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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 13.

Synapse Evolution with Seth Grant (BSP 101)
Seth Grant (click photo to hear interview) Early in his career Seth Grant helped develop the transgenic mice that Eric Kandel used in his studies of how memory works. Since then he has combined his skill in genetics with his work on isolating the proteins that form the functional components of the synapse. (The synapse is a key component in the nervous systems of all multi-cellular animals.) When we last talked back in BSP 51 I was particularly struck by how many of these proteins actually evolved with single celled life--long before the arrival of nervous systems.Recently Grant's work has focused on the ...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - September 27, 2013 Category: Neurologists Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Brain Evolution Brain Research Interviews learning Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Source Type: blogs

We have a Jesuit Pope
Oswald Sobrino has a link to Pope Francis' interview in the Jesuit magazine America. His answers have been celebrated; the interviewer and his questions were excellent in their own right. (Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans)
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - September 27, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Eating Disorders Coalition Hill Briefing: “Fear of Fat and Weight Stigma: The Intersection of Obesity and Eating Disorders”
Last week the Eating Disorders Coalition held a briefing on Capital Hill that addressed issues around the negative health outcomes that can result from weight-based stigma and discrimination. They also discussed how important it is to take the focus off of obesity and size, and instead shift the focus to healthy behaviors. The panel of speakers included: Rebecca Puhl, PhD, Deputy Director, Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity, Yale University B. Timothy Walsh, MD, Ruane Professor of Pediatric Psychopharmacology, Department of Psychiatry at the College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University Chevese Turner, ...
Source: Balanced Health and Nutrition Rebecca Scritchfield's Blog - September 26, 2013 Category: Nutritionists and Food Scientists Authors: rebeccascritchfield Tags: diet health healthcare policy binge eating disorder weight stigma Source Type: blogs

FwdJournal Alert - PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT
This study examined the relationship of 6 forms of > implicit cognition about death, suicide, and self-harm with the > occurrence of self-harm in the future. We then attempted to develop a > model using these measures of implicit cognition along with other > psychometric tests and clinical risk factors. We conducted a prospective > cohort of 107 patients (age > 17 years) with a baseline assessment that > included 6 implicit association tests that assessed thoughts of death, > suicide, and self-harm. Psychometric questionnaires were also completed > by the patients, and these included the Beck Hop...
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - September 26, 2013 Category: Neurologists Source Type: blogs

Unregulated gun access and its drain on medical resources
On September 17, 2013, I joined the growing  ranks of physicians who  have gotten  a message they hoped  never  to  receive: “There has been a mass shooting in the area.  Prepare to receive casualties.” That morning, a  gunman was indiscriminately mowing down people at the US Navy Yard.  Within an hour my hospital had geared up to provide both medical and supportive care, answer calls from those seeking to know the identity of victims, and coordinate other services with the rest of the hospitals in the city. In the end, we provided care to only one bereaved family and treated a few minor injuries. Still, the e...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 25, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The #Pillshaming Bingo Card
Reblogged from The Not So Big Society: The #Pillshaming Twitter hashtag was created by @Sectioned_ to refer to condescending articles and viewpoints, deriding the use of psychiatric medication. There's been a fair few of these recently. In the Guardian Giles Fraser and Will Self leapt onto their respective soapboxes to pour forth a series of tired cliches. Today in the Daily Mail, Dr Joanna Moncrief published an article… Read more… 271 more words (Source: Dawn Willis sharing the News and Views of the Mentally Wealthy)
Source: Dawn Willis sharing the News and Views of the Mentally Wealthy - September 25, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Authors: Zarathustra Tags: Mental Health, The News & Policies. Source Type: blogs

How Does The Shutdown Relate To Me?
is Obama there? (Source: The Last Psychiatrist)
Source: The Last Psychiatrist - September 25, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Real Men Want To Drink Guinness, But Don't Expect Them To Pay For It
the reason the bubbles go down is because of the drag created by the bubbles rising up the center.  yeah, like a metaphor. (Source: The Last Psychiatrist)
Source: The Last Psychiatrist - September 25, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

10 Idiotic Motivational Quotes
I’m not entirely sure if it’s illegal to have a Pinterest account and not post random motivational quotes from time to time, but I suspect it is by the sheer amount of people doing it. And that’s very cool because who doesn’t love a great motivational quote or two? I know I do and I too am ‘guilty’ of posting and sharing the good ones I stumble upon. The problem is though that some people are so eager to demonstrate their insight and understanding they forget to actually use any insight or try to understand what the person quoted really meant. The result is they post quotes that would have not only been better ...
Source: Life Coach Blog: The Discomfort Zone : - September 25, 2013 Category: Life Coaches Authors: Tim Brownson Tags: Life Coaching Source Type: blogs

A symptom that will hasten Medicare’s eventual insolvency
Days from her 80th birthday, “Nancy” (not her real name) is doing well.  She’s active, exercises, drives, travels, and lives alone in a multi-story apartment building without an elevator.  Her busy schedule of weekly activities includes several appointments with physicians.  Nancy’s medical needs are covered by Medicare. Nancy’s been in psychotherapy for a half-century.  She’s seen me, her psychotherapist, for the past three years.  Nancy reports difficulty developing meaningful relationships over the course of her adult life.  On a fixed income funded by Social Security, like many older adults, Nancy’s...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 25, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

You Rang?
Mom has called me four times this afternoon which is par for the course on any given day.   First, it was that Mrs. Sandra couldn’t go to the Mexican restaurant this week.  Mom now  just called and asked me if I would take her to eat Reuben sandwiches at Arby’s tomorrow night. I told her I would be happy to take her.  I wouldn’t mind a Rueben myself. “Your mother needs to quit eating out so much,” my father told me last night worried about her weight. My Veterinarian also called this morning and it is time for Maggie’s annual check up and booster shots. I think I am just going to leave ...
Source: The 4th Avenue Blues - September 25, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Authors: Andrew Quixote Source Type: blogs

Dr. David Nutt on Alcohol
Rebutting industry myths. A couple of years ago, the European Alcohol Policy Alliance, known as EuroCare, put together a brochure addressing the common messages the liquor industry attempts to drive home through its heavy spending on advertising. The messages are not just designed to sell product, but also to influence alcohol policy at the political level. According to EuroCare, the “industry”—the alcohol and tobacco companies—“has traditionally worked closely together, sharing information and concerns about regulation. They have used similar arguments to defend their products in order to prevent or delay re...
Source: Addiction Inbox - September 25, 2013 Category: Addiction Authors: Dirk Hanson Source Type: blogs

“RxISK” Database Reports Side Effects, Including Violence, Undisclosed by Pharma Firms - by John Horgan
My previous post considered whether an antidepressant might have served as a catalyst for a gunman’s massacre of 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard last week. Some readers objected to my discussion of this possibility, given the paucity of evidence that psychiatric drugs can trigger violent acts.RxISK gathers and disseminates data on drug side effects, which manufacturers often fail to disclose.The problem with this objection is that negative reactions to medications often go unreported, because of the persistent failure of pharmaceutical companies to disclose adverse effects of their products.This enormous, ongo...
Source: PharmaGossip - September 24, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Should Psychiatrists See Patients?
Today's Wall Street Journal has an article on a new model of psychiatric care: the psychiatrist serves as a consultant to the primary care doctors and the psychotherapist.  The psychiatrist hears about the patient, but if my read is right, the psychiatrist has a large caseload and never actually sees the patients.   In Getting Mental-Health Care at the Doctor's Office: Providers Take Integrated Approach, With Patient Numbers Set to Jump Under New Law and Psychiatrists in Short Supply, Melinda Beck writes: As the consulting psychiatrist for four primary-care practices, Dr. Ratzliff confers weekly wit...
Source: Shrink Rap - September 24, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

'Anti-Psychotic' Drugs and Bipolar Disorder
A few words on the odd seeming fact that all of the drugs for schizophrenia, all of the 'anti-psychotic drugs,' have been found useful for bipolar disorder. Schizophrenia is a disorder characterized by loosening of ego boundaries. As a recent cartoon in the New Yorker captioned 'I can't tell if that is an internal thought or something I already said.' Viewed in a topographic sense, these drugs tighten up those boundaries. I can recall walking down the hall of the ward with the Vice Chief of Psychiatry at the VA and a patient walked up to us and indicated some way in which he had been hostilely treated by Dr. Charles. Dr. C...
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - September 24, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Mind Med: Easing ADHD Symptoms Without Medication
Currently available ADHD medications are typically very strong, habit forming drugs, whose side-effects can often be worse than the disorder they are intended to treat. As an ADHD patient, this editor took the liberty of testing an iPhone app designed to help ease the symptoms of the disorder, either as a supplement to medication, or as a standalone treatment option. The ADHD treatment app was designed by Mind Med, a psychiatric disorder neuro-cognitive treatment technology start-up based in Ontario, Canada. According to their website, Mind Med claims their app is based on scientific and clinical research, and is shown to...
Source: Medgadget - September 23, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Yona Gidalevitz Tags: Medgadget Exclusive Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Perspectives on Pain - 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth, No 15 (2012)
This issue of 19, guest edited by Louise Hide, Joanna Bourke, and Carmen Mangion, examines the meaning of pain - for sufferers, physicians, and other witnesses - in the nineteenth century. Articles by social and cultural historians, and by literary scholars, discuss the implications of shifting discourses in personal narratives, in religious communities, and in philosophical, medical, and psychiatric texts. Analysing language in the diverse theories of the period, this issue extends and deepens our understanding of the complex interaction between the body, mind, and culture in order to gain insight into the ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, September 23, 2013
From MedPage Today: Type 1 Diabetes Not Controlled in Teens. Glucose control remained inadequate in a cohort of teens with type 1 diabetes, and many of these young patients already had microvascular complications. White House Seeks to Ease Obamacare Fraud Fears. The White House unveiled several steps this week to protect consumers from fraud in the new online health insurance marketplaces, a move that comes after 17 states hostile to the law acted to limit the spread of information about the program, and congressional Republicans raised concerns about the privacy of medical and financial records. Add ‘Shrapnel̵...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 23, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Diabetes Endocrinology Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

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This weekend an APA task force released a report saying that 'antipsychotic drugs' are overused*. The comments at USAToday had a delighted group of psychiatry bashers. In reviewing the literature, I find that other adult bipolar drugs are just not found useful in Adolescents. Further, from a criticism standpoint, the spokesman, Joel Yager, MD is from the same Medical School that treated the man found armed to the hilt at the scene of the Aurora Colorado movie shooting. Presumably he has some prominence at the Medical School as well. Are we to be speculatively happy that the shooter wasn't about to develop diabetes from Ris...
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - September 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

What happens to patients after their doctors die?
Several studies have explored the experience of grief that physicians feel when they lose a patient. But what about when the patient loses a physician — when the doctor dies? Dr. K was a well-known child psychiatrist, a loving husband, a father of two, and an irreplaceable support and friend for a number of children suffering from trauma, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism and other challenging psychiatric conditions. Earlier this year, Dr. K passed away in a tragic accident while vacationing with his family. His loss was nearly unbearable for most of us. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 22, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Patient Patients Primary care Source Type: blogs

Do Addicts Benefit From Chronic Care Management?
Controversial JAMA study questions orthodox addiction treatment.  What is the best way to treat addiction? The conventional wisdom has been to treat it with chronic care management (CCM), the same approach used for various medical and mental illnesses. But a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) purports to demonstrate that “persons with alcohol and other drug dependence who received chronic care management (CCM)” were no more likely to become abstinent that those who received nothing beyond a timely appointment with a primary care physician, and a list of addiction treatment resource...
Source: Addiction Inbox - September 22, 2013 Category: Addiction Authors: Dirk Hanson Source Type: blogs

So Many Medication Issues....
I made a really dumb mistake.  I *thought* I was being smart by buying little pill boxes and putting morning pills in one and night time pills in the other.  The morning pills were just Prestiq, but I added a bunch of stuff like vitamins since I was taking pills anyway.I've been waking up several times throughout the night and had NO idea why I was sleeping poorly lately.  This morning I went to take my morning pills and realized what I had been doing.  I got the pill boxes mixed up!  I don't know how long I've done it, but I've been taking the night ones in the morning and vice versa. The night on...
Source: bipolar.and.me - September 20, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

Sanofi Pays $40M To Settle Suit About Fibs And Its Failed Fat Pill
Six years after Sanofi withdrew its application to sell its troubled Acomplia diet pill in the US over concerns about psychiatric side effects, the drugmaker has agreed to pay $40 million to settle a shareholder lawsuit that alleged misleading statements were made about the safety of the drug. Various pension funds cited statements made by Sanofi that Acomplia, which was sold as Zimulti in Europe, could become a blockbuster seller and had few side effects. But the lawsuit referenced internal documents indicating the drugmaker was aware of cases of suicidal ideation and a statistically significant link to suicidal thoughts ...
Source: Pharmalot - September 20, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

6 strategies hospitals should steal from the airline industry
Conclusion: Although air traffic flow is simpler and easier to manage than healthcare, the industry can offer many lessons that will enable us to treat patient flow systemically as a 24/7, inpatient/outpatient, continuous operation that requires continuous management and oversight to standardize processes, exploit bottle-necks, manage random variation and eliminate non-random variation. By doing so, we can reduce costs, improve quality/safety/service and successfully compete globally for high quality-low costs services. Jonathan H. Burroughs, MD, MBA, FACHE, FACPE is a certified physician executive and a fellow of the Am...
Source: hospital impact - September 19, 2013 Category: Health Managers Authors: Wendy Johnson Source Type: blogs

Nervewracking: US Army Tells Troops Not To Take Anti-Malaria Drug
Just weeks after the FDA boosted warnings on a widely used malaria drug called mefloquine because neurologic and psychiatric side effects may become permanent, the Surgeon General’s Office of the Army Special Operations, which includes such US forces as the Green Berets, ordered troops to immediately discontinue use. The move comes years after reports surfaced that the drug, which is also called Lariam and was sold by Roche before various generic versions appeared, could cause serious side effects that could last for years. The FDA announcement, however, was apparently the first time that the agency noted that neurologic...
Source: Pharmalot - September 19, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Army units ordered to stop taking anti-malarial drug mefloquine
Published September 19, 2013APhttp://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/09/19/army-units-ordered-to-stop-taking-anti-malarial-drug-linked-to-brain-damage/?The top doctor for Green Berets and other elite Army commandos has told troops to immediately stop taking mefloquine, an anti-malaria drug found to cause permanent brain damage in rare cases.The ban among special operations forces is the latest development in a long-running controversy over mefloquine. The drug was developed by the Army in the 1970s and has been taken by millions of travelers and people in the military over the years. As alternatives were developed, it fell out...
Source: PharmaGossip - September 19, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Guns, Again (--another broken record shrink rapper)
Apparently,  if the shooter is dead, I can talk about it (a little).  I don't know any facts except what I've seen in the paper, and I've interviewed absolutely no one, so I'm not going to say much, but I am going to use what I've read to write a post on the on-going issue of the role of mental illness and gun control. Per today's New York Times: But several senators, like Senator Richard Blumenthal, Democrat of Connecticut, who has pushed for tougher gun laws since last year’s elementary school massacre in Newtown, Conn., see mental health policy as a way forward. “Mental health is really the ...
Source: Shrink Rap - September 19, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

What Can You Do When Faced With Relapse?
There is no word in the English language I despise more than “relapse.” Because by the time I use it, I have suffered months of agonizing depression that involves the typical symptoms you check off at a psychiatrist’s office: overwhelming guilt, fantasizing about death, no energy, lots of tears, trouble sleeping, eating too much (or too little), trouble concentrating, difficulty doing just about anything but obsessing about how bad you feel and crying enough to keep Kleenex in business. Here are a few strategies I use when I start to relapse… when my symptoms don’t abate for weeks on end and when I’m scare...
Source: World of Psychology - September 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Brain and Behavior Depression Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Art Therapy Chardonnay Classic Music Creative Expression Despair Fantasizing General Health Helplessness Immune System Kleenex La Source Type: blogs

Will Germany Squelch Gilead Hopes For Its Stribild AIDS Drug?
In a move that may make Gilead Sciences execs a wee bit anxious, German regulators have issued a preliminary decision that their once-daily, combination Stribild HIV treatment does not offer a benefit over their older Atripla medication. Stribild, you may recall, contains four different Gilead compounds and is projected to become a multi-billion-dollar seller in a few years. For the moment, there is no reason to suggest the decision means Stribild will not become a success story. The treatment, which won FDA approval last year, has generated more than $190 million in sales in the first six months of this year (see page 20)...
Source: Pharmalot - September 18, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Chantix Does Not Increase Depression Risk? A Pfizer Study Says Yes
Faced with declining sales of its controversial Chantix quit-smoking pill, Pfizer has undertaken various educational and promotional efforts to revive its fortunes. And as part of the plan, the drugmaker funded a study that found people with a history of depression were no more likely to become depressed or have suicidal thoughts than those given a placebo. The study was designed to determine whether Chantix would help people who had been treated for depression quit smoking without worsening their depression and those findings were positive. Among those on Chantix, 35 percent did not smoke, compared with 15 percent of thos...
Source: Pharmalot - September 18, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Speaking Ill of the Dead
I'm moving this discussion to its own post since it has little to do with mandatory employee health screening and I think it deserves its own section. Jesse put up a link to a PBS news interview with Drs. E. Fuller Torrey and Elspeth Ritchie regarding Aaron Alexis, the alleged Navy yard shooter. This has spurred discussion about what, if anything, psychiatrists should be saying in the media about specific individuals with rumored mental illness. I've gotten on a soapbox about this a number of times before and I don't want to be repetitive, so if you feel inclined you can search the blog for the labels "shooter psychology...
Source: Shrink Rap - September 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: ClinkShrink Source Type: blogs

Can New Talents Develop After a Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease?
I am asked if this type of cognitive ability can slow down the process of deterioration from Alzheimer's disease. It seems that it could be beneficial in this regard. By Max Wallack +Alzheimer's Reading Room I would like to introduce you to the work of Dr. Daniel C. Potts, a neurologist in Alabama. Dr. Potts’s father died of Alzheimer’s disease in 2007. Having never painted previously, Dr. Potts’s dad became an acclaimed watercolor artist after his Alzheimer’s diagnosis. Here is an amazing video of this artist’s work: Dr. Potts is now, “Very interested in improving quality of life for those with Alzheimer...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - September 18, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Max Wallack Source Type: blogs

6 strategies hospitals should steal from the airline industry
Conclusion: Although air traffic flow is simpler and easier to manage than healthcare, the industry can offer many lessons that will enable us to treat patient flow systemically as a 24/7, inpatient/outpatient, continuous operation that requires continuous management and oversight to standardize processes, exploit bottle-necks, manage random variation and eliminate non-random variation. By doing so, we can reduce costs, improve quality/safety/service and successfully compete globally for high quality-low costs services. Jonathan H. Burroughs, MD, MBA, FACHE, FACPE is a certified physician executive and a fellow of the Am...
Source: hospital impact - September 17, 2013 Category: Health Managers Authors: Wendy Johnson Source Type: blogs

Revisiting Glasser’s Controversial Choice Theory
When I was in graduate school, I took a course on Dr. William Glasser’s controversial choice theory. I had never heard of the man before I signed up for the class and had no idea that he was a psychiatrist with some controversial ideas. Until recently, when I read that Dr. Glasser had passed away, I had completely forgotten about choice theory and my experience in the class. After I read Dr. Glasser’s obituary, I started to think about what had been covered in my course and how I had initially reacted to it. The first thing I learned about Dr. Glasser was that he did not believe in mental illness. He believed that eve...
Source: World of Psychology - September 16, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Tracey Silver Tags: Books Brain and Behavior College Disorders General Medications Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy Psychiatry Psychology Students Choice Theory Controversial Ideas Dr Glasser Dr William Glasser Elective Credit Gr Source Type: blogs

Ariel Castro: That could be your patient they’re talking about
I thought I’d share what I saw on my Twitter feed as soon as I got up recently. I immediately felt a blog post coming on, particularly after reading the Twitter comments as they rolled in. I felt a bit sick, knowing what some of my colleagues in Ohio must be going through right now. This post is for you. When it comes to patient suicide, correctional psychiatry is probably one of the higher risk subspecialties within psychiatry. The average prisoner has three risk factors for suicide before he even steps into the facility: he’s male, young, and has an active substance abuse problem. There’s even a recent...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 16, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The Mass in the setting of Yom Kippur
After going to Yom Kippur Saturday, I heard Mass differently. The opening prayer, after greetings, in the Mass is: Brethren (brothers and sisters), let us acknowledge our sins, and so prepare ourselves to celebrate the sacred mysteries. I confess to almighty God and to you, my brothers and sisters, that I have greatly sinned, in my thoughts and in my words, in what I have done and in what I have failed to do, through my fault, through my fault, through my most grievous fault; therefore I ask blessed Mary ever-Virgin, all the Angels and Saints, and you, my brothers and sisters, to pray for me to the Lord our God In the Jewi...
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - September 16, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Is it ethical to instil false hope in people with mental illness?
There's an ethical consensus in medicine that it's wrong to give patients with physical illness false hope. But what about patients with mental health problems? Might the provision of unrealistic optimism be a vital part of their treatment? Or might this serve only to prolong their suffering? Psychiatrist Justine Dembo at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre has explored these delicate issues in a thought-provoking essay. Dembo highlights research showing the numerous positive illusions to which most psychologically healthy people are prone. This includes feelings that we're better than average, that we have more control...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 16, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Christian Jarrett Source Type: blogs

Vanity Came Knocking: Being Safe with My Bipolar
I nearly checked myself into the mental ward recently. I’ve been once, and it is no vacation. But, one ordinary day in September, I was in that much pain. And I didn’t trust myself enough to be safe — all over some vanity and pride. For the most part, over the years, my bipolar disorder has been tamped down with medication, therapy and stress reduction. And, until that day, I thought I was in remission. But I was wrong. Remission for me meant experiencing episodes that weren’t much worse than having a bad cold. I didn’t have any mixed episodes, full-blown mania or crushing depression.1 I like the idea ...
Source: World of Psychology - September 15, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Meaghan Tags: Bipolar Brain and Behavior Depression Disorders General Mania Medications Mental Health and Wellness Personal Treatment Arrogance Blah Bp Breadwinner Chantix Daily Basis Day In September Ego Failed Attempt Medication Source Type: blogs

Antipsychotics in the Long Term: Zero Evidence
Last week’s post, Antipsychotics Over the Long Term: Thomas Insel Weighs In, elicited 20 comments. First, a quick summary of the post:   In his NIMH Director’s Blog, Dr Insel cited research in support of the proposition that, contrary to conventional psychiatric wisdom, antipsychotic medications may not always be a wise long-term option. According to Dr Insel:   It appears that what we currently call... (Source: John McManamy's SharePosts)
Source: John McManamy's SharePosts - September 15, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Authors: John McManamy Source Type: blogs

Is There a True Medical Benefit From Knowing Your APOe4 Genotype?
Would the availability of helpful drugs change your decision about being tested for Alzheimer's disease? By Max Wallack +Alzheimer's Reading Room Last month I wrote an article, Would You Want to be Tested for the APOe4 Gene? I asked the reasons why people would, or would not, want to know their APOe4 genotype. In other words, I was asking if people would want to know if they are genetically predisposed to Alzheimer's disease. I received many interesting responses. Many people did want to know. Among the people who did not want to know, there were two major reasons. Lack of confidence in the security of the inform...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - September 15, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Max Wallack Source Type: blogs

Staple a Kid's Head and Eat a Few Knives?
~ There's an article on mental health stigma in The New York Times by Pauline Chen, worth the read: Caring for a Mind in Crisis. ~Since I like to gripe about electronic records and privacy, I'll add this to my list of you-don't-want-to-believe privacy issues: On Campus, A Faculty Uprising Over Personal Data.   Penn State administrators quietly introduced the plan, called “Take Care of Your Health,” this summer in the deadest part of the academic calendar. But that didn’t prevent some conscientious objectors from organizing a protest online and on their campuses, culminating last week in an emotionall...
Source: Shrink Rap - September 15, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Small Acts of Kindness Can Have Big Effects
I live in Rochester, Minnesota, which basically is famous only for being home to the Mayo Clinic. My biggest health problem is mental, not physical (I’m bipolar). Several years ago, my internist snagged me a consultation with the psychiatrist who is nationally known for his work with bipolar disorder. After a three-hour discussion that felt like it ranged from birth to present day, he asked if I had questions. I said yes, just one: “Is this ever going to get any better?” He then felt compelled — after all that time — to tell me the research showed it got worse as people aged, not better, and he wa...
Source: World of Psychology - September 14, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Candy Czernicki Tags: Bipolar Brain and Behavior Disorders General Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Personal Psychiatry Relationships Bottom Floor Consultation Followup Visits Health Problem Hospitalization Mayo Clinic Present D Source Type: blogs

6 More Ways to Manage Clinical Depression
In a prior blog post, I listed seven ways to manage severe, clinical depression when you can’t get out of bed. The suggestions are different than the popular tips most depression experts give for boosting your mood, which are usually written for those with mild or moderate depression — or the really lucky people who just want to feel better. I thought it would be helpful to expand my list and give you six more ways to manage severe depression. 1. Remember your heroes. When making it to the breakfast table is a humble feat, it helps to remember I’m in good company with depressives past and present: Abraham Linc...
Source: World of Psychology - September 14, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Brain and Behavior Depression Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Abraham Lincoln Art Buchwald Black Dog Breakfast Table British Prime Minster Brooke Shields Death Thoughts Good Company Kay Redfield Jamison Source Type: blogs

OCD: Sometimes It’s Not You, It’s the Situation
Virginia Woolf, the 20th century English author who also suffered from mental illness, once wisely wrote “You cannot find peace by avoiding life.” Recently, I was talking to my psychiatrist. It was another one of those “Do I or don’t I?” medication moments that people with mental illness routinely have to live with. He had treated me for my obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) for about six months before I decided to be treated by another facility. I didn’t like the new facility’s recommendations, so I had gone back to this doctor for a second opinion. Since I had been treated by him for at leas...
Source: World of Psychology - September 13, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Keith Fraser Tags: Brain and Behavior Disorders General Medications Mental Health and Wellness OCD Personal Success & Achievement Treatment anhedonia Coping With Mental Illness English Author Enjoying Life Insights Intrusive Thoughts People Wit Source Type: blogs

Anxiety treatment app from Mayo Clinic: "Anxiety Coach" ($5)
"Mayo Clinic Anxiety Coach is designed to help people start mastering their fears and worries one step at a time. Watch this video to learn more about this iOS app and whether it might be helpful for you." For more information go to: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/anxietycoach/id565943257 Description Mayo Clinic Anxiety Coach is a comprehensive self-help tool for reducing a wide variety of fears and worries from extreme shyness to obsessions and compulsions. Anxiety Coach helps you make a list of feared activities and then guides you through mastering them one by one. Through this experience you can increase your con...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - September 13, 2013 Category: Professors and Educators Tags: Mayo Clinic Apps Psychiatry iPhone iPad Psychology Source Type: blogs

Ketamine, A Darling of the Club Scene, Inspires Next-Generation Antidepressants [Part 3]
Recent experimental research showing that ketamine, an anesthetic and club drug (Special K), can relieve depression quickly has intrigued a number of major pharmaceutical companies. Depression, it goes without saying, affects huge numbers and a fundamentally new and effective pharmaceutical approach to treating the disorder hasn’t emerged in decades. The enthusiasm for ketamine is such that physicians, often working out of small clinics, have already started prescribing low doses of the generic anesthetic off-label for fast relief of le cafard—and drug companies are contemplating whether to get into the act by creatin...
Source: PharmaGossip - September 13, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Loneliness Increases Dementia Risk, Heart Attacks and Stroke
A recent study published in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (Source: Minding Our Elders)
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 13, 2013 Category: Caregivers Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

What keeps some people from feeling that they really matter?
“Yeah, Doc, I drink. I drink a lot. Some nights I drink a case of beer and a half pint. Can’t sleep if I don’t drink. Relaxes me. Pure and simple. Numbs me up like novocaine.” A toothless grin. “It’s the feeling of floating away. I don’t know, I just keep coming back to it. Stuff goes in, feel a little flushed, a little rush, then I go somewhere else, you know? I just kinda float off on a cloud for a while. Things back here hurt. I don’t have a job. I can’t buy my kids stuff. I can’t provide. I’m nothing, Doc. I’m nothing to nobody.” One tear, sliding silently down the weathered cheek like a raind...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 12, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The Problem with Labeling Children with a Psychiatric Disorder
The way we label children who do poorly in school has taken a dramatic turn — in many ways for the better, in some ways for the worse. In yesteryear, kids who didn’t perform well in school would have been labeled as no-good, lazy, defiant, incorrigible, or just plain stupid. They would be disciplined by being shamed, blamed, hit, scolded, punished, ridiculed or simply written off as hopeless cases. Progress has been made. For the most part, we have eliminated such verbal and physical abuse. But we still must question the progress that’s been made when we replace the old labels with psychiatric diagnoses that ref...
Source: World of Psychology - September 12, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: ADHD and ADD Children and Teens Disorders General Medications Parenting Personality Policy and Advocacy Psychology Self-Esteem Students Treatment Attention Deficit Disorder Cher Class Clown Conduct Disorder Defiant Disorder Source Type: blogs

An Amazing Experience in Nepal
By Heather Brown, MD     I had an amazing opportunity to spend a month working in the ED at Scheer Memorial Hospital in Banepa, Nepal, during my second year of residency. Scheer is a missionary hospital 30 kilometers outside Kathmandu with a six-bed emergency room open 24 hours a day. The ED was staffed with a mix of seasoned western physicians and young Nepali house staff who were mostly recent medical school graduates. There were plenty of chances to make a serious impact, and I was ready to do just that!   Arriving in Nepal I’ve been passionate about international medicine since I was in college, and I couldn’t...
Source: Going Global - September 12, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs