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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 2.

The remarkable story of a psychiatrically hospitalized clinician
I am a licensed clinical social worker. And, occasionally, a mental patient. Today, in this inpatient psychiatric unit, I am more a patient than a social worker. It is Monday morning, and I am eating breakfast across from Owen, a muscular, flannel-clad, Paul Bunyan-looking patient. Little pieces of his scrambled eggs keep landing on his copper-colored beard. I sort of want to motion with my hand at where the eggs are on his face, but I’m too tired, and I don’t really care. About anything. Owen is an odiferous, rebel-flag-t-shirt-wearing, phlegm-spitting, hairy-eared mechanic who, to be honest, would not normall...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 3, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error, Continued: A Few Words About “Harassment”
By David Tuller, DrPH David Tuller is academic coordinator of the concurrent masters degree program in public health and journalism at the University of California, Berkeley.   Last week, a commentary in Nature about the debate over data-sharing in science made some excellent points. Unfortunately, the authors lumped “hard-line opponents” of research into chronic fatigue syndrome with those who question climate change and the health effects of tobacco, among others—accusing them of engaging in “endless information requests, complaints to researchers’ universities, online harassment, distortion of scien...
Source: virology blog - February 1, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Commentary Information chronic fatigue syndrome data sharing FOI information requests mecfs myalgic encephalomyelitis PACE vexatious Source Type: blogs

“After Jesse Longoria recovered from a roadside bomb blast...
"After Jesse Longoria recovered from a roadside bomb blast that nearly killed him in Iraq, he got a job with the Wounded Warrior Project (@wwp), training #veterans to help other veterans. @tamirhasacellphone photographed Jesse, a former @marines sniper, with his 16-month-old son, Noah, for a story about how @wwp's swift rise has led to aggressive styles of fund-raising, marketing and personnel management. Insiders say the charity has also spent millions per year on itself. In 2012, after Jesse had been working at @wwp for about a year, he had to have his right arm amputated and later checked himself into suicide watch at a...
Source: Kidney Notes - January 28, 2016 Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Joshua Schwimmer Source Type: blogs

Depressiegala - Depression gala
I saw about this in De Volkskrant recently, and I thought was such a good idea I would share it here.Het Depressiegala took place on "Blue Monday", 25th January, in the Theater Amsterdam, to raise awareness of depression and raise funds at the same time.  An initiative of two psychiatrists, Esther van Fenema and Bram Bakker, the gala featured singers, journalists, writers, presenters, comedians.  One was the writer Marjolijn van Kooten, who has written of personal mental health experiences, and has appeared with Bram Bakker.  Also there was Edith Schippers, Minister of Health, Welfare and Sport.The site has ...
Source: Browsing - January 27, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: depression Source Type: blogs

Genetic Associations Between Determinants of Intelligence and Determinants of Longevity
There is a well known association between intelligence and life expectancy, part of a web of related correlations that include wealth, social status, networks of relationships, and education, among others. In the case of intelligence, there is the intriguing possibility that genetics plays a significant role in this statistical relationship with longevity, and effects on life span are not just the results of a greater capability to succeed in obtaining wealth, status, and a consequently better usage of medical technology, for example. This paper points out that some of the same genetic variants influence determinants of bo...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 27, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Brain Drain
I find it incredible that, buried in the common advice to consume more “healthy whole grains,” is advice to consume what is, in effect, a mind-active drug. Wheat and grain consumption have very real effects on the brain, thinking, and emotions, some of which are reversible, some of which are permanent. Many of the effects are due to the gliadin protein of wheat, rye, and barley. Dr. Alessio Fasano has mapped out the segments of the gliadin protein that, upon partial digestion (humans are incapable of complete digestion of this grass protein) yield the following peptides (protein fragments): Red = direct cytotox...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 26, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat-Free Lifestyle adhd appetite bipolar Depression emotions gluten grains mind opiates schizophrenia Source Type: blogs

Jama jumps the shark
JAMA JUMPS THE SHARKMedical journals are supposed to promote professional values – scientific, social, and ethical. Quality matters, in each of these domains. Lately, however, highly ranked journals are failing in respect of ethics commentaries. Some editors seem happy to publicize or even to co-author commentaries that are dismissive of current ethics initiatives – like transparency of data reporting and disclosure of conflicts of interest (COI). That’s one way for journals to jump the shark in the race for ratings. They surely get attention and applause in some quarters – but those stunts are net negatives for th...
Source: Health Care Renewal - January 25, 2016 Category: Health Management Tags: Anne Cappola Bernard Carroll conflict of interest conflict of interest blog confluence of interest Garret FitzGerald JAMA Source Type: blogs

How this doctor beat burnout. You can, too.
2015 was a year to regroup and reassess my professional goals.  Immediately after residency, I did as most physicians do — apply and hope to get a job that pays well and is in a good location.  Similar to the personalities of most physicians, I am a workaholic and overachiever.  Therefore, since graduating residency, I strove to perform well at my job, treated my patients to the best of my ability, passed my psychiatry board exams, in addition to participating in extra professional activities on the side (gave psychiatry talks, restarted blogging again, enrolled in a psychoanalytic course, etc.) while attempt...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 23, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

A hypocrite in a coffee shop
The woman in ill fitting snow pants and parka, as if there is such a thing as well-fitting snow pants and parka, clumps of blonde stuck-together hair poking out of her non-hipster cap, you know exactly what she looks like, stares at me from the sagging mid-century couch across the alcove in the café where I have set up my laptop, a scone, a huge cup of expensive coffee described as “an approachable blend with toffee undertones” and have nothing to be responsible for for the next two and one half hours except a new writing project. These are rare moments of fallow field that we creative types crave like a low level cra...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 22, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Patient Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error, Continued: More Nonsense from The Lancet Psychiatry
By David Tuller, DrPH David Tuller is academic coordinator of the concurrent masters degree program in public health and journalism at the University of California, Berkeley.   The PACE authors have long demonstrated great facility in evading questions they don’t want to answer. They did this in their response to correspondence about the original 2011 Lancet paper. They did it again in the correspondence about the 2013 recovery paper, and in their response to my Virology Blog series. Now they have done it in their answer to critics of their most recent paper on follow-up data, published last October in The Lancet ...
Source: virology blog - January 19, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Commentary Information chronic fatigue syndrome GET graded exercise therapy Lancet mecfs Michael Sharpe myalgic encephalomyelitis PACE trial Source Type: blogs

A daily decision to prioritize my patients over my notes
It’s been a long day in the psychiatry clinic. Seeing patients is never dull, and each interaction is meaningful in its own way. From the moment they walk into my office to the moment they leave, I try my best to be fully present with the patients sitting in front of me. That means listening to every word, watching every nuance of body language, hearing every concern — both spoken and unspoken. It means bearing their grief as they tell me about the father they’re losing to cancer, their pain as they suffer through profound bouts of depression and their agony as they recall their nightmares of childhood trauma. It...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 16, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Health IT Source Type: blogs

Diversionary Tactic
Rita Rubin, in the new JAMA, discusses the relationship between mental health treatment and gun violence. Since we can't seem to get any policies implemented that will actually reduce gun violence, it's fashionable for politicians to use the problem as an argument for improving accessibility of behavioral health services.I am reluctant to be contrarian about this because I'm all for getting people the help they need. However, this is an excellent example of the way cognitive biases distort our politics. While it is true that mass shooters -- like the perpetrators of the attack on Gabby Giffords and the Aurora, Colorado mov...
Source: Stayin' Alive - January 12, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

CMS’ Standardized Plan Option Could Reduce Discrimination
The objective is to make sure shoppers can compare plans on premiums and provider networks, knowing that the rest of the benefit design has largely identical cost-sharing requirements. It has become clear that failing to standardize all benefits could allow insurers to set cost-sharing amounts that discourage enrollment by those with certain chronic diseases. Promoting Standardization Standardized options appear to be an excellent way to ease health plan decisions and reduce or eliminate discriminatory benefit designs. The adoption of such plans should be encouraged to improve choices for consumers. One option would be a r...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - January 6, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Douglas Jacobs Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Equity and Disparities Featured Payment Policy Quality Adverse Tiering CMS Essential Health Benefits HIV/AIDS Massachusetts New York States Source Type: blogs

Farewell
In his farewell post, Dr. Insel looks back at six years of the director’s blog and reflects on the tasks ahead in mental health research and practice. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

New hope for treating psychosis
Results from a major NIMH project provide evidence that coordinated specialty care can improve outcomes for first episode psychosis. Dr. Insel blogs about the RAISE project and other recent studies of coordinated care. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Look who is getting into mental health research
Tech companies are bringing their ability to extract knowledge from data to health care. Dr. Insel gives some examples that show the potential of new tech-based approaches to diagnosis and treatment. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

August at NIMH
Despite its reputation as a month for slowing down, August is busy at NIMH as the end of the fiscal year approaches. Dr. Insel takes time out to give an update on NIMH-supported clinical trials. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

The Brain’s Critical Balance
The BRAIN Initiative is supporting scientists aiming to understand how the 86 billion neurons in the brain act together to enable consciousness and behavior. Dr. Insel gives a snapshot of recent work and its implications for understanding normal and disordered brain function. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Quality Counts
The Institute of Medicine has issued a report looking at the effectiveness of psychosocial treatments for mental disorders. Dr. Insel blogs about the need to ensure that consumers needing treatment receive evidence-based therapies. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Viewing the STARRS Data
Last week, two important research events unfolded without fanfare and without headlines. June 30 marked the end of the first phase of Army STARRS, the largest study of mental health risk and resilience ever conducted among military personnel. July 1 marked the release of Army STARRS data for use by the broad scientific community. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Accentuate the Positive: Rhythm and Blues
Researchers were able to reverse some of the behavioral effects of stress in mice by stimulating brain cells activated by pleasure. Dr. Insel describes the work and its implications for understanding depression. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Early BRAIN Breakthroughs
Dr. Insel blogs about recent breakthroughs from the BRAIN Initiative, which show the promise of what we can accomplish with investment focused on new tool development to better understand and treat brain disorders. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Something Interesting is Happening
Dr. Insel discusses how the Precision Medicine Initiative will create a new kind of patient-driven research, which is similar to how innovative companies have created a new share economy based on trust. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Training for the Future
Dr. Insel talks about the importance of incorporating neuroscience in the training of psychiatric residents and a new initiative to do that. The clinician of 2025 will need to know about the science of the brain. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Mental Health Awareness Month: By the Numbers
Statistics paint a picture of the impact of mental illness in the United States; Dr. Insel reviews the numbers for Mental Health Awareness Month. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Crowdsourcing RDoC
NIMH’s RDoC initiative is in keeping with current interest in precision medicine. In his latest blogpost, Dr. Insel invites the research community to engage in discussion on the RDoC online forum. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

What Caused This to Happen? – Part 2
A London neuroscientist suggests two kinds of causes for disease; Dr. Insel talks about the implications of this view for understanding mental disorders. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Targeting Suicide
Suicide only occasionally makes the national news, but it is the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S. Dr. Insel talks about the need for research targeted directly at suicide and recent efforts to raise awareness and marshal research. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

A Plan for Changing Times
NIMH’s new Strategic Plan for Research is a broad roadmap for the Institute’s priorities for the next five years; Dr. Insel provides context and an overview. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

BRAIN Awareness
March 16-22 is Brain Awareness Week, an opportunity to celebrate neuroscience. Dr. Insel talks about some exciting areas of research underway on the brain. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Transparency
Dr. Insel introduces a white paper posted on the NIMH website which provides answers to many of the most common questions NIMH receives about how it makes funding decisions. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Collaborative Care
Dr. Insel lauds University of Washington psychiatrist and researchers Wayne Katon and the collaborative care approach for depression he helped develop. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Mortality and Mental Disorders
A recent paper reports findings on the reduction in life expectancy among people with mental illness relative to the general population; Dr. Insel discusses the magnitude and reasons for this excess mortality. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Immune to Stress?
We tend to assume that the secrets to understanding individual differences in resilience to stress must be sought in the brain. Now, findings in mice suggest that the peripheral immune system might play a pivotal role. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Precision Medicine for Mental Disorders
In his latest blog, Dr. Insel discusses precision medicine, which is the new hot topic in research and what it means for mental health. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

The Ignorance Project
At the recent World Economic Forum, brain research was a hot topic; Dr. Insel reports on statistics presented at the conference that inspire optimism that progress can be made on difficult problems, including mental disorders. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Funding Science
Relative to other countries, U.S. funding of science has declined in recent years; Dr. Insel talks about the need for research and development related to mental illness. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

What Caused This to Happen?
Dr. Insel discusses the idea that chance may have as much to do with the development of mental illness as do genetic and environmental factors. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Best of 2014
Dr. Insel offers an overview of his top ten mental health stories for 2014. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Lost in Translation
Drug testing in mice has been a poor guide to effectiveness in humans; Dr. Insel talks about the need for research approaches that can more reliably guide medication development. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Can We Prevent Psychosis?
In his blog, Dr. Insel talks about on new NIMH grants that will support research on services for people of all ages with autism. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

P-Hacking
In his blog, Dr. Insel talks about on new NIMH grants that will support research on services for people of all ages with autism. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Depression, Daughters, and Cellular Aging
An early sign of depression risk may provide not only a biomarker for depression but a clue to the relationship between depression and risk for medical illnesses; Dr. Insel blogs. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Don’t poop where you eat: Mental health services for young physicians
Imagine you are an ambitious new worker at a powerhouse institution. Your job performance is soaring, but you frankly work like a dog. Your weeks top out at 80 hours, you get maybe a single 24-hour block of time off every 7 days, you work weekends, and you often work up to 30 hours straight in one stint, sleep at work, and eat exclusively from food options in the building. You rarely see the sun, your mother currently has to take care of your cat for you, and you are home so infrequently you cancelled your Internet and cable. You start doing too many drugs to stay awake, drinking too much alcohol to try to sleep afterwards...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 27, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

When “healing” loses its meaning: A cynical medical resident meets Patch Adams
The afternoon began like any other day in medical school.  Students arrived at the lecture hall and took their seats.  An individual with long blue-and-white hair and handlebar mustache entered the room wearing oversized fish-print pants, a loose-fitting clown shirt, and a single earing fashioned out of a bent fork.  He casually strolled up to the front, introduced himself as Dr. Patch Adams, and told us that the next several hours would be some of the most important in all of our medical training. We learned about the Gesundheit! Institute, a community that has provided care to thousands of patients without charge for ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 27, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Psychiatry Residency Source Type: blogs

Miracle on 34th Street
We watched the 1947 version at a film night at church.  I had never seen it.  There Are many things of interest - 1940s New York, a scene in Dutch (involving a young girl who has come to New York from the Netherlands, I thought, because she had no English and I thought it was post war, for reasons related to the post war state of affairs there, but no reason is given), only one African American character (in the kitchen)...  And then there is the role of men and women - there is one very central female character, a divorcee and single parent, but the other women seem to be at home, with an allowance and havi...
Source: Browsing - December 26, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: mental health Source Type: blogs

CMS Releases Draft 2017 Letter To Issuers In The Federally Facilitated Marketplaces
Implementing Health Reform. On December 23, 2017, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released its draft 2017 Letter to Issuers in the Federally Facilitated Marketplaces (FFMs). CMS also released a draft bulletin on the timing of rate filing submissions and rate filings for January 1, 2017 non-grandfathered individual and small group plans and a table of key dates for qualified health plan (QHP) certification, rate review, risk adjustment, and reinsurance for 2017. The Draft Letter To Issuers CMS issues a draft letter to FFM insurers (the “draft letter”) late each year following the release of its pro...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - December 24, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Timothy Jost Tags: Following the ACA Medicaid and CHIP Medicare Payment Policy cost-sharing reductions essential community providers Essential Health Benefits Federally Facilitated Marketplace Provider Participation Rate QHPs SHOP exchanges Source Type: blogs

How Managerialists Turned Housestaff Training into a Zero-Sum Game: the Continuing Saga of the FIRST and iCompare Studies
Conclusion: the Problem is Managerialism    While the ongoing trials of housestaff sleep deprivation have been largely anechoic, the recent Washington Post commentary by Clark and Harari make questions about why in the world medical academics would have set up such trials and continue to defend them even more stark.But it seems that medical academics are boxed in, playing a zero-sum game.  They may know that there housestaff are overworked and sleep deprived, a situation that endangers the housestaff and their patients.  Yet every reasonable way one could imagined improving the situation would require s...
Source: Health Care Renewal - December 22, 2015 Category: Health Management Tags: academic medical centers amphetamines clinical trials generic managers managerialism medical ethics post-graduate medical education resident sleep deprivation Source Type: blogs