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Psychiatry

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 12.

Mind Med: Easing ADHD Symptoms Without Medication
Currently available ADHD medications are typically very strong, habit forming drugs, whose side-effects can often be worse than the disorder they are intended to treat. As an ADHD patient, this editor took the liberty of testing an iPhone app designed to help ease the symptoms of the disorder, either as a supplement to medication, or as a standalone treatment option. The ADHD treatment app was designed by Mind Med, a psychiatric disorder neuro-cognitive treatment technology start-up based in Ontario, Canada. According to their website, Mind Med claims their app is based on scientific and clinical research, and is shown to...
Source: Medgadget - September 23, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Yona Gidalevitz Tags: Medgadget Exclusive Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Perspectives on Pain - 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth, No 15 (2012)
This issue of 19, guest edited by Louise Hide, Joanna Bourke, and Carmen Mangion, examines the meaning of pain - for sufferers, physicians, and other witnesses - in the nineteenth century. Articles by social and cultural historians, and by literary scholars, discuss the implications of shifting discourses in personal narratives, in religious communities, and in philosophical, medical, and psychiatric texts. Analysing language in the diverse theories of the period, this issue extends and deepens our understanding of the complex interaction between the body, mind, and culture in order to gain insight into the ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, September 23, 2013
From MedPage Today: Type 1 Diabetes Not Controlled in Teens. Glucose control remained inadequate in a cohort of teens with type 1 diabetes, and many of these young patients already had microvascular complications. White House Seeks to Ease Obamacare Fraud Fears. The White House unveiled several steps this week to protect consumers from fraud in the new online health insurance marketplaces, a move that comes after 17 states hostile to the law acted to limit the spread of information about the program, and congressional Republicans raised concerns about the privacy of medical and financial records. Add ‘Shrapnel̵...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 23, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Diabetes Endocrinology Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

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This weekend an APA task force released a report saying that 'antipsychotic drugs' are overused*. The comments at USAToday had a delighted group of psychiatry bashers. In reviewing the literature, I find that other adult bipolar drugs are just not found useful in Adolescents. Further, from a criticism standpoint, the spokesman, Joel Yager, MD is from the same Medical School that treated the man found armed to the hilt at the scene of the Aurora Colorado movie shooting. Presumably he has some prominence at the Medical School as well. Are we to be speculatively happy that the shooter wasn't about to develop diabetes from Ris...
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - September 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

What happens to patients after their doctors die?
Several studies have explored the experience of grief that physicians feel when they lose a patient. But what about when the patient loses a physician — when the doctor dies? Dr. K was a well-known child psychiatrist, a loving husband, a father of two, and an irreplaceable support and friend for a number of children suffering from trauma, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism and other challenging psychiatric conditions. Earlier this year, Dr. K passed away in a tragic accident while vacationing with his family. His loss was nearly unbearable for most of us. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 22, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Patient Patients Primary care Source Type: blogs

Do Addicts Benefit From Chronic Care Management?
Controversial JAMA study questions orthodox addiction treatment.  What is the best way to treat addiction? The conventional wisdom has been to treat it with chronic care management (CCM), the same approach used for various medical and mental illnesses. But a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) purports to demonstrate that “persons with alcohol and other drug dependence who received chronic care management (CCM)” were no more likely to become abstinent that those who received nothing beyond a timely appointment with a primary care physician, and a list of addiction treatment resource...
Source: Addiction Inbox - September 22, 2013 Category: Addiction Authors: Dirk Hanson Source Type: blogs

So Many Medication Issues....
I made a really dumb mistake.  I *thought* I was being smart by buying little pill boxes and putting morning pills in one and night time pills in the other.  The morning pills were just Prestiq, but I added a bunch of stuff like vitamins since I was taking pills anyway.I've been waking up several times throughout the night and had NO idea why I was sleeping poorly lately.  This morning I went to take my morning pills and realized what I had been doing.  I got the pill boxes mixed up!  I don't know how long I've done it, but I've been taking the night ones in the morning and vice versa. The night on...
Source: bipolar.and.me - September 20, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

Sanofi Pays $40M To Settle Suit About Fibs And Its Failed Fat Pill
Six years after Sanofi withdrew its application to sell its troubled Acomplia diet pill in the US over concerns about psychiatric side effects, the drugmaker has agreed to pay $40 million to settle a shareholder lawsuit that alleged misleading statements were made about the safety of the drug. Various pension funds cited statements made by Sanofi that Acomplia, which was sold as Zimulti in Europe, could become a blockbuster seller and had few side effects. But the lawsuit referenced internal documents indicating the drugmaker was aware of cases of suicidal ideation and a statistically significant link to suicidal thoughts ...
Source: Pharmalot - September 20, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

6 strategies hospitals should steal from the airline industry
Conclusion: Although air traffic flow is simpler and easier to manage than healthcare, the industry can offer many lessons that will enable us to treat patient flow systemically as a 24/7, inpatient/outpatient, continuous operation that requires continuous management and oversight to standardize processes, exploit bottle-necks, manage random variation and eliminate non-random variation. By doing so, we can reduce costs, improve quality/safety/service and successfully compete globally for high quality-low costs services. Jonathan H. Burroughs, MD, MBA, FACHE, FACPE is a certified physician executive and a fellow of the Am...
Source: hospital impact - September 19, 2013 Category: Health Managers Authors: Wendy Johnson Source Type: blogs

Nervewracking: US Army Tells Troops Not To Take Anti-Malaria Drug
Just weeks after the FDA boosted warnings on a widely used malaria drug called mefloquine because neurologic and psychiatric side effects may become permanent, the Surgeon General’s Office of the Army Special Operations, which includes such US forces as the Green Berets, ordered troops to immediately discontinue use. The move comes years after reports surfaced that the drug, which is also called Lariam and was sold by Roche before various generic versions appeared, could cause serious side effects that could last for years. The FDA announcement, however, was apparently the first time that the agency noted that neurologic...
Source: Pharmalot - September 19, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Army units ordered to stop taking anti-malarial drug mefloquine
Published September 19, 2013APhttp://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/09/19/army-units-ordered-to-stop-taking-anti-malarial-drug-linked-to-brain-damage/?The top doctor for Green Berets and other elite Army commandos has told troops to immediately stop taking mefloquine, an anti-malaria drug found to cause permanent brain damage in rare cases.The ban among special operations forces is the latest development in a long-running controversy over mefloquine. The drug was developed by the Army in the 1970s and has been taken by millions of travelers and people in the military over the years. As alternatives were developed, it fell out...
Source: PharmaGossip - September 19, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Guns, Again (--another broken record shrink rapper)
Apparently,  if the shooter is dead, I can talk about it (a little).  I don't know any facts except what I've seen in the paper, and I've interviewed absolutely no one, so I'm not going to say much, but I am going to use what I've read to write a post on the on-going issue of the role of mental illness and gun control. Per today's New York Times: But several senators, like Senator Richard Blumenthal, Democrat of Connecticut, who has pushed for tougher gun laws since last year’s elementary school massacre in Newtown, Conn., see mental health policy as a way forward. “Mental health is really the ...
Source: Shrink Rap - September 19, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

What Can You Do When Faced With Relapse?
There is no word in the English language I despise more than “relapse.” Because by the time I use it, I have suffered months of agonizing depression that involves the typical symptoms you check off at a psychiatrist’s office: overwhelming guilt, fantasizing about death, no energy, lots of tears, trouble sleeping, eating too much (or too little), trouble concentrating, difficulty doing just about anything but obsessing about how bad you feel and crying enough to keep Kleenex in business. Here are a few strategies I use when I start to relapse… when my symptoms don’t abate for weeks on end and when I’m scare...
Source: World of Psychology - September 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Brain and Behavior Depression Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Art Therapy Chardonnay Classic Music Creative Expression Despair Fantasizing General Health Helplessness Immune System Kleenex La Source Type: blogs

Will Germany Squelch Gilead Hopes For Its Stribild AIDS Drug?
In a move that may make Gilead Sciences execs a wee bit anxious, German regulators have issued a preliminary decision that their once-daily, combination Stribild HIV treatment does not offer a benefit over their older Atripla medication. Stribild, you may recall, contains four different Gilead compounds and is projected to become a multi-billion-dollar seller in a few years. For the moment, there is no reason to suggest the decision means Stribild will not become a success story. The treatment, which won FDA approval last year, has generated more than $190 million in sales in the first six months of this year (see page 20)...
Source: Pharmalot - September 18, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Chantix Does Not Increase Depression Risk? A Pfizer Study Says Yes
Faced with declining sales of its controversial Chantix quit-smoking pill, Pfizer has undertaken various educational and promotional efforts to revive its fortunes. And as part of the plan, the drugmaker funded a study that found people with a history of depression were no more likely to become depressed or have suicidal thoughts than those given a placebo. The study was designed to determine whether Chantix would help people who had been treated for depression quit smoking without worsening their depression and those findings were positive. Among those on Chantix, 35 percent did not smoke, compared with 15 percent of thos...
Source: Pharmalot - September 18, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Speaking Ill of the Dead
I'm moving this discussion to its own post since it has little to do with mandatory employee health screening and I think it deserves its own section. Jesse put up a link to a PBS news interview with Drs. E. Fuller Torrey and Elspeth Ritchie regarding Aaron Alexis, the alleged Navy yard shooter. This has spurred discussion about what, if anything, psychiatrists should be saying in the media about specific individuals with rumored mental illness. I've gotten on a soapbox about this a number of times before and I don't want to be repetitive, so if you feel inclined you can search the blog for the labels "shooter psychology...
Source: Shrink Rap - September 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: ClinkShrink Source Type: blogs

Can New Talents Develop After a Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease?
I am asked if this type of cognitive ability can slow down the process of deterioration from Alzheimer's disease. It seems that it could be beneficial in this regard. By Max Wallack +Alzheimer's Reading Room I would like to introduce you to the work of Dr. Daniel C. Potts, a neurologist in Alabama. Dr. Potts’s father died of Alzheimer’s disease in 2007. Having never painted previously, Dr. Potts’s dad became an acclaimed watercolor artist after his Alzheimer’s diagnosis. Here is an amazing video of this artist’s work: Dr. Potts is now, “Very interested in improving quality of life for those with Alzheimer...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - September 18, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Max Wallack Source Type: blogs

6 strategies hospitals should steal from the airline industry
Conclusion: Although air traffic flow is simpler and easier to manage than healthcare, the industry can offer many lessons that will enable us to treat patient flow systemically as a 24/7, inpatient/outpatient, continuous operation that requires continuous management and oversight to standardize processes, exploit bottle-necks, manage random variation and eliminate non-random variation. By doing so, we can reduce costs, improve quality/safety/service and successfully compete globally for high quality-low costs services. Jonathan H. Burroughs, MD, MBA, FACHE, FACPE is a certified physician executive and a fellow of the Am...
Source: hospital impact - September 17, 2013 Category: Health Managers Authors: Wendy Johnson Source Type: blogs

Revisiting Glasser’s Controversial Choice Theory
When I was in graduate school, I took a course on Dr. William Glasser’s controversial choice theory. I had never heard of the man before I signed up for the class and had no idea that he was a psychiatrist with some controversial ideas. Until recently, when I read that Dr. Glasser had passed away, I had completely forgotten about choice theory and my experience in the class. After I read Dr. Glasser’s obituary, I started to think about what had been covered in my course and how I had initially reacted to it. The first thing I learned about Dr. Glasser was that he did not believe in mental illness. He believed that eve...
Source: World of Psychology - September 16, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Tracey Silver Tags: Books Brain and Behavior College Disorders General Medications Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy Psychiatry Psychology Students Choice Theory Controversial Ideas Dr Glasser Dr William Glasser Elective Credit Gr Source Type: blogs

Ariel Castro: That could be your patient they’re talking about
I thought I’d share what I saw on my Twitter feed as soon as I got up recently. I immediately felt a blog post coming on, particularly after reading the Twitter comments as they rolled in. I felt a bit sick, knowing what some of my colleagues in Ohio must be going through right now. This post is for you. When it comes to patient suicide, correctional psychiatry is probably one of the higher risk subspecialties within psychiatry. The average prisoner has three risk factors for suicide before he even steps into the facility: he’s male, young, and has an active substance abuse problem. There’s even a recent...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 16, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The Mass in the setting of Yom Kippur
After going to Yom Kippur Saturday, I heard Mass differently. The opening prayer, after greetings, in the Mass is: Brethren (brothers and sisters), let us acknowledge our sins, and so prepare ourselves to celebrate the sacred mysteries. I confess to almighty God and to you, my brothers and sisters, that I have greatly sinned, in my thoughts and in my words, in what I have done and in what I have failed to do, through my fault, through my fault, through my most grievous fault; therefore I ask blessed Mary ever-Virgin, all the Angels and Saints, and you, my brothers and sisters, to pray for me to the Lord our God In the Jewi...
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - September 16, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Is it ethical to instil false hope in people with mental illness?
There's an ethical consensus in medicine that it's wrong to give patients with physical illness false hope. But what about patients with mental health problems? Might the provision of unrealistic optimism be a vital part of their treatment? Or might this serve only to prolong their suffering? Psychiatrist Justine Dembo at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre has explored these delicate issues in a thought-provoking essay. Dembo highlights research showing the numerous positive illusions to which most psychologically healthy people are prone. This includes feelings that we're better than average, that we have more control...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 16, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Christian Jarrett Source Type: blogs

Vanity Came Knocking: Being Safe with My Bipolar
I nearly checked myself into the mental ward recently. I’ve been once, and it is no vacation. But, one ordinary day in September, I was in that much pain. And I didn’t trust myself enough to be safe — all over some vanity and pride. For the most part, over the years, my bipolar disorder has been tamped down with medication, therapy and stress reduction. And, until that day, I thought I was in remission. But I was wrong. Remission for me meant experiencing episodes that weren’t much worse than having a bad cold. I didn’t have any mixed episodes, full-blown mania or crushing depression.1 I like the idea ...
Source: World of Psychology - September 15, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Meaghan Tags: Bipolar Brain and Behavior Depression Disorders General Mania Medications Mental Health and Wellness Personal Treatment Arrogance Blah Bp Breadwinner Chantix Daily Basis Day In September Ego Failed Attempt Medication Source Type: blogs

Antipsychotics in the Long Term: Zero Evidence
Last week’s post, Antipsychotics Over the Long Term: Thomas Insel Weighs In, elicited 20 comments. First, a quick summary of the post:   In his NIMH Director’s Blog, Dr Insel cited research in support of the proposition that, contrary to conventional psychiatric wisdom, antipsychotic medications may not always be a wise long-term option. According to Dr Insel:   It appears that what we currently call... (Source: John McManamy's SharePosts)
Source: John McManamy's SharePosts - September 15, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Authors: John McManamy Source Type: blogs

Is There a True Medical Benefit From Knowing Your APOe4 Genotype?
Would the availability of helpful drugs change your decision about being tested for Alzheimer's disease? By Max Wallack +Alzheimer's Reading Room Last month I wrote an article, Would You Want to be Tested for the APOe4 Gene? I asked the reasons why people would, or would not, want to know their APOe4 genotype. In other words, I was asking if people would want to know if they are genetically predisposed to Alzheimer's disease. I received many interesting responses. Many people did want to know. Among the people who did not want to know, there were two major reasons. Lack of confidence in the security of the inform...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - September 15, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Max Wallack Source Type: blogs

Staple a Kid's Head and Eat a Few Knives?
~ There's an article on mental health stigma in The New York Times by Pauline Chen, worth the read: Caring for a Mind in Crisis. ~Since I like to gripe about electronic records and privacy, I'll add this to my list of you-don't-want-to-believe privacy issues: On Campus, A Faculty Uprising Over Personal Data.   Penn State administrators quietly introduced the plan, called “Take Care of Your Health,” this summer in the deadest part of the academic calendar. But that didn’t prevent some conscientious objectors from organizing a protest online and on their campuses, culminating last week in an emotionall...
Source: Shrink Rap - September 15, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Small Acts of Kindness Can Have Big Effects
I live in Rochester, Minnesota, which basically is famous only for being home to the Mayo Clinic. My biggest health problem is mental, not physical (I’m bipolar). Several years ago, my internist snagged me a consultation with the psychiatrist who is nationally known for his work with bipolar disorder. After a three-hour discussion that felt like it ranged from birth to present day, he asked if I had questions. I said yes, just one: “Is this ever going to get any better?” He then felt compelled — after all that time — to tell me the research showed it got worse as people aged, not better, and he wa...
Source: World of Psychology - September 14, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Candy Czernicki Tags: Bipolar Brain and Behavior Disorders General Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Personal Psychiatry Relationships Bottom Floor Consultation Followup Visits Health Problem Hospitalization Mayo Clinic Present D Source Type: blogs

6 More Ways to Manage Clinical Depression
In a prior blog post, I listed seven ways to manage severe, clinical depression when you can’t get out of bed. The suggestions are different than the popular tips most depression experts give for boosting your mood, which are usually written for those with mild or moderate depression — or the really lucky people who just want to feel better. I thought it would be helpful to expand my list and give you six more ways to manage severe depression. 1. Remember your heroes. When making it to the breakfast table is a humble feat, it helps to remember I’m in good company with depressives past and present: Abraham Linc...
Source: World of Psychology - September 14, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Brain and Behavior Depression Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Abraham Lincoln Art Buchwald Black Dog Breakfast Table British Prime Minster Brooke Shields Death Thoughts Good Company Kay Redfield Jamison Source Type: blogs

OCD: Sometimes It’s Not You, It’s the Situation
Virginia Woolf, the 20th century English author who also suffered from mental illness, once wisely wrote “You cannot find peace by avoiding life.” Recently, I was talking to my psychiatrist. It was another one of those “Do I or don’t I?” medication moments that people with mental illness routinely have to live with. He had treated me for my obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) for about six months before I decided to be treated by another facility. I didn’t like the new facility’s recommendations, so I had gone back to this doctor for a second opinion. Since I had been treated by him for at leas...
Source: World of Psychology - September 13, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Keith Fraser Tags: Brain and Behavior Disorders General Medications Mental Health and Wellness OCD Personal Success & Achievement Treatment anhedonia Coping With Mental Illness English Author Enjoying Life Insights Intrusive Thoughts People Wit Source Type: blogs

Anxiety treatment app from Mayo Clinic: "Anxiety Coach" ($5)
"Mayo Clinic Anxiety Coach is designed to help people start mastering their fears and worries one step at a time. Watch this video to learn more about this iOS app and whether it might be helpful for you." For more information go to: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/anxietycoach/id565943257 Description Mayo Clinic Anxiety Coach is a comprehensive self-help tool for reducing a wide variety of fears and worries from extreme shyness to obsessions and compulsions. Anxiety Coach helps you make a list of feared activities and then guides you through mastering them one by one. Through this experience you can increase your con...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - September 13, 2013 Category: Professors and Educators Tags: Mayo Clinic Apps Psychiatry iPhone iPad Psychology Source Type: blogs

Ketamine, A Darling of the Club Scene, Inspires Next-Generation Antidepressants [Part 3]
Recent experimental research showing that ketamine, an anesthetic and club drug (Special K), can relieve depression quickly has intrigued a number of major pharmaceutical companies. Depression, it goes without saying, affects huge numbers and a fundamentally new and effective pharmaceutical approach to treating the disorder hasn’t emerged in decades. The enthusiasm for ketamine is such that physicians, often working out of small clinics, have already started prescribing low doses of the generic anesthetic off-label for fast relief of le cafard—and drug companies are contemplating whether to get into the act by creatin...
Source: PharmaGossip - September 13, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Loneliness Increases Dementia Risk, Heart Attacks and Stroke
A recent study published in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (Source: Minding Our Elders)
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 13, 2013 Category: Caregivers Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

What keeps some people from feeling that they really matter?
“Yeah, Doc, I drink. I drink a lot. Some nights I drink a case of beer and a half pint. Can’t sleep if I don’t drink. Relaxes me. Pure and simple. Numbs me up like novocaine.” A toothless grin. “It’s the feeling of floating away. I don’t know, I just keep coming back to it. Stuff goes in, feel a little flushed, a little rush, then I go somewhere else, you know? I just kinda float off on a cloud for a while. Things back here hurt. I don’t have a job. I can’t buy my kids stuff. I can’t provide. I’m nothing, Doc. I’m nothing to nobody.” One tear, sliding silently down the weathered cheek like a raind...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 12, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The Problem with Labeling Children with a Psychiatric Disorder
The way we label children who do poorly in school has taken a dramatic turn — in many ways for the better, in some ways for the worse. In yesteryear, kids who didn’t perform well in school would have been labeled as no-good, lazy, defiant, incorrigible, or just plain stupid. They would be disciplined by being shamed, blamed, hit, scolded, punished, ridiculed or simply written off as hopeless cases. Progress has been made. For the most part, we have eliminated such verbal and physical abuse. But we still must question the progress that’s been made when we replace the old labels with psychiatric diagnoses that ref...
Source: World of Psychology - September 12, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: ADHD and ADD Children and Teens Disorders General Medications Parenting Personality Policy and Advocacy Psychology Self-Esteem Students Treatment Attention Deficit Disorder Cher Class Clown Conduct Disorder Defiant Disorder Source Type: blogs

Had the Dosages Wrong AGAIN!
I got my blood test results - picture of perfect health, so apparently no thyroid problem but I'm going to request a copy.  It annoyed me that the nurse called me to give me the results so I then assume my family doctor is now "done" with me because she didn't say anything about coming back in.  All of these symptoms he did find so concerning that I didn't even go to him about and he's no longer concerned or wants to find out medically why I have them?  I guess he's blowing me off because, you know, I'm "bipolar".  That's merely speculation however.So right away I made an appointment with my psychiatris...
Source: bipolar.and.me - September 11, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

Book of Nurses: Angela.
Angela is an Enrolled Nurse working in North-West Tasmania. And don’t forget….We would love to read YOUR story. Click on the ‘Share your Story’ link below for more info.   I’m a student EN in Tasmania, and Nursing has always been a dream career. I started studying the Bachelor of Nursing at UTAS in 2006 at 18, and completed over half of the degree before I realised that I have a massive difficulty in communicating openly and honestly with people. I failed one of the practical components of an assessment, mainly due to the fact that I couldn’t talk to the mannequin I was bandaging. I...
Source: impactEDnurse - September 11, 2013 Category: Nurses Authors: impactEDnurse Tags: ectopics Source Type: blogs

ADHD Awareness Week October 14-20th 2013. Want To Help Change Some Minds?
Post from: Adult ADD Strengths This is cross posted to my new blog BC ADHD. Canadian ADHD Awareness Week is October 14th to 20th 2013.  The US has ADHD Awareness month, all of October. CADDAC, The Center for ADHD Awareness will be soon putting out more information on ADHD Awareness Week. Many adult and children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in British Columbia are 3rd class citizens. The health bureaucracy refuses to demand doctors, psychologist and psychiatrists in BC be properly trained to diagnose and treat adults and children with ADHD. At UBC, medical students only get one hour of training on ADHD. Th...
Source: Adult ADD Strengths - September 9, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Pete Quily Tags: ADD / ADHD Awareness Vancouver Source Type: blogs

ADHD Awareness Week October 14-21st 2013. Want To Help Change Some Minds?
Post from: Adult ADD Strengths This is cross posted to my new blog BC ADHD. Canadian ADHD Awareness Week is October 14th to 21st 2013.  The US has ADHD Awareness month, all of October. CADDAC, The Center for ADHD Awareness will be soon putting out more information on ADHD Awareness Week. Many adult and children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in British Columbia are 3rd class citizens. The health bureaucracy refuses to demand doctors, psychologist and psychiatrists in BC be properly trained to diagnose and treat adults and children with ADHD. At UBC, medical students only get one hour of training on ADHD. Th...
Source: Adult ADD Strengths - September 9, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Pete Quily Tags: ADD / ADHD Awareness Vancouver Source Type: blogs

What are You Afraid to Ask About Psychiatry?
On Thursday, ClinkShrink and I will be speaking at the Johns Hopkins University's  Fall Odyssey Program.  It's a lecture series, and we'll be speaking at the kick-off reception for a program called Mini-Med School.  We were asked and, flattered, we said "Yes!"  I didn't ask what they'd like us to speak about, and I started hearing details from people after the brochure came out.  Our talk is titled,   "Everything you always wanted to know about psychiatry but were afraid to ask."  One hour.  Two speakers.  Please leave lots of time for questions.  Okay, so I'm tasked with c...
Source: Shrink Rap - September 9, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

What Happens To Our Children When We Die? Maine Man Killed Himself and Adult Autistic Son in 2010
"Ginger Taylor  commented on the pressures on families with autism and on the greatest fear of many parents of autistic children: "That is the big question -- what happens to our child when we die. .... We understand their needs better than anyone else. It really breaks my heart hearing what happened to this family. It shouldn't be like that."" The Portland Press Herald , April 28, 2010 The recent murder and attempted murder/suicide cases involving mothers and their children with severe autism disorders are not the first such tragedies to occur.  Unfortunately the same patterns are unfolding ... the...
Source: Facing Autism in New Brunswick - September 9, 2013 Category: Autism Authors: H L Doherty Source Type: blogs

emergency nursing #101.
Received the following question today from Sophie: Love your blog, been a follower for a long time! Just writing for some advice.. So I’m an EEN, studying B. Nursing (graduating next year) I’ve been hiding in Theatres for the last 5yrs doing Anaesthetics, I have just accepted a job at a major Sydney ED as I needed a little change.. Anyways, do you have any advice on textbooks, literature or anything that I can use to make me a half decent ED Nurse? As in ED Nursing 101.. I have played in ED previously, but that was a while ago.. Thanks Sophie….a good question. To tell you the truth, if I spin around and look at the b...
Source: impactEDnurse - September 9, 2013 Category: Nurses Authors: impactEDnurse Tags: the nurses desk: Source Type: blogs

The wounded healer is sometimes the best choice of therapist
Sometimes, it really does take one to know one.  Not every counselor can work well with every patient.  It is hard to understand how people can presume to know bereavement and grief when they have lost no one of significance in their lives.  Surely everyone has experienced loss at some time.  However, the death of a tame woods animal is usually, qualitatively, very different from the death of one’s parent or sibling or spouse or child. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 8, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Patient Patients Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The Falling Leaves of Arabic Communism
The papers of both novels started to come in my hands as I turn them and the two books ended like trees in autumn, devoid of their fallen yellow leaves. The first novel was bought from Algeria, the second form Iraq. Both about a life of a communist. Both written by a communist. An ex-communist?Both main characters are ill. In the Algerian novel he had paranoid delusions and spending the time in a mental hospital, the Iraqi novel he had paraplegia, spending the time in a wheelchair. Both are men who are taken care by a European woman. Selene, the French, takes care of the Algerian anonymous protagonist, and Maria, that nurs...
Source: psychiatry for all - September 8, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

The Mysteries of Sleep Explained
We know we need it. If we don’t get it, we’re cranky, have trouble concentrating, tend to overeat and are more likely to make mistakes.  Yet, with the crush of demanding schedules, bad habits, or sleep disturbances, we don’t always get enough. So what is happening during those precious hours when we’re asleep?  Is it really a time of restoration for our brains?  And is it possible that it’s more than that? What happens in our brains while we’re asleep is a question neuroscientist Penelope Lewis is trying to answer. Lewis directs the Sleep and Memory Lab at the University of Manchester in England. In he...
Source: World of Psychology - September 8, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Christy Matta, MA Tags: Antidepressant Books Brain and Behavior Depression Dreams General Habits Happiness Health-related Memory and Perception Mental Health and Wellness Research Sleep “Spring Cleaning” for the Brainanti-depressant drugs Bad Habi Source Type: blogs

7 tips to stay away from misery on vacation
This year my wife and I decided to compile a list of all of the holidays we’ve had since we had kids. Its a nice list and we’re lucky to have traveled as well as we have. I always get excited about going. There’s the anticipation of downtime away from work (and other peoples’ problems), time for relaxation, sleeping, eating, reading, and some quality time with my family. Life is just going to be better on holidays. I just know it is going to be. Of course it is. But as Robert Louis Stephenson said , “It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.” Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you onl...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 7, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Update on Ketamine in Palliative Care Settings
Many recent headlines have heralded a new use for the old veterinary anesthetic ketamine, which can provide rapid-onset (albeit short-lived) relief for some patients with treatment-resistant depression (aan het Rot et al., 2012). This finding has been inflated into “arguably the most important discovery in half a century” by Duman and Aghajanian (2012). While finding a cure for refractory depression is undoubtedly an important research priority, might ketamine be useful for other conditions that cause profound human misery? The care of terminally ill patients suffering from unbearable pain is not a sexy topic, and hosp...
Source: The Neurocritic - September 7, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Borderline: Understanding the Patients that Psychologists Fear
This article explores what it’s like to live with borderline personality disorder. What Causes BPD? Sufferers of BPD often experienced neglect, abuse or unstable attachments as children. Borderlines lack coping skills because they failed to learn them as children. Borderline sufferers did not have their emotions regularly validated as children. They were taught that the world and those closest to them in it should be expected to be unstable and unpredictable and their responses should coincide accordingly. Have more questions? Check out this frequently asked questions guide to BPD. What is the Treatment for BPD? Dia...
Source: World of Psychology - September 7, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Amanda O'Donnell Tags: Borderline Personality Disorders General Psychotherapy Treatment Borderline Patients Borderline Personality Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Bpd Borderlines Demystification Dialectical Behavioral Therapy Emotional Reactions Source Type: blogs

Is there an acceptable way to end friendships?
When I was in first grade, my teacher once called the class together and said, “Glen is feeling bad because no one will play with him. Will anyone here play with Glen?” Glen was new (I think he moved to the area mid-year) and awkward-looking, and I remember how bad I felt for him when she said that. So I raised my hand. “I’ll play with Glen,” I said. To this day, I still remember the abashed smile he gave in response. So we arranged a play date, and I went over to Glen’s house. And I discovered that Glen was nice — but boring. I don’t remember if he ever asked me to play again, but I do remember how unc...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 6, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

A Glut of Antidepressants
By RONI CARYN RABINOver the past two decades, the use of antidepressants has skyrocketed. One in 10 Americans now takes an antidepressant medication; among women in their 40s and 50s, the figure is one in four.Experts have offered numerous reasons. Depression is common, and economic struggles have added to our stress and anxiety. Television ads promote antidepressants, and insurance plans usually cover them, even while limiting talk therapy. But a recent study suggests another explanation: that the condition is being overdiagnosed on a remarkable scale.The study, published in April in the journal Psychotherapy and Psy...
Source: PharmaGossip - September 6, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

The Circle of Zero
On of the worst things of living in a country like mine, Iraq, is that there is no liberty of thinking. Since childhood and we were being trained about what is permitted to think about, about what is permitted to write and read. Liberty to read whatever you like was actually present since there is nothing available to read only after it passes through the filters of censorship: governmental, religious, and social. Before 2003 I didn't know about Iraq history. And this is bad because you get hold of the continuity of what you are living in.After 2003 every former Iraqi politician that was regarded by Saddam's regime as bad,...
Source: psychiatry for all - September 5, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs