Medicine RSS Search Engine

Psychiatry

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 13.

False Claims, Off-Label Prescribing And Doctors, Part Two
Over the past few years, an attorney has been waging a seemingly Quixotic battle to reduce off-label prescriptions for medicines – specifically, antipsychotics for children. Concerns over such prescribing have, in fact, been rising. Recently, the Office of Inspector General at the US Department of Health & Human Services began investigating the trend and asked the states to tighten their Medicaid oversight. But to achieve his goal, Jim Gottstein has taken a novel approach. He has been urging the US government to pursue physicians for violating the False Claims Act. In his view, off-label prescribing would be reduced ...
Source: Pharmalot - September 4, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Are ADHD drugs responsible for mental illness in college?
Recently, I “launched” my oldest off to college. As anticipated, it was an intense emotional experience full of joy, sadness, and many things in between. (I have to tip my hat to Beverly Beckham for her piece I was the sun, the kids were my planets that was very helpful. However, I might have written that my child was the sun, a burst of light in our household, and the experience of leaving her is like being temporarily knocked out of orbit as our family re-orients to life without her.) The same week I received in the mail, in exchange for filling out a questionnaire about a study on diversion — use o...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 4, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Meds Medications Pediatrics Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The EMRs You Don’t Hear About
The best-known EMRs got that way because they target the masses. About a third of the country’s physicians focus on primary care, with the remainder fragmented across dozens of specialties and subspecialties. It’s easy to see, then, why the major EMRs are primary-care centric. For specialists, the solution is often to use a general EMR and tailor it, with templates and other features, for the field’s common diagnoses and treatments, as well as its workflow. The question is whether the customization is enough. After all, the practice of, say, a nephrologist, who focuses on kidney ailments, doesn’t look much like tha...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - September 4, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: James Ritchie Tags: EHR Electronic Health Record Electronic Medical Record EMR EMR Selection EMR Technology Healthcare HealthCare IT Meaningful Use Practice Management EHR Companies EHR Selection EHR Software EHR Stimulus EHR Vendor EHR Vendors Source Type: blogs

Hospitalizing people against their will: 4 questions to ask
Involuntary commitment refers to hospitalizing people against their will for psychiatric reasons. It is a controversial topic because this is where medicine and civil liberties intersect: Physicians have the ability to take away the rights of fellow citizens. (I suspect that few people who become psychiatrists realize that making recommendations about involuntary commitment is part of the job. I certainly did not know this. I also did not appreciate the ramifications until I was well into my residency training. It is the worst part of my job.) Involuntary commitment laws differ in each state. In general, there are three cr...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 4, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Hospital Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Your Patient Died. Who Cares?
    I thought I'd share what I saw on my Twitter feed as soon as I got up this morning. I immediately felt a blog post coming on, particularly after reading the Twitter comments as they rolled in. I felt a bit sick, knowing what some of my colleagues in Ohio must be going through right now. This post is for you. When it comes to patient suicide, correctional psychiatry is probably one of the higher risk subspecialties within psychiatry. The average prisoner has three risk factors for suicide before he even steps into the facility: he's male, young, and has an active substance abuse problem. There's even a ...
Source: Shrink Rap - September 4, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: ClinkShrink Source Type: blogs

In retrospect Foursquare’s lack of celebratory badges for visiting hospitals, funeral homes,...
In retrospect Foursquare’s lack of celebratory badges for visiting hospitals, funeral homes, and psychiatric facilities was a smart move. — Joshua Schwimmer (@joshuaschwimmer) September 4, 2013 Posted on infosnack. (Source: Kidney Notes)
Source: Kidney Notes - September 4, 2013 Category: Urologists and Nephrologists Authors: Joshua Schwimmer Source Type: blogs

Identity and Medical Theft
Wow, so not feeling good.  I have not felt this amount of panic in so, so long!  Yes, my husband is probably right.  I've been very "intense" lately.  I feel very passionate about things, I guess I am being a bit extreme emotionally.  If I'm explaining or describing something to him that at that moment is incredibly important to me and I feel a certain way about it, I don't understand and am not happy if I do not get the reaction out of him that I think he should have.  I may be happy one moment, and then just a look on his face can completely deflate me.  My moods are VERY irrational rig...
Source: bipolar.and.me - September 4, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

The voices of schizophrenia: Treatment still has a long ways to go
Read the original op-ed from the TED speaker who inspired this post: “Why I Thank the Voices in My Head.” Eleanor Langdon is an extraordinary woman who has shown remarkable grit and creativity in transforming her disturbing symptoms into useful tools. Hats off to her for finding such a fruitful path to personal recovery and for sharing her techniques and inspiring story so that others may benefit from what she has learned. There are many precious lessons we can draw from this tape — never give up hope; never forget the person who is ill by focusing only on the illness; normalize the experience of mental...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 3, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Article: Former DSM Chairman Says The Psychiatric Manual Is Attempting To Turn Eccentricity Into An Illness
Former DSM Chairman Says The Psychiatric Manual Is Attempting To Turn Eccentricity Into An Illnesshttp://disinfo.com/2013/05/former-dsm-chairman-says-the-psychiatric-manual-is-attempting-to-turn-eccentricity-into-an-illness/Sent via Flipboard (Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner))
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - September 3, 2013 Category: Neurologists Source Type: blogs

A Chemical Peek at Modern Marijuana
Researchers ponder whether ditch weed is better for you than sinsemilla. Australia has one of the highest rates of marijuana use in the world, but until recently, nobody could say for certain what, exactly, Australians were smoking. Researchers at the University of Sydney and the University of New South Wales recently analyzed hundreds of cannabis samples seized by Australian police, and put together comprehensive data on street-level marijuana potency across the country. They sampled police seizures and plants from crop eradication operations. The mean THC content of the samples was 14.88%, while absolute levels varie...
Source: Addiction Inbox - September 3, 2013 Category: Addiction Authors: Dirk Hanson Source Type: blogs

---
Gerald Ford said in his taking over the presidency from Nixon, 'Our long national nightmare is over;' rather the reverse happened when James Earl Ray killed Martin Luther King, Jr. As David Brooks said this week*: The idea was to reduce ugliness in the world by reducing ugliness in yourself. King argued that “unearned suffering is redemptive.” It would uplift people involved in this kind of action. It would impose self-restraint. The strategy of renunciation and the absorbing of suffering was meant to guard against all that. In short, the method relied upon a very sophisticated set of paradoxes. It relied on leaders wh...
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - September 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Deeds, not Diagnosis.
Here on Shrink Rap, we've talked at length about the implications of having a psychiatric diagnosis on one's future occupational endeavors.  For example: We've talked about whether you can have bipolar disorder and be a doctor. We've talked about the fact that a psychiatric diagnosis prevents you from being a pilot. We've talk about psychiatric disorders and being in a powerful political office. We've noted that the New York Times recently ran an article on psychiatric diagnoses and how it affects one's ability to be admitted to the Bar Association. We've discussed mental illness and gun legislation.   Wha...
Source: Shrink Rap - September 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

When Patients Don't Pay
Before we start, some housekeeping issues: First, I want to say that I was misled.  I was told that gazpacho freezes well, and following such advice, I can say with impunity that fresh gazpacho is far better than defrosted gazpacho. Second, I want to say that when I deactived my personal Facebook account, I lost access to the ShrinkRapBook Facebook account where I post new Shrink Rap articles and other links to Shrinky Things of Interest.  Instead, please follow us on Twitter: ShrinkRapDinah, ShrinkRapRoy, and ClinkShrink.  I'm slowly transferring my social media addiction.   Third, ClinkShrink ...
Source: Shrink Rap - September 1, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Deadly Medicines and Organized Crime by Peter Gøtzsche
'The main reason we take so many drugs is that drug companies don't sell drugs, they sell lies about drugs. This is what makes drugs so different from anything else in life...Virtually everything we know about drugs is what the companies have chosen to tell us and our doctors...the reason patients trust their medicine is that they extrapolate the trust they have in their doctors into the medicines they prescribe. The patients don't realise that, although their doctors may know a lot about diseases and human physiology and psychology, they know very, very little about drugs that hasn't been carefully concocted and...
Source: PharmaGossip - September 1, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

---
'Boris' should get more respect. Brad DeLOng had a good day blogging. As I thought the other day 'Some element of surprise may be lost or ambiguity in what the military's action will be if there is a resolution (regarding US military action in Syria). On the other hand some general resolution affirmatively stating one of the purposes the president or Secretary of State has given for military action and authorizing it in Congress would desirably remove the penumbra of Obama as being imperator in the Roman sense.' So I am pleased at the president's request for congressional approval. I understand that 100 members of Congress...
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - September 1, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Antidepressants for the Short Term: How Strong is the Evidence?
Our previous post, Antidepressants: The Evidence, offered a quick rundown of what three major depression treatment guidelines tell us and what they don’t tell us. The guidelines were issued by the American Psychiatric Association (APA), the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatment (CANMAT), and (in the UK) the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE). All three guidelines cite strong evidence in support of the efficacy of... (Source: John McManamy's SharePosts)
Source: John McManamy's SharePosts - August 31, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Authors: John McManamy Source Type: blogs

Nuvigil: Not Better Than Placebo for Depression Symptoms in Bipolar
Millions of people around the world rely on antidepressants in the treatment of clinical depression and, to a lesser extent, bipolar disorder. Over a dozen such medications exist, and many are also available in generic form. But for reasons that scientists can’t yet adequately explain, some people don’t respond to many antidepressant drugs. And the drugs they do respond to may carry unwanted side effects that make taking the drug for any length of time downright challenging. So drug companies are constantly looking for new drugs, new uses for old drugs, and new formulations of old drugs to help improve their b...
Source: World of Psychology - August 31, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Antidepressant Bipolar Depression Disorders General Medications Research Sleep Stimulants Antidepressant Drugs armodafinil Batting Average Clinical Depression Depression Symptoms Depressive Symptoms Endpoints Excessive Slee Source Type: blogs

A Lot to Deal With, But I Should Probably Count My Blessings
One of my weird symptoms is back, although people can be complete klutz's sometimes; however, everyone knows what is "normal" for them.  I fell again, in the same weird way.  My feet just came up from under me and I landed on my elbow I think (because it really hurts) on the hard wood floor and started yelling in pain.  I chalked it up to the maids just coming that day so maybe the floors were slippery, no clue.  But the next day I stubbed my pinkie toe so bad that it was bleeding from the toenail and still really hurts. Great, my race is Sunday with a painful pinkie toe.On their own, big deal, so ...
Source: bipolar.and.me - August 31, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

Memory and Forgetting: Forgetfulness and the Self
Memory is an important topic of any psychology course; and I always find it fascinating that you are using your memory to learn about memory. Click here to view the embedded video. Questions I always pose to my classes are what would life be like without memory? Is memory reliable? How much can you actually remember? And we attempt to answer these through the classes. Usually this involves studying the extreme cases of memory such as HM and Clive Wearing to learn about the ‘normal’ functioning of the different memory stores. The institute of Arts and Ideas have just released a new debate on memory, forgetting ...
Source: PsychBLOG.co.uk - August 31, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Jamie Davies Tags: Cognitive Psychology ewt forgetting memory Source Type: blogs

Antidepressants for Depression: The Evidence
Do antidepressants work? Three treatment guidelines, totaling more than a thousand pages, should give us something to go on, right?    In 2010, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) issued its third edition to its Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients with Major Depressive Disorder. That same year, in the UK, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Practice (NICE) issued its latest version of The NICE Guideline... (Source: John McManamy's SharePosts)
Source: John McManamy's SharePosts - August 31, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Authors: John McManamy Source Type: blogs

What good is Medicaid expansion if no doctor sees Medicaid patients?
With its expansion of Medicaid eligibility, the Affordable Care Act (a.k.a. Obamacare) was supposed to go a long way towards providing healthcare coverage to millions of uninsured Americans. That accomplishment was dealt a large blow by the Supreme Court, when it forbade the federal government from requiring states to expand Medicaid coverage. Nevertheless, many states plan to offer Medicaid to anyone with incomes at or below 138% of the Federal Poverty Limit (FPL). And more states might follow suit over time, under pressure from the healthcare industry, which likes its customers to be paying customers. Continue reading .....
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 29, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Policy Health reform Heart Medicare Primary care Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Caution, pretty gross
I finally made an appointment with my family doctor, today at 1:00pm (unless I cancel which I am notorious for doing these days). The catalyst was not my concern about being tired and sleeping so much, but the fact that when I run really hard, like speed intervals, I...hmmm...I  don't know how else to say it but be blunt.  I urinate a little and cannot stop it.  It wasn't a big deal when I would just have 20 second intervals and the little dribble would last for about a second.  But when I did 16 intervals of 8 minutes fast/slow, the 2 minutes of running fast 8 times amounted to a LOT of urine.&nbs...
Source: bipolar.and.me - August 29, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

A Mental Illness Epidemic? Or Hype Masquerading as Journalism?
Are we in the midst of an epidemic of mental illness? My dictionary would suggest the word “epidemic” is appropriate when discussing some that is “excessively prevalent” or “characterized by very widespread growth.” Is mental illness really growing as much as some critics claim? It’s with some interest to examine the claims of those who say we’re in some sort of “epidemic” of mental illness. But owing to their sloppy premise, loose research efforts, and illogically connecting dots that have little to do with one another, I find it a hard claim to swallow. In fact...
Source: World of Psychology - August 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Minding the Media Policy and Advocacy Professional Psychiatry Psychology American Psychiatric Association Arch Gen Psychiatry Bruce Levine Connecting Dots Demler Dsm Iv Institute Of Source Type: blogs

A Look at Email and HIPAA
Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer and do not offer legal advice. The others quoted in this post are offering general information or interpretation and not specific legal advice or any statement of fact. For more background on this topic, check out my previous post “Practice Fusion Violates Some Physicians’ Trust in Sending Millions of Emails to Their Patients” When I first started looking into the millions of emails that Practice Fusion was sending to patients, doctors were suggesting that these emails constituted a HIPAA violation. Practice Fusion has responded in my previous post that “The patient email r...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - August 28, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: John Lynn Tags: EHR Electronic Health Record Electronic Medical Record EMR HealthCare IT HIPAA General David Harlow HIPAA Emails Mac McMillan PHI Practice Fusion Secure Emails William O'Toole Source Type: blogs

OMG, Hypomanic, But Why Is It So Wrong?
So strange, but I guess I shouldn't be so surprised.  How many times has this happened to me now?  More than I can possibly count.Mark and I had a 2.5 hour drive to pick up his "toy" he recently bought and had it modified mechanically and a very unique paint job.  It turned out above his expectations I think, which are incredibly high, *especially* for cars, I would describe as obsessive even.  I'm convinced he has OCD, which he doesn't deny, when it comes to details and could be a blog post by itself.  Just like I say it's hard to live with someone with bipolar disorder or depression, it's al...
Source: bipolar.and.me - August 28, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

Suicidal Patient: A Medical Student's Perspective
A medical student on his psychiatry rotation writes about his encounter with a patient who had attempted to take her own lifeContributor: Jay FalboPublished: Aug 27, 2013 (Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content)
Source: Most Recent Health Wellness - Associated Content - August 27, 2013 Category: Other Conditions Source Type: blogs

I Loathe Having to Get Presciptions!
I haven't posted in over a week, but seriously, I just haven't had the energy or desire to write.  I've had so much in my head that I've wanted to get out, but it just wasn't in me.I totally blew off my therapist and psychiatrist visits AGAIN last week.  I haven't rescheduled with either yet.  I say "blew off", I called to cancel with my therapist an hour before the session, but I was a no show for my psychiatrist.  They called about an hour after my appointment time to ask if I was okay and to reschedule.  Of course, I let it go to voicemail as I do just about every call.  This week, I am get...
Source: bipolar.and.me - August 27, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

Revenge fantasies can be satisfying but are they dangerous?
Revenge fantasies aren't just satisfying, research shows they can have meaningful therapeutic benefits for victims of violence and abuse, including a restored sense of control. What about the draw-backs? There are several, including the potential for guilt and shame. A new study focuses on another possible risk - that indulging in revenge fantasies could inspire real acts of aggression. Laura Seebauer and her colleagues simulated the effects of trauma by having several dozen psychologically healthy students watch three disturbing and violent 5-minute clips from these films: Funny Games, Sleepers and The Girl With The Dr...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - August 27, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Christian Jarrett Source Type: blogs

Reading Iraqi Newspapers
An article published last Thursday named Plastic Palms in an Iraqi newspaper named Al-Aalem Al-Jadeed (= The New World) talks about those ugly plastic palms that the government had bought from outside of Iraq to decorate Iraqi streets. What breaks the heart is that those palms are not only ugly but their price is triple the price of real palms that the Iraqi farmer are ready to provide.Another article in the same newspaper published last Sunday named Twereej Tobacco talks about an old story from the city of Twereej, the city of origin of the current Iraqi prime minster. The story says that on each side of the river that pa...
Source: psychiatry for all - August 26, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, August 26, 2013
From MedPage Today: Depression: Can a Coach Help? Adding old-fashioned technology — the telephone — to a Web-based intervention for depression improved adherence to the intervention, but there was no symptom benefit. Affording Care: A Medical Student’s Story. The Affordable Care Act as approved by Congress required all insurance plans to to limit personal out-of-pocket expenses to $6,350 for individual plans and $12,700 for family plans. Outcomes Mixed for Brain Surgery in Epilepsy. Long-term follow-up in children undergoing hemispherectomy for refractory epilepsy showed that most were seizure-free and ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 26, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Medications Neurology Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Is Iron Accumlation in the Brain the Cause of Alzheimer's Disease?
The findings of this study challenge the conventional thinking that beta-amyloid and tau are the culprits in Alzheimer's disease. +Alzheimer's Reading Room From the Semel Institute at UCLA. Alzheimer's disease has proven to be a difficult enemy to defeat. After all, aging is the No. 1 risk factor for the disorder, and there's no stopping that. Most researchers believe the disease is caused by one of two proteins, one called tau, the other beta-amyloid. As we age, most scientists say, these proteins either disrupt signaling between neurons or simply kill them. Now, a new UCLA study suggests a third possible cause: i...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - August 26, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Bob DeMarco Source Type: blogs

Are We Medicating Normalcy?
You’ve heard it all at dinner parties, graduations, school fundraisers, and family cookouts… At least, I have, and it goes something like this: “Psychiatry is a business that is medicating every normal syndrome out there: Too shy to ask a girl to prom? Take Zoloft for Social Anxiety Disorder…. Grieving the loss of a spouse a year after he passed away? Try Prozac for Major Depressive Disorder…. Feeling a little hyper and can’t concentrate? You need Adderall for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. “Doctors are greedy experts that are too lazy to get to the core problem and will medica...
Source: World of Psychology - August 25, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression Disorders General Medications Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy Psychiatry Treatment Adderall Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Cereal Bowl Core Problem Depressive Disorder Dinner Parties Elderly Source Type: blogs

Tim’s Story, Dual Recovery
Dual Recovery Anonymous has offered me what I had lost or been unable to find in my sobriety. It offers me believable hope and steps to apply to both my chemical dependency and my psychiatric illnesses. It also offers me a way to heal the emotional and psychic damage that I experienced as a result of my dual disorders. This is just as true for me today as it was when DRA first began to develop. In 1973 I made a decision to seek professional help for my chemical dependency. I had started drinking and using drugs when I was 13. By the time I was 18, I was using every day. I drank, swallowed, snorted and shot as many drugs as...
Source: Recovery Is Sexy.com - August 24, 2013 Category: Addiction Authors: Sparrow Tags: 12 Step Fellowships Addictions Alcoholism Drugs Dual Recovery Emotions Sobriety Spirituality Treatment chemical dependency psychiatric illness treatment program Source Type: blogs

Involuntary Psychiatric Hospitalization: Tell Me Your Stories of How it Helped You
A while back, I asked readers to tell me their stories of how they felt injured by being hospitalized against their will.  Now I want to ask for stories from those who felt like being hospitalized was helpful to them.  Because the topic is so heated, I'm going to put comment moderation on so that people can feel safe writing their stories.  If you want to tell me how miserable your experience was, go to the other post, don't write it here.  Oh, can I ask that you stick some type of identifier on your stories, not just Anon or Anonymous. Also, could you mention if you were hospitalized in a country out...
Source: Shrink Rap - August 24, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Electronic Cigarettes Commentators Fail to Disclose Financial Conflicts of Interest with Big Pharma
The New York Times "Room for Debate" section Wednesday featured a debate about electronic cigarettes. I was one of six commentators who provided their perspectives on the issue. After reviewing the other commentaries, the first thing that struck me was the failure of one of the commentators to disclose an important financial conflict of interest: his receipt of funding from Big Pharma to study the effectiveness of a competitive product to electronic cigarettes.The commentary was written by Dr. Andrew Strasser, an associate professor in the department of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medi...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - August 23, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, August 23, 2013
From MedPage Today: Antipsychotic No Help for Delirium in Critical Care. Critically ill patients’ episodes of delirium and coma did not resolve any sooner when treated with intravenous (IV) haloperidol. Heart Ailment Tied to Severe Hypoglycemia. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) was associated with a significantly greater risk of severe hypoglycemia in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes. Antipsychotics Raise Risk of Diabetes in Kids. Antipsychotic medications were linked to type 2 diabetes in children and young adults, particularly with longer use at higher doses. Behavior Changes Show Up Early in Traumat...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 23, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Heart Neurology Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Published This Week
Raphael Cohen-Almagor, First Do No Harm: Pressing Concerns Regarding Euthanasia in Belgium, 36 Int'l J. of L. & Psychiatry ___ (2013). Nicole Marie Piemonte, Laura Hermer, Avoiding a 'Death Panel' Redux, 43 Hastings Center Rep. 20 (2013). Linda Christine Fentiman,... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - August 23, 2013 Category: Medical Lawyers and Insurers Authors: HealthLawProf Hodnicki Source Type: blogs

The decision to end a treatment is as important as the one to start it
We have become a pill popping society. It makes absolutely no sense that 20 percent of our population regularly uses a psychotropic medicine and that the United States has more deaths each year from overdose with prescription drugs than from street drugs. The causes of excessive medication use are numerous — the diagnostic system is too loose; some doctors are trigger happy in. their prescribing habits; the drug companies have sold a misleading bill of goods that all life’s problems are mental disorders requiring a pill solution; and the insurance companies make the mistake of encouraging quick diagnosis on t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 22, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Meds Medications Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Antipsychotics Can Triple The Risk That Children Develop Diabetes
In a disturbing finding, children prescribed several widely prescribed antipsychotics face a threefold risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the first year of usage compared with other medications that are available for the same disorders the medicines are used to treat. Originally prescribed for schizophrenia, the pills are now used to treat bipolar disorder, ADHD and mood disorders, such as depression. “It’s well known that antipsychotics cause diabetes in adults, but until now the question hadn’t been fully investigated in children,: Wayne Ray, one of the study authors and director of the division of pharmacoe...
Source: Pharmalot - August 22, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Practice Fusion Violates Some Physicians’ Trust in Sending Millions of Emails to Their Patients
When Practice Fusion asked their users to prepare for some new “patient communication tools”, the outcry from many doctors was for Practice Fusion to stop focusing new features on patients and instead focus on unsolved physician requests that were made years previous. What I found when I started digging into Practice Fusion’s focus on patients through its launch of Patient Fusion was a much more important story where Practice Fusion’s actions were violating some physicians’ trust and might have issues with HIPAA. The story starts in early April 2012. With little fanfare (only a generic blog po...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - August 22, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: John Lynn Tags: EHR Electronic Health Record Electronic Medical Record EMR HealthCare IT HIPAA General Medical Privacy Chief Medical Officer CMO Patient Fusion Physician Ratings Physician Reviews Practice Fusion Source Type: blogs

Practice Fusion Violates Some Physicians’ Trust in Sending Millions of Emails to Their Patients
Update: At the bottom of this post, I’ve included Patient Fusion’s response to this article. When Practice Fusion asked their users to prepare for some new “patient communication tools”, the outcry from many doctors was for Practice Fusion to stop focusing new features on patients and instead focus on unsolved physician requests that were made years previous. What I found when I started digging into Practice Fusion’s focus on patients through its launch of Patient Fusion was a much more important story where Practice Fusion’s actions were violating some physicians’ trust and might ...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - August 22, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: John Lynn Tags: EHR Electronic Health Record Electronic Medical Record EMR HealthCare IT HIPAA General Medical Privacy Chief Medical Officer CMO Patient Fusion Physician Ratings Physician Reviews Practice Fusion Source Type: blogs

Facebook No More (At Least for Now)
It hasn't been the easiest of summers for me.  As I've mentioned before, my brother died unexpectedly. And then last week, a neighbor's house burned down in the most dramatic of ways.  Watch those candles, folks.  Who would think that a citronella candle outside could burn down an entire house in minutes?  The people all got out, and the firefighters were spectacular.  But it's all a reminder of how fragile life is, and how it takes but a moment for one's whole world to change.  I go through life feeling very blessed, and losing my brother put a kink in that whole concept. Last month, in the ...
Source: Shrink Rap - August 22, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

New edition of core neuroscience text
Principles of neural science / Kandel E & Schwartz J. 5th ed, New York: McGraw-Hill, 2013. Deciphering the link between the human brain and behavior has always been one of the most intriguing.and often challenging.aspects of scientific endeavor. The sequencing of the human genome, and advances in molecular biology, have illuminated the pathogenesis of many neurological diseases and have propelled our knowledge of how the brain controls behavior. To grasp the wider implications of these developments and gain a fundamental understanding of this dynamic, fast-moving field, Principles of Neuroscience stands alone as the mos...
Source: DentistryLibrary@Sydney - August 21, 2013 Category: Dentists Tags: New books Source Type: blogs

Do You Understand the Bipolar Spectrum?
In modern psychiatry, there is more than one type of bipolar disorder, and patients may be told that they are ‘somewhere on the bipolar spectrum.’ This can be confusing to hear; as a newly diagnosed patient, you may wonder, ‘so do I really have bipolar disorder or not?’ According to the current, dominant model, the bipolar spectrum runs from bipolar I at one end, to cyclothymia and ‘not otherwise specified’ at the other. You may have heard that bipolar disorder (BD) affects only one in a hundred people, but this is untrue — or only a partial truth — according to the spectrum model. One pe...
Source: World of Psychology - August 21, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Hannah Leach Tags: Bipolar Brain and Behavior Disorders General Medications Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Treatment 1s Bd Bipolar Disorder Bipolar Illness Bipolar Spectrum Bipolars Cyclothymia Dominant Model Source Type: blogs

Clevermind for iPad Helps Alzheimer’s Patients Exercise Their Minds
Take a quick look at the app store for whatever computer or device you’re currently reading this on, and you’ll likely find at least one “brain-training” app that claims to increase your cognitive abilities through a series of puzzles and exercises. A new app for the iPad called Clevermind takes a similar approach to mental exercise, but is designed specifically for patients with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Clevermind is more than just a collection of games, however. As management of Alzheimer’s involves more than just mental exercise, Clevermind also includes other ...
Source: Medgadget - August 21, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Geriatrics Neurology Psychiatry Rehab Source Type: blogs

6 Simple Tips to Be More Mindful in Everyday Life
As a psychiatrist and meditation practitioner, I work with many people who have heard of the benefits of meditation, and want to commit to a daily practice to help them feel more relaxed and at ease. “But,” they tell me, “my life is so hectic. I don’t have time to meditate.” Thankfully, you don’t need to spend hours a day sitting in a Buddhist monastery to achieve the benefits of meditation. Rather, you can use everyday experiences as opportunities to practice being mindful and connected to the present moment. 1. Practice mindful driving I live in Los Angeles, where daily life is built around the ebb and flow...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - August 21, 2013 Category: Life Coaches Authors: Elana Miller Tags: meditation self improvement mindful well being Source Type: blogs

When evaluating mental health patients, go beyond snap decisions
It is tempting to use our sense of sight to make snap judgments about people, places and things. Think about it. When you walk into a restaurant, if you see a sparkling clean dining room, you probably assume that the kitchen looks the same and that the food will be prepared in a clean, safe environment. When you see a well-dressed pilot and crew walking onto an airplane that has been cleaned, fueled and prepped for flight, you assume that you are going to safely make it to your next destination. The same thing happens when we meet people for the first time. It takes only a second, a small fraction of a second actually, to ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 20, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Emergency Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Experts call for revising physician social media guidance
In a viewpoint published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, three ethics and psychiatry experts from Johns Hopkins University argue that industry guidelines on online medical professionalism inappropriately call on physicians to separate their personal and professional identities. read more (Source: Healthcare IT News Blog)
Source: Healthcare IT News Blog - August 19, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Christina Thielst Tags: Industry News Johns Hopkins University Margaret Chisolm Matthew DeCamp Thomas Koenig Mobile/Wireless Source Type: blogs

Is a Glut of Antidepressants Really So Bad?
The other week I read in the New York Times about a “glut of antidepressants.” The story was about the loose (and perhaps over-diagnosis) of depression in a community sample of over 5,600 patients. Most of those patients examined who supposedly had clinical depression turned out to, in fact, not have it — only just over 38 percent met the official criteria after 12 months. Somehow this got convoluted with the increase in antidepressants over the past two decades. “One in 10 Americans now takes an antidepressant medication; among women in their 40s and 50s, the figure is one in four.” While w...
Source: World of Psychology - August 19, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Antidepressant Depression Disorders General Medications Minding the Media Psychiatry 12 Months 40s 50s Alcohol Antidepressant Medication Antidepressants Clinical Depression Culture Decades Diagnosis Of Depression Doct G Source Type: blogs

Mohammed Athari, commenting in Megan's blog, provided a good Pb and behavior reference.
From an EPA reference, .. Final volume, p. 6-45, "Cord blood Pb levels were not associated with the prevalence or nature of behavior problems reported by teachers." Though apparently a regression analysis did show a correlation between tooth Pb and the ACBP Total Problem Behavior Scores which assess both both "under- and overcontrol of behaviors. Only weak associations were seen between tooth Pb concentrations and the tendency to score in the clinically significant range on these scales." Earlier in the very extensive discussion, the reports suggests it is 'problematic' to make an association with behavior and what Pb leve...
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - August 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs