Medicine RSS Search Engine

Psychiatry Psychiatry RSS feedThis is an RSS file. You can use it to subscribe to this data in your favourite RSS reader or to display this data on your own website or blog.

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 12.

The Biggest Lesson I’ve Learned in Managing My Bipolar Disorder
When Andy Behrman was diagnosed with bipolar disorder over 20 years ago, he didn’t know anyone who had the illness. He didn’t even know what it was. “I remember asking the doctor if I needed to have an MRI and if I would live to see my next birthday.” For about 10 years he struggled with stabilizing his disorder, which included being misdiagnosed by seven mental health practitioners, taking over 40 medications and receiving ECT. It’s a period he chronicles in his book Electroboy: A Memoir of Mania. One of the biggest lessons he’s learned in managing his bipolar disorder and living a successful life is to embra...
Source: World of Psychology - December 11, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Psychotherapy Self-Help Treatment Andy Behrman Bipolar Disorder Coping Skills Elaina J. Martin Ellen Forney Hypomania Jennifer Marshall Julie A. Fast Kevin Hines Laura SQ Source Type: blogs

We need a movement to deconstruct the ADHD diagnosis
When the American Academy of Pediatrics changed the guidelines for ADHD to expand age of diagnosis to include children from age 4-18 (from 6-12), that number of cases would rise was, by definition, inevitable. The recent survey by the CDC, published in the current issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, indicating that one in 11 children in the US carry a diagnosis of ADHD, confirms just that. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 10, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Who are the Mentally Ill? Please take my Brief Survey!
We hear about "the mentally ill" all of the time.  They shouldn't have guns.  They die an average of eight years younger than those without mental illness.  We don't have enough hospital beds for them.  They're filling our prisons and some of them are homeless... oh, the list goes on.Defining the term is important because we single this group out for all types of discriminatory practices related to employment, driving, gun ownership, and even the ability to enter the United States for a vacation (at least on a few occasions).  We also single this group out for special benefits such as being allowed...
Source: Shrink Rap - December 10, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

But Don't Worry, Your Health Information is Secure: the Enforcers are Themselves Incompetent and Broke
Another in my "But Don't Worry, Your Health Information is Secure" series (see http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/search/label/medical%20record%20privacy) ... a promise blindly made by the healthcare information technology hyper-enthusiasts.The Office of the Inspector General for HHS just issued a report finding that the Office of Civil Rights (OCR), which is charged with enforcing the HIPAA/HITECH law, had itself failed to adequately protect the security of the health information it handled. Specifically OIG found that OCR “focused on system operability to the detriment of system and data security.”From “The Office for C...
Source: Health Care Renewal - December 9, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: computer security HHS HIPAA medical record confidentiality medical record privacy OCR Source Type: blogs

Death By Stubbornness: What’s A Doctor To Do?
Over the years that I’ve worked in acute inpatient rehab centers, I have been truly vexed by a particular type of patient. Namely, the stubborn patient (usually an elderly gentleman with a military or armed forces background). I know that it’s not completely fair to generalize about personality types, but it seems that the very nature of their work has either developed in them a steely resolve, or they were attracted to their profession because they possessed the right temperament for it. Either way, when they arrive in the rehab unit after some type of acute illness or traumatic event, it is very challenging t...
Source: Better Health - December 9, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Dr. Val Jones Tags: Opinion True Stories Acute Inpatient Rehab anorexia Downward Spiral Ex-military Infection Motivation Patient Autonomy Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation Physical Therapy Police Officers Psychiatry Stubbornness Veterans Wive Source Type: blogs

Alliance for CEHP Hosts Sunshine Act Webinar: Sunshine Effects on CME Left Open; Attendee Meals at CME Events Still Up for Interpretation
The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions (CEHP) hosted a webinar to discuss federal perspectives on the implementation of the Sunshine Act. Dr. Shantanu Argawal, Medical Director at the Center for Program Integrity at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), outlined the objectives of the Sunshine Act, and addressed specific questions with respect to the Act's exemption for accredited continuing medical education (CME) activities. Dr. Argawal described the Sunshine Act as essentially a balance between the beneficial aspects of industry-physician relationships, which encourage discovery...
Source: Policy and Medicine - December 9, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Andrew Solomon on Shameful Profiling of the Mentally Ill by Immigration Officials
In Today's New York Times, Andrew Solomon, author of The Noonday Demon and Far From the Tree, has an opinion piece on "Shameful Profiling of the Mentally Ill."  It's on a topic that ClinkShrink has been very interested in: the disturbing issues that arise when the immigration department  ("ICE") decides the fate of psychiatric patients. I'll leave you to read Mr. Solomon's article about tourists who were not allowed to enter the United States because they had been hospitalized for depression in Canada.  One woman was simply traveling through the US to get to her cruise ship, stringed lights in hand to m...
Source: Shrink Rap - December 8, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Nominate your favourite #mentalhealth tweeters in the #Twentalhealthawards 2013
Last year the first #Twentalhealthawards were held on the World of Mentalists blog, recognising the best in mental health tweeting. It’s now returning for a second time, and you lot get to decide the winners. Meanwhile, the judges for the This Week in Mentalists Awards 2013 have been voting on the shortlist of mental health blogs and vlogs, and the results will be announced publicly on 21st December. Meanwhile, you can still nominate up to that date in the Best New Blog/Vlog and Most Sadly Missed Blog/Vlog categories by clicking here and leaving a comment. For the #Twentalhealthawards, the categories are: Patient Exp...
Source: Dawn Willis sharing the News and Views of the Mentally Wealthy - December 7, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Authors: Zarathustra Tags: Mental Health, The News & Policies. TwentalHealthAwards Source Type: blogs

Can Laypeople Replace Psychologists, Psychiatrists in the Treatment of Depression?
I was recently intrigued by the claims made — and that went completely unchallenged — by Vikram Patel, a psychiatrist who was interviewed by Wired Science’s Greg Miller. I guess my expectations for something appearing on Wired should be readjusted. Patel claimed that specially-trained health professionals could provide enough care to people that they may be able to treat clinical depression successfully. (The article suggests these are the same as “laypeople,” but really, they’re not.) With skills learned in as little as 2 days. An amazing claim? You bet. One based in reality? Let’...
Source: World of Psychology - December 6, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Minding the Media Policy and Advocacy Psychology Psychotherapy Treatment America Clinical Psychology Cochrane Database Systematic Review Depression Depression (mood) Family Physic Source Type: blogs

Substance Use & Addiction
This article is not going to cast many moral judgment or advocate any side, but instead will lay out the latest research and knowledge about this subject. Symptoms of Substance Use In the past year, the main psychiatric diagnostic manual (DSM-5) updated its criteria for what constitutes substance "abuse" and "dependence" (addiction), into what is now called a "substance use disorder", which has levels of severity. The symptoms related to substance use issues are below. Take the number of them that are experienced and plot them on the continuum below to determine what the level of concern should be. 1. Using the substanc...
Source: Staff Psychologist - December 6, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Tags: Blog Source Type: blogs

Guest Blogger Dr. Erik Roskes with an Update on Gun Legislation and the Mentally Ill
In case you haven't heard enough from the Shrink Rappers on mental illness and gun legislation, I'm stealing a synopsis of the recent legislative changes from The Crime Report, a blog by forensic psychiatrist Dr. Erik Roskes.  Taken verbatim, with permission of course:--------On October 1, 2013, Maryland’s modified firearms safety law took effect.  Passed in the aftermath of the Newtown massacre, this law expanded the group restricted from owning certain firearms.  This blog will focus only on the mental health aspects of the law, as I have no claim to expertise outside the mental health arena.  ...
Source: Shrink Rap - December 6, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

At Least One of These Things Most People Get Wrong About Depression
Depression and bipolar are often misunderstood, sometimes even by those afflicted. Unfortunately, misconceptions can be stumbling blocks to taking the action needed to overcome depression, which may prolong the illness and worsen its effects over time. Just ask Tricia Goddard, well-known TV talk show host and mental health advocate. Goddard shares her long and difficult relationship with mental health issues, a part of her and her family’s life for many years. But by working to understand depression and how she can influence and manage her own relationship with the illness, she built up the knowledge, resources and supp...
Source: World of Psychology - December 6, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Graeme Cowan Tags: Bipolar Books Brain and Behavior Depression Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Bipolar Disorder Breast Cancer Dysthymia Godard Major Depressive Disorder Mental Disorder Psychology Schizophrenia Suicide The Brink Source Type: blogs

Should a Guardian Science Blog be Recommending an App Based Upon a Single Pilot Study?
Suzi Gage, over in her Guardian science blog Sifting the Evidence, suggests that based upon a single pilot study (that didn’t even use the app she’s recommending), you should purchase an app for your phone that purports to treat depression. It’s a glorious 771 word advertisement for a for-profit company’s app. Now Gage, a PhD student, I’m sure is well-intentioned with her recommendation. Even if she has an undisclosed conflict of interest in writing about this app. But if you’re going to write a blog called “Sifting the Evidence,” one would hope you’d dig a little deep...
Source: World of Psychology - December 5, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Depression Disorders General Minding the Media Research Technology Treatment Depressed depression app Emotion Experiment Jericoe Major Depressive Disorder Munafò Randomized Controlled Trial representative Scientific Method Source Type: blogs

Bipolar, Pregnant & Visiting the UK? They May Take Your Unborn Baby
Yesterday I brought you the unfortunate story of a Canadian turned away from our borders not because she was a terrorist or criminal — but because she simply had a diagnosis of depression and, more than a year ago, was hospitalized for treatment of it. Just to show you that the United States isn’t the only backwards country in the world when it comes to discriminating against those with a mental illness, I bring you the much sadder story of an Italian woman who had bipolar disorder, went to the UK for a training course, and wound up being forced to have a C-section without her consent. Wait, what? Worse, this ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 4, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Policy and Advocacy Women's Issues Bipolar Disorder Britain Canada Italy Mental Disorder Pregnancy Psychiatry Relapse Ryanair Social Services Suicide United Kingdom Source Type: blogs

My 40 year love of internal medicine
Last night, while interviewing an intern applicant, I realized that 40 years ago I discovered that I was an internist. My performance the first two years of medical school were acceptable, but no “great shakes”. I suppose that I was going through the motions. Passion had not engulfed me. As the 3rd year started medicine became more exciting. Still I did not know what I was going to do. I flirted with ideas of ophthalmology, adolescent medicine, psychiatry and pediatrics. At that point internal medicine was mysterious. In November 1973 on my first VA ward month, I realized that I was a future internist. Like ma...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - December 4, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Guest Blogger Dr. Ronald Chase on Historical Misuses of Psychiatry
Dr. Ronald Chase is the author of  Schizophrenia: A Brother Finds Answers in Biological Science.   Today, he joins us as a guest blogger to talk about his recent trip to Heidelberg and the atrocities committed by the Nazis under the guise of psychiatry and a reminder for all of the things psychiatry should not be.  Dr. Chase is a biologist who taught neurobiology at McGill and now writes about mental illness.  As per the title of his book, the topic can be very personal.   A Memorial is a Reminder To research a book I am writing about the 19th century origins of modern psychiatry, I recently travel...
Source: Shrink Rap - December 4, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

How can our society regain respect?
“I don’t get no respect!” -Rodney Dangerfield He was a little guy, munching on the taco lunch that his mother had brought into my office for him, his younger sister and herself. I was a little miffed, I won’t lie, that the family knew they had an appointment with me right after lunch, but they decided to make the appointment itself lunch. I tried to concentrate on my interview questions and assessment, shredded lettuce and ground beef flying onto the floor as I did so. I could overlook the need to vacuum my office after the visit. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage y...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 4, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Gene-Environment Autism Disorder Research CHARGEs Ahead With New Air Pollution Study
The belief that autism is 100% genetics has always seemed to me to be nothing more than that ... a belief ... a non-evidence based ... unscientific belief. But what do I know? I'm not a scientist, just a parent with a keen interest in autism disorders.  I was privileged to attend, courtesy of an invitation from Autism Speaks Canada, the IMFAR 2012 conference in Toronto but was disappointed, with respect to autism cause research,  that most of the environment oriented autism research was consigned to the "boards" posted outside of the main presentation rooms.  Very little that I could find was actually featur...
Source: Facing Autism in New Brunswick - December 2, 2013 Category: Autism Authors: H L Doherty Source Type: blogs

Dementia and Delusion
Dementia sufferers are often prescribed psychotropic drugs to mitigate symptoms such as delusions. This tactic can cause more harm than good.+Alzheimer's Reading Room *Dementia — an acute loss of cognitive ability — can be marked by memory loss, decreased attention span, and disorientation. It occurs in severe disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Despite the fact that the condition is common, especially among older persons, there is still a lack of an effective treatment. **Please consider sharing this article in support groups and via social media (Facebook, Google, Twitter, and message boards). Subscribe to the Alz...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - December 2, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Bob DeMarco Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer’s Risk for Older Adults is on the Decline
“Our findings suggest that, even if we don't find a cure for Alzheimer's disease and dementia, there are social and lifestyle factors we can address to decrease our risk.”+Alzheimer's Reading RoomPeople are less likely to experience dementia and Alzheimer's disease today than they were 20 years ago.And, those who do may be developing it later in life – says a new perspective article in the New England Journal of Medicine that examines the positive trends in dementia.“Of course, people are tending to live longer, with worldwide populations aging, so there are many new cases of dementia; but, some seem to be developi...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - December 2, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Bob DeMarco Source Type: blogs

AA Works & Costs Less
Reduced Costs for Participants of Alcoholics Anonymous The people in this study had never sought treatment for alcoholism. A comparison was made between those who wished to attend AA and those who were seeking professional outpatient help. At entry to the study AA participants had less education, less income, more adverse effects of alcohol, a higher score on alcohol dependence scales, a higher (detrimental) depression score, but were similar in all other ways. 8.1% of AA attenders sought detoxification. 6.1% of outpatient seekers sought detoxification. Similar percentages (18%) of both groups were admitted for inpatient...
Source: Recovery Is Sexy.com - December 2, 2013 Category: Addiction Authors: Sparrow Tags: Alcohol Alcoholics Anonymous Alcoholism Relapse Sobriety Treatment aa detoxification outpatients Source Type: blogs

Celebrity Tips For Beating Depression
When we suffer from depression, including bipolar disorder and postpartum depression, we may feel responsible for the depressive feelings. Like somehow it’s our fault. We may also feel alone in battling the illness and lack support or inspiration from others. Sometimes this may cause us to give up hope and feel like there’s no end to how low we’re feeling; after all, if there’s nothing we can do and nobody we can turn to for help, there’s no point in trying to get better. Celebrities Can’t Get Depressed, Can They? After all, only ordinary people like you can suffer from depression. High-flying celebrit...
Source: World of Psychology - December 1, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Graeme Cowan Tags: Bipolar Books Depression Disorders General Industrial and Workplace Psychology Substance Abuse Treatment Alastair Campbell Bipolar Disorder Celebrities celebrity depression Cliff Richey Clinical Depression Depressed postpar Source Type: blogs

Quantifiable Goals
A local hospital was recently reviewed by one of those hospital accreditation agencies.  It did well-- passed with bells and whistles -- but for a few citations for psychiatry.Individual Treatment Plans (ITP)s:"Surveyors cited us for not having measurable goals in the ITPs. So, changes were made to [the electronic records system] to  clarify the requirement for objective and measurable patient goals as well as the patient’s progress toward those goals."Okay, so help me with this.  Two decades of trying to come up with acceptable, measurable goals and I'm left with the idea that therapy has a limited number...
Source: Shrink Rap - December 1, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Hunger Games Catching Fire: Badass Body Count
sorry old man, I have a dress fitting to go to (Source: The Last Psychiatrist)
Source: The Last Psychiatrist - December 1, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Should we consider an integrative psychiatry model?
As a psychiatrist who is passionate about integrative mental health treatments, I was excited to spend five days recently in St. Petersburg, Florida for the annual conference of the American Board of Integrative and Holistic Medicine. At the conference, I learned that even more than I previously realized, our ecosystem and environment have a profound effect on our happiness and wellness, and can either give us easy access to good food and healthy activities, or add toxins and contaminants to our already stressed bodies. I learned about botanical and herbal treatments for anxiety and insomnia, including lemon balm, skullcap...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 29, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Patient Modesty: Volume 60
Discussion Blog)
Source: Bioethics Discussion Blog - November 28, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Source Type: blogs

Happy Thanksgiving! Free Novels Now through Black Friday.
Happy Thanksgiving!Now through Black Friday (November 27-29, 2013), three of my novels will be available as free downloads to Kindle. No cost.  No parking.  No crowds.  No Kindle, you say?  There is a link below to download a free Kindle app onto your computer, phone, or tablet.  Double Billing is the story of a woman whose life changes when she discovers she has an identical twin she never knew existed. It's a short book and a quick read with some plot twists.  So far, I think it's my best fiction. Home Inspection is a story told through psychotherapy sessions in a format that is similar...
Source: Shrink Rap - November 28, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Do I Need to Go Back on Psychiatric Medication?
It’s not the first time I have pushed it. This time, it was my (new) son. After being on a number of different medications for different diagnoses for the past 10 years, I went off my medicine two months into my first pregnancy. I haven’t known life without medication in 10 years. Except that one time. And let’s just say I was put on a medical leave from university, sent 4,000 miles back to my parents — and it wasn’t pretty. And that’s putting it lightly. Much to my amazement now, I live a pretty normal life. Parts of me wondered how I’d ever do normal things like be in steady relatio...
Source: World of Psychology - November 27, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Jillayna Adamson Tags: Disorders General Medications Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Personal Treatment Women's Issues getting off of meds Psychiatric Drugs Psychiatric Medication psychiatrid meds Source Type: blogs

Hearing Voices? It’s OK, It’s Part Of Who We Are
In my 30′s my life was turned upside down by a huge psychotic breakdown.  I was terrorised by auditory and visual hallucinations.  The voices I heard provided a relentless commentary on what was happening in my mind.  I link my psychotic episode to traumatic events during my dysfunctional childhood and first, abusive marriage.  I am in no doubt about this and challenge those who say “it would have happened anyway” because in no way was it biological in origin.  I first heard voices at 14, just after the death of my grandmother.  I was anxious and depressed and my parents took me, without telling me,...
Source: Dawn Willis sharing the News and Views of the Mentally Wealthy - November 27, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Authors: judithhaire Tags: *Special Guest Writers* Hallucination Hearing Voices Movement Member of Parliament Mental disorder National Health Service NHS Psychosis Rufus May Source Type: blogs

Interview with Air Ambulance Provider, CSI Aviation
There is a remarkable degree of overlap between medical technology enthusiasts and aviation aficionados. Perhaps this is why there are so many analogies drawn between the aviation and health care industries, with the former serving as a model that the latter strives to emulate (e.g. safety checklists, decision support tools/gauges, etc). A few of us Medgadget editors also have backgrounds as aeronautical engineers or pilots, so when we had the opportunity to learn more about air ambulances we jumped on it. The result is the interview below with Michele Martinez of CSI Aviation, which arranges for air ambulance transport s...
Source: Medgadget - November 26, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Shiv Gaglani Tags: Emergency Medicine Medgadget Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, November 26, 2013
From MedPage Today: Alzheimer’s Gene Effects Show Up in Infancy. Infants and toddlers with the Alzheimer’s disease-associated APOE4 genotype already showed distinctive patterns of brain structure relative to other young children. ADHD Prevalence Still Rising, CDC Says. Rates of parent-reported diagnoses of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) continued their upward trend through 2011. FDA Opens Door to Wider Avandia Prescribing. The FDA has loosened restrictions on the diabetes drug rosiglitazone (Avandia) — under fire since 2007 because of potential cardiovascular risks — and will allo...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 26, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Diabetes Endocrinology Heart Neurology Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

---
Dallas Mayor Rawlings JFK Event speech. (Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans)
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - November 26, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Holiday Shopping at Shrink Rap? Free Novels Tomorrow through Black Friday.
Black Friday is Coming!From Wednesday through Black Friday (November 27-29, 2013), three of my novels will be available as free downloads to Kindle. No cost.  No parking.  No crowds.  No Kindle, you say?  There is a link below to download a free Kindle app onto your computer, phone, or tablet.  Double Billing is the story of a woman whose life changes when she discovers she has an identical twin she never knew existed. It's a short book and a quick read with some plot twists.  So far, I think it's my best fiction. Home Inspection is a story told through psychotherapy sessions in a format ...
Source: Shrink Rap - November 26, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Cyberchondria: Do Medical Websites Hurt More Than They Help?
Welcome to the world of online medical sites and diagnostics — WebMD, Mayo Clinic, MedicineNet, take your pick. While it’s tempting to easily type in symptoms and research potential illnesses when feeling under the weather, I advocate that these sites do more harm than good and only propel worries further. I’ll be the first to admit that I’m prone to anxiety as it is when sick, so it’s not exactly mentally healthy to Google “headaches” and then proceed to read that I have a brain tumor. Or I’ll type in “back tightness,” where I’m led to a page that speaks of muscle cramping (okay, fair enough), bu...
Source: World of Psychology - November 25, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Lauren Suval Tags: Anxiety and Panic Brain and Behavior Disorders General Health-related Psychology Self-Help Stress Technology cyberchondria health informatics Internet medical websites Webmd Worry worrying Source Type: blogs

"Deep Brain Stimulation in Children: Parental Authority Versus Shared Decision-Making"
by Farah Focquaert has been published in the most recent issue of Neuroethics: Abstract This paper discusses the use of deep brain stimulation for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric... (Source: Neuroethics and Law Blog)
Source: Neuroethics and Law Blog - November 25, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: NELB Staff Source Type: blogs

CogCubed Aims to Bring a Tangible User Interface (TUI) to ADHD Patients
The objective tools typically provide reports, or ‘printouts’ designed for highly trained professionals. We wanted to do something different, by providing a web portal that can be seen and utilized by providers, parents and/or patients. It  made sense to partner with a human-centered design firm like Azul 7 because they are experts in taking a lot of data, disseminating it, and understanding what is useful for people to actually use this tool to find value. We still provide the ‘printouts’, but you don’t need to have a PhD to understand it.   Medgadget: How has Azul 7 impacted usability?  Kurt Roots: The...
Source: Medgadget - November 25, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Shiv Gaglani Tags: Medgadget Exclusive Pediatrics Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Confessions of a Prosocial Psychopath
Many neuroscientists have been howling about the media coverage surrounding a new book written by UC Irvine Professor Emeritus, Dr. James H. Fallon. This is because unbeknownst to himself for 58 years (or apparently to anyone else, for that matter), he was secretly a psychopath. How did he finally discover this? Did he complete the Psychopathy Checklist and score over 30?No.Instead, he diagnosed himself as a psychopath on the basis of his PET scan.Compared to a control brain (top), neuroscientist James Fallon’s brain (bottom) shows significantly decreased activity in areas of the frontal lobe linked to empathy and morali...
Source: The Neurocritic - November 25, 2013 Category: Neurologists Source Type: blogs

The "Magic" of the Doctor-Patient Relationship
There is no doubt that in psychotherapy, some of what heals is the relationship the patient has with the therapist.  Medicines can be helpful, even when they are prescribed by a doctor with no personality, but no one enjoys going to see a doctor "just to get a prescription."  In therapy, it's hard, if not impossible, to heal if the patient does not see the therapist as being reasonably kind, empathic, and mutually valued, at least some of the time.   Aside from any medications, aside from the exact use of the words chosen, and aside from what tribe of psychotherapy the therapist aligns with, part of wha...
Source: Shrink Rap - November 24, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Virginia's Law On Civil Commitment: 4-6 Hours to find a bed or the dangerous go free
Virginia is a funny state.  They like their guns and they like their civil rights.  Well, not for sex offenders who get to serve life terms in "treatment" facilities after their prison terms are finished, but that's for another day.If you've been paying attention to the news, you know that former Virginia state senator and gubernatorial  candidate Creigh Deeds was stabbed in the chest and face by his 24 year old son on Tuesday.  After the altercation, the son died of a gun shot wound, at this point his death was believed to be a suicide.  The son was a student at William and Mary College, one of Vi...
Source: Shrink Rap - November 24, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Anxiety - Interesting Suggestion
I saw my psychiatrist yesterday and told her I was doing really, really well, probably 1000% times better, but I have a lot of problems with anxiety.  It can overwhelm me at times. She did increase my Latuda by 40 more (milligrams?) and said to take the extra in the morning, but what she really suggested in addition was to do yoga or meditate, learn how to bring my thoughts into the present.  She was totally right - my anxiety comes from worrying about the future or the past, so she said I needed to learn how to bring my thoughts into the present.  I thought that was a most excellent idea, especially si...
Source: bipolar.and.me - November 23, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

When Should You Go to the Hospital for Severe Depression?
Knowing when to commit yourself or a loved one to the hospital to be treated for severe depression can be a very gray area. I wish there were a set of directions much like those when you are in labor: if contractions come within five minutes of each other and last a minute, pack your bags. Some physicians will make the decision for you, but usually it is up to you. Here are a few guidelines. 1. When you are in danger of hurting yourself or someone else. If you are very suicidal and have gone as far as making plans, you should be in a safe place where you don’t have to rely on sheer willpower. All of us who have experie...
Source: World of Psychology - November 22, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Antidepressant Depression General Medications Psychiatry Psychology Treatment Clinical Depression Depression (mood) Hospital Hospitalization inpatient Medicine Physician Severe Depression Suicide Source Type: blogs

Best Post of August 2013: Profile of Wash U NP Fellow Dr. PJ Cimino
The next in our "Best of the Month" series is from August 1, 2013, when I profiled Dr. PJ Cimino, a prominent first-year neuropathology fellow at Washington University in St. Louis. After a short biographical sketch, Dr. Cimino answers a few of my questions:Dr. PJ CiminoP.J. Cimino grew up in Seattle, WA, where he did both his undergraduate studies (double major in neurobiology and biochemistry) and Medical Scientist Training Program (combined MD/PhD program) at the University of Washington. He earned his PhD in Neurobiology and Behavior while working in the laboratory of Tom Montine MD, PhD in the Department of Pathology....
Source: neuropathology blog - November 22, 2013 Category: Pathologists Tags: Best of the Month series neuropathologists Source Type: blogs

Confused Thinking about New Cholesterol Guidelines - Were Conflicts of Interest to Blame?
For years, clinical practice guidelines promulgated by prominent health care organizations have been hailed with accolades as received wisdom.  However, there is increasing reason to be skeptical of such guidelines.  Many guidelines are not based on rigorous application of the principles of evidence-based medicine, and often seem to arise from the personal opinions of their authors.  This is particularly troublesome when those authors  have conflicts of interest, and when the organizations that sponsor guideline development have institutional conflicts of interest.  Back in 2011, an Institute of Me...
Source: Health Care Renewal - November 22, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: American College of Cardiology American Heart Association conflicts of interest evidence-based medicine guidelines logical fallacies Source Type: blogs

Is ADHD Overdiagnosed? It’s Complicated, Part 2
Earlier this year, the CDC released data that showed that diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) went up over the past few years. But the CDC data also showed that diagnoses went up across the board for multiple mental disorders. Some media outlets at the time, however, only focused on the increase in the diagnosis of ADHD. This two-part article (part 1 is here) examines whether there really is an “over”-diagnosis of ADHD — or whether it’s more complicated than answering with a simple “yes” or “no.” The Recent BMJ Study This past month, the prestigious...
Source: World of Psychology - November 22, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: ADHD and ADD Children and Teens Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Minding the Media Parenting Policy and Advocacy attention Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Bmj Depression Diagnosis Media Outlets Mental Disor Source Type: blogs

Medicine then and now: The importance of team
I have been visiting different sites and having staff meetings with different groups of clinicians since I came back to my psychiatric services chief job recently. I have noticed something that is very important to the smooth operation of a mental health center, and most likely any health care facility you might look at. In order to do the best job possible and help the most people who need us, we must work as a team. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 21, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Is ADHD Overdiagnosed? Yes & No
This article has been revised to reflect the following correction: Correction: April 2, 2013 A headline on Monday about the marked rise in diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, described incorrectly the disorder that saw the increase. It is A.D.H.D. — not hyperactivity, which is present in only a portion of A.D.H.D. cases. The article also misidentified the organization that plans to change the definition of A.D.H.D. to allow more people to receive the diagnosis and treatment. It is the American Psychiatric Association, not the Am...
Source: World of Psychology - November 21, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: ADHD and ADD Children and Teens Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Minding the Media Parenting Policy and Advocacy Treatment Alan Schwarz American Psychiatric Association attention Attention Deficit Attention Deficit Hy Source Type: blogs

When is disclosure not disclosure?
WHEN IS DISCLOSURE NOT DISCLOSURE? Hint: When it is made by the Chairman of the DSM-5 Task Force.Here is a case study in conflict of interest (COI). A remarkable confession has just appeared by a group of 5 prominent academics, writing in the journal JAMA Psychiatry. Having been outed to the Editors, they now admit to concealing pertinent financial information. One of the five is David J. Kupfer, MD, chairman of the DSM-5 Task Force and past chairman of the department of psychiatry at The University of Pittsburgh. The others are from Pittsburgh, Minnesota, and Chicago.With millions in funding from NIMH, these folks have be...
Source: Health Care Renewal - November 21, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: Bernard Carroll conflicts of interest David Kupfer deception DSM-5 JAMA JAMA Psychiatry NIMH Robert Gibbons Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

New Deep Brain Stimulation System Measures Neurotransmitter Release
In this study, the investigators will monitor extracellular neurotransmitter levels using a probe that is able to perform real time electrochemical detection during deep brain stimulation surgery. The overall question this study is designed to answer is: Are there neurotransmitters released during deep brain stimulation? Interestingly, the primary outcome measure is adenosine1 release recorded by WINCS, and the secondary outcome measure is dopamine release (pre-, during, and post-DBS, over a time frame of 30 min). Adenosine A2A antagonists may extend the duration of action of L-dopa, a primary treatment for PD. Preliminary...
Source: The Neurocritic - November 21, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

2013: The Year Of Autism's Grand Error, The DSM5 Autism Spectrum Disorder
Photo by Harold L DohertyEdward Ritvo-Susan Swedo Shootout at the IMFAR Corral, Sheraton, Toronto, May 18, 2012The year 2013 will be remembered as the year the simplified DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder definition was imposed on a very complex and diverse group of disorders and/or symptoms.  Catherine Lord, Susan Swedo and other members of the DSM-5 committee responsible for the definition change simply ignored criticisms of their proposals and pushed ahead because, in their minds, they know better than their critics. It would be one thing if the DSM5 Autism Spectrum Disorder critics were simply par...
Source: Facing Autism in New Brunswick - November 21, 2013 Category: Autism Authors: H L Doherty Source Type: blogs

Researchers Back Peddle From Their Own Risperdal Study
In the wake of the $2.2 billion settlement by Johnson & Johnson to resolve criminal and civil charges for illegal marketing of the Risperdal antipsychotic pill (more here), two of the authors of a medical paper that was used to inappropriately market the medicine are back peddling from the publication, according to The Chronicle of Higher Education. Denis Daneman, a professor and chair of pediatrics at the University of Toronto, asked The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, which published the article a decade ago, to retract the article or remove his name. But the publisher declined to do so, maintaining that the article ...
Source: Pharmalot - November 20, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs