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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 13.

Basic screening tests take on a new meaning after cancer
Most people, by this I mean people who have never had cancer, go to the doctor for check ups and get sent for tests and don't think twice. They get nice negative results sent to them in the mail and they don't think twice about it.Throw in a few cancer diagnoses, and any screening test takes an ominous turn. Of course any screening test will show that you are doomed. There is  no way you will ever get a clean result again. One test will lead to another which will lead to another which will lead to another and then surgery, chemo, and more and more and more. Or so the little voices in your head tell you.It is perfectly...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - June 24, 2013 Category: Cancer Tags: test results sanity stress medical tests Source Type: blogs

Sometimes it is best to do nothing. A "must read " by Dr Justin Coleman
The Naked Doctor: an indepth look at the pitfalls of “cutting edge” medicineThe Naked Doctor is an ongoing project at Croakey that aims to encourage discussion and awareness of the opportunities to do more for health by doing less.In this latest edition, Dr Justin Coleman suggests that an equitable health system does not mean trying to give everyone the very best, if that means “the most tests, the most expense, the most treatments”.“Not only will that aspiration require others to miss out on even the second-best treatment, but it too often also actively harms the recipient,” he says.Perhaps one ...
Source: PharmaGossip - June 24, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Duck and her Little Ducklings
Get your ducks in a row from C Peter Clough on Vimeo. No psychiatry today, just ducks.  They were last seen by the local tavern.----- Listen to our latest podcast at mythreeshrinks.com or subscribe to our rss feed. Email us at mythreeshrinks at gmail dot com Our book is out now. (Source: Shrink Rap)
Source: Shrink Rap - June 24, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Executive Function and Alcohol Dependence
Executive function (EF) guides complex behavior such as planning, decision-making, and response control. Alcohol dependence (AD) is known to impair EF. New findings indicate that increased impulsiveness and decreased EF may comprise an inherited trait that signifies greater risk for developing AD. Executive function (EF), frequently associated with the frontal lobes, guides complex behavior such as planning, decision-making, and response control. EF impairment due to alcohol dependence (AD) has been linked to alcohols toxic effects on the frontal lobes. A study of EF in a group of adult offspring of AD individuals...
Source: Twelve Step Facilitation.com - June 23, 2013 Category: Addiction Authors: Sparrow Tags: Alcohol Alcoholism Brain Disease of addiction Research alcohol-dependence decision-making Executive Function Source Type: blogs

Free Association (Part 1/2013)
Yesterday I had some free time at the evening and I decided to watch that French film DVD "Un Ete Brulant" (=a hot summer". As usually in front of almost all French films I was taken by the music and the photography and the way of direction. But the story was so silly. I knew that the story was so silly after it ended. There is nothing. What surprised me that one of the characters who doesn't have a work was supposed to be a communist. We know that almost at the end of the film. I remembered how once I was talking to a man in a bus and he told me that the Iraqi communists are contradictory if we compare the way they live w...
Source: psychiatry for all - June 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Rare Genomic Mutations Found with Early Onset, Familial Alzheimer's Disease
These are the first new early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease gene mutations to be reported since 1995, when we co-discovered the presenilins. +Alzheimer's Reading Room Although a family history of Alzheimer's disease is a primary risk factor for the devastating neurological disorder, mutations in only three genes – the amyloid precursor protein and presenilins 1 and 2 – have been established as causative for inherited, early-onset Alzheimer's, accounting for about half of such cases. Now Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers have discovered a type of mutation known as copy-number variants (CNVs) – ...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - June 23, 2013 Category: Dementia Authors: Bob DeMarco Source Type: blogs

With Obesity, A New Disease is Born: Its Profound Implications for Psychiatry
A new disease was discovered the other day — or rather, one was created. There is no “lab test” for this disease, nor is there an X-ray, MRI, or CT scan that can detect it. It is diagnosed on the basis of a mathematical formula that many believe is simplistic and poorly-validated. Sometimes this “disease” results in metabolic abnormalities, sometimes not. Many clinicians view the decision to recognize this disease as another example of “medicalizing” a problem stemming from the person’s “life-style” — not from a specific pathological process. In fact, the declaration that this condition is ...
Source: World of Psychology - June 22, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Ronald Pies, M.D. Tags: Eating Disorders General Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy Professional Psychiatry Psychology American Medical Association Ct Scan Disea Dsm 5 Lab Test Life Style Major Depression Mathematical Form Source Type: blogs

The Catcher in the Rye
I passed more than half of the novel yet didn't understand the significance of the title. I started to hurry up the reading and some words started to be missed. I liked Phoebe much, so when she appears in the papers I slow down and here comes the lines where the word RYE appears again and CATCHER too:"Anyway, I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody's around-nobody big, I mean-except me. And I'm standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff-I mean if they're runn...
Source: psychiatry for all - June 22, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Will New Brunswick Ever Act To Provide Adult Autism Residential Care?
The Campbellton Based Restigouche Psychiatric Hospital  is the Only NB Based Residential Care Option for Severely  Autistic Adults in New Brunswick June 22, 2013 David Alward, Premier's Council on Status of Disabled Persons  Hugh J Flemming, Minister of Health  Madeline Dube, Minister of Social Development  Dorothy Shephard, Minister of Healthy and Inclusive Communities  Dear Premier Alward and Honourable Ministers: Re: Residential Care and Treatment for NB`s Autistic Youth and Adults I am the father of a 17 year old son with severe autism, developmental delays and epileptic seizu...
Source: Facing Autism in New Brunswick - June 22, 2013 Category: Autism Authors: H L Doherty Source Type: blogs

James Davies’s top 10 #psychiatry critiques. #MentalHealth #ukmh
http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/jun/19/james-davies-top-10-psychiatry-critiques#start-of-comments Filed under: Mental Health, The News & Policies. (Source: Dawn Willis sharing the News and Views of the Mentally Wealthy)
Source: Dawn Willis sharing the News and Views of the Mentally Wealthy - June 21, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Authors: Dawn Willis Tags: Mental Health, The News & Policies. Source Type: blogs

Anarchy, Activism and Assholes - Finding Common Ground.
Hey, it's been a while. It's been difficult scraping up a reason to write, and a lot of that has had to do with the sense that I'd been repeating myself. A lot. Over and over and over.And yet, I can't stop. If it's not here, well, I'm off whacking moles on Reddit. Yes, I am an Redditor. It kind of snuck up on me.Anyhoo, one of those reddit bounce-abouts - from front page to article to comment thread to embedded link - led me to a page where this was in the sidebar. Well, something like that.Are the Young People That Shrinks Label as Disruptive Really Anarchists with a Healthy Resistance to Oppressive Authority?  It ha...
Source: Graphictruth - June 21, 2013 Category: Autism Source Type: blogs

Scant data on seizure drugs for women's genital pain | Reuters
Although doctors sometimes prescribe anti-seizure drugs to treat chronic pain in the vulva, just a handful of low-quality studies have examined the drugs' effects, according to a new review. Based on these studies, "it's very difficult to make definitive statements on efficacy," said Dr. Raphael Leo, the study's author from the State University of New York at Buffalo. "Certainly, more investigation is warranted." Still, "I think that there is promise" for the use of anti-seizure medications, he added. Chronic pain in a woman's genitals, also called vulvodynia, affects as man...
Source: Psychology of Pain - June 20, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Contemporary Iraqi Conversations
"In my younger and more vulnerable years, my father gave me some advice: "Always try to see the good in people!" he would say. As a consequence I reclined to reserve all judgments. Even I have a limit." With these words the new version of "The Great Gatsby" starts with Carraway's voice narrating his memories while he is a resident in a psychiatric ward.I was in bus going to work when we passed by that city south of Baghdad named Alexandria, a city Alexander the Great had passed in once. I asked the man sitting next to me about the prices of rent of apartments in this city. He answered tha...
Source: psychiatry for all - June 20, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

A Smoking Pillbox: Evidence that Sgt. Bales May Have Been on Lariam By Elspeth Cameron Ritchie
New evidence has surfaced that Army Staff Sergeant Robert Bales may have been on mefloquine during his March, 2012, rampage that killed 16 Afghan civilians. I first wondered if Bales had been on the anti-malarial agent, also known by its trade name, Lariam, on March 20, 2012, a week after the massacre. I noted that “this medication has been increasingly associated with neuropsychiatric side effects, including depression, psychosis, and suicidal ideation.” A number of other media outlets picked up the story. But that was just a working hypothesis, absent evidence on Bales’ use of the drug. S...
Source: PharmaGossip - June 20, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Not 25 mg - 200!!! Oh no!
I'm an idiot.  I wrote down the wrong dosage of Lamictal and gave it to my new psychiatrist, but hopefully she has my chart from my old psychiatrist by now.  I am taking 200mg of Lamictal, not 25.  So he was always wanting me to take *400* daily, and it was the second 200 I could never remember to take.  When I felt a bit manic, I would take an extra 200 in the mornings until I felt better.  So now, I have a new prescription coming in the mail eventually for doubling of my Lamictal - to from 25 to 50mg.  UGH!  It should be to 400!That extra little 0 makes a big difference!  I guess m...
Source: bipolar.and.me - June 20, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

How exercise benefits kids with ADHD
Many years ago, I worked as a counselor at the city camp in North Miami Beach, Florida. Camp “No Mi Be” was attended by what seemed to be a countless number of very active, very inquisitive, and pretty-much-unstoppable 10-year-old boys. We learned quickly that the best way to start the day was with running. Run, run, run. We’d make the kids run back and forth to the fence, or run around the building, or whatever we could come up with. We’d challenge them to race us—it turned out that 16 year old legs, even on a non-athletic type like me, were long enough to beat any 10 year old. And it turned out that 10-year-old...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 19, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

How Long Was I Messed Up?
Wow, I keep seeing how far back I was "out of it".  The Pella contract guy came to measure our doors to make sure that what we had ordered on Saturday was going to be the correct measurements.  There was one detail that had been bothering me about what I *thought* I remembered the representative saying and it was something I did not want.  We went outside to look at the outside of the back door, and I asked him what color that was going to be.  He said white.  I told him "No, no, no, no, NO!".  Oh my God that would be hideous.  I told him what color it needed to be and he agreed - it was ...
Source: bipolar.and.me - June 19, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

Blah, blah, blah - with your medical history we have to be sure
Yesterday I had my annual physical. Or Woman Wellness Exam or whatever the correct term is for it these days.It did start off interestingly while I was waiting to check in at the desk, there was a woman who was being told she can't call the doctor's office every day making demands, should go back to her psychiatrist, and perhaps become an inpatient at a psychiatric facility. We'll just say that I was very happy that was not me. My health/mental stability is not that bad.My primary care, who I like, just had a baby and is out for the summer on maternity leave so I met with her nurse practitioner who was one I had not met be...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - June 19, 2013 Category: Cancer Tags: procedures blood tests stress waiting Source Type: blogs

Cue The Black Helicopters
I don't want to cut short any discussion on my last couple involuntary treatment posts, but I wanted to let people know we've got a new Shrink Rap News column up over on Clinical Psychiatry News. My titles over there tend to run on the wordy side, but it's called "RAND Report Signals Threat to Patient Privacy." It's about a recently published think tank report discussing the state of the art of current digital surveillance sources, how they can be analyzed and interpreted and potential applications in national security systems. It's relevant to Shrink Rap because one of the sources they mention----quite transiently and in ...
Source: Shrink Rap - June 19, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: ClinkShrink Source Type: blogs

Psychiatric patients don’t fit the usual medical mold in the ED
The ED is a hectic place. Sore throats. Heart attacks. Dog bites. Broken bones. Strokes. Major trauma. If you work in an ED, you see it all. And then some. Is it any wonder then, with the potential for literally thousands of medical and surgical problems to stumble through the doors of an ED, that hospitals and the bodies that accredit them demand strict, regimented, standard, reproducible emergency assessments and the forms that document them? Of course not. This insures that all the basic questions are asked, that decision trees are followed, that diagnostic criteria are carefully applied, that correct diagnoses are mad...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 18, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Emergency Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Project ECHO: Can We Teach Physicians to Better Diagnose Mental Disorders?
I’m conflicted about the announcement of Project ECHO’s expansion last week. The ECHO Institute was founded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the GE Foundation and the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center to help primary care physicians do a better job with common, chronic condition diagnosis and treatment via Project ECHO. On Friday, they announced a new initiative focusing on mental health treatment. The new effort will involve having academics train primary-care physicians to strengthen and better coordinate their mental health care. It’s the right focus, because family doctors and gen...
Source: World of Psychology - June 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Policy and Advocacy Professional Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Chronic Condition Enormous Difficulty Family Doctors General Practitioners Health Concern Health Sciences Center Mental Disorders Mental Health Care M Source Type: blogs

FDA Probes Deaths Linked to Long-Acting Zyprexa
By John Gever, Deputy Managing Editor, MedPage Today Published: June 18, 2013 SILVER SPRING, Md. -- Two patients died 3-4 days after injections with the long-acting antipsychotic drug olanzapine pamoate (Zyprexa Relprevv), prompting an FDA investigation. The agency has not determined whether the drug caused the fatalities. "At this time, FDA is continuing to evaluate these deaths and will provide an update when more information is available," it said in a statement Tuesday. Both patients received intramuscular injections of the drug at appropriate doses, the FDA said, but tests showed "very high olanzapine blood...
Source: PharmaGossip - June 18, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

What Would You Do? What Would You Want?
Courtesy of CNN, here are a couple real-life scenarios I thought I'd share with you. Both of these videos represent the kind of cases that a psychiatrist confronts in an emergency room. I'd like you to put yourself first in the position of the patient: suppose you've been sick before, but never this sick (let's take it for granted none of this is due to drugs for now). You have an advance directive in place that says you absolutely don't want treatment even if you're a danger to yourself (again, for the sake of the exercise it's an enforceable advance directive). You never addressed danger to others in your advance directi...
Source: Shrink Rap - June 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: ClinkShrink Source Type: blogs

Lamictal Withdrawal - Day 3, Part 2
WOW, even just since my last post, I've deteriorated quite a bit.  I'm starting to get it, just the tiny bits of what I read people going through this wrote, how it was described as a kind of withdrawal from hell, just from a hell I've never known.  The world is becoming blurry, physically blurry, like I'm not able to focus on it, I'm not a part of it.  Lamictal withdrawal is so, so strange.  I'm trying to very hard to PRETEND I care, to be a part of just...being here.  The world almost doesn't exist.  I'll suddenly realize I have both palms of my hands on the temples of my head...
Source: bipolar.and.me - June 17, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

Lamictal Withdrawal - But I Couldn't Care Less.
A major flaw of mine is that I am a huge procrastinator.  Of course it's not something I like about myself, but I used to be so much worse, or maybe I just think that because Mark has taken over most of what I used to procrastinate the most about or has created strict schedules on tasks that are the worst for me, like laundry which I do not allow him to do.  He does not believe that separating colors is necessary, or maybe he only says that so he doesn't have to do laundry.I knew I was running out of Lamictal at least two weeks ago as I get a 90 day supply at a time and can re-order a month in advance since my in...
Source: bipolar.and.me - June 17, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

Professor nemeroff goes to london
THREE STRIKES AND …Professor Charles Nemeroff is being honored today in London. He will deliver a high profile lecture at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, a component of The University of London. IoP and its associated Maudsley Hospital have long been at the forefront of psychiatric research in Britain. The occasion today is the establishment of a new program on mood disorders, and Professor Nemeroff’s topic will be “The Neurobiology of Child Abuse: Treatment Implications.” He will be introduced by Professor Allan Young and the vote of thanks will be proposed by Professor Sir Robin Murray, a fo...
Source: Health Care Renewal - June 17, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: University of London Institute of Psychiatry Charles Nemeroff King's College London Sir Robin Murray Allan Young Maudsley Hospital Carmine Pariante Shitij Kapur Bernard Carroll Source Type: blogs

Just sayin’
Psychiatric Predictive Value of the Voice Message Had voice messages existed in the past, there would be a Budhist riddle to the effect of “what is the sound of one man conversing?”. For most of us, the answer to this riddle would be “awkward”. Human communication relies on feedback and cues from an audience. Sustained solo communication just feels weird. Health budgets are about to be squeezed like the bowels of a patient being disimpacted. To extrapolate the analogy further, the likely result coming out of both patient and cuts will be the same. Each challenge requires innovative solutions, and here our friend th...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 17, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Jarrad Hall Tags: Featured Medical Humor psychopathy voice message Source Type: blogs

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Again Greg Mankiw has an article Defending the One Percent. On another topic, I think Obama's decision to extend air cover over a part of Syria is thoughtful. Also I hav really been shocked by the fact that if it weren't for the Apaches and Comanches, much of the area north of Mexico would be or have been Spanish and then Mexican. This is part of the perspective of Empire of the Summer Moon. (Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans)
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - June 16, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

A Weak Smoker’s Vaccine Might Be Worse Than None
New PET scans show wide responses to antibodies. One of the brightest hopes of addiction science has been the idea of a vaccine—an antibody that would scavenge for drug molecules, bind to them, and make it impossible for them to cross the blood-brain barrier and go to work. But there are dozens of good reasons why this seemingly straightforward approach to medical treatment of addiction is devilishly difficult to perform in practice. Last January, health care company Novartis threw in the towel on NicVax, a nicotine vaccine that failed to beat placebos in Phase III clinical trials for the FDA. And back in 2010, a re...
Source: Addiction Inbox - June 16, 2013 Category: Addiction Authors: Dirk Hanson Source Type: blogs

More Telomerase Activity In Depressed People
Telomere caps on chromosomes shorten every time a cell divides and short telomeres interfere with cell division. However, in some conditions cellls turn on an enzyme, telomerase, that lengthens telomeres. Higher telomerase activity in depressed people might be an attempt by the body to boost neurogenesis against depression. Now a research team led by Owen Wolkowitz, MD, professor of psychiatry at UC San Francisco, has found that within cells of the immune system, activity of an enzyme called telomerase is greater, on average, in untreated individuals with major depression. The preliminary findings from his latest, ongoing ...
Source: FuturePundit - June 16, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Randall Parker Source Type: blogs

Deja vu for deja vus
A colleague told me once that in one of the Iraqi board exams a question was difficult and it says: (Discuss the statement: “A delusion is a delusion even if proved to be true”). This phrase was taken from Fish’s psychopathology if I was not wrong. I am not writing here to discuss this statement but I am writing since I am much hurt by the misunderstanding that veils psychiatry. The film starts with his waking up from a dream in which he sees a crime: “two men fighting on the beach of Deauville till death while a third man watching.” He wakes up and goes to the bathroom. He is frightened to see a beautiful lady w...
Source: psychiatry for all - June 15, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Shrinky Stuff Around the Web
Today, I'm just going to point out some links by others who are talking about the same types of things we've been talking about here on Shrink Rap. Regarding everyone's favorite topic, involuntary treatment, Dr. Greg Smith talks about his experiences committing people at Are You Ready to Commit?  On the Huffington Post, Erin Hawkes writes Medicate Me Even When I Refuse. And Pete Earley talks about the safety of tasers in Tasers: Friend of Foe.  On the topic of privacy, PsychPractice wrote a post for me defining HIPAA.  See What, Exactly is HIPAA?  And while Rob has talked about how he does not like...
Source: Shrink Rap - June 15, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Stop prescribing benzodiazepines for anxiety
As a physician in a rural health clinic, I frequently see patients who complain of anxiety. The majority of these patients are in their 20s to 40s. Some have never been evaluated by a mental health professional, and many of these patients take benzodiazepines on a chronic basis. After current review, I wonder if we as primary care physicians are good at treating anxiety, or are we contributing to drug dependency? Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 14, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Meds Medications Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

A New Biomarker for Treatment Response in Major Depression? Not Yet.
Is a laboratory test or brain scanning method for diagnosing psychiatric disorders right around the corner? How about a test to choose the best method of treatment? Many labs around the world are working to solve these problems, but we don't yet have such diagnostic procedures (despite what some might claim). A new study by McGrath et al. (2013) might be a step in that direction, but the results are very preliminary and await further validation.The principal investigator of that study is Dr. Helen Mayberg, a leader in neuroimaging studies of major depression. She and her colleagues have pioneered the use of deep brain stim...
Source: The Neurocritic - June 14, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Senator Roy Blunt: Would His Laws Really Help Mental Health?
Senator Roy Blunt from Missouri yesterday published an editorial in USA Today lamenting President Obama’s lack of movement on mental health legislation after the Sandy Hook Elementary School tragedy. And while Senator’s Blunts concerns are perhaps well-intentioned, his invocation of Sandy Hook in relation to “mental health” is about as tenuous a connection one could make about two, largely unrelated subjects. Because in his editorial, Senator Blunt glosses over one inconvenient fact — Sandy Hook’s perpetrator, Adam Lanza, had no diagnosed mental disorder, nor was he apparently ever see...
Source: World of Psychology - June 13, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Aspergers Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy Violence and Aggression Asperger S Syndrome Chief Psychiatrist Columnist Richard Cohen Dr Harold Glosses Gun Control Bill Human Judgment Inconvenient Fact Source Type: blogs

First Therapist Appointment!
I had a total melt down and freak out before my counseling appointment yesterday over nothing.  I actually had to take a klonipin just to get myself THERE without totally breaking down!  I was almost in hysterics, crying and crying.  What in the world is wrong with me?  What was I so scared of?  Of course I know the answer to that, but no one can force me to do or say anything I don't want to.The therapist was very nice, and she held my psychiatrist in such high regard - so much so that she was even surprised I was able to just call and get an appointment to see her.  Yes, my psychiatrist was ...
Source: bipolar.and.me - June 13, 2013 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

ProPublica Publishes Medicare Part D Prescriber Data
In 2010, the "investigative journalist organization" known as ProPubilca, through donations from the Pew Foundation and several other organizations geared towards attacking industry, began the "Dollars for Docs" campaign. As we have covered extensively since the launch of that campaign, ProPublica aggregated the payment reporting data of approximately 15 manufacturers who were reporting their payments publicly—either as a requirement of a corporate integrity agreement (CIA) with HHS-OIG, or voluntarily—and then created a searchable, aggregated website. Additionally, ProPublica teamed up with national and local medi...
Source: Policy and Medicine - June 13, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Surgery for the future - enhancing function !
Typically surgery , has always been about correcting anatomical problems. If you broke a bone , the doctor joined it for you; if you had a tumour, he cut it out; and if you had an abscess , he drained it. In the future , surgery will become much more exciting , because rather than focus on fixing problems, clever surgeons and biomedical scientists will create procedures which will enhance function in normal people.Thus, for example , functional neurosurgery will allow normal people to improve their memory while phonic surgery on the vocal cords will allow people who have a good voice to make it even better because of surgi...
Source: The Patient's Doctor - June 13, 2013 Category: Obstetricians and Gynecologists Tags: surgeons future of surgery Source Type: blogs

Tarnished Image? Psychiatrists Square Off Over A Nemeroff Lecture
For the second time in little more than a year, Charles Nemeroff is the subject of protest by other psychiatrists. The latest instance involves an invitation by the Institute of Psychiatry, the leading center in the UK for psychiatric research, to the University of Miami psychiatry professor to lecture next week at its new Centre for Affective Disorders. A group of UK psychiatrists, however, object to the invitation and point to his tenure as a sort of poster boy for undisclosed conflicts of interest. In the view of the Critical Psychiatry Network, which his planned appearance will reflect badly on all psychiatrists and th...
Source: Pharmalot - June 12, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Charles Nemeroff - Honoured in Britain, the US psychiatrist who took $1.2m from drug companies
Britain’s premier institute for the study of mental illness has become embroiled in a damaging row over its decision to invite a disgraced US academic to give the inaugural lecture for a new research centre.The decision by the Institute of Psychiatry at Kings College, in central London, Europe’s largest psychiatric research organisation, to invite Professor Charles Nemeroff, an expert in the treatment of depression, has split the psychiatric profession and been attacked by members of the institute itself. Professor Nemeroff, a leading authority on the biological causes of mental illness, is one of the highest profile d...
Source: PharmaGossip - June 12, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

The Special Issue Spotter
We trawl the world's journals so you don't have to: Anxiety disorders (Clinical Psychologist). Open-access journal publishing in psychology (Psychological Inquiry). open access Resilience in child development (The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry). Exploring Cognitive Readiness in Complex Operational Environments (Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making). Disgust (Psychological Bulletin). Neuroscience of sleep (Nature). Cognitive science approach to developmental disorders (Japanese Psychological Research). Mapping the brain (Nature). open access Styles, approaches, and patterns in student l...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - June 12, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Christian Jarrett Source Type: blogs

No dishonour in depression
Comedian and writer Ruby Wax, a regular on British television, has clinical depression. In her book published last week, Sane New World (Hodder & Stoughton, 2013), she describes her struggles with different therapies and her fear of being ‘found out’. She is not alone. A 2010 survey in Europe revealed that 38% of people had a diagnosed mental disorder — including 7% with major depression. The proportion is likely to be similar in all populations, even in Africa, where psychiatric disease barely features on the health agenda.The stigma attached to such disorders means that many people do not admit to the...
Source: PharmaGossip - June 12, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Healing the Overwhelmed Physician - by Jerry Avorn
BOSTON — DURING an 1817 visit to Florence, the French author Marie-Henri Beyle, known by the pen name Stendhal, was seized by palpitations, dizziness and a feeling of being overwhelmed by the abundance of great art surrounding him; an Italian psychiatrist later coined the term Stendhal syndrome to describe this phenomenon. Enlarge This Image Sophia Martineck Connect With Us on Twitter For Op-Ed, follow@nytopinion and to hear from the editorial page editor, Andrew Rosenthal, follow@andyrNYT. We physicians are susceptible to a kind of medical Stendhal syndrome as we confront the volumino...
Source: PharmaGossip - June 12, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Quick Relief from Emotional Suffering? This One Simple Thing Could Help
Is it really possible to snap out of your worries in no time? It seems so, according to a paper recently published in the journal Medical Hypotheses. The paper is based on two major assumptions. One is that inward cognitive attention is the cause of all emotional suffering. And two is that emotional suffering can be overcome by simple acts of outward cognitive attention. Evidence suggests that emotional distress — and all major psychiatric disorders — are associated with a state of excessive inward attention. And inward attention that is excessive in its intensity or duration could easily become pathological o...
Source: World of Psychology - June 11, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Rohith Sebastian Tags: Brain and Behavior Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Research anxiety Anxious Thoughts Assumptions Contemplation Duration Emotional Distress Emotions Intensity Journal Medical Medical Hypotheses Neural Source Type: blogs

A psychiatric disorder or a profound lack of discipline in our kids?
It is hard to see a child in pain. I have seen quite a few children in the emergency departments of South Carolina in the past three years, more than I could have imagined just a while ago. Now, in the interest of full disclosure, I am not a child psychiatrist by trade. Like any general psychiatrist, my training provided me with didactic and clinical training in a variety of sub-specialties in my field, including affective disorders, substance abuse, and the disorders that children may suffer from. Most hospitals that I work in now, desperate for help with children who come in sick and in need of assistance, grant me and o...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 11, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Physician Pediatrics Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

HIP HIP HIPAA HOORAY! Where's My Medical Privacy?
And whatsoever I shall see or hear in the course of my profession, as well as outside my profession in my intercourse with men, if it be what should not be published abroad, I will never divulge, holding such things to be holy secrets.     *       *        * Today, I"m ranting about medical privacy (now gone) and electronic medical records over on KevinMD.  The link is HERE.  Did you know that hospitals now send your medical information to the state (at least in our state), whether you want that or not?  And while you're rea...
Source: Shrink Rap - June 11, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

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Greg Mankiw referred to his comencement address the other day. He said in part:It is an honor to be able to speak to you today. When Mr. Conrad invited me, he suggested that maybe, as a professional economist, I could talk with you about the future economy that you will soon be entering and in which you will be spending your lives. It is true that as an economist, I know precisely what the future holds. But union rules prevent me from sharing that knowledge with the general public. So we economists usually just make stuff up, and it often turns out to be wrong. I won’t burden you with those made-up stories today. The who...
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - June 11, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Neurofeedback Therapy an Effective, Non-Drug Treatment for ADHD
Pills are not the only way to manage your child’s inappropriate or maladaptive behaviors. Neurofeedback therapy is a safe, non-invasive, alternative option for the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents. In November 2012, the American Academy of Pediatrics approved biofeedback and neurofeedback as a Level 1 or “best support” treatment option for children suffering from ADHD. For parents looking for an effective, non-drug treatment of ADHD, neurofeedback is one worth serious consideration. It is estimated that two million children in the United States are struggling ...
Source: World of Psychology - June 10, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Kristi DeName Tags: ADHD and ADD Brain and Behavior Children and Teens Disorders General Research Technology Treatment Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Adhd Beta Waves Bi Source Type: blogs

Saving Grady: Reflections On Kate Neuhausen’s Narrative Matters Essay
In the past 12 years, several of our nation’s most storied public hospitals have closed, including DC General (2001), New Orleans’s Charity Hospital (2005), and Martin Luther King, Jr. hospital in Los Angeles (2007). When Atlanta’s Grady Memorial Hospital was featured on the front page of The New York Times on Jan 8, 2008, it was widely assumed it would be the next to go. However, at its darkest hour, Grady received help from an unexpected quarter. In the June issue of Health Affairs, a young physician, Dr. Kate Neuhausen, describes how she and other leaders of a little-known student organization mobilized hundreds ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - June 10, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Arthur Kellermann Tags: All Categories Disparities Hospitals Medicaid Nurses Personal Experience Physicians Policy Politics Public Health Source Type: blogs