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Psychiatry

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 2.

There’s movie psychiatry, and then there’s real psychiatry
The page comes from the psychiatry intern on call. “There’s a situation with patient RB on the unit. Please advise.” We gather in the hall outside the patient’s room. There are already three — no, four — security guards standing several feet away with their arms folded. Backup. Ready. Ready for what? We whisper in hushed tones as the intern explains what happened. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 20, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

How the Jews became Chosen
God asked the Greeks if they would be interested in Commandments. 'Name one,' they said. 'Thou shall not commit adultery,' God said. 'Not interested,' said the Greeks. The Arabs also got to an example, 'Thou shalt not steal.' 'Thanks, but..'was the reply. He asked the Jews if they were interested in Commandments. They answered, 'How much are they?' 'Free,' He said, to which they replied, 'We'll take 10.' (Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans)
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - March 20, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Can You Make Docs Be Nice?
Today's post, called Legislating Kindness, can be found on our Clinical Psychiatry News column.  Please surf over there for the post.   They no longer have commenting ... I don't know why that is...but please come back here if you want to say something.  ----- Listen to our latest podcast at mythreeshrinks.com or subscribe to our rss feed. Email us at mythreeshrinks at gmail dot com Our book is out now. (Source: Shrink Rap)
Source: Shrink Rap - March 20, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Risperdal - ARKANSAS COURT TOSSES $1.2B JUDGMENT AGAINST J&J BY CHUCK BARTELS ASSOCIATED PRESS
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) -- The Arkansas Supreme Court on Thursday overturned a $1.2 billion judgment against Johnson & Johnson in a lawsuit challenging the drugmaker's marketing of the antipsychotic drug Risperdal.The court ruled that the state improperly sued under a law that applies to health care facilities, not pharmaceutical companies.The ruling comes in an appeal of lawsuit filed by Arkansas against the drugmaker and subsidiary Janssen Pharmaceuticals. The state says the companies didn't properly communicate the drug's risks and marketed it for off-label use, calling the practices fraudulent.Johnson & Johnson ...
Source: PharmaGossip - March 20, 2014 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Usmle step 1 step 2 shelf exam tutor!
by skassf (Posted Wed Mar 19, 2014 9:16 pm)I'm an NYU student who scored 260+ on step 1, 260+ on step 2, and 90+ on all shelf exams. I got honors in every clinical clerkship (Internal Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Neurology, Ambulatory Care).I've been tutoring since 2002 and have worked with many different students from those who struggle to pass to those who are looking to achieve perfection. Whatever it may be that you want to achieve, I will help you develop a plan and work with you to reach your goals. I can give you all the inside details that I have picked up along to way to ac...
Source: Med Student Guide - March 19, 2014 Category: Medical Students Source Type: forums

Usmle step 1 step 2 shelf exam tutor!
by skassf (Posted Wed Mar 19, 2014 9:14 pm)I'm an NYU student who scored 260+ on step 1, 260+ on step 2, and 90+ on all shelf exams. I got honors in every clinical clerkship (Internal Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Neurology, Ambulatory Care).I've been tutoring since 2002 and have worked with many different students from those who struggle to pass to those who are looking to achieve perfection. Whatever it may be that you want to achieve, I will help you develop a plan and work with you to reach your goals. I can give you all the inside details that I have picked up along to way to ac...
Source: Med Student Guide - March 19, 2014 Category: Medical Students Source Type: forums

The Good Kind of Small Talk…
“How is your daughter?” I will perkily ask my nurse, Rebecca, in the morning as I take my place in the examining room. This immediately sets forth in motion the kind of small talk that is on a doable basis for me. I sit and smile as Rebecca regales me in tales of her young daughter who is on a big Lego kick at the moment. My main duty is to act as interested as possible and respond in an appropriate manner.  I got on this tangent tonight because my father just called me and reminded me that my injection of Risperdal Consta in the ole derrière is tomorrow.  This is my father’s so-called insurance that I wil...
Source: The 4th Avenue Blues - March 19, 2014 Category: Mental Illness Authors: Andrew Quixote Source Type: blogs

Virtual Reality Forest Project Creates Novel Environment for Dementia Patients, Caretakers (VIDEO)
Video games have been used in a number of therapeutic applications, such as managing pain in burn victims and helping youngsters deal with depression. A new project in Australia is bringing together video game technology with gesture recognition and some other components to create a virtual reality interactive environment for dementia patients and their caretakers. The project is still in the development stage, and is looking for crowdsourced funds, but the video below shows off the current prototype that will eventually include a 10 m x 10 m projection screen, a touch display, and special lighting.   Project page: ...
Source: Medgadget - March 18, 2014 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: Geriatrics Psychiatry Rehab Source Type: blogs

From Drugs to Brain Training: The Future of Brain Health?
Brain Training And The End Of The Prozac Generation (Forbes): “According to the National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH), more than 57 million people, or 26% of the U.S. population suffer from some form of mental health problem. But despite the ongoing need, one can legitimately claim that research has not produced a novel neurological drug in the past 30 years. Additionally, many drugs currently on the market have been increasingly identified with negative side effects and limited efficacy…” “Are we moving into a post-pharmaceutical age in the treatment of neurological and psychiatric illness? If the flurry of ...
Source: SharpBrains - March 17, 2014 Category: Neurologists Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology brain-computer interface Brain-health brain-stimulation Brain-Training Mental-Health neurological drug Prozac Source Type: blogs

Mental Nurse Role
The primary roles of a mental health nurse is a combination of three very important areas of mental care?providing mental health care, managing coexisting physical conditions and also providing differential diagnosis and assessments of drugs that are needed to treat the illness. Most mental health nurses work in psychiatric settings; however, some mental health nurses are also providing mental health interventions in primary care situations. Mental health nurses work with adults, children, the elderly?all who suffer from various and sundry mental health conditions. Basically this kind of work involves helping people to ove...
Source: Mental Nurse - March 17, 2014 Category: Nurses Authors: Iqcguest Tags: Mental Nurse Role psychologists Source Type: blogs

In Their Shoes
There was an op-ed in the New York Times recently by the Executive Director of the Colorado Department of Corrections about the 23 hours he chose to spent in solitary confinement (ad seg, I think is what our forensic friends call it) --- see "My Night in Solitary Confinement."  In a similar experiment, psychiatrist-blogger Simple Citizen spent a day going through the motions of being a patient on a Residential Treatment Unit where he is the psychiatrist.  He details his experiences in "My Day as a Patient." I don't believe these experiences are anything like the real thing, nor do I believe they are meant to...
Source: Shrink Rap - March 17, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Aks or Ask
"Aks" is a perfectly legitimate variant of "ask" that's been part of English for nearly 800 years. From the romance King Horn (c. 1250): He axede what hi soghte Other to londe broghte. (Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans)
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - March 15, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

The Hunger Fix: Managing Your Addiction to Food
There’s a scene in an episode of “Sex and the City,” where Miranda Hobbes has shamelessly salvaged a cupcake from the trash and, half of the thing in her mouth, leaves a voicemail with Carrie admitting her weak moment in case her friend needs that evidence when she admits her into the Betty Ford clinic. Katie Couric played the clip before introducing her guest, Dr. Pam Peeke, internationally recognized expert, physician, and author in the fields of nutrition, stress, fitness, and public health, on the “Katie” show. Peeke’s latest book, The Hunger Fix (a New York Times bestseller), lays out the science to prove...
Source: World of Psychology - March 14, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Addiction Disorders Eating Disorders General Research Substance Abuse Crack Cocaine Dopamine Dr. Pam Peeke Drug Addiction Food Addiction Genetics health Katie Couric Miranda Hobbes Nutrition Source Type: blogs

All About Weight
I started feeling very frustrated yesterday. I felt like no one really listened to me and it hurt my feelings although now looking back, it's not really true, yet my feelings were so hurt. I don't think I've been as nice to Mark and giving him a hard time for things he doesn't deserve. When I feel so frustrated, I actually do know that what I feel is way overblown and not rational, yet the fact that I do know this does not change the way I feel and the incredible urge to lash out.I'm pretty sure I know what is causing this. I didn't feel this way at all until yesterday, and coincidentally just three days ago I started taki...
Source: bipolar.and.me - March 14, 2014 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

Stanford Study Provides False Hope For Many Parents, Misrepresents Autism Disorders By Excluding Subjects With Intellectual Disability
A Stanford study which excluded autistic subjects with intellectual disability is being used to spread the false notion that autism is not a disability ... just a difference. This misrepresentation of autism disorders appears in the August 16, 2013 San Jose Mercury News (I added the underlining, HLD):"Autistic kids with math abilities show different brain patternsBy Lisa M. Kriegerlkrieger@mercurynews.com"Stanford researchers have unearthed clues about the formidable brains of some autistic children, suggesting that the diagnosis may signal a different cognitive style, not disability. Superior math skills were found i...
Source: Facing Autism in New Brunswick - March 12, 2014 Category: Autism Authors: H L Doherty Source Type: blogs

DHHS Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Program Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2013
The U.S. recovered $4 billion last year through healthcare fraud prevention and enforcement efforts, according to a report released by Attorney General Eric Holder and Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. The report says that the Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Act (HCFAC) recovered more than $8 for every $1 it spent on healthcare fraud investigations over the last three years, the best ratio in the 17-year history of the program. See some of our other health care fraud coverage here. As reported, highlights include: DOJ opened 1,013 new criminal health care fraud investigations involving ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - March 12, 2014 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Pardon the Interruption
I've mentioned it before, but Clink and I are working on a new book.  Today, it the book-to-be is titled is "Committed: The Battle Over Forced Psychiatric Care."  I've started the process of meeting with people, interviewing, shadowing -- it's my mid-career crisis of being part-Shrink/ part-journalist.  Blogging, in the coming months, may be a bit less frequent, and may be more focused on involuntary treatments, because that's what I've been thinking about.  So for yesterday's headlines here in Maryland, do read "Legislation Pushes Involuntary Mental Health Treatment" from yesterday's Baltimore Sun...
Source: Shrink Rap - March 12, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Dinah Source Type: blogs

Alcohol - A Blessing and A Curse
I did it *again*!  I think it's been less than a year since last time.  We went to a really nice dinner with four other couples that are Mark's friends from work, and I was having a BLAST!  Everyone was talking, in a great mood, laughing, it was just awesome.  Plus - I'm not around people very often and I'm an over extravert, so being around people energizes me, opposed to introverts who need to rest after socialization.But here is the problem.  I have practically zero tolerance to alcohol.  I can drink light beer or perhaps two glasses of wine, and that is where I should stop.  I'm ...
Source: bipolar.and.me - March 11, 2014 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

7 Tips for Authentic Engagement in an Online Support Community
Online support communities offer patients, people, caregivers, family members, and even professionals the opportunity to engage with one another in an environment designed to encourage discussion. Not only do people engage in emotional support and discussions, but they also exchange valuable information about their own research, experiences, and techniques that work for them. Support communities are so much more than a simple social group with a shared purpose. They serve as a lifeline to a person in crisis or need, and the newly-diagnosed who is scared their life may never be the same. So how do you authentically engage i...
Source: World of Psychology - March 11, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Disorders General Health-related Policy and Advocacy Psychology Self-Help Technology Emotional Support Online Support Group social network Social Networking support community Virtual Community Source Type: blogs

Ten Extra Seconds Would Have Saved True Detective's Finale
what could it mean? (Source: The Last Psychiatrist)
Source: The Last Psychiatrist - March 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Let’s do something about teen stress
Adults are the ones who are supposed to be stressed, not kids. Childhood is supposed to be the stress-free part of life, right? Well, maybe not. At least not for teens. According to a recently released survey from the American Psychological Association, teens are actually more stressed than their parents. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 10, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Shopping for a Good Therapist? 4 Questions You Must Ask
Finding the right therapist is right up there with finding the right spouse when it comes to securing happiness and serenity. And while friends and siblings can help you screen candidates for a permanent place at the Thanksgiving table, you’re left solo when recruiting a therapist. Marriage and family therapist Ilyana Romanovsky offers four helpful questions to start with in her book, Choosing Therapy: A Guide to Getting What You Need. It may be helpful to keep these in mind when shopping for a therapist… 1. How do you stay current in the latest research? Therapists are obligated to attend a number of workshops a...
Source: World of Psychology - March 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Caregivers Disorders General Psychotherapy Research Self-Help Treatment Family therapy Find A Therapist finding a good therapist Mental Health Professional Psychiatry Psychology shopping therapist Source Type: blogs

Why We Shouldn’t Focus on Developing Alzheimer’s Treatments
Recently, The New York Times announced the creation of a partnership between the National Institutes of Health, 10 pharmaceutical companies and seven nonprofit organizations dedicated to the development of drugs to treat, among other things, Alzheimer’s disease. While at first blush, this five-year, $230 million effort may seem noble, the ultimate motivation for this seemingly ecumenical event is suspect. Alzheimer’s disease affects some 5.4 million Americans, and according to a recent report from the RAND Corporation, costs Americans in the neighborhood of $200 billion each year to care for those afflicted. To context...
Source: Renegade Neurologist - A Blog by David Perlmutter, MD, FACN - March 10, 2014 Category: Neurologists Authors: gbadmin Tags: Science Alzheimer’s fat FDA Memantine NIH olive oil Vitamin E Source Type: blogs

Sacred Longing: The Wisdom of Embracing Our Desires
Many of us grew up in religions that warned about the perils of desire. Greed and gluttony are two of the seven deadly sins that imperil our soul. Buddhism, which many view as a psychology more than a religion, is often understood as teaching that desire is the root cause of suffering; the path toward liberation is one of freeing ourselves from its seductive grip. No doubt, our desires and longings have brought a heap of trouble with them. But an open question remains: is suffering created by desire itself or how we relate to it? Perhaps it is how we engage with desire — or fail to engage with it in a wise and skillful w...
Source: World of Psychology - March 9, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John Amodeo, PhD Tags: General Happiness Psychology Relationships Spirituality Attachment Theory Buddhism Immune System John Bowlby Love Mark Epstein Seven deadly sins Tara Brach Source Type: blogs

True Detective's Detective
taking part in a particular pleasure (Source: The Last Psychiatrist)
Source: The Last Psychiatrist - March 8, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

5 Essential Remedies for Treating Depression: Coming Back from the Brink
Graeme Cowan suffered through a five-year episode of depression that his psychiatrist described as the worst he has ever treated. Part of his recovery involves helping people build their resilience and mental fitness as the Director of R U OK? In his book, Back From the Brink: True Stories and Practical Help for Overcoming Depression and Bipolar Disorder, he offers advice gleaned from interviews with 4,064 people who live with mood disorders. He asked the respondents to rate the treatments they had tried and how much each had contributed to their recovery. Here’s what he found. The following were the top eleven mos...
Source: World of Psychology - March 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Bipolar Depression Disorders Family Friends General Medications Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Research Self-Help Treatment Bipolar Disorder Clinical Psychology C Source Type: blogs

Simple Enough Goals You Would Think
I just got over being sick, or at least am much better. Stupid asthma and bronchitis! My doctor put me on prednisone, a steroid. All the side effects he said I would have, it turned out to be completely opposite. He said I would feel cranked up, but I felt extremely weak. Not cranky like he said, but a bit more aggressive than normal. And these weird hot flash sensations. Not looking forward to menopause, that was uncomfortable!My mood seems to be better. I took myself down from 80mg of Latuda to 40 because I was wondering if that had increased my appetite so drastically. I have probably gained 15-20 pounds now and really,...
Source: bipolar.and.me - March 7, 2014 Category: Mental Illness Source Type: blogs

SunSprite Hopes to Help You Get Enough Sun
Researchers have been using light monitors for decades to study everything from how the body adapts to changing sleep schedules to what effect light has on our mood, sleep, and overall health. A lot of this knowledge could be made more useful if people knew what their personal exposure to light is. SunSprite, a new device that is scheduled to come out in a few months thanks to Indiegogo crowdsource funding, is designed to monitor and record your daily exposure to light. It clips on to your shirt, purse, or dress, and uses a solar panel to measure brightness. The same panel generates the electric power needed to run the Sun...
Source: Medgadget - March 6, 2014 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Editors Tags: OTC Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Thriving with Mental Illness: Q&A with Susannah Bortner
Here’s a message we don’t hear nearly enough: Even though living with mental illness is hard — really hard — many people are successfully managing their conditions and savoring satisfying, healthy lives. Here’s another message we need to hear more: How they do it. That’s why we’ve created this new interview series. It debuted last month with Elaina J. Martin, who writes the popular Psych Central blog Being Beautifully Bipolar. This month we’re honored to talk to Susannah Bortner, a mom, writer, early education teacher and amateur baker living in Brooklyn, N.Y. Below, Bortner, who has panic d...
Source: World of Psychology - March 5, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Anxiety and Panic Disorders General Interview Mental Health and Wellness Psychotherapy Treatment Advocacy Mental Disorder Mental Illness Panic Attack Panic Disorder Suicide Susannah Bortner thriving with mental illness Source Type: blogs

ADHD and the value of uncertainty
A recent article in the New Republic, provocatively titled “ADHD Does Not Exist,” starts out well enough. The author, a psychiatrist with “over 50 years experience” points to the fact that ADHD describes a collection of symptoms, rather than their underlying cause. Using stimulants to control these symptoms, he argues, is analogous to prescribing pain medication for cardiac chest pain rather than addressing the underlying circulatory problem. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 5, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions ADHD Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Warning about Ketamine in the American Journal of Psychiatry
The dissociative anesthetic and ravey club drug ketamine has been hailed as a possible “miracle” cure for depression. In contrast to the delayed action of standard antidepressants such as SSRIs, the uplifting effects of Special K are noticeable within an hour. “Experimental Medication Kicks Depression in Hours Instead of Weeks,” says the National Institute of Mental Health. NIMH has been bullish on ketamine for years now. Prominent researchers Duman and Aghajanian called it the “the most important discovery in half a century” in a recent Science review.But in 2010, I pondered whether this use of ketamine...
Source: The Neurocritic - March 5, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite — 03-04-2014
Science reporter Miles O’Brien suffers a freak accident while packing equipment after a reporting trip. Case falls onto his arm and causes bruise/injury. The following day, pain and swelling in his arm got worse. The day after that, he was being rushed to the operating room for compartment syndrome. His blood pressure dropped during surgery and the surgeon had to amputate his arm. Best wishes for a speedy recovery, Miles. Patients who have had strokes are 50% more likely to have iron deficiency anemia as are control populations. Authors suggest a couple of possible mechanisms for the correlation including decreased o...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - March 4, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

Primary Day tomorrow
I have been so busy.I am inclined to vote for Corona and David Dewhurst and am surprised the Morning News didn't endorse Dewhurst. Inclined to go with them on the other candidates but given we disagree on the latter may defer. (Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans)
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - March 4, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs

Should You Consider Medication in the Treatment of ADHD?
There are many treatment options available for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Sadly, most people turn to their general family physician or pediatrician to discuss these options — well-meaning medical professionals who can prescribe a quick ADHD medication to help. Increasingly, some people and doctors seem reluctant to prescribe an ADHD medication, due to misunderstandings about their use (and abuse) by some patients. That’s why it was a breath of fresh air to come across a blog entry that examined the issue from one doctor’s perspective. The question is more nuanced than it might fir...
Source: World of Psychology - March 3, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: ADHD and ADD Disorders General Medications Psychotherapy Stimulants Treatment Attention Deficit Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Iris Lesser Medications For Adhd treatment of ADHD Source Type: blogs

9 Habits of Highly Effective Psychiatrists
Having seen a half dozen psychiatrists in town, I can appreciate the differences in bedside manners, communication styles, and psychiatric strategies. I also know what makes a person a good psychiatrist, a mediocre one, and one that should have been held back in medical school, without a license to dole out antipsychotics and other powerful drugs to vulnerable patients. Here are a few things I look for in a doctor, qualities that set them apart from your average psychiatrist. 1. Possesses some humility. Nothing is more dangerous than a doctor who thinks he holds the secret to your mental health, who is convinced he is ...
Source: World of Psychology - March 3, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Caregivers General Psychiatry Treatment Clinical Psychology Doctor Patient Relationship Hypothyroidism Hypovitaminosis D Mental Health Professional Physical Therapy Physician Psychiatrist Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, March 3, 2014
From MedPage Today: 5 Ways Doctors Can Use Data Analytics. Reimbursements are increasingly linked to quality and value metrics, but providers often don’t have the best tools to handle that transition. Killing Pain: Script by Script. Primary care doctors wrote about 53 million benzodiazepine prescriptions in 2013, roughly four times the number written by psychiatrists, a group that penned 13 million benzo scripts. New Food Labels Target Sugar and Serving Size. FDA plans to roll out new nutrition labels and this time the emphasis is not only on calories, but also on serving size and sugar. 4 Things to Know About Heal...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 3, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Health IT Medications Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Why we need to break the silence on eating disorders
Over the course of medical school, you are expected to get comfortable with a whole host of expensive-sounding equipment (see: popsicle stick becomes tongue depressor). You sling a stethoscope around your neck, maybe tuck a reflex hammer in your white coat pocket, and begin that privileged journey of looking for things that don’t sound or sit quite right. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 2, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

5 Difficult Workplace Types & How to Get Them to Cooperate
The workplace is filled with difficult personalities — bullies, know-it-alls, rumor mongers… Our fallback reaction when faced with problem people at work is to either assert ourselves or walk swiftly in the other direction. But there’s a middle ground, a way of communicating that’s more effective, because it’s not rigid or oppositional. It’s about being fluid, surrendering to your intuition, and letting go of your need to push back or control the outcome. Your ability to go with the flow is really important when dealing with difficult people. In my new book Ecstasy of Surrender, I descri...
Source: World of Psychology - March 2, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Judith Orloff, MD Tags: General Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Self-Help Stress Success & Achievement bullying Career Colleagues Coworkers Empathy Employment Judith Orloff MD Narcissism work issues workplace issu Source Type: blogs

Mental health units ‘are heading for a Mid Staffs scandal’, warns senior psychiatrist
http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/mar/02/sue-bailey-mental-health-staffsFiled under: Mental Health, The News & Policies. (Source: Dawn Willis sharing the News and Views of the Mentally Wealthy)
Source: Dawn Willis sharing the News and Views of the Mentally Wealthy - March 2, 2014 Category: Mental Illness Authors: Quinonostante Tags: Mental Health, The News & Policies. Source Type: blogs

The limits of child psychiatry
Originally posted on The Not So Big Society: This morning I read an article which I mostly agreed with, but contained a brief snippet that irritated me. Sean Duggan in the Guardian rightly points out that mental health services are suffering from a crisis of under-investment. It’s all very well for politicians to talk about “parity of esteem” for mental health with physical health, but that simply isn’t translating into services on the ground. Services are being slashed to the bone, with vulnerable people being left to sink or swim, and sadly, too many them sink and drown. Duggan is entirely correct to say that...
Source: Dawn Willis sharing the News and Views of the Mentally Wealthy - March 2, 2014 Category: Mental Illness Authors: Quinonostante Tags: Mental Health, The News & Policies. Source Type: blogs

How Does Low Self-Esteem Negatively Affect You?
We live in a world where there is an epidemic of low self-esteem. It affects almost every aspect of our lives, from how we think about ourselves to the way we think about or react to life situations. When negative influences and thoughts are prevalent — generated either from within ourselves or through others — it adversely affects the way we feel about ourselves. It also affects the experiences we have in our lives. Over time this can lead to low self-esteem which can reduce the quality of a person’s life in many different ways. Unchecked, low self-esteem may even lead to mental health issues such as anxiet...
Source: World of Psychology - March 1, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Elizabeth Venzin Tags: General Happiness LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Self-Esteem abuse Low Self Esteem Self-Help Stress Source Type: blogs

Who Can Know How Much Randi Zuckerberg Is Worth?
cue hatred (Source: The Last Psychiatrist)
Source: The Last Psychiatrist - March 1, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Tags: Narcissism Source Type: blogs

A Call To Rein In Phase III Trials
Here's a very nice perspective on what gets funded in drug research and why. Robert Kocher and Bryan Roberts bring their venture-capital viewpoint (Venrock) to the readers of the NEJM: It is not mysterious why projects get funded. As venture-capital investors, we evaluate projects along four primary dimensions: development costs, selling costs, differentiation of the drug relative to current treatments, and incidence and prevalence of the targeted disease (see table). For a project to be attractive, it needs to be favorably reviewed on at least two of these dimensions. Many drugs designed for orphan diseases and cancers a...
Source: In the Pipeline - February 28, 2014 Category: Chemists Tags: Clinical Trials Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, February 28, 2014
From MedPage Today: A Targeted Treatment for Scleroderma? A monoclonal antibody that binds to the type 1 interferon-alpha receptor showed an acceptable safety profile in a phase I trial for systemic sclerosis, but efficacy was less clear. CMS: More ‘Meaningful Use’ Exemptions Coming. Some healthcare providers struggling to meet the second stage of the incentive program for electronic health records (EHRs) may receive a bit of relief. MRSA: Physician Clean Thy Stethoscope. Stethoscopes carried more methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other bacteria after a physical exam than most areas of th...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 28, 2014 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Infectious disease Psychiatry Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

The 100 most followed psychologists and neuroscientists on Twitter
Updated for 2014, here are the 100 most followed psychologists and neuroscientists on Twitter based on follower counts recorded over the last few weeks. You can follow all 100 as a Twitter list here (thanks @psychoBoBlogy). If we've missed anyone who should be in the top 100, please let us know via comments and we'll add them in to future iterations of the list. This is an update to our July 2013 post. Check the comments to that earlier post for even more psychologists on Twitter than we were able to include here.Andrew Mendonsa. Clinical psychologist. Followers: 364822Sam Harris. Neuroscientist, author. Fol...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - February 28, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Christian Jarrett Source Type: blogs

14 Recommended Books for Psychiatry Patients
An effective psychiatrist or psychologist will own a bookshelf stocked with recommended reading for his patients.  He will have read a host of books on various topics, from sleep strategies to marital advice, so he knows what he is recommending. My psychiatrist has compiled the following list of recommended books for patients. It may be helpful to you too. 1. “A Deeper Shade of Blue” by Ruta Nonacs. Nonacs, the associate director of the Center for Women’s Mental Health at Massachusetts General Hospital and an instructor in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, offers a comprehensive guide on depression during ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 27, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Books General Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Psychiatry Psychology Relationships Self-Help An Unquiet Mind Anne Sheffield Bipolar Disorder Center for Women's Mental Health Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Colle Source Type: blogs

Interview with Dr. Szilard Voros, CEO and Co-Founder of Global Genomics Group
Dr. Szilard Voros, CEO and co-founder of Global Genomics Group (G3), is currently heading the international GLOBAL study, which will enroll up to 10,000 patients with coronary artery disease. The coronary atherosclerotic disease of each patient will be precisely phenotyped with advanced CT angiography; subsequently, each patient’s blood sample will undergo a panomic analysis that includes genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, lipidomics, lipoprotein and proteomics. The trillions of data points collected from the phenotyping and the panomic analyses will be analyzed with specially designed bioi...
Source: Medgadget - February 27, 2014 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Tom Fowler Tags: Genetics Medgadget Exclusive Source Type: blogs

The Trials of Parenting Teens with Mental Health Concerns
Perhaps the biggest problem of being a parent of an adolescent, particularly a teen that might be exhibiting symptoms of mental illness, is whether to consider your child’s behavior normal for the adolescent stage of life. For instance, your child is sleeping more than he used to. He hardly responds to your questions about his day at school, whereas he used to tell you in detail. He used to help with the yard afterschool. Now, every afternoon, he closes the door to his bedroom, hides away for hours, and remains glued to his Ipad. You begin to wonder about depression. But it’s not until you notice that his grades are dr...
Source: Mental Nurse - February 27, 2014 Category: Nurses Authors: Author123 Tags: Mental health adolescent mental illness Parenting Teens Source Type: blogs

Coping with Heightened Emotions When You Have ADHD
People with ADHD tend to have a hard time regulating their emotions. For instance, they report going from zero to 100 in just several seconds, according to Roberto Olivardia, Ph.D, a clinical psychologist and clinical instructor in the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. “They report being emotionally hypersensitive, as long as they can remember.” Their feelings also may be more intense. “[W]atching a sad movie can push them into an episode of depression or crying. A happy event can bring on almost a manic type of excitement,” said Terry Matlen, MSW, ACSW, a psychotherapist and ADHD coach. In anoth...
Source: World of Psychology - February 27, 2014 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: ADHD and ADD Disorders General Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Emotion Emotion Regulation Emotions Feeling heightened emotions Mood Roberto Olivardia Terry Matlen Source Type: blogs

ICU brain (long term cognitive defects after critical illness)
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - February 26, 2014 Category: Internists and Doctors of Medicine Tags: critical care neurology psychiatry Source Type: blogs