Medicine RSS Search Engine

Infectious Diseases

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 11.

Deadly MERS Virus Discovered in Egyptian Tomb Bat in Saudi Arabia
The deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) virus has been discovered in an Egyptian Tomb Bat in Saudi Arabia. Experts have been trying to track the source of the mysterious MERS outbreak since it was first discovered in September 2012. 70 of the nearly 100 cases have been in Saudi Arabia. The novel coronavirus has killed 47 people so far. Over a six-week period during field expeditions in October 2012 and April 2013, the researchers collected more than 1,000 samples from seven bat species in regions where cases of MERS were identified. Analysis was performed using polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. One ...
Source: HealthNewsBlog.com - August 22, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: bats mers Source Type: blogs

Update: August 22, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: August 20 to August 22, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (3 updates) 3 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (126 updates) 46 Diseases80 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - August 22, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Drug-Resistant Bacteria Found In Workers At Industrial Farms
The ongoing use of antibiotics in livestock has spawned controversy over the extent to which these medications jeopardize human health by causing resistance to develop to the drugs. Two months ago, for instance, a bill was introduced in the US Senate to limit antibiotic use in livestock. And for the second time this year, a study published in PLOS One indicates that such concerns have merit. Researchers found drug-resistant bacteria associated with livestock in the noses of industrial livestock workers in North Carolina, but not in the noses of antibiotic-free livestock workers. The drug-resistant bacteria examined were St...
Source: Pharmalot - August 20, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Threading the NEIDL – the trailer
Ray Ortega of the American Society for Microbiology has created a beautiful one-minute trailer for our documentary visit to a BSL-4 facility, ‘Threading the NEIDL‘. (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - August 20, 2013 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Information biosafety Boston University BSL-4 movie National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory NEIDL pathogen trailer viral virology virus Source Type: blogs

Update: August 20, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: August 16 to August 20, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (92 updates) 1 Clinical note28 Diseases63 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - August 20, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Tiny Microfluidic Device Detects Early Malarial Infections
Malaria has several stages of development and once it passes the ring stage, the cells that it infects are noticeably stiffer and magnetically responsive. This fact has been used to diagnose the disease in humans, but while the Plasmodium is in its early development it remains elusive. An MIT research team has developed a device that may end up being developed into a portable malaria detector. By running whole blood across an electrode, the device detects the impedance (resistance to an applied current) of each cell as it passes by. Since malaria infected cells have a slightly different electrical properties from their hea...
Source: Medgadget - August 19, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: in the news... Source Type: blogs

Many medical interventions are 50/50: Who informs the patient?
Lately, my virtual inbox in our electronic medical record has seen a surge in requests for prescriptions for the vaccine against herpes zoster, shingles. This has made me think a lot about our responsibility as physicians to inform patients about the evidence behind our recommendations – but who informs the patients when doctors are kept out of the loop or put under pressure to prescribe without seeing the patient? Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 16, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Infectious disease Primary care Source Type: blogs

Certain Antibiotics Linked to Blood Glucose Swings
By Diane Fennell People with diabetes who take a certain class of antibiotics are more likely to experience severe swings in blood glucose, according to new research from Taiwan. Previous research and case reports have raised concern about the possibility of severe high and low blood glucose associated with the use of fluoroquinolones, a class of antibiotics that includes ciprofloxacin (brand name Cipro), levofloxacin (Levaquin), and moxifloxacin (Avelox). One drug in this class, gatifloxacin (Tequin), was removed from the US market due to the risk of blood glucose fluctuations. To assess the risk of severe blood gluc...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 16, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: Diane Fennell Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, August 16, 2013
From MedPage Today: Psoriasis Often Goes Untreated. As many as 30% of patients with severe psoriasis received no treatment, and many others received only topical therapy. Breastfeeding Baby May Delay Breast Cancer. Breastfeeding for a longer period of time might have helped protect women from breast cancer, although the effect didn’t appear to overcome the higher risk for women who smoked. Fluoroquinolones Linked to Hypo-, Hyperglycemia. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics are associated with an increased risk of blood glucose swings in diabetic patients. Top blogs: Vulvodynia is not associated with oral contraceptives: ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 16, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Dermatology Infectious disease Medications OB/GYN Palliative care Source Type: blogs

Update: August 16, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: August 13 to August 16, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (6 updates) 6 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (218 updates) 1 Clinical note62 Diseases155 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - August 16, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

SENS Research Foundation Releases 2013 Research Report
The SENS Research Foundation coordinates and conducts research into the baseline technologies needed for human rejuvenation. We age because we become damaged: cells and the structures between cells accumulate broken proteins, waste products, and other forms of harm. The machines of our cells run down, run amok, and run ragged. Eventually that kills us, as damage overwhelms self-repair, but this ugly process of aging to death could be indefinitely postponed given effective means of repairing the forms of damage that are fundamental, those that result from nothing more than the ordinary operation of human metabolism. SENS s...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 15, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Dangerous online writing demands physician attention
This report is the most comprehensive examination of the immunization schedule to date. The IOM committee uncovered no evidence of major safety concerns associated with adherence to the childhood immunization schedule. The science is clear that living a life with vaccines is a safer one. Great thing is you can have it best: eat organic, leave a near-zero carbon footprint, and avoid life-threatening infections for you and your children with safe vaccines as recommended by the Center for Disease Control and The American Academy of Pediatrics. Dr. Edgar Marcuse a pediatrician and epidemiologist at Seattle Children’s Hospit...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 14, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, August 14, 2013
From MedPage Today: Retina May Be Window Into Stroke Risk. Damage to the retina from hypertension independently pointed to elevated stroke risk, even when blood pressure was controlled by medication. High-Deductible Plans Mean More Hospital Red Ink. As employers and insurance companies shift more health costs into workers’ pockets, hospitals are making a discovery. The pockets aren’t bottomless. Special Diet Quells Genetic Risk of Stroke. The Mediterranean diet may lower the risk of stroke in patients with a certain genetic variant that makes them susceptible to type 2 diabetes and metabolic troubles. Top bl...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 14, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Infectious disease Neurology Source Type: blogs

C difficile in children: Do probiotics help?
The intestines, particularly the large intestine, are teeming with bacteria. They are piled on each other as dense as the above photomicrograph shows. The huge majority of them are what we call friendly bacteria: they live inside us, feeding off the rich stew of food we eat, but cause no disease. In fact, their presence is important to our health because they crowd out bacteria that cause disease — the good guys take all the food. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 13, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions GI Infectious disease Medications Source Type: blogs

Update: August 13, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: August 8 to August 13, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (9 updates) 9 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (293 updates) 1 Clinical note78 Diseases214 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (10 updates) 1 New Drugs Added1 New Drug Synonyms Added7 Drug interactions – New1 Susceptibility database – New Microbiology – Bacteria (11 updates) 3 New Bacteria Added1 New Bacteria Synonyms Added2 Microbes – New5 Microbes – Update (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - August 13, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Best Post of February 2013: Review by Dr. Mark Cohen of "Neuropathology: A Volume in the Hight Yield Pathology Series", edited by Yachnis and Rivera-Zengotita
The next in our "Best of the Month" series appeared on February 26, 2013: Mark L. Cohen, MDI am honored to present a guest post by the inimitable Dr. Mark Cohen of the illustrious Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Cohen not only reviews a great new neuropathology textbook, but illustrates yet again why he is widely known as the Maxwell Smart of Neuropathology. (Not really) Full disclosureSelf-annihilating conflicts of interest, as follows:Long-standing professional relationship with unbridled admiration for lead editor Tony Yachnis, both as a person and as a pathologist (he's not the Moderator of the world-famous ...
Source: neuropathology blog - August 13, 2013 Category: Pathologists Source Type: blogs

Carbapenem-resistant gram negative infections: treatment update
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - August 13, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, August 12, 2013
Brought to you by MedPage Today. 1. Med Students Who Shadow Surgeons Keener on Surgery. Medical student interest in critical care surgery has fallen since the 1980s, but shadowing surgeons on a busy night bolstered enthusiasm in a small group. 2. Second-Hand Smoke, Asthma Link Remains. Children with asthma were more likely to be exposed to second-hand smoke than those without the disease. 3. New Guidelines: HIV Exposure at Work, Treat ASAP. Healthcare workers exposed to HIV at work should immediately begin four weeks of post-exposure prophylaxis with three antiretroviral drugs, according to new recommendations. Your patie...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 12, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Infectious disease Medical school Pulmonology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Update: August 8, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: August 4 to August 8, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (9 updates) 9 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (535 updates) 97 Diseases437 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym AddedMap Microbiology – Bacteria (2 updates) 1 Microbes – New1 Microbes – Update Microbiology – Mycobacteria (1 updates) 1 New Mycobacteria Added (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - August 8, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Update: August 2, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 29 to August 2, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (8 updates) 8 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (255 updates) 76 Diseases179 Country notesMap Infectious Diseases – Drugs (1 updates) 1 Interacting drugs – New (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - August 2, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

A couple of drive-by insights from the Global Burden of Disease
The GBD is a project of the World Health Organization, started in 1991. It's a massive effort to put together comparable morbidity and mortality statistics for all the nations of the world. The numbers are more reliable in some places than in others, and have all sorts of conceptual and systematic weaknesses, but they're the best we've got and they do tell us quite a lot that's interesting and important.http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMra1201534, review the changes in the U.S. and the world from 1990 to 2010. It's a complicated story, which they perhaps could have made more clear than they do in some ways. Read it ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - August 1, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Source Type: blogs

Knockout Mice, In Detail
Everyone in biomedical research is familiar with "knockout" mice, animals that have had a particular gene silenced during their development. This can be a powerful way of figuring out what that gene's product actually does, although there are always other factors at work. The biggest one is how other proteins and pathways can sometimes compensate for the loss, a process often doesn't have a chance to kick in when you come right into an adult animal and block a pathway through other means. In some other cases, a gene knockout turns out to be embryonic-lethal, but can be tolerated in an adult animal, once some key developmen...
Source: In the Pipeline - August 1, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Biological News Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, August 1, 2013
Brought to you by MedPage Today. 1. Salad Mix Eyed in Cyclospora Outbreak. Health officials in Iowa and Nebraska said they had identified a prepackaged salad mix as the likely source of a multistate outbreak of Cyclospora cayetanensis infections. 2. Low Cost, Doc Relationship Key to BP Control. Minimizing out-of-pocket drug costs and having one provider are two factors that appear to improve blood pressure treatment. 3. Stroke Centers Don’t Drive Up Costs. Establishing a coordinated stroke center at a tertiary care community hospital did not increase the total direct and indirect costs of treating patients at one in...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 1, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Heart Infectious disease Neurology Source Type: blogs

Perhaps this meeting should be renamed "Of Microbiomes and Men" ....
Discussion – Pharma/Biotech/Food Industry Partnering Small Company Showcases www.globalengage.co.uk/microbiome.html Not interested in the Microbiome/Microbiota?Unsubscribe hereNick Noakes: nnoakes@globalengage.co.uk Tel +44 (0) 1865 849841Global Engage, The Kidlington Centre, Kidlington, Oxfordshire, OX5 2DL, UK. You might think that at some point some of the people organizing meetings -------- This is from the "Tree of Life Blog" of Jonathan Eisen, an evolutionary biologist and Open Access advocate at the University of California, Davis. For short updates, follow me on Twitter. --------...
Source: The Tree of Life - August 1, 2013 Category: Medical Scientists Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs

What doctors wear: Do we care too much?
What would you prefer your doctor to be wearing when examining and treating you or your loved ones? Most would likely reply with something along the lines of “it doesn’t really matter, as long as they are competent and do a good job.“ Except it does matter, apparently. So much so that there have been hospital/nation-wide policies surrounding the issue, and a recent surge in publications studying this phenomenon – some of them hinting at the possibility that patients do care a great deal, even if they don’t consciously know it. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 30, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

The bar for becoming a stool donor just got higher
Recently, I have spent a lot of time talking to patients, trying to explain why I’ve had to cancel their upcoming fecal transplant. The FDA has ruled that stool is an investigational new drug (IND), which now imposes a huge bureaucratic hurdle to getting a much needed therapy for patients with recurrent or intractable C. difficile infection. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 29, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions GI Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: July 29, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 24 to July 29, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (7 updates) 7 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (594 updates) 117 Diseases477 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 29, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Infections due to Klebsiella Pneumoniae Carbapenemase (KPC) producing bacteria: a systematic review
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - July 28, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Why you should never order a herpes IgM blood test
Routine screening blood tests for herpes are not recommended by the Centers for Disease Control. When I say routine screening I mean a scenario such as, “I want to get checked for everything, ok?” Blood tests for herpes do have a place in specific clinical situations, but that’s for another post. But say you did get a herpes blood test (even though it’s not recommended many people seem to get it done) and it’s positive for something called IgM antibodies. Armed with these results your doctor proceeds to tell you that these results mean you caught herpes recently, so you start to freak out. Stop right there. Con...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 27, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: July 24, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 20 to July 24, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (8 updates) 8 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (251 updates) 1 Clinical note64 Diseases185 Country notes1 New Disease Synonym AddedMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 24, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Nature Podcast: 25 July 2013
This week, the superbugs resistant to the most powerful antibiotics, how flatworms regrow their heads and why the oil palm genome could be good news for sustainable crop breeding. Plus, the best science outside Nature. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - July 24, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Nature Publishing Group Source Type: blogs

August is National Immunization Awareness Month
Each year in August, National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM) provides an opportunity to highlight the need for improving national immunization coverage levels. Activities focus on encouraging all people to protect their health by being immunized against infectious diseases. In 2013, the National Public Health Information Coalition is coordinating NIAM activities. The following resources are available: Find CDC Resources for National Immunization Awareness Month <http://1.usa.gov/143jjGY> Get Toolkits to Help You Raise Awareness About Immunization (developed by NPHIC in collaboration with CDC) <http://bit.l...
Source: BHIC - July 24, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Michelle Burda Tags: General Public Health Source Type: blogs

Antimalarial Drug Linked to Sgt. Robert Bales Massacre - By SUSAN DONALDSON JAMES
U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, who is facing sentencing by a military court for killing 16 civilians on a rampage in Afghanistan last year, might have faced a perfect storm of stress, which included the use of mefloquine hydrochloride, an antimalarial drug given routinely to soldiers in that part of the world. Mefloquine was developed by the U.S. military and has been used for more than three decades by the government to prevent and to treat malaria among soldiers and Peace Corps workers. But the drug can cause varying neurological side effects 5 to 10 percent of the time, according to Dr. David Sullivan, an infectiou...
Source: PharmaGossip - July 23, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

How to reduce the risk of oral cancer
The fact that cunnilingus increases a man’s risk of developing oral cancer has been all over the Internet recently with Michael Douglas’ disclosure that he had an HPV-positive tumor. To recap: some strains of human papilloma virus (HPV) are oncogenic, meaning they induce changes in a cell’s DNA that can lead to cancer. The same strains of HPV that are oncogenic in the genital tract for women, causing both cervical cancer and anal cancer, can also wreak havoc on cells in the oral cavity. As an aside, HPV can also cause anal cancer for men. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Man...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 21, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

Update: July 20, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 16 to July 20, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (13 updates) 13 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (286 updates) 89 Diseases197 Country notesMap Microbiology – Mycobacteria (1 updates) 1 New Mycobacteria Added (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 20, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Parvovirus B19 in the United Kingdom
The following background data on Parvovirus B19 infection in the United Kingdom is abstracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series. [1,2] Parvovirus B19 (Erythrovirus B19) was first discovered in England in 1974, among serum specimens from healthy blood donors. – Highest rates are reported during spring and early summer. – Epidemics are reported every 4 to 5 years – the last occurring during 1997 to 1998. – Infection is estimated to occur in 1:512 pregnancies, and may account for as many as 150 fetal deaths annually (26% of viruses associated with fetal death).. The foll...
Source: GIDEON blog - July 20, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology ProMED Parvovirus B19 United Kingdom Source Type: blogs

Would C. Everett Koop be an effective Surgeon General today?
I have been thinking a lot about C. Everett Koop lately, ever since his death on February 25 at the ripe old age of 96 and more recently with the announcement that our current Surgeon General, Regina Benjamin, is planning to step down from that post. In particular, I have been pondering what made Koop such an effective Surgeon General, and what has made it so hard for his successors to approach even a portion of his impact. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 19, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Infectious disease Primary care Source Type: blogs

The Situation of Secret Pleasures (more on Dan Wegner’s Work)
This excerpt, which highlights some of the remarkable work by the late Dan Wegner, comes from an article written by Eric Jaffe in a 2006 edition of the APS’s Observer: “Freud’s Fundamental Rule of Psychoanalysis was for patients to be completely open with a therapist no matter how silly or embarrassing the thought,” says Anita Kelly, a researcher at the University of Notre Dame who published one of the first books on the formal study of secrets, The Psychology of Secrets, in 2002. Only since the late 1980s and early 1990s have researchers like Daniel Wegner and James Pennebaker put Freud through the empirical r...
Source: The Situationist - July 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Situationist Staff Tags: Emotions Life Morality Social Psychology Source Type: blogs

Early goal directed therapy: Patwari Academy video
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - July 17, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: critical care infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Update: July 16, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 13 to July 16, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (9 updates) 9 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (419 updates) 42 Diseases377 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 16, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Will Your Mind Still Be Sharp At 95? The Chances Are Improving All The Time
People are living longer than ever before—often into their 90s—but can the mind keep up? Although our bodies might still be (sort of) working as we approach 100-years-old,  many wonder whether their minds will be sharp enough to appreciate life. A new Danish study has looked at this by comparing the brainpower of two groups of nonagenarians (Christensen et al., 2013): The first group were born in 1905 and assessed at 93-years-old. The second group were born in 1915 and assessed at 95-years-old. To see how dramatically lifespan is increasing, the chances of people in this study reaching 90 increased by almost 30% in ...
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - July 16, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Update: July 13, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 10 to July 13, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (11 updates) 11 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (219 updates) 74 Diseases145 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 13, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 26-year-old man with fever and lower abdominal pain
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 26-year-old man is evaluated for a 3-day history of fever, lower abdominal pain, tenesmus, hematochezia, and watery diarrhea. Seven months ago, he underwent a cadaveric kidney transplantation. At the time of transplantation, the transplant donor was seropositive for cytomegalovirus, and the patient was seronegative for this virus. Current medications are tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, prednisone, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Valganciclovir was discontinued 1 month ago after 6 months of prophylaxis as ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 13, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Infectious disease Nephrology Source Type: blogs

Free Continuing Education Resources for Safety Net Health Professionals from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Friday, July 12, 2013, 2 PM ET The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) are hosting a webinar to announce an exciting new HRSA Website http://1.usa.gov/14M5jFp  that provides HRSA grantees and safety net providers, such as health center providers, rural health providers, physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and other safety net health professionals with free, clinically relevant modules to support continuing education and workforce training.  These free, accredited continuing education resources are based on the comparative effectiveness research from...
Source: BHIC - July 11, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Monica Rogers Tags: Conferences Public Health Websites Source Type: blogs

Pulmonary mucormycosis
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - July 10, 2013 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: infectious disease pulmonary Source Type: blogs

Fever, Friend or Foe?
The audio and slides for this SMACC talk are at the bottom of this blog post Fever is so hot right now… ‘Humanity has but three great enemies: fever, famine and war; of these by far the greatest, by far the most terrible, is fever’ — William Osler1 Fever is one of the cardinal signs of infection and — nearly 120 years after William Osler’s statement in his address to the 47th annual meeting of the American Medical Association on The Study of the Fevers of the South1 — infectious diseases remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality2. Despite this, it is unclear whether fever itself is truly the enemy or w...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 10, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Paul Young Tags: Emergency Medicine Featured Infectious Disease Intensive Care critical care Fever Friend or Foe ICU paul young SEPSIS SMACC Source Type: blogs

Update: July 10, 2013
GIDEON what’s new summary: July 4 to July 10, 2013 Infectious Diseases – Outbreaks (8 updates) 8 DiseasesMap Infectious Diseases – Diseases (492 updates) 83 Diseases409 Country notesMap (Source: GIDEON blog)
Source: GIDEON blog - July 10, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: What's New Source Type: blogs

Stop blanket animal antibiotics now - before it's too late
Factory Farm Workers Are Carrying An Antibiotic-Resistant Pig BacteriaBy Aviva Shen on Jul 9, 2013 at 3:50 pmhttp://thinkprogress.org/health/2013/07/09/2270181/factory-farm-workers-drug-resistant-bugs/?mobile=wt(Credit: AP)Shortly before Americans fired up their grills for Independence Day, researchersannounced that industrial farm workers have been contaminated with “pig MRSA,” an antibiotic resistant bacteria that is increasingly found in American hogs. According to a new study, workers at factory hog farms that use antibiotics are far more likely to contract the drug-resistant bacteria from ...
Source: PharmaGossip - July 10, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs