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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 13.

A New Research Agenda for Suicide Prevention
Director’s Blog (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - October 27, 2014 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Mental Health in Davos
Director’s Blog (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - October 27, 2014 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

BRAINS—A New Research Generation
Director’s Blog (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - October 27, 2014 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, October 27, 2014
From MedPage Today: Nurse Beats Ebola. Fourteen days after she felt her first symptoms, Nina Pham, RN, has conquered Ebola. ‘Bad’ Fats Down but Not Out of Diets. Trans and saturated fat consumption have dropped, but not far enough to meet recommended levels for heart health, and omega-3s have plateaued too low. Can Comics Help Treat Mental Illness? Comic books may be a helpful tool for treating mentally ill adolescents and adults. Kidney Stones Up Fracture Risk. Patients who have kidney stones may be at increased risk of fracture. Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputa...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 27, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Infectious disease Nephrology Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Suicide puts the medical profession in a difficult position
Recently, I wrote about the importance (and difficulty) of maintaining a healthy lifestyle as a resident. Now, I’d like focus more specifically on the toll that residency — and in general, a career in medicine — takes on a health care provider’s mind and soul. As you may have heard, in August two young physicians decided to end their lives. No one can know how tormented they must have felt or what circumstances drove them to the point where suicide seemed like the only answer. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. F...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 26, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Exorcism and Nonepileptic or Pseudosiezures
The discussion of the painting (1) The Miracles of St Ignatius Loyola might seem to disparage religion. My consultation experience and that of others (2) with ‘pseudoseizures’ or nonepileptic seizures and conversion disorders , the syndromes of the discussion, suggests that the syndromes may be variants of panic disorder and successfully biologically treated as such. Hypothetically the syndromes might be induced by the anxiogenic methods of sodium lactate infusion (3) or high dose caffeine ingestion (4). In reference to the painting and its discussion, if religious experience restructures the psychodynamic and psychoph...
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - October 26, 2014 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

What I Learned Part 3
Today I enjoyed the presentation about the role of the Academy and of the American Psychiatric Association in appellate litigation. Both organizations work together to file amicus curiae ("friend of the court") briefs for court cases that have relevance to psychiatry and the care of the mentally ill. The APA has participated in 127 cases since 1962, and AAPL has participated in 16 cases since 1985. Most briefs are written by the APA counsel (all of whom have been former Supreme Court law clerks). Most of the cases were criminal rather than civil cases, and several were cases that went before the U.S. Supreme Court. AAPL wr...
Source: Shrink Rap - October 25, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: ClinkShrink Source Type: blogs

What I Learned Part 2
Day Two of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law ConferenceI picked up a number of tidbits from the poster sessions:-250,000 juveniles a year are sent to the adult criminal just system-3/4 of all juveniles serving life without parole were sentenced in five states-Louisiana uses an assertive community treatment program to supervise and restore  incompetent, nondangerous criminal defendants. This sounds like a good way to get people out of the hospital, or avoid having to send them there in the first place-In Indiana, a survey was done of judges who have dealt with defendants claiming to be “sovereign citizen...
Source: Shrink Rap - October 25, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: ClinkShrink Source Type: blogs

Fright Week: The Waking Nightmare of Lord Voldemort
Nightmares can seem very real at times, but then we wake up and realize it was all a bad dream. Now imagine having a vivid nightmare with all the reality of waking life and then... it turns out you're actually awake through it all!This happened to an 11 year old Italian boy who reported frightening auditory and visual hallucinations of Voldemort, the archenemy of Harry Potter, for three straight days. These hallucinations began after a bout of sore throat and fever (38°C).  As Vita et al. (2008) report:The day after the resolution of fever, he began to present hallucinations. Hallucinations occurred in the after...
Source: The Neurocritic - October 25, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Lesson learned: Not everyone is crazy
An excerpt from The Spattered White Coat: Intense experiences which formed a young doctor. I’ll never forget one of the first patients I interviewed. When I went to get him, I could see him sitting in the waiting room, looking around and scratching his arms repeatedly. He was a very large middle-aged black man from the neighborhood. He looked like he could have been a lineman for the Chicago Bears. He had been sent over by the dermatology clinic at County. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 23, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

What I Learned Part 1
Hello from Chicago and the 45th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law!One of the Shrink Rap traditions is that I blog tidbits that I picked up at various sessions of the forensic psychiatry conference. This year's conference was preceded (for me, anyway, not for all attendees) by a three day review course in preparation for my mandatory recertification exam next year. This is another way of saying that I'm starting the conference in "listener overload" mode, so my notes may be a little light this year.As usual, the conference started out with a keynote address by current president Dr. Richard Wei...
Source: Shrink Rap - October 23, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: ClinkShrink Source Type: blogs

Pamela Wible: A eulogy to her father
I believe we choose our parents before we are born. I hit the jackpot. I picked an unlikely pair — a radical feminist and a guy named Ted Krouse. Mom wasn’t home much (she was finishing up her psychiatry residency) so I became head of the household. Dad always kowtowed to the strongest woman in the room. I was two at the time. I never had a bed time or a bath time and I sent Dad out on midnight runs to 7-11 to get us Slurpees and chocolate bars for dinner. Since I rarely bathed, I ended up with dreadlocks. Dad turned my poor hygiene into a neighborhood contest. The kids on the block lined up in our living room. Dad...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 22, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Comments on 'Validity of Sensory Systems as Distinct Constructs'
Chia-Ting Su and Diane Parham (2014) wrote an interesting article that appears in this month's American Journal of Occupational Therapy.  Their study involved use of confirmatory factor analysis to test constructs within sensory integration theory.  Results of their analysis have rather broad implications and raise many important questions.A highly popularized notion based on Dunn's (2001) Slagle lecture is that sensory processing can be identified as occurring within different systems where there might be over or under responsiveness to incoming stimuli.  Su and Parham applied data to this model and could n...
Source: ABC Therapeutics Occupational Therapy Weblog - October 21, 2014 Category: Occupational Health Tags: OT practice sensory integration Source Type: blogs

Ebola and Politics
Socialism or family life is like an MC Esher print. It has areas or blocks of equal properties which fit together and then there is an edge in which the properties of the spaces change. The unseen disharmony of the same spaces can be covered over in an unseen way by some of the spaces until an edge. The failure of the CDC or simply its lack of effectiveness represents Obama's inability to cover an unseen disharmony. The U.S. is at risk from West African travelers. To allow the CDC to acknowledge this risk suggests that steps which disproportionately affect black people might be appropriate. That contradicts the internal do...
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - October 21, 2014 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Multidisciplinary Learning for Medical Students
<p><span style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">The clerkship years of medical school expose students to a range of specialties medical practitioners may select as an area of advanced study during residency. Pediatrics, surgery, general medicine, radiology, psychiatry, and more are part of the array of educational exposures students gain from during these rotations. As an educator facilitating discussion groups which provide the opportunity for reflection, questioning, and connecting expectations to the actual experiences, I have found that there are gaps in understanding the roles of other person...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 21, 2014 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Hayley Dittus-Doria Tags: Health Care Healthcare Training medical education syndicated Source Type: blogs

Should we use antipsychotics to treat ADHD?
Polypharmacy, or use of multiple psychiatric drugs, for treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is on the rise. A recent study compared treatment with basic therapy (stimulants plus parent training) with augmented therapy (those two plus risperidone, an atypical antipsychotic). The study concluded that treatment with risperidone was superior. When children show dramatic improvements in behavior on risperidone, now being prescribed with increasing frequency for ADHD and a range of other disorders that represent difficulty with emotional regulation, we need to ask ourselves one question. Does this ch...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 19, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Teaching Health Centers: An Attainable, Near-Term Pathway To Expand Graduate Medical Education
We describe a near-term and attainable pathway to expand GME that could gain consensus among these stakeholders. This approach would sustain and expand Teaching Health Centers (THCs), a recent initiative that directly funds community-based GME sponsoring institutions to train residents in primary care specialties, dentistry and psychiatry. We further propose selectively expanding GME to meet primary care and other demonstrable specialty needs within communities, and building in evaluations to measure effectiveness of innovative training models. Our proposal includes: Congressional reauthorization and funding of the THC GM...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - October 17, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Richard Rieselbach, Paul Rockey, Thomas Nasca, Kathleen Klink, Robert Phillips, Malcolm Cox, David Sundwall, John Frohna, and Katherine Neuhausen Tags: All Categories Disparities Health Care Costs Health Reform Hospitals Medicaid Medicare Physicians Policy Politics Primary Care Veterans Workforce Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, October 16, 2014
From MedPage Today: Pfizer, FDA Square Off on Chantix Psych Risk. The maker of the popular stop-smoking drug varenicline (Chantix), Pfizer, says new data indicate the risk of suicidality and other serious psychiatric events is not as great as once thought, and has applied to the FDA to remove a boxed warning on those risks. Major Advance for Diabetes Stem Cell Therapy? Last month, two papers reported successful transformation of human stem cells into insulin-producing beta cells that worked when they were implanted into diabetic mice. Post-MI Prognosis Worse With IBD. Patients with active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 16, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Cancer Diabetes Endocrinology Heart Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Almost a convert: Donating one’s body to science
During most of my career as a psychiatrist, I haven’t often dealt directly with death. For the past five years, though, I have had the privilege of spending two days a week treating service men and women returning from deployments in Afghanistan and Iraq. Listening to their stories and talking with them about their war experiences, I’ve spent much more time thinking about death and dying. Despite this, I was shocked when my wife recently told me she was planning to donate her body to science — specifically, to the Georgetown University Medical Center’s anatomical donors program. Continue reading ... Yo...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 14, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

Finding My Purpose through My Wife’s Breast Cancer
In the spring of 2000 Susan, my wife then of 33 years (now of 48), was diagnosed with breast cancer.  It all started with her annual check-up and her internist saying she felt something “funny” in Susan’s right breast.  She suggested Susan see a breast surgeon. While I was surprised, I wasn’t alarmed.  It was going to be Susan’s fourth breast biopsy.  Unlike the three previous ones, this one was done as an out-patient procedure in one of the then relatively new surgical centers now found in shopping centers everywhere.  No frozen section this time, just wait to hear what the surgeon found. He literally skipp...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - October 14, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Cancer Source Type: blogs

CADDAC 6th Annual ADHD Conference In Vancouver, Nov 1st & 2nd Dr. Russell Barkley, Dr. Adele Diamond, Gina Pera & More
CADDAC 6th Annual ADHD Conference In Vancouver, Nov 1st & 2nd Dr. Russell Barkley, Dr. Adele Diamond, Gina Pera & MorePost from: Adult ADD Strengths Cross posted to BCADHD CADDAC, The Center for ADHD Awareness, Canada will have it’s 6th annual conference in Vancouver, BC November 1st & 2nd. Early bird deadline is in 2 days October 14th, don’t wait. It’s pretty rare to get ADHD conferences in Vancouver, CADDAC is a Toronto based Canadian ADHD organization so it’s meetings are usually down east in Toronto or Montreal, so you might want to check it out because you may not see another on...
Source: Adult ADD Strengths - October 13, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Pete Quily Tags: ADD / ADHD Conferences and Workshops Vancouver Source Type: blogs

Don’t call me a “prescriber”
Please don’t call call me a “prescriber.” Yes, I know it’s easier to say “prescriber” than “psychiatric nurse practitioner or psychiatrist.” The word “prescriber,” however, puts severe limits on what I can do and how I can help. You may believe that, because I have a license to prescribe medications, that’s all I choose to do. In fact, you may believe that’s all I know how to do. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 12, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Payments to Doctors: The Bottom Line
(Source: The Carlat Psychiatry Blog)
Source: The Carlat Psychiatry Blog - October 8, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Young fathers can also get postpartem depression
A study published in the journal Pediatrics showed that young fathers, those who became dads at an average age of 25 years, have a 68% increase in depression symptoms within the first five years of becoming dads. This applied to young dads who lived with their children and their wives or girlfriends. Dads who lived away from their children and older fathers did not show that same increase in rates of depression. So why might “postpartum depression” happen to dads? Isn’t that a “hormonal thing” that happens to new moms? But now that we know that this is an issue, can we and should we do something about it? Con...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 2, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

I'm Back! Now Let's Talk Sunshine.
(Source: The Carlat Psychiatry Blog)
Source: The Carlat Psychiatry Blog - October 1, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Tags: Charles Ornstein Open Payments Pew Physician Payments Sunshine Act ProPublica Source Type: blogs

I ' m Back! Now Let ' s Talk Sunshine.
(Source: The Carlat Psychiatry Blog)
Source: The Carlat Psychiatry Blog - October 1, 2014 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Charles Ornstein Open Payments Pew Physician Payments Sunshine Act ProPublica Source Type: blogs

White House BRAIN Conference
September 30 is the last day of the fiscal year for the US government. So it's no coincidence that President Obama's BRAIN Initiative1 ended the year with a bang. The NIH BRAIN Awards were announced on the last possible day of FY2014, coinciding with the White House BRAIN Conference. A total of $46 million was dispersed among 58 awards involving over 100 scientists.Census of Cell Types (RFA MH-14-215)  Tools for Cells and Circuits (RFA MH-14-216)  Next Generation Human Imaging (RFA MH-14-217)  Large-Scale Recording-Modulation - New Technologies (RFA NS-14-007)  Large-Scale Recording-Modulation - Optimiz...
Source: The Neurocritic - October 1, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 09-30-2014
This article mocks some of the entries in the government’s new ICD-10 coding scheme. For example, “Bizarre personal appearance” is actually a codeable diagnosis. Estimates are that the costs for a doctor’s practice to change to the new coding system will average from $56,000 to $226,000. And sure, being required to differentiate between Orca bites and piranha bites or between first and subsequent run-ins with a lamp post may seem idiotic to most people, but if the coding isn’t accurate, it gives the government the ability to allege that there was false billing and to levy huge fines or even im...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - October 1, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

Happy? Me? Strange, new feeling! : )
I am actually happy and content with my life right now!   It is a wonderful, if not scary, feeling.  I haven't felt this good in so long that I can't even remember when it was.  I find it sad that whenever I am simply happy I don't trust my feelings.  I have to analyze "am I too happy?", but no, I have zero hypomanic symptoms.  I really am simply happy.  Then I start worrying and even warning people about how depressed I can get and probably will be again soon.  Surely this can't last?  And I know it won't.  Eventually, for everyone, something situational will happen to bri...
Source: bipolar.and.me - September 27, 2014 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

How Engaging Patients Can Improve Care And Health Outcomes
Patients and caregivers are gaining momentum as powerful new resources in efforts to improve the health care system. They are increasingly becoming active partners in their own care, as well as seeking to make the health care delivery system more responsive to their needs and easier to navigate. And they are increasingly engaging as collaborators in planning and conducting research, and disseminating its results, with the goal of producing evidence that can help patients and those who care for them make better-informed decisions about the clinical choices they face. It is this last trend that led the Patient-Centered Outco...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - September 26, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Sue Sheridan Tags: All Categories Chronic Care Comparative Effectiveness Consumers Disparities Policy Public Health Quality Research Source Type: blogs

Pull Your Own Oxygen Down First
Disruptive Women UK will be launching Tuesday, September 30th in the House of Commons. This post is a part of a series running up to the launch welcoming Disruptive Women UK. Almost everyone reading this will have heard the instruction given before taking off on any air flight, “in case of emergency pull your own oxygen mask down first before helping others.” Over recent months I have repeated this phrase often – not, I hasten to add because I am now moonlighting as an Airline stewardess – no, because it is a phrase I give to doctors when talking to them about how to stay mentally and physically healthy in these tr...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - September 24, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: DW UK Source Type: blogs

Global Health Update: High Bed Occupancy Rates And Increased Mortality In Denmark
High levels of bed occupancy are associated with increased inpatient and thirty-day hospital mortality in Denmark, according to research published in the July issue of Health Affairs. Authors Flemming Madsen, Steen Ladelund, and Allan Linneberg received considerable media attention in Denmark for their research findings. For one major Television channel, it topped Germany’s victory in the World Cup finals. In another story from the Danish newspaper, Information, Councillor Ulla Astman, Chairman of the North Denmark Regional Council and second highest ranking politician, who runs all of the Danish public hospitals, report...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - September 24, 2014 Category: Health Management Authors: Tracy Gnadinger Tags: All Categories Global Health Hospitals Research Source Type: blogs

Responding to a medical student in pain
This evening, I read a post written by a woman who finds herself feeling alone, depressed, desperate, and afraid of losing herself as she goes through medical school. This post is my response to that woman. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 23, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Education Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 09-22-2014
More updated from around the web at my other blog at DrWhiteCoat.com Study in the journal Pediatrics shows that about 10,000 children are hospitalized each year for accidental medication ingestions. Three quarters of those hospitalizations involved 1 or 2 year olds. Twelve medications were responsible for 45% of all pediatric emergency hospitalizations for accidental drug ingestions. Opioids were not surprisingly the top classification prompting hospitalizations, but buprenorphine and clonidine were the top two medications – responsible for 15% of all hospitalizations. The rate of hospitalization for buprenorphine pr...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - September 22, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

Cut your grass . . . then eat the clippings
You mow your lawn, then save the clippings to consume on top of your salad, right? Well, why not? It’s green, it’s a plant, just like spinach, kale, chard, and broccoli. Why can’t we eat the green leafy clippings, dowsed with your favorite Ranch dressing or mixed into a casserole and proudly served to your family? You walk on it and the dog does its duty on it? Oh, and the neighborhood kids take a short cut traipsing through your back yard? Well, why not set aside an area, fenced off to keep it clean, and use those clippings? Well, let’s say you did and you tossed all those cups and cups of fresh ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - September 22, 2014 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle barley corn grains grass millet oats rice seeds of grasses sorghum Source Type: blogs

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Books noted: Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer. Also Dying Unneeded: The Cultural Context of the Russian Mortality Crisis Also Max Hastings on the Marne and WWI more generally and Fromkin on 'Europe's Last Summer' (before WWI), the Prussian plan for war, and Fromkin on the war outcome 'The Peace to End All Peace.' DeLong also highlighted the classic book on the Marne recently, that by Sewll Tyng. (Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans)
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - September 20, 2014 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Stars We Look At
Since my friend's coming back from the USA and we meet almost each evening and chat. Each time he got something new to show me. Yesterday he brought with him some magazines. Two of the magazines talks about Robin Williams. I like Robin Williams movies. I remember seeing AWAKENING before I knew Oliver Sacks and Dopamine. That was something unforgettable. My friend also brought a book and a DVD about the life of Marilyn Monroe. We talked about Elton John's CANDLE in the Wind, and Lady D, and we were smiling with joy but... But when we saw this next picture of Robin Williams we thought that he was pictured in a cryi...
Source: psychiatry for all - September 19, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Making parity a reality: six asks for the next government to improve the nation's mental health
Royal College of Psychiatrists - This manifesto calls for a firm commitment from all parties to take action to ensure that the millions of people who do, and will experience mental health problems are given timely, appropriate care. It highlights the need for a waiting time target for mental health treatment; improved access to crisis and specialist services; and greater investment in evidence-based parenting programmes. Manifesto Press release (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - September 19, 2014 Category: UK Health Authors: The King's Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: General Election 2015 Mental Health Source Type: blogs

Health anxiety: What hypochondriasis really should be called
“Am I a hypochondriac?” It’s a question I hear with quite some regularity, almost never from people who suffer from bona fide anxiety disorders related to their health. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 16, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Primary care Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Reading Reader's Digest in Baghdad
 A friend of mine came back to Baghdad from Abroad bringing with him some newspapers and magazines. September's issue of Reader's Digest was in my hand while my mesmerized eyes were glistering and saying: "you are holding the latest issue!"After 2003 we started seeing the used books and magazines of the US Army personnel in Baghdad including some Reader's Digest issues, usually from more than a year past, but holding the September issue in Baghdad is such a privilege. I was in a 2-store bus like that one in the picture above. Next to the window Hedy Lamarr is said to have invented the Wi-Fi. I thought that that w...
Source: psychiatry for all - September 16, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

How to Find a Good Therapist
One of the most common questions I'm asked is, "How can I find a good therapist?"Well, it's a multi-step process, so let's get going. Types of TherapistsFirst, it's important to think about the type of therapist you think is best for your presenting issues. There are many kinds of mental health therapists, but sometimes understanding "who does what" can be confusing. Here is a list to help identify the specialties and degrees therapists can hold.PsychologistsPsychologists generally have a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.), or Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) and must complete at least four years of pos...
Source: Dr. Deborah Serani - September 16, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Tags: treatment Source Type: blogs

Drama every where I go, and depression as always
I have no idea what is I wrong with me.  Each day now, seems like it is worse in the afternoon, I've been getting pretty low, down, I guess depressed.  I want to be cautious with that word because so many times now it doesn't seem like I'm depressed then I'm told that I am.  I was doing all of these non-normal things and didn't know why but wanted to change myself, yet depression never entered my mind.  So NOW that I think I am getting depressed, with no idea why, I hesitate to use that word.Nothing bad is going on in my life.  My husband supports my new small business venture. ...
Source: bipolar.and.me - September 16, 2014 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

In the age of EHRs, don’t turn your backs to patients
One of the most important tricks of the trade that I learned in medical school was what some might have considered a little throwaway bit of advice. During my psychiatry clinical rotation the preceptor advised that, when applying the stethoscope to the patient’s back, one should rest the other hand gently on his or her shoulder. Human touch was important. It would relax the patient and convey subconsciously a sense of compassion, a feeling that we’re in this together. I decided to take that advice and throughout my career always touched my patient’s shoulder with my left hand while I was listening to his or her lungs...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 14, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Health IT Primary care Source Type: blogs

Higher Authorities? - Pharmaceutical Companies, Addiction Experts, and Marijuana Policy
We have often discussed the web of conflicts of interest that is draped over medicine and health care, and seems responsible for much of our current health care dysfunction.  We have discussed examples of conflicts of interest affecting clinical research, clinical teaching, clinical care, and health care policy.  Each time I think we must have cataloged all the useful examples, a striking new one appears.So, let us get down into the weeds, so to speak, in the trendy new area of marijuana policy.I am not about to express an opinion on whether marijuana will prove to be useful in health care, but certainly some peo...
Source: Health Care Renewal - September 11, 2014 Category: Health Management Tags: conflicts of interest narcotics patient advocacy groups stealth health policy advocacy Source Type: blogs

Physician Wellness and Medical Marriages
Editor’s Note: Check out our Twitter conversation this week on #MedicalMarriage. Share your stories with @AcadMedJournal and hear from your peers. When I began my internship, I was the only one among my fellow interns who was not married. I was jealous of the boxed lunches that they carried, packed carefully and lovingly by partners at home. Several years later, after I joined the faculty at the University of New Mexico, I got married and realized that many in my intern cohort had been divorced by then. I received cautionary notes of congratulations from them. I wasn’t sure what had happened to their marriages ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - September 11, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: David P. Sklar, M.D. Tags: Featured From the Editor medical marriage mutual support physician well-being shared values University of Michigan Medical School Source Type: blogs

The Science of Depression - moving from neurotransmitters to neurogenesis and synaptogenesis
From ASAP Science: What's going on inside the brain of a depressed person?Recent thinking suggests that rather than a shortage of serotonin, a lack of synaptogenesis (the growth of new synapses, or nerve contacts) and neurogenesis (the generation and migration of new neurons) could cause depression.The main group of medications to treat depression, SSRIs, might promote synaptogenesis and neurogenesis by turning on genes that make ITGB3 as well as other proteins that are involved in these processes. ITGB3 stands for integrin beta-3.If the neurogenesis and synaptogenesis hypothesis holds, a drug that specifically targeted mi...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - September 10, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Depression Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Slow Down Drama, You Move Too Fast!
I have gotten to where I absolutely hate drama.  Of course, in my own life, but it seems like drama is always happening to people I know as well.  It isn't their fault, and while I so many times can see the way out of their misery, it is very strange.  Obviously we are not all going to see everything the same way, but the answers seem so apparent to their problems to me, yet all they want to do is complain and not do what to me is perhaps the only thing that will help them.God knows this blog is full of me saying "Why this" and "how did that.." with obvious answers, so that is where I have empathy.  Jus...
Source: bipolar.and.me - September 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Physician Payments Sunshine Act: Organizations Respond to CMS
  September 2nd marked the last day for comments on CMS’ proposed rule to eliminate the accredited continuing medical education (CME) exemption from Sunshine Act reporting.  In an overwhelming display of support for the exemption, over 800 comments were submitted encouraging the agency to either maintain or expand the current exclusion. -Total comments supporting maintenance or expansion of the CME exemption:  820 -Total comments supporting elimination of the CME exemption:  approximately 20 -Percentage of comments supporting the CME exemption: 98% We have followed this issue closely, and recentl...
Source: Policy and Medicine - September 8, 2014 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

A Dangerous New Dish
Bibimbop Brugmansia ** Do NOT try this at home.Edible flowers can make for a beautiful garnish on salads and trendy Brooklyn cocktails, but these decorative flourishes can be a disaster for the oblivious amateur. An unusual case report in BMC Research Notes summarizes what happens when you sprinkle toxic flower petals on your bibimbop (Kim et al., 2014).A 64 year old Korean woman came to the emergency room with incoherent speech and fluctuations in attention, orientation and comprehension. She had called her daughter for help but couldn't remember why. (Hint: that's because she ingested flowers containing scopolamine and a...
Source: The Neurocritic - September 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

This Week: Russia and the Ukraine
Books noted: Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer Also: Dying Unneeded: The Cultural Context of the Russian Mortality Crisis, reviewed in NY Review of Books with an appropriate picture. And the London Review of Books gives a related emotional justification for the Ukrainian 'rebels' and, by extension, Putin. References originated from this source. (Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans)
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - September 6, 2014 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs