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Psychiatry

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 12.

Guest Blogger Simple Citizen on The Suicidal Patient's Right to Have Advance Directives Honored
Simple Citizen is a psychiatrist reader with his own blog (see our sidebar).  This started as a comment, but I asked to use it as a stand-alone post.  Dr. Citizen writes:   We have the right to die, but not the right to commit suicide. This makes my life in Consult Psychiatry extremely difficult, especially when someone has an Advance Directive that states "Do-Not-Resusciate" and then they try to kill themselves.They arrive at the hospital in critical condition, the medical team knows the need to be intubated and they are likely going to go into cardiac arrest. Should they intubate them and save them ...
Source: Shrink Rap - July 26, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Why Congress should be responsible to fix mental health
The past months have been disastrous for mental health. One embarrassment has followed another — leading to a crisis of confidence that is potentially dangerous for those who rely on psychiatric care. Most damaging were the negative reviews of DSM-5, the new diagnostic manual. It was justly panned for introducing many unsafe and scientifically unsound diagnoses that will worsen the already existing over-treatment of the worried well and the shameful neglect of the really sick. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 25, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Unmotivated
I guess I'm getting better, mainly I feel like I'm drifting through life right now, not doing much.  I don't think I'm depressed, I just really don't care about anything.  I'm not emotionless, just unmotivated to the point that I can't even care enough to get motivated.  Yes, I *want* to be motivated to do things, but what am I doing to get that way?  I'm taking my new prescription Prestiq like I am supposed to, but I even cancelled my therapy appointment yesterday.  I slept most of the day, even had a chocolate shake because, like I said, I'm unmotivated, I suppose even to stay thin? and just coul...
Source: bipolar.and.me - July 25, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

Biomarkers: Can Blood & Brain Scans Help with Future Depression Treatment?
Are predictive biomarkers the wave of the future of depression treatment? Recent research has demonstrated — in small pilot studies — that brain PET scans and, in a separate study, blood proteins, may act as important biomarkers for determining whether an antidepressant or cognitive behavioral therapy might be the best treatment for a person’s clinical depression. Such an indicator would be a potential boon for those seeking treatment for depression. Currently, depression treatment is characterized by a trial-and-error approach, with most professionals recommending most people get both medications and psy...
Source: World of Psychology - July 25, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Depression Disorders General Medications Professional Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Treatment Blood Proteins Boon Brain Scans Clinical Depression Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Depression Treatment Emory University Erro Source Type: blogs

The stigma experienced by patients with psychiatric disorders
“It don’t matter how many men you shot in Memphis,” the saying goes, “if your name is Sierra or Sequoia, you can’t sing the blues”. In a sense, this adage reworks an older, more bitter joke from the civil rights era, the one that begins “some of my best friends are …” and ends with “but you wouldn’t want your sister to marry one.” Both statements embody stigma, the social effects of being someone who violates others’ expectations or fails to fit into an assigned social niche. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media g...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 24, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

An opinion on the Zimmerman trial
Appreciated the remarks of Charles Barkley. What has gone on in the public arena since the trial of George Zimmerman has a tribal Lord of the Flies 'Kill the Beast' quality to it. What the book lacked was a reason for the projection of evil which was to be projected into the other. In this case the violence of TM is ignored, his youthful homophobia and all fault is projected into George Zimmerman who came into his circle of consideration. So we have a completion of the 'Kill the Beast' orgiastic excitement. I am genuinely shocked at its primitiveness. The president's remarks are a minor help but certainly don't acknowledge...
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - July 24, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Webinar: DSM-5 Changes, Clinical Overview and Business Implications
July 31, 2013 2:00 – 3:30pm Eastern The American Psychiatric Association released the DSM-5, the latest iteration of the leading diagnostic manual for mental health disorders.  The DSM is the foremost resource for psychiatric diagnoses relied upon by individual practitioners, insurers, researchers and policymakers.  Join the National Council for Behavioral Health for this webinar to review the overall changes, garner resources to help clinicians factor the changes into practice and review the business implications. More information about the DSM-5 Changes webinar can be found on the National Council for Behavioral ...
Source: BHIC - July 23, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Gail Kouame Tags: Conferences Mental Health Websites Source Type: blogs

Antimalarial Drug Linked to Sgt. Robert Bales Massacre - By SUSAN DONALDSON JAMES
U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, who is facing sentencing by a military court for killing 16 civilians on a rampage in Afghanistan last year, might have faced a perfect storm of stress, which included the use of mefloquine hydrochloride, an antimalarial drug given routinely to soldiers in that part of the world. Mefloquine was developed by the U.S. military and has been used for more than three decades by the government to prevent and to treat malaria among soldiers and Peace Corps workers. But the drug can cause varying neurological side effects 5 to 10 percent of the time, according to Dr. David Sullivan, an infectiou...
Source: PharmaGossip - July 23, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Coping with Childhood ADHD
A young boy diagnosed with ADHD makes a video diary about what life is like with it, followed by a studio discussion with a panel of experts about the disorder, in an episode of Keeping Kids Healthy titled ADHD in Children: How to Cope with It. Pediatrician Winnie King hosts this panel discussion between Johnathan and his mother, plus three specialists. They talk about the difference between regular rambunctiousness and a disorder, the three types of ADD/ADHD, research into causes, the controversy of overdiagnosis and medicating kids, the importance of a correct diagnosis by the right professional, and strategies for copi...
Source: Channel N - July 23, 2013 Category: Neurologists Authors: sandra at psychcentral.com (Sandra Kiume) Tags: All Documentary ADHD brain child pediatrics psychiatry psychology video youth Source Type: blogs

Vaccines, Depression, and Type-1 Diabetes—Going Beyond Your Doctor
CONCLUSIONS As per doctor recommendation, I would receive flu shots, my children would continue to be vaccinated, I would live through the nightmare of antidepressants, and our daughter would receive uncontrollable amounts of insulin that caused frequent and potentially life-threatening side effects. Doctors can be dead wrong, partially right, and completely right in their diagnosis, analysis, and treatment recommendations. As per my own research and in consulting with experts, I will never receive a flu shot again, and my children will not be vaccinated again until independent studies proof safety and effectiveness of vac...
Source: vactruth.com - July 22, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Markus Heinze Tags: Markus Heinze Top Stories 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) Adverse Reaction Depression type-1 diabetes Source Type: blogs

7 Simple “Calm-Down Phrases” That Can Blow Away Your Worst Troubles
Have you heard the popular urban legend of the space pen? As the story goes, the US space mission needed something reliable to write with while they were on space missions. None of the pens they had until then worked in the zero-gravity environment of outer space. So, millions of dollars were spent to invent a space pen. In the meantime on the other side of the pond, the Russian astronauts faced the same problem. They however, decided to adopt a much simpler solution... they used pencils. Even though it’s an urban legend, the story is so plausible that decades after the mission to the moon, the story is still in circu...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - July 22, 2013 Category: Life Coaches Authors: Sumitha Tags: psychology self improvement be calm best quotes depression quotes reduce stress stress quotes Source Type: blogs

Rorschach inkblots and the neuroscientific basis for pareidolia
image via psychpsychbabyA fascinating new historical article in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry reviews the aesthetic and perceptual aspects of the Rorschach inkblots and proposes a role for them in understanding pareidolia, the phenomenon of ‘seeing’ objects in amorphous shapes (Schott, 2013). The Rorschach test was developed by handsome Swiss psychoanalyst Hermann Rorschach as a Psychodiagnostic method and only later used as a "projective test" thought to reveal unconscious psychopathology. Although still in use today, it has been widely discredited and shown to be an invalid instrument for ass...
Source: The Neurocritic - July 22, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

New Alternative DSM Zine out from Icarus member unraveled
I am proud to announce the long awaited release of the zine “Depictions of Self-Identified Madness: A Visionary Alternative to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders”. The zine is a collection of over thirteen self portraits created by individuals who self identify as having madness, mental health issues, or as being a psychiatric survivors. Accompanying their self portraits are their responses to questions about their experiences. read more (Source: The Icarus Project - Navigating the Space Between Brilliance and Madness)
Source: The Icarus Project - Navigating the Space Between Brilliance and Madness - July 21, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Authors: unraveled Tags: Publications Source Type: blogs

Why this doctor writes and puts himself out there
Recently, Dr. Mike Sevilla decided to hang up his podcasting mic, his blogging tools, his Twitter creds, and his Facebook presence, all in one fell swoop. Find out more about Mike the man, and why he decided to take this drastic action, at his website. Now, I have known Mike for some time on Twitter primarily, where we will sometimes comment back and forth about issues of the day or one of his podcasts or one of my blog posts. We’ve never been close, personally close, as I have come to be with other friends in social media. That said, there has always been that connection, usually unspoken, with another doctor who wants ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 21, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Social media Facebook Psychiatry Twitter Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's Patients Mentor Medical Students To Increase Knowledge And Reduce Stigma
While the global population is aging, and the personal and economic burdens due to Alzheimer's disease and related disorders are skyrocketing, the number of doctors trained to effectively diagnose and treat people with Alzheimer's is already woefully inadequate. +Alzheimer's Reading Room Subscribe to the Alzheimer's Reading Room Email: People With Early-Stage Alzheimer's Mentor Medical Students To Increase Knowledge And Reduce Stigma While the global population is aging, and the personal and economic burdens due to Alzheimer's disease and related disorders are skyrocketing, the number of doctors trained to effectivel...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - July 21, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Bob DeMarco Source Type: blogs

Q&A: Survey about Marijuana?
I was looking through some old posts and found this question. I thought it was a good one so I wanted to post an answer here. The question comes from ‘A’: I’m doing a final project for my class and had an opinion poll that I wanted to ask anyone who would like to participate:1) Have you ever used marijuana?2) Have you ever committed a crime, misdemeanor or felony? 3) Do you believe marijuana can be used as a mental and/or physical healing agent?4) Do you continue to use marijuana? If so, how long have you used it? If not, how long did you use it?5) Do you believe alcohol or marijuana is more dangerous?6) ...
Source: Addiction Recovery Blog - July 19, 2013 Category: Addiction Authors: Addiction Recovery Author Tags: Heroin Treatment Source Type: blogs

Poll: nurse fatigue levels over the last 48 hrs.
An interesting document from Canada laying out some best practice strategies for minimising fatigue in the nursing workforce that is worth skimming through for some good information. Preventing and mitigating Nurse fatigue in Health Care. Nursing work that involves extreme physical, cognitive and emotional demands (e.g. nursing in medical-surgical, critical care, and peri-operative areas) has been shown to increase the likelihood of inadequate or poor sleep, anxiety, depression and absenteeism. Work-related fatigue has also been associated with higher rates of injury, divorce, domestic abuse and chemical impairment. Sleep ...
Source: impactEDnurse - July 19, 2013 Category: Nurses Authors: impactEDnurse Tags: the nurses desk: Source Type: blogs

The Situation of Secret Pleasures (more on Dan Wegner’s Work)
This excerpt, which highlights some of the remarkable work by the late Dan Wegner, comes from an article written by Eric Jaffe in a 2006 edition of the APS’s Observer: “Freud’s Fundamental Rule of Psychoanalysis was for patients to be completely open with a therapist no matter how silly or embarrassing the thought,” says Anita Kelly, a researcher at the University of Notre Dame who published one of the first books on the formal study of secrets, The Psychology of Secrets, in 2002. Only since the late 1980s and early 1990s have researchers like Daniel Wegner and James Pennebaker put Freud through the empirical r...
Source: The Situationist - July 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Situationist Staff Tags: Emotions Life Morality Social Psychology Source Type: blogs

WSJ: Paul McHugh Derides DSM5 for Failure to Progress
Paul McHugh, MD, esteemed past Chair of Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins, writes in the criticism from Tom Insel from NIMH. Paul eloquently explained his point, which makes a lot of sense. Wall Street Journal about how the new DSM fails to account for causes, similar to the With its new manual, the APA might instead have started taking steps toward a system of classification that, as in medicine, organizes disorders according to what we know about their natures and causes. Such knowledge, rather than checklists of symptoms, would then direct treatment and research. Psychiatrists know, for instance, that depression and anxi...
Source: Shrink Rap - July 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Roy Source Type: blogs

New EEG Based Test Helps Diagnose ADHD with Greater Confidence
Psychological disorders are usually diagnosed by trained psychiatrists that watch for certain behavior characteristics that are telltale signs of underlying conditions. Experience and a keen eye are often all that a doctor has to work with, often making diseases like ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) be inconsistently diagnosed from doctor to doctor. Now a new test from NEBA Health of Augusta, Ga has been approved by the FDA that may help bring a new level of objectivity to the diagnosis of ADHD. Called EEG-Based Assessment Aid (NEBA), the system calculates the ratio between the brain’s theta and beta w...
Source: Medgadget - July 17, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

One Day At A Time!
I'm feeling better but I still feel unmotivated.  I try to get one thing done every day like go to the grocery store.  Do laundry.  Today it is fold the laundry.  There are things I do every day like make dinner, feed the dog, those types of things but outside of that, I just choose one thing and try to accomplish that.  I take a shower every day, fix my hair, put on make up.  One day I went to the salon and got my hair colored and cut.  That was what I got accomplished for that day.  It's really all I can handle.  Why am I so unmotivated?However, I have started running again.&n...
Source: bipolar.and.me - July 17, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

FDA clears use of EEG-based ADHD test
First ADHD brain wave test approved by FDA (CBS News): “Diagnosing someone with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is often a tricky science because it relies heavily on psychiatric and behavioral examinations. For the first time, the Food and Drug Administration has approved a device that could aid doctors by providing physical evidence for diagnosis…The Neuropsychiatric EEG-Based Assessment Aid (NEBA) System is the first medical device of its kind to help diagnose the neurobehavioral disorder in children and teens. It uses an electroencephalogram (EEG) test to look at the patient’s brain waves.” FDA...
Source: SharpBrains - July 17, 2013 Category: Neurologists Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Attention and ADD/ADHD Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology behavioral EEG FDA NEBA neurobehavioral psychiatric Source Type: blogs

Dear Anna Kennedy: Please Stop Misrepresenting Autism, Autism Is A Health DISORDER NOT a Gift
Anyone  described as "having autism" or "being autistic"  would have received an autism disorder diagnosis  pursuant, in all likelihood, to either the DSM or the ICD  Dear Anna Kennedy My 17 year old son Conor who was diagnosed 15+ years ago with "autistic disorder" (now autism spectrum disorder) and profound developmental delays ( a euphemism for intellectual disability) is truly a gift. Conor brings great joy to our lives as shown on the sample pictures that follow.  While Conor is a joy, however, his autism disorder is not.  Nor is his autism disorder a GIFT or a SUPER ...
Source: Facing Autism in New Brunswick - July 17, 2013 Category: Autism Authors: H L Doherty Source Type: blogs

Hunger Strikes, Coercision, and What's New in My Life
These days, ClinkShrink and I are talking about very different things over on Clinical Psychiatry News. Clink is setting some guidelines for how one might go about determining if a prisoner has been coerced to go on a hunger strike.  You can read about that in Assessing Coercion Among Hunger Strikers: A Primer.  For those of us who are a little less specialized, I wrote an article a few weeks ago about My Life/Your Life and self-disclosure by the therapist during tough times.  See The Delicate Balance of Self-Disclosure.  And Roy is....where is Roy?  Has anyone seen Roy?  Clink, check und...
Source: Shrink Rap - July 17, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

5 Reliable Ways to Deal With Mental Health Stigma, Prejudice
Had depression not killed my godmother — my mom’s sister — and had it not made a pretty good attempt at ending my life, I doubt I would admit to anyone that I pack my suitcase full of the old-people container of meds. It’s hard enough to list them all at the doctor’s office with a straight face, much less speak openly online and offline about my ongoing struggles with anxiety and depression. We all make fun of Tom Cruise for his beliefs that you can cure depression with exercise alone, but my guess — based on the reactions I get and the conversations I have when I throw out the D word — is that most p...
Source: World of Psychology - July 16, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Anxiety and Panic Bipolar Brain and Behavior Depression Disorders Family General Mental Health and Wellness Minding the Media Policy and Advocacy Research Anxiety And Depression Anxiety Depression Black Magicians Conversations Source Type: blogs

PIP Biofeedback Game Controller Helps You Achieve Inner Calm (VIDEO)
Do your hands get all sweaty when you spot that special someone or when a big decision comes down to the wire? A new device out of Dublin, Ireland called the PIP measures the changes of the conductivity of your skin that occurs when your sweat glands open (referred to as the Galvanic Skin Response, or GSR) and helps you manage your stress levels. PIP is more than just a GSR sensor, though. It’s a Bluetooth-enabled game controller that makes relaxing more fun. Pair up PIP with an iOS or Android device, and PIP will measure your GSR, determine your stress levels, and, in the case of the game Relax & Race, will ma...
Source: Medgadget - July 16, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Net News OTC Psychiatry Rehab Source Type: blogs

After attending a medical graduation, a new sense of optimism
I recently attended the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine graduation for the class of 2013. It had special meaning for me since this was the last group of students at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine-Charles M. Schmidt Florida Atlantic University (FAU) joint venture to pass through my tutelage prior to the Boca Raton program becoming solely an FAU program. One of the graduates visited my office weekly for two years and then once per quarter the following year.   He came to me as a first year student to learn how to take a history and do a physical exam after being out in the world working for...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 16, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

Best of Our Blogs: July 16, 2013
Fear and anxiety are two of the most paralyzing emotions and can literally bring your life to a screeching halt. The simplest example I can think of is when I see a centipede. I usually stop, scream and run in the opposite direction. I refuse to go into the room where the centipede is until someone else goes and kills it. If it gets away, that room is off limits for a few hours. It does not matter if I need something in that room or have to take another route to get to another room. I let that little centipede (with all those legs!) stop me from doing what I wanted or needed to do. Fear caused by trauma, failure, rejectio...
Source: World of Psychology - July 16, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Kristie Hayes Tags: Best of Our Blogs Bad Decisions Behavioral Health brain Centipede Despair Duress Emotions Failure Fear Fear And Anxiety Google Happiness Health Treatment Legs Loo Medication Midst Negativity Paralysis Psychiatrists Source Type: blogs

Family…It’s What’s For Dinner
In the past 20 years family dinners have declined 33%. With all the hustle and bustle of everyday life, it’s difficult to contemplate sitting down to a relaxing family dinner each night or even a few times a week.  After all, who has time after a full day of work, sports practice/games, dance, homework, library, laundry, laundry, and laundry? Grocery shopping has to, once again, wait until tomorrow! As a parent, it’s your job to raise your kids in a way that makes sense to you. Maybe there were some things about your childhood you loved and other things you’d rather not pass on. You focus on “breaking...
Source: Balanced Health and Nutrition Rebecca Scritchfield's Blog - July 15, 2013 Category: Nutritionists and Food Scientists Authors: rebeccascritchfield Tags: children cooking eating healthy life book dinner family family meal The Hour That Matters Most Source Type: blogs

DSM-5 Autism Emperors' Ridiculous Assumption
"The fifth edition of the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5) (APA in diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, Author, Washington, 2013) has decided to merge the subtypes of pervasive developmental disorders into a single category of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) on the assumption that they cannot be reliably differentiated from one another." LY Tsai, M. Ghaziuddin (JADD 2013) DSM-5 ASD Moves Forward into the Past I agree with the observations of Tsai, Ghazuiddin and Dr. Waterhouse.  I have none of their outstanding academic and research  qualifications.  I am ...
Source: Facing Autism in New Brunswick - July 14, 2013 Category: Autism Authors: H L Doherty Source Type: blogs

Fat and at Fault?
  In psychiatry, we are sensitive to issues of stigma.  It's no longer cool to openly discuss disdain for people who belong to other races, who are gay, who are handicapped, and I think we're making progress in some areas of mental illness.  It seems that people feel free to say the problem is the 'crazy people' and not the guns, but in general, we don't really condemn people people because they've been depressed or had panic attacks.  I sometimes think that the last group of people that it's fine to blame for their plight are the obese.  Okay, and alcoholics, those with drug addictions. and smok...
Source: Shrink Rap - July 14, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

What to Do with Worry Thoughts
All of us have negative thoughts. And we have “lots of them,” writes professor Mark Reinecke, Ph.D, in his book Little Ways to Keep Calm and Carry On: Twenty Lessons for Managing Worry, Anxiety and Fear. And all of us worry about the same things, everything from work and school to health and relationships. What separates an anxious person from a calm one isn’t the content of their thoughts, it’s the connotation. According to Reinecke, “The types of intrusive, negative thoughts that anxious, worried people experience differ little, however, from the thoughts of nonanxious people. The difference is in the meaning g...
Source: World of Psychology - July 13, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Anxiety and Panic Books Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Accomplishment Anxious Person Behavioral Sciences Connotation Dwelling Effective Tools Fear Feinber Source Type: blogs

National audit of dementia care in general hospitals 2012-13: second round audit report and update
Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCPsych) - This audit report has identified continuing problems in the quality of care received by people with dementia in hospitals in England and Wales. Although there has been positive change, the audit shows that many patients are not receiving key health assessments. It also reveals that less than half of hospital executive boards are routinely involved in reviewing hospital performance data on quality of care received by people with dementia, and two in five hospitals do not provide dementia awareness training to new staff. Audit report RCPsych - news (Source: Health Managemen...
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - July 12, 2013 Category: UK Health Authors: The King's Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Mental Health Quality of care and clinical outcomes Regulation, governance and accountability Source Type: blogs

Lawyer Spars With FDA Over J&J Risperdal Court Documents
In an unusual tactic, an attorney is prodding the FDA to seek documents that purportedly detail side effects caused by the Risperdal antipsychotic, but cannot be released publicly due to a court order. The documents were sealed by a Philadelphia judge as part of ongoing litigation over claims the Johnson & Johnson drug causes gynecomastia, which is the abnormal development of breasts in males (back story). For the past year, Stephen Sheller has attempted to convince the FDA that the documents should be disclosed and, initially, filed a Citizen’s Petition, which also asks the agency to require a so-called Black Box wa...
Source: Pharmalot - July 11, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Here Is An Issue We Still Have Not Addressed. How Will We Record And Protect Mental Health Information In An Electronic Health Record?
This appeared a little while ago. Proceed With Caution Elizabeth Gardner JUL 1, 2013 Adam Kaplin, M.D., chief psychiatric consultant at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, wants everyone to be aware that depression is the biggest killer of heart attack patients during the year after their surgery. Not smoking, not high cholesterol, but an insidious mental illness that, like other mental illnesses, has serious physical repercussions. "Cardiologists should know that they need to pay extra attention to depressed patients because they're at much greater risk, since these diseases interact with each other," Kaplin says. ...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - July 11, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Dr David More MB PhD FACHI Source Type: blogs

Drug Rep$
Meet your doctor's generous friend BY ROB WIPOND, JULY/AUGUST 2013 Pharmaceutical companies have paid billions of dollars in fines in the US for giving bribes and kickbacks to doctors. Are their drug sales representatives behaving any differently in Victoria? "Dinner and Yankee game with family. Talked about Paxil studies in children.” That note, written by a drug sales representative about his evening with a doctor and his family, was one of many records that forced GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) to pay a $3 billion fine to the U.S. government in 2012. According to Public Citizen, since 1991, there have been 239 legal...
Source: PharmaGossip - July 10, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

The Special Issue Spotter
We trawl the world's journals so you don't have to: Memory and the law - insights from case studies (Memory). Cultures of the internet (Transcultural psychiatry). How mindful should psychotherapists and counsellors be about mindfulness? (European Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling). Social psychological perspectives on the legitimation of social inequality (European Journal of Social Psychology). Treatment programmes for high-risk offenders (Psychology, Crime and Law). Age in the workplace: challenges and opportunities (European Journal of Work and Organisational Psychology). Eating disorders (special section ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - July 10, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Christian Jarrett Source Type: blogs

New Item On The Menu: Pristiq
I saw my psychiatrist this afternoon - she has the most ADORABLE and sweetest "therapy dog".  I  just want to pet and love on her the whole time I am there!  As soon as I get there and bend down to pet her, she rolls over on her tummy for a belly rub!  How trusting is that?  I wish I could be so trusting - just roll over onto my most vulnerable side to anyone that tried to touch me!  Hmm, doesn't sound quite right coming from a human, though.  You get the idea.She put me on an anti-depressant, Pristiq.  She started to put me on Effexor - she asked if I had been on it before because m...
Source: bipolar.and.me - July 10, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

A ruptured eardrum turns out to be something much more
My shift is over and I’m ready to head out the emergency department door.  When I walked in 12 hours ago, the department had 20 waiting patients.  I look up at the monitor and after 12 hours of trying to wrestle the department under control, not only is it not under control, now we’re 25 patients deep in the weeds.  My partner Dr. Jim looks at me and says, “Get out of here.  Don’t even think about staying late.  You can’t save the world.” With me leaving, the department will drop to single coverage with Jim taking the reins alone the rest of the night.  Despite his words, the dejected look on his face rea...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 9, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Emergency Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

I Just Want To Sleep
Wow, I thought I was getting better, now here it is Tuesday and I'm a slobbering, crying mess again.  I just sit here, listening to nothing, the television isn't on, no music, all I hear is whatever sounds may or may not be coming from outside, stare at the walls, and think, think, think.  How strange is that?  But I don't want to do anything but that or sleep.  I really want to crawl back into bed and sleep, I feel physically and mentally exhausted, I want it all to go away, but I have a psychiatrist appointment this afternoon and I can't miss it.  I was just there a week ago but I guess she isn't...
Source: bipolar.and.me - July 9, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

Looking for a Doctor? 10 Questions You Should Always Ask
The average patient with bipolar disorder takes approximately 10 years to get a proper diagnosis. About 56 percent are first diagnosed with unipolar depression. I imagine the stats for depression and other diagnoses aren’t pretty either. Working with a good doctor can save you 15 years of pain and misery. Trust me, I know. I went through seven doctors before finding the one who saved my life. Not only was I diagnosed incorrectly for more than 10 years of my life, once I did get the right diagnosis, I was treated incorrectly — with about 15 different kinds of medication in the time period of four months. No wonde...
Source: World of Psychology - July 9, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Disorders General Health-related Medications Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Treatment Academic Appointments Adjunct Faculty Adult Practice American Psychiatric Association Bipolar Current Research Detox Different Kinds Source Type: blogs

Neuropsychology Abstract of the Day: Aging
CONCLUSIONS: Higher level of very late-life physical activity was associated with a lower risk of subsequent dementia in oldest-old women. These findings support future studies for late-life physical activity interventions for the prevention of dementia among oldest-old women.PMID: 23831179 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: BrainBlog)
Source: BrainBlog - July 9, 2013 Category: Neurologists Source Type: blogs

ADHD in Adults: 5 Tips for Taming Impulsivity
In people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), being impulsive is often one of the more challenging symptoms. “[I]mpulsivity is one of the core symptoms of ADHD,” according to Terry Matlen, ACSW, a psychotherapist and author of Survival Tips for Women with AD/HD. It’s also “one of the more challenging aspects to treat and manage,” said Carol Perlman, Ph.D, a psychologist who specializes in ADHD and developed a cognitive behavioral therapy for adult ADHD. Impulsivity can manifest in many different ways in adults with ADHD. In fact, it can range from seemingly benign to more dangerous behaviors. ...
Source: World of Psychology - July 8, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: ADHD and ADD Brain and Behavior Disorders General Psychotherapy Self-Help Treatment Adhd Adults Adhd Coaching Adhd In Adults Adhd Symptoms Adult Adhd Adults With Adhd Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Attention Deficit Hyperactiv Source Type: blogs

Progressing - Slow and Steady
After being SO incredibly depressed and now back on my medication, actually increasing the dosage of two of them, I'm feeling a whole lot better.  It's not been that long, I suppose two weeks since I ran out of Lamictal because I was an idiot.I guess that proves I truly do have a chemical imbalance, not that I wasn't already sure of it.  And that I am taking the right medications.  There are countless times I have tried numerous medications and had to stop because they had horrible side effects or made me eat everything in the house (which is a horrible side effect as well) or sometimes just d...
Source: bipolar.and.me - July 8, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

5 Tips for Finding the Right Therapist
Admitting we need help to face life’s issues is sometimes one of the hardest things we’ll ever have to do. Once we have made the decision to reach out and seek psychotherapy, we want to find someone that we feel we can connect with — someone we feel can truly understand not only where we are, but who we are. Most importantly, we want to find someone we can trust with our innermost thoughts and feelings. Finding a therapist should not be a rushed decision. It should take a little bit of time and effort. If you choose a therapist that you do not feel connected with, chances are you won’t make much progres...
Source: World of Psychology - July 8, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Donna M. White, LPCI, CACP Tags: Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Psychotherapy Treatment Cancer Consultations Couples Therapy Finding A Therapist Group Therapy Innermost Thoughts Insurance Little Bit Oncologist Ophthalmologist Opportunity Rese Source Type: blogs

Upper Valley Memory Cafe
I am making an effort to supply puzzles to as many Memory Cafes as possible. By Max Wallack +Alzheimer's Reading Room About a year ago, I became aware of a wonderful Memory Café that meets monthly. The Upper Valley Memory Café in Lebanon, New Hampshire has a wonderful program for Alzheimer’s patients and their caregivers. Students from Dartmouth are integrally involved in this program, and I think this intergenerational project is extremely beneficial to all. Here is a link to their online blog,  Memory Memos, which includes some very interesting topics. There are also some wonderful photos of people i...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - July 8, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Max Wallack Source Type: blogs

DSM-5 Bipolar: David Kupfer Weighs In
Okay, this is really interesting. One can argue that the most trenchant criticism of DSM-5 bipolar comes from none other than the chair of the DSM-5 Task Force, David Kupfer. This requires some explanation:   Until 2009, Dr Kupfer was the chair of the department of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh and Western Psychiatric Institute. He is one of the leading experts on mood disorders, having authored more than 800 articles and... (Source: John McManamy's SharePosts)
Source: John McManamy's SharePosts - July 7, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Authors: John McManamy Source Type: blogs

10 Years of NB Government Inaction On Adult Autism Care: Is It Possible Our Elected Leaders Just Don't Care?
It is increasingly difficult to be polite when discussing the lack of compassion demonstrated by NB governments towards New Brunswick's adult autism population. As the letter from Gary Mayes to the Telegraph Journal in 2005 demonstrates, after two years, at that time, of flat refusals to act, the refusal of our governments to address adult autism care in a systemic, conscientious fashion over the last decade is fixed in stone:  Today New Brunswick still needs appropriate residential facilities to meet the individual needs of NB adults with autism, particularly those with severe symptoms including sensory challeng...
Source: Facing Autism in New Brunswick - July 7, 2013 Category: Autism Authors: H L Doherty Source Type: blogs

"It may have been Roaccutane"
Open verdict in death of Cheltenham College pupilJack Bowlby, the nephew of former champion racehorse trainer and novelist Jenny Pitman, was prescribed Roaccutane in December 2011. Photograph: SWNS.comA coroner has expressed concern at the way a prestigious public school cares for pupils in crisis following the case of a boy who died after taking an acne drug that has been blamed for causingdepression.The parents of 16-year-old Jack Bowlby, who was found with a ligature around his neck, also criticised Cheltenham College for the way it acted after the teenager expressed "very dark thoughts".Jack, the nephew of former champ...
Source: PharmaGossip - July 7, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs