 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (383 updates) 1 Clinical note75 Diseases306 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym AddedMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - September 29, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

We lack the will to solve antibiotic resistance
Recently, another report was released by the Centers For Disease Control saying that antibiotic overuse is creating “so-called superbugs.” In this USA Today article, it states that superbugs “cause at least 2 million infections and 23,000 deaths each year.” You know who is causing the problem, right? It’s doctors like me. Depending on the report you read, I am the one who is giving antibiotics out like candy. Now, if you have the courage to dig deeper, antibiotic overuse is just a symptom of our broken health care system, unrealistic high expectations from society, and paralyzed government b...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 27, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: September 27, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: September 25 to September 27, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (3 updates) 3 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (170 updates) 45 Diseases125 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - September 27, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Up And Down The Ladder... Job Changes
Hired someone new and exciting? Promoted a rising star? Finally solved that hard-to-fill spot? Share the news with us and we’ll share with it others. That’s right. Send us your announcements and we’ll find a home for them. Don’t be shy. Everyone wants to know who is coming and going, especially with all the layoffs. Despite the downsizing, there is movement. Here are some of the latest changes. Recognize anyone? And here is our regular feature. Send us a photo and we will spotlight a different person each week. This time around, we note that Sandler Travis & Rosenberg named Arnie Friede Of Counsel and a senio...
Source: Pharmalot - September 27, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

New post up over at TheHeart.org: Compassion and Control — Lessons from Dr. Donald Low
As some of you may know, theHeart.org has merged with Medscape Cardiology. This will be my first post on the new site. Dr Donald Low was a prominent Canadian physician. When Toronto faced a deadly SARS outbreak a decade ago, Dr Low was a voice of calm and reason. His research in cell signaling and infectious disease led some to think he was Canada’s best chance for a Nobel Prize in Medicine. He did a lot of good in the service of others, right until the days before he died. Dr. Low recorded a seven-minute video a few days before he died. The hyperlink to the video is included in my post. It’s a stirring video t...
Source: Dr John M - September 27, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

The time to get flu shots is now
Please don’t tune me out on this one. Don’t let this post resemble Gary Larson’s The Far Side cartoon where you only hear, “Blah, blah, blah, Flu shot, blah, blah, blah, Flu shot, blah, blah, blah” I write about flu every year because it’s one infectious disease that is not only more aggressive and dangerous for babies and young children, it’s vaccine preventable. The flu causes high fever, terrible cough, body aches, and significant discomfort. It can also potentially cause more serious infections like pneumonia. Unlike viruses that cause the common cold (rhinovirus or RSV), we have a vaccine for influen...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 25, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Thirteen patients in New England put at risk for iatragenic CJD
CNN reports that a patient who had undergone neurosurgery in New Hampshire later developed autopsy-confirmed sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Before the patient's disease was discovered, the same nonsurgical equipment used on the CJD patient was used on thirteen subsequent patients, putting those patients at risk for prion infection. The Centers for Disease Control has said that no cases of the disease linked to the use of contaminated medical equipment have been reported in the United States since 1976. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - September 25, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Thirteen patients in New England put at risk for iatrogenic CJD
CNN reports that a patient who had undergone neurosurgery in New Hampshire later developed autopsy-confirmed sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Before the patient's disease was discovered, the same nonsurgical equipment used on the CJD patient was used on thirteen subsequent patients, putting those patients at risk for prion infection. The Centers for Disease Control has said that no cases of the disease linked to the use of contaminated medical equipment have been reported in the United States since 1976. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - September 25, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Three Products That My Dermatologist Says Are “Of The Devil” – And Other Skin Tips
This actress keeps her dermatologist on speed dial too. As a light skinned, be-freckled woman with a history of pre-melanoma, I have been sternly instructed to keep my dermatologist on speed dial. Every six months I dutifully return to his office for inspection – nervously eyeing the biopsy tray as I sweat through my paper gown, legs dangling from a vinyl exam table. In preparation for my most recent trip, I decided to be “an empowered patient” and arrive with a list of general dermatology and skin care questions that could be answered during my skin check. Judging from the near-syncopal episodes that I i...
Source: Better Health - September 23, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Dr. Val Jones Tags: Health Tips Allergies Antibacterial Ointment Bounce Brush Clarisonic Contact Dermatitis Dermatologist Dermatology Dryer Sheets Exfoliator Hydroquinone melanoma Moisturizer Neosporin Physical Block Pores Skin Cancer Skin Source Type: blogs

Things with a cure
The CDC recently warned of these new germs that are resistant to treatment - the superbugs as they are called. They are out there and killing more and more of us as they resist most treatments. While the pictures of them are pretty cool, the germs themselves are not. There are other ailments with out a cure. I have a few:FibromyalgiaRheumatoidDegenerating disksThere are lots of others that I don't have for which I am grateful.They have treatments to ease the symptoms but not cures. Medical research is needed for these nasty germs and the incurable ailments.Perhaps I am feeling a little down this morning because when I got ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - September 23, 2013 Category: Cancer Tags: depression research cure fibromyalgia back pain rheumatoid arthritis Source Type: blogs

Update: September 20, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: September 18 to September 20, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (243 updates) 52 Diseases191 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - September 20, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Update: September 18, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: September 15 to September 18, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (4 updates) 4 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (229 updates) 69 Diseases160 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - September 18, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

CDC: Phase Out Antibiotic Use In Food-Producing Livestock
For the first time, the federal government has attempted to tally the number of people who are made sick each year from bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics. And the numbers are, perhaps, larger than many might have realized – at least 2 million Americans fall ill and some 23,000 later die from those infections. The magnitude underscores what is widely acknowledged as a serious public health threat. However, one aspect of the report, which was issued by the US Centers for Disease Prevention and Control, highlights the use of antibiotics in food-producing livestock, which the agency says has contributed to the probl...
Source: Pharmalot - September 17, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Two UC Davis Neurosurgeons Resign After Intentionally Infecting Intracranial Glioblastomas with Bowel Bacteria
The Sacramento Bee recently reported that two UC Davis neurosurgeons who intentionally infected three glioblastoma patients with bowel bacteria have resigned their posts after the university found they had "deliberately circumvented" internal policies, "defied directives" from top leaders and sidestepped federal regulations, according to newly released university documents.Neurosurgeon J. Paul Muizelaar, MDDr. J. Paul Muizelaar, 66, the former head of the neurosurgery department, and his colleague, Dr. Rudolph J. Schrot, violated the university's faculty code of conduct. All three patients consented to the procedures in 20...
Source: neuropathology blog - September 16, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

Update: September 15, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: September 13 to September 15, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (6 updates) 6 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (109 updates) 44 Diseases65 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - September 15, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

American Public Health Association’s Get Ready Day on September 17
Launched in 2006, APHA’s Get Ready campaign helps Americans prepare themselves, their families and their communities for all disasters and hazards, including pandemic flu, infectious disease, natural disasters and other emergencies. The campaign includes free resources for the public and health workers, including fact sheets, a blog, a Twitter, podcasts, Q&As and a calendar of events. Use of Get Ready materials and information is encouraged. You may print and photocopy Get Ready fact sheets, game, toolkits, guides or other materials without permission and use them for educational activities at work, school, commu...
Source: BHIC - September 13, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Naomi Gonzales Tags: Emergency Preparedness Environmental Health Public Health Source Type: blogs

Update: September 13, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: September 11 to September 13, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (216 updates) 70 Diseases146 Country notesMap Microbiology – Bacteria (1 updates) 1 New Bacteria Added (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - September 13, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, September 13, 2013
From MedPage Today: Hospitalists No Panacea for HF. Greater use of hospitalists for managing patients with heart failure did not improve outcomes through 30 days. Third-Hand Smoke Impacts Kids’ Breathing. Third-hand smoke — residue that remains on the skin, clothes, and furniture of smokers, even if they do their smoking out of the house — still impacts children’s breathing. Low Dose Vancomycin Works for C. Diff. A low dose of oral vancomycin yields similar outcomes to a high dose for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection. Sudden Death, Pump Failure Cut With CABG. For patients with isch...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 13, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Heart Hospitalist Infectious disease Pulmonology Source Type: blogs

Cryptococcus gattii Causing New Deadly Fungal Infection
Cryptococcus gattii is a deadly fungal infection that has now been found in several states outside of the Pacific Northwest in a development that is perplexing to infectious disease physicians and public health officials. Unlike the more common Cryptococcus neoformans which infects mostly immunocompromised patients, C. gattii, while still very rare, can infect and kill the young and healthy, including a recent case of a healthy 18 year old woman in Georgia. The fungus causes severe brain and lung infections. Julie Harris, MD, of the CDC comments in the article. Unencapsulated (left) and encapsulated forms of C. gattii &nbs...
Source: Inside Surgery - September 11, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Infectious Disease Medical News Wire brain infection CDC Cryptococcus fungal infection gatti Julie Harris lung infection neoformans Source Type: blogs

HHS Strategic Plan for 2014-2018 is open for comment
Every four years, HHS updates its strategic plan, which describes its work to address complex, multifaceted, and ever-evolving health and human service issues. Follow this link to the draft and for more information about how to submit comments: http://go.usa.gov/Db4YGoal 1: Health Care - http://go.usa.gov/Db2jThis goal focuses on health insurance coverage, healthcare quality and safety, connecting primary and preventive care, healthcare costs, access to care, disparities, and health information technology.Goal 2: Research and Innovation - http://go.usa.gov/Db25This goal focuses on health, public health, and human services ...
Source: Pathology Informatics from the Trenches - September 11, 2013 Category: Pathologists Source Type: blogs

Best Post of April 2013: A Rich Focus
The next in our "Best of the Month" series is a post from April 16, 2013. The grey arrow is pointing to a Rich focus that has hemorrhaged into the subarachoid spaceA Rich focus is a tuberculoma in the cerebral cortex. Rich foci become particularly significant when they rupture into the subarachnoid space and cause tuberculous meningitis. This entity is named for Johns Hopkins pathologist Dr. Arnold Rice Rich (1893-1968), who first described it. (Source: neuropathology blog)
Source: neuropathology blog - September 11, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: infectious disease Best of the Month series Source Type: blogs

Update: September 11, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: September 8 to September 11, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (11 updates) 11 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (135 updates) 41 Diseases94 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (1 updates) 1 Drug (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - September 11, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

We shine best when we're dusty
They are as vibrant and varied as a new box of crayons, where the water washes and darkens them. Plain dusty old rocks brought to life by the waves. You can hear them skittering and rolling onto each other, a series of clicks and clacks, as they are tumbled by the ebb and flow of the water. I stop to finger one, wondering if it's an agate. It's hard to pick the really valuable ones out when they are all so pretty.The key to testing whether it's a treasure or an ordinary rock? Let it dry.In a sea of pastel dullness, you'll catch the tempered glint of the rough edges of an agate amongst all the basalt and granite. These rock...
Source: Turquoise Gates - September 10, 2013 Category: Cancer Tags: lessons from nature trials character shaping suffering treasured Source Type: blogs

Update: September 8, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: September 6 to September 8, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (402 updates) 67 Diseases335 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - September 8, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs