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Psychiatry

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 13.

Still Alive
WHERE DID YOU GO?I flatter myself by thinking you are asking this question.  I am writing a book of and about porn. (Source: The Last Psychiatrist)
Source: The Last Psychiatrist - July 6, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Neuropsychology Abstract of the Day: Neuropsychological Assessment
CONCLUSIONS: The WTT demonstrated excellent concurrent validity with existing 'Gold Standard' assessments of cognitive impairment. We believe that this instrument will prove to be a valuable additional screening assessment in epidemiological, primary care, specialist mental health or clinical investigations. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.PMID: 23824787 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: BrainBlog)
Source: BrainBlog - July 6, 2013 Category: Neurologists Source Type: blogs

I'm Just a Little Unwell, But Doing Great!
I'm feeling SO much better!  And to think, just a few days ago I was looking up lethal dosages of all of my medications, crazy!  I'm not 100% - yesterday I couldn't find the word "reputation", I'm still having memory issues.  I'm still a bit emotional, but overall, a huge, huge improvement.The changes I've made was getting back on Lamictal after running out, my psychiatrist increasing the dosage of Lamictal as well as Latuda, I've stopped drinking, not that I drank much anyway, but in no way do I want any form of depressant to enter my body, and today, for the first time in a few months, I ran!  It felt...
Source: bipolar.and.me - July 5, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

How to enhance access to mental healthcare in rural America
Rural America has a higher proportion of people who are at risk for mental health disorders and state offices of rural health have identified suicide, depression, anxiety disorders and lack of access to mental  healthcare, as major rural health issues.   A particularly sobering statistic is that suicide is the second leading cause of death in states with primarily rural populations. There is a shortage of mental health professionals practicing in rural areas so rural populations face significant disparities in accessing care, especially with regards to the provision of highly specialized services. Continue reading .....
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 5, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Just Trying to Keep Up!
I saw my therapist yesterday, and as I was talking, she asked me to open up my notepad on my iphone and write down things to tell my psychiatrist when I saw her as we were talking.  They work closely together, respect each other's work a lot, and when I tell them one of them has told me one thing and to tell them that, they take it seriously, or they ask me what did the other say when I tell them something.  Not about EVERYTHING, just once in awhile.So, because I have a horrible memory right now and have absolutely NO CLUE what she told me to write down in therapy, I will open up notepad and see what she told me ...
Source: bipolar.and.me - July 4, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

How's this for patient rights? Affinity Medical Center manager: file a safety complaint, and I'll plaster it to your head!
At my June 19, 2013 post "Affinity RNs Call for Halt to Flawed Electronic Medical Records System Scheduled to Go Live Friday" (http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2013/06/affinity-rns-call-for-halt-to-flawed.html) I noted what appeared to be an imperial hospital leadership recklessly and negligently ignoring their own nurses' concerns about safety of a new EHR system implementation.Now there's this at IndeOnline.com: "Judge orders Affinity to bargain with union" (http://www.indeonline.com/news/x1808710525/Judge-orders-Affinity-to-bargain-with-union?zc_p=1)CANTON (OH) — July 2, 2013A judge ruled Affinity Medical Center violated...
Source: Health Care Renewal - July 3, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: Affinity Medical Center National Nurses United National Labor Relations Board imperial CEO Ann Wayt bullying Source Type: blogs

Painful Problem: Why Kids Face Chronic Pain | LiveScience
This study shines a light on how poorly understood and mismanaged recurrent and chronic pain syndromes are." However, Walco also said he believes the number of pain patients reported in the new study is "potentially artificially inflated" due to the diagnostic codes used to identify pain patients. Those codes, Walco said, "leaned in the direction of psychological issues." The multiple diagnostic procedures and readmissions cited in the study underscore the need to do better when it comes to dealing with pain in youngsters, Walco said. Instead of treating chronic pain as an acute problem, physici...
Source: Psychology of Pain - July 3, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

NIH Director’s Award Winner to speak at 2013 SharpBrains Summit
We’re glad to announce one more excel­lent speak­er at the 2013 Sharp­Brains Vir­tual Sum­mit, Sep­tem­ber 19-20th. A Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University, Dr. Bruce Wexler won the NIH Director’s Award for high impact, high innovation, paradigm changing medical research, 2012–2016. Dr. Wexler is founder and chief scientist of C8 Sciences, one of the 10 Com­pa­nies to Watch in 2013/ 2014 accord­ing to our lat­est mar­ket report. He created C8 Kids, a brain-based content-independent pedagogy to directly improve thinking abilities in 5–9 year old children, combining computer presented brain exerc...
Source: SharpBrains - July 3, 2013 Category: Neurologists Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Bruce Wexler C8 Kids C8 Sciences Mental-Health neurocognitive NIH Director’s Award Source Type: blogs

Is It Your Marriage or Your Depression?
“It often seems that I could fill a practice with cases of falling out of love, so common is the complaint,” writes bestselling author and renowned psychiatrist Peter D. Kramer in his book, “Should You Leave?” He chronicles dozens of cases based on the stories of his patients and arrives at this little mantra: “Depression causes divorce as often as divorce cases depression.” His insight into the relationship between mood disorders and marriage is fascinating for a person like myself who recognizes the deterioration of marriage in so many surrounding couples, often due to an undiagnosed mood disorder. Blogger ...
Source: World of Psychology - July 3, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Brain and Behavior Depression Disorders Family General Marriage and Divorce Men's Issues Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Relationships Women's Issues Anger Bestselling Author Depressed Person Deterioration Divorce Cases Source Type: blogs

For psychiatric patients in the ED, waiting is the hardest part
There was the time I was hugging a trashcan in the lobby of the community hospital ED just a few blocks from my house. Not because I have a molded plastic fetish or because I like the smell of trash, mind you. I had an itinerant renal calculus, otherwise known as a kidney stone that was moving through my urinary system. It. Hurt. Like. Hell. I. Wanted. To. Die. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 3, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Emergency Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Adults with ADHD: How to Stop Beating Yourself Up
If you didn’t get diagnosed with ADHD until adulthood, you might’ve grown up with many damaging messages: You’re lazy. You’re not good enough or smart enough. You’re stubborn. You can’t do anything right. You also probably grew up with many hardships, including a poor academic record, parental disapproval and frequent punishments, according to Terry Matlen, ACSW, a psychotherapist and author of Survival Tips for Women with ADHD. You might be seen “as spacey, wild, purposefully difficult or obstinate and [receive] a lot of negative feedback from others,” said Lidia Zylowska, M.D., a board-certified psychiat...
Source: World of Psychology - July 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: ADHD and ADD Brain and Behavior Disorders General Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Self-Esteem Self-Help Academic Record Adhd Treatment Adult Adhd Adulthood Adults With Adhd Board Certified Psychiatrist Co Wo Source Type: blogs

The Psychology of Nostalgia (in under 300 words)
Nostalgia has been rehabilitated from a disease of the mind to a beneficial emotional experience. It seems incredible now but at one time nostalgia used to be considered a psychiatric condition: "Nostalgia was regarded as a medical disease confined to the Swiss, a view that persisted through most of the 19th century. Symptoms—including bouts of weeping, irregular heartbeat, and anorexia—were attributed variously to demons inhabiting the middle brain, sharp differentiation in atmospheric pressure wreaking havoc in the brain, or the unremitting clanging of cowbells in the Swiss Alps which damaged the eardrum and brain ce...
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - July 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Former Archdeacon of Wells, Dick Ackworth, denounces unfair ‘benefits test’ – read why and sign his petition. #ukmh #MentalHealth
The Link:   http://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/department-for-work-and-pensions-make-the-wca-fair-for-people-with-mental-health-problems Dear Iain Duncan-Smith, Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, We call on you to stop re-assessments for people with mental health problems until your fit-for-work test is fixed. People with mental health problems are substantially disadvantaged by how they are being assessed and many are found fit to work when they are very unwell. Tens of thousands of people like me and my son have known for a long time how unfair this is. Why is this important? My son first became unwell with...
Source: Dawn Willis sharing the News and Views of the Mentally Wealthy - July 2, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Authors: Dawn Willis Tags: Mental Health, The News & Policies. Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer’s Disease Explained To Children
Julie struggles with understanding why her Halloween trick-or-treating got cancelled, or why Grandma can’t remember her name. Julie is struggling with understanding her grandmother’s Alzheimer’s disease. By Max Wallack +Alzheimer's Reading Room There is a growing need to explain Alzheimer’s Disease to young children. I recognized this need some time ago, and  since no book really existed aimed at the 4 to 10 year old audience I decided to tackle this need along with my colleague Carolyn Given. Not only did I want to explain this disease, but I also wanted to provide these young caregivers (children) with s...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - July 1, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Max Wallack Source Type: blogs

Better, But It's a Long Road I Think
I think I'm slowly feeling better.  One day at a time. Actually, one minute at a time, one second at a time, one hour at a time - you get the picture.  I can be pretty happy one minute, the tiniest thing will happen and completely deflate my mood and those old, sad thoughts and feelings will start creeping in.  I have absolutely no idea if I'm anywhere close to being back to my normal self, or what my normal self even is.  When I ran out of Lamictal, I didn't know I was acting strangely for days although everyone around me saw it - even strangers who had never met me - so now I feel like I can...
Source: bipolar.and.me - June 29, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

You May Likely Gain Weight on these 6 Psychiatric Medications
I had been on the drug Zyprexa (olanzapine) for four weeks and had already gained 15 pounds which, you know, didn’t help my depression. After going to a wedding and catching a side view of myself, I called my doctor and told him that my name was now Violet Beauregarde, you know, the gum chewer in “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” who becomes a blueberry balloon. Except that when I rose to the top of the room I was crying. “The two most common questions that patients ask me are, ‘Will I become dependent on the medications?’ and ‘Will I gain weight?’” says Sanjay Gupta, M.D. It’s a serious concern fo...
Source: World of Psychology - June 28, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Antidepressant Antipsychotic Disorders General Health-related Medications Mental Health and Wellness Self-Esteem Treatment Anticonvulsant Charlie And The Chocolate Charlie And The Chocolate Factory Chemical Compound Clozaril De Source Type: blogs

Psychiatrist Appt, and the Cycle Continues
I saw my psychiatrist last night - she was SO nice, she fit me in, the same day, at 8:00p.  She increased my Latuda and we went over what she wanted me to take as far as the Lamictal increase.  I have no idea why, but it was very hard for me to understand.  She was telling it to me, but I couldn't comprehend it.  She wrote it down for me, and I read it, and I still wasn't getting it.  She had written it down two different ways, so she crossed out one of the ways and had me read it back to her, and then I thought I understood.  Something so simple, reading the dosage amounts of medications to t...
Source: bipolar.and.me - June 28, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

Psychology in Brief: 5 Things We Didn’t Know Last Week
Meeting online = longer marriages--Internet banging--Suicides peak in spring--The power of cutlery--When uncertain we choose narcissistic leaders. Five things we didn't know last week from the world of psychology: Meeting online = (slightly) longer marriages Did you know that one-third of people who get married in the US originally met online? And it seems these marriages are slightly less likely to fail. In this sample of almost 20,000 people in the US: "...marriages that began on-line, when compared with those that began through traditional off-line venues, were slightly less likely to result in a marital break-up (separ...
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - June 28, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Psychology in Brief: 5 Things We Didn’t Know Last Week (28 June 2013)
Meeting online = longer marriages--Internet banging--Suicides peak in spring--The power of cutlery--When uncertain we choose narcissistic leaders. Five things we didn't know last week from the world of psychology: Meeting online = (slightly) longer marriages Did you know that one-third of people who get married in the US originally met online? And it seems these marriages are slightly less likely to fail. In this sample of almost 20,000 people in the US: "...marriages that began on-line, when compared with those that began through traditional off-line venues, were slightly less likely to result in a marital break-up (separ...
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - June 28, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Anxiety and Mania in Depression - Some Key DSM-5 Changes You Need to Know
If you happened to have been depressed in May, then you went to sleep one evening with DSM-IV depression and woke up with DSM-5 depression. What changed? Absolutely nothing, well sort of absolutely nothing.    The DSM, as you may be aware, is psychiatry’s diagnostic bible, issued by the American Psychiatric Association. As opposed to physical illnesses, mental illnesses are defined according to symptoms rather than cause. The... (Source: John McManamy's SharePosts)
Source: John McManamy's SharePosts - June 28, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Authors: John McManamy Source Type: blogs

Guest blogger Dr. Manuel Mota-Castillo on the overdiagnosis of ADHD
We don't shy away from controversy here at Shrink Rap, and today, child psychiatrist Dr. Mota-Castillo joins us to discuss the idea that children with bipolar disorder are being misdiagnosed with attention deficit disorder and then being inappropriately treated with stimulants, which may be causing them more harm than good.  I've already written about my thoughts on the diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder as a catch-all category, and if you'd like to revisit that, see my article on Rethinking Bipolarity in Clinical Psychiatry News.   And now for our guest blogger: *             *   ...
Source: Shrink Rap - June 28, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Link feast
In case you missed them - 10 of the best psychology links from the past week: 1. "Every year, suicide peaks with the tulips and lilacs" - this article features poetic science writing at its best. David Dobbs describes a curious pattern in suicide rates that could provide clues to suicide risk in general. 2. "Over the years ... research has shown again and again that even trained, professional palates are terrible at judging wine." Related from the Digest archive: "Practising describing wines could help you become a connoisseur." 3. Scott Barry Kaufman interviews autistic savant Temple Grandin. 4. There's a lo...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - June 28, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Christian Jarrett Source Type: blogs

Finding the pony in healthcare
by Kenneth H. Cohn I confess to having an out-of-body experience last week. As I listened to two orthopedic surgeons state why they could not trust hospital administrators to keep their word, I imagined Ronald Reagan telling a favorite story about twin boys whose parents brought them to a psychiatrist because they seemed to develop extreme personalities. First, the psychiatrist approached the overly pessimistic boy with a bunch of new toys. The boy cried. "If I played with them, I'm afraid that I'd break them," he explained. The psychiatrist next approached the optimistic twin, taking him to a room full of horse ma...
Source: hospital impact - June 28, 2013 Category: Health Managers Authors: Wendy Johnson Source Type: blogs

More Suicide Articles
I like it when I know celebrities, it makes me feel important.  So imagine how excited I was when I went to my Epic personalization session yesterday and I was seated with that famous New York Times quoted psychiatrist, Dr. Adam Kaplin.  Dr. Kaplin's work was discussed in a Well article earlier this week on the rise of suicide in the springtime, Clues in the Cycle of Suicide. Dr. Kaplin studies depression in patients with multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune inflammatory disease. In M.S., he says, depression and inflammation feed each other: Even after accounting for the psychological effects of any serious illn...
Source: Shrink Rap - June 27, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 06-26-2013
See more HealthCare Updates at my other blog at http://drwhitecoat.com. UK Accident and Emergency Department criticized for multiple failures after going into “crisis” mode from January through March due to a surge in patient volumes. Of course, all the investigators go and pick through the hospital’s policies four times in April after things have calmed down, rather than going and trying to address the problems in real time while they’re happening. Want to see me faint? Give me a story about an inspector going to a hospital during a crisis, and making a specific real-time recommendation on how to improve the ...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - June 27, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

What If a Sugar Pill Was Just as Effective As Psychotherapy?
Yum, sugar pills! We talk about them all the time in science, where they have a much more formal and less appetizing name — placebos. A placebo is simply something used in research to act as a treatment equivalent, so as to not bias either the research subjects or the researchers themselves in how they perceive and react to the experimental treatment. In research on drugs, this often means giving one group of patients pills that look just like the medicine being studied, but lacking any active ingredient. In recent years, new research has emerged looking solely at the studies that were used to gain FDA approval of ...
Source: World of Psychology - June 26, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Antidepressant General Medications Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Research Treatment Active Ingredient Antidepressant Drug Antidepressant Medications Antidepressants Bias brain Control Group Decades Depression Drugs Source Type: blogs

Seeing Violence; Doing Violence
From Case Western Reserve University on Newswise: Aggression in school-age children may have its origins in children 3 years old and younger who witnessed violence between their mothers and partners, according to a new Case Western Reserve University study. “People may think children that young are passive and unaware, but they pay attention to what’s happening around them,” said Megan Holmes, assistant professor of social work at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve in Cleveland. Between three and 10 million children witness some form of domestic violence each ...
Source: The Situationist - June 26, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Situationist Staff Tags: Life Source Type: blogs

Extras
Eye-catching psychology studies that didn't make the final cut: What can we learn about emotion by studying psychopathy? [open access] Why do people attend science festivals? A tread-mill study of high-heel expertise: "high-heel experts adapted walking regularity more flexibly to shoe type and cognitive load than novices". [open access] "Ten undergraduate students from psychology classes were interviewed regarding their beliefs about the meaning of life" "marriages that began on-line .... were slightly less likely to result in a marital break-up (separation or divorce) and were associated with slightly higher mar...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - June 26, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Christian Jarrett Source Type: blogs

Why social media is an imperative for disaster psychiatry
Hidden amongst all the intense media coverage surrounding Facebook’s IPO, there was a news item that was covered so briefly that if you blinked you may have missed it: Facebook’s CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, took a trip to Japan and during this visit told Japan’s Prime Minister that the terrible Tsunami that had struck the country in 2011 had inspired him to find ways that the social network could help people after natural disasters. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 25, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Social media Facebook Psychiatry Twitter Source Type: blogs

I was there
Regular readers know that I am a fan of the blog, 1boringoldman. Last week he did a post that set me to reflecting on my own career. In a long and lonely wait, he describes his experience of having his identity as a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst pretty much thrown on the trash heap by the powers that be who are considered the leaders in psychiatry today.  Wednesday I was at a meeting of the curriculum committee of our Senior College and there was talk of developing a course looking at the future. One of the other members asked if I would be interested in taking an hour or so to look at mental health and I said sure...
Source: Jung At Heart - June 25, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Sensible and perplexing changes in ADHD diagnostic criteria (DSM-V)
The American Psychiatric Association recently published DSM-V, the first major revision to the diagnostic manual for psychiatric disorders since 1994. In DSM-V, ADHD is included in the section on Neurodevelopmental Disorders, rather than being grouped with the disruptive behavior disorders, i.e., Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct Disorder. This change better reflects the way ADHD is currently conceptualized. Below I review changes that have been made to the actual diagnostic criteria for ADHD. Core symptoms A common criticism of the ADHD diagnostic criteria has been that the core symptoms reflect how the disorder p...
Source: SharpBrains - June 25, 2013 Category: Neurologists Authors: Dr. David Rabiner Tags: Attention and ADD/ADHD Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness diagnostic DSM-V Neurodevelopmental psychiatric Source Type: blogs

Where Do Docs See Pharma Ads? If You Said Mobile Devices...
Although many physicians report they use smartphones for work more than ever before, they actually notice ads for medicines least often on their mobile devices, which also includes tablets. Instead, doctors continue to pay more attention to ads that appear in medical journals that are printed on good, old-fashioned paper. Specifically, 66 percent of cardiologists and endocrinologists cite print journals as the place where they most often are aware of branded ads. And 63 percent of psychiatrists and 62 percent of oncologists say the same thing, according to a recent survey of 600 specialists and general practitioners by CMI...
Source: Pharmalot - June 25, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Addiction Trajectories: Book Review
This study of faith-based healing in the addiction recovery community forms one chapter of a new volume, Addiction Trajectories, edited by Eugene Raikhel of the University of Chicago and William Garriott of James Madison University. What anthropologists can do for addiction science is document these sociocultural attributes of addiction. In a chapter on buprenorphine and methadone users in New York City and the five boroughs, Helena Hansen, assistant professor of anthropology and psychiatry at New York University, finds that buprenorphine users live in predominantly white, high-income neighborhoods, tended to have college...
Source: Addiction Inbox - June 25, 2013 Category: Addiction Authors: Dirk Hanson Source Type: blogs

HHS OIG Reports Small Percentage of Prescribers May be Overutilizing Part D Drugs
This report is a view into things to come under the Sunshine Act, as OIG relied on several of the same factors CMS will rely on including: (1) NPI #; (2) name as reported in the NPPES database; (3) National Drug Code (NDC); and (4) specialty. For example, OIG explained that it identified each prescriber's specialty based on the primary taxonomy code that he or she reported in the NPPES. The taxonomy code indicates a provider's specialty and subspecialty, if any. For example, it may indicate that a prescriber is a family-medicine physician specializing in geriatric medicine. OIG then grouped the taxonomy codes for simila...
Source: Policy and Medicine - June 25, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Being indigent is not a crime, but being an uncaring doctor should be
Okay, so this morning I want you to think about something with me. I want you to be honest, as honest as you can, as I will be with you too. Deal? We can’t move forward until you agree. Right. What do you feel when you’re driving along, you come to the next busy intersection, stop for the red light, and see that homeless guy? You know the very one I’m talking about. That homeless guy with his grimy, almost blackened clothes, week’s growth of beard, and the cardboard sign that says, “Will work for food?” Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputat...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 24, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Emergency Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Free Association (4 Jun 2013)
It is 1:29 p.m. and my French exam is at 3:00 p.m. and I am just waiting for the time. Yesterday I read something interesting about the necessity of being active and having healthy habits. About how lethargy and fatigue can be a way of living and how it is important to combat depression by activating the self. I remembered Regis Debray diaries written from the prison in South America and that phrase that says that all human misfortunes are caused from being unable to combat boredom when we are alone in our room.Yes, boredom when we are alone in our room. I understand that so well. Yesterday I read Russell. I liked him so m...
Source: psychiatry for all - June 24, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Basic screening tests take on a new meaning after cancer
Most people, by this I mean people who have never had cancer, go to the doctor for check ups and get sent for tests and don't think twice. They get nice negative results sent to them in the mail and they don't think twice about it.Throw in a few cancer diagnoses, and any screening test takes an ominous turn. Of course any screening test will show that you are doomed. There is  no way you will ever get a clean result again. One test will lead to another which will lead to another which will lead to another and then surgery, chemo, and more and more and more. Or so the little voices in your head tell you.It is perfectly...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - June 24, 2013 Category: Cancer Tags: test results sanity stress medical tests Source Type: blogs

Sometimes it is best to do nothing. A "must read " by Dr Justin Coleman
The Naked Doctor: an indepth look at the pitfalls of “cutting edge” medicineThe Naked Doctor is an ongoing project at Croakey that aims to encourage discussion and awareness of the opportunities to do more for health by doing less.In this latest edition, Dr Justin Coleman suggests that an equitable health system does not mean trying to give everyone the very best, if that means “the most tests, the most expense, the most treatments”.“Not only will that aspiration require others to miss out on even the second-best treatment, but it too often also actively harms the recipient,” he says.Perhaps one ...
Source: PharmaGossip - June 24, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Duck and her Little Ducklings
Get your ducks in a row from C Peter Clough on Vimeo. No psychiatry today, just ducks.  They were last seen by the local tavern.----- Listen to our latest podcast at mythreeshrinks.com or subscribe to our rss feed. Email us at mythreeshrinks at gmail dot com Our book is out now. (Source: Shrink Rap)
Source: Shrink Rap - June 24, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Executive Function and Alcohol Dependence
Executive function (EF) guides complex behavior such as planning, decision-making, and response control. Alcohol dependence (AD) is known to impair EF. New findings indicate that increased impulsiveness and decreased EF may comprise an inherited trait that signifies greater risk for developing AD. Executive function (EF), frequently associated with the frontal lobes, guides complex behavior such as planning, decision-making, and response control. EF impairment due to alcohol dependence (AD) has been linked to alcohols toxic effects on the frontal lobes. A study of EF in a group of adult offspring of AD individuals...
Source: Twelve Step Facilitation.com - June 23, 2013 Category: Addiction Authors: Sparrow Tags: Alcohol Alcoholism Brain Disease of addiction Research alcohol-dependence decision-making Executive Function Source Type: blogs

Free Association (Part 1/2013)
Yesterday I had some free time at the evening and I decided to watch that French film DVD "Un Ete Brulant" (=a hot summer". As usually in front of almost all French films I was taken by the music and the photography and the way of direction. But the story was so silly. I knew that the story was so silly after it ended. There is nothing. What surprised me that one of the characters who doesn't have a work was supposed to be a communist. We know that almost at the end of the film. I remembered how once I was talking to a man in a bus and he told me that the Iraqi communists are contradictory if we compare the way they live w...
Source: psychiatry for all - June 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Rare Genomic Mutations Found with Early Onset, Familial Alzheimer's Disease
These are the first new early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease gene mutations to be reported since 1995, when we co-discovered the presenilins. +Alzheimer's Reading Room Although a family history of Alzheimer's disease is a primary risk factor for the devastating neurological disorder, mutations in only three genes – the amyloid precursor protein and presenilins 1 and 2 – have been established as causative for inherited, early-onset Alzheimer's, accounting for about half of such cases. Now Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers have discovered a type of mutation known as copy-number variants (CNVs) – ...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - June 23, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Bob DeMarco Source Type: blogs

With Obesity, A New Disease is Born: Its Profound Implications for Psychiatry
A new disease was discovered the other day — or rather, one was created. There is no “lab test” for this disease, nor is there an X-ray, MRI, or CT scan that can detect it. It is diagnosed on the basis of a mathematical formula that many believe is simplistic and poorly-validated. Sometimes this “disease” results in metabolic abnormalities, sometimes not. Many clinicians view the decision to recognize this disease as another example of “medicalizing” a problem stemming from the person’s “life-style” — not from a specific pathological process. In fact, the declaration that this condition is ...
Source: World of Psychology - June 22, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Ronald Pies, M.D. Tags: Eating Disorders General Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy Professional Psychiatry Psychology American Medical Association Ct Scan Disea Dsm 5 Lab Test Life Style Major Depression Mathematical Form Source Type: blogs

The Catcher in the Rye
I passed more than half of the novel yet didn't understand the significance of the title. I started to hurry up the reading and some words started to be missed. I liked Phoebe much, so when she appears in the papers I slow down and here comes the lines where the word RYE appears again and CATCHER too:"Anyway, I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody's around-nobody big, I mean-except me. And I'm standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff-I mean if they're runn...
Source: psychiatry for all - June 22, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Will New Brunswick Ever Act To Provide Adult Autism Residential Care?
The Campbellton Based Restigouche Psychiatric Hospital  is the Only NB Based Residential Care Option for Severely  Autistic Adults in New Brunswick June 22, 2013 David Alward, Premier's Council on Status of Disabled Persons  Hugh J Flemming, Minister of Health  Madeline Dube, Minister of Social Development  Dorothy Shephard, Minister of Healthy and Inclusive Communities  Dear Premier Alward and Honourable Ministers: Re: Residential Care and Treatment for NB`s Autistic Youth and Adults I am the father of a 17 year old son with severe autism, developmental delays and epileptic seizu...
Source: Facing Autism in New Brunswick - June 22, 2013 Category: Autism Authors: H L Doherty Source Type: blogs

James Davies’s top 10 #psychiatry critiques. #MentalHealth #ukmh
http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/jun/19/james-davies-top-10-psychiatry-critiques#start-of-comments Filed under: Mental Health, The News & Policies. (Source: Dawn Willis sharing the News and Views of the Mentally Wealthy)
Source: Dawn Willis sharing the News and Views of the Mentally Wealthy - June 21, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Authors: Dawn Willis Tags: Mental Health, The News & Policies. Source Type: blogs

Anarchy, Activism and Assholes - Finding Common Ground.
Hey, it's been a while. It's been difficult scraping up a reason to write, and a lot of that has had to do with the sense that I'd been repeating myself. A lot. Over and over and over.And yet, I can't stop. If it's not here, well, I'm off whacking moles on Reddit. Yes, I am an Redditor. It kind of snuck up on me.Anyhoo, one of those reddit bounce-abouts - from front page to article to comment thread to embedded link - led me to a page where this was in the sidebar. Well, something like that.Are the Young People That Shrinks Label as Disruptive Really Anarchists with a Healthy Resistance to Oppressive Authority?  It ha...
Source: Graphictruth - June 21, 2013 Category: Autism Source Type: blogs

Scant data on seizure drugs for women's genital pain | Reuters
Although doctors sometimes prescribe anti-seizure drugs to treat chronic pain in the vulva, just a handful of low-quality studies have examined the drugs' effects, according to a new review. Based on these studies, "it's very difficult to make definitive statements on efficacy," said Dr. Raphael Leo, the study's author from the State University of New York at Buffalo. "Certainly, more investigation is warranted." Still, "I think that there is promise" for the use of anti-seizure medications, he added. Chronic pain in a woman's genitals, also called vulvodynia, affects as man...
Source: Psychology of Pain - June 20, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Contemporary Iraqi Conversations
"In my younger and more vulnerable years, my father gave me some advice: "Always try to see the good in people!" he would say. As a consequence I reclined to reserve all judgments. Even I have a limit." With these words the new version of "The Great Gatsby" starts with Carraway's voice narrating his memories while he is a resident in a psychiatric ward.I was in bus going to work when we passed by that city south of Baghdad named Alexandria, a city Alexander the Great had passed in once. I asked the man sitting next to me about the prices of rent of apartments in this city. He answered tha...
Source: psychiatry for all - June 20, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

A Smoking Pillbox: Evidence that Sgt. Bales May Have Been on Lariam By Elspeth Cameron Ritchie
New evidence has surfaced that Army Staff Sergeant Robert Bales may have been on mefloquine during his March, 2012, rampage that killed 16 Afghan civilians. I first wondered if Bales had been on the anti-malarial agent, also known by its trade name, Lariam, on March 20, 2012, a week after the massacre. I noted that “this medication has been increasingly associated with neuropsychiatric side effects, including depression, psychosis, and suicidal ideation.” A number of other media outlets picked up the story. But that was just a working hypothesis, absent evidence on Bales’ use of the drug. S...
Source: PharmaGossip - June 20, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs