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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 2.

What is mental illness? Words matter.
I’ve been invited to speak to a group of attorneys who work at the interface of psychiatry and the law. The topic of my talk? “Psychiatry 101.” A psychiatrist who gave this talk to a similar group a few years ago advised me: “You should assume that lawyers are laymen. It’s surprising how little they know, given the work that they do.” This teaching opportunity to teach has given me pause: What is mental illness? Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 25, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The Unbefriended – NYC HHC Annual John Corser Ethics Conference
Conclusion and Attendee Evaluation (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 25, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope Tags: Health Care medical futility blog syndicated Source Type: blogs

Integrating Behavioral Medicine Into Primary Care GME: A Necessary Paradigm For 21st Century Ambulatory Practice
Limited access to child and adolescent, adult, and geriatric psychiatry, as well as other mental health providers, has a large impact on the capacity of our health care system to address mental health needs, particularly in underserved urban and rural areas. A major determinant of this limited access is an under-supply of mental health providers. The recently developed Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education (THCGME) program provides a promising resource to address this problem because of its unique educational setting, which could facilitate integration of behavioral medicine into primary care graduate medical e...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 24, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Alan Axelson Tags: Health Policy Lab Health Professionals Organization and Delivery Population Health Behavioral Health GME Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Teaching Health Centers: Targeted Expansion For Immediate GME Reform
We describe examples of current or proposed programs which illustrate the potential of these modifications. Need for Immediate Targeted GME Expansion in Primary Care There is broad agreement on the need for adequate numbers of physicians prepared to work in primary care, geriatrics and psychiatry in urban and rural underserved areas. A 12,000-31,000 shortage over current primary care physician supply in the next ten years is anticipated, depending on modeling considerations such as physician retirement rates and entrance of advanced practice nurses to take up some of the duties physicians currently perform. Regional and st...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 24, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Richard Rieselbach Tags: Costs and Spending Health Policy Lab Health Professionals Organization and Delivery Graduate medical education teaching health centers THCGME Source Type: blogs

Law, Religion, and Health in America
Discussion E. J. Dionne, Jr., Columnist, The Washington Post; Senior Fellow, The Brookings Institution Diane L. Moore, Senior Lecturer on Religious Studies and Education and Senior Fellow at the Center for the Study of World Religions, Harvard Divinity School Charles Fried, Beneficial Professor of Law, Harvard Law School Frank Wolf, Representative, Virginia’s 10th Congressional District, U.S. House of Representatives, 1981-2015 (retired) Moderator: Daniel Carpenter, Freed Professor of Government, Harvard University and Director, Center for American Political Studies at Harvard University&...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 24, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope Tags: Health Care medical futility blog syndicated Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 080
This study calls into question the current guidelines and will hopefully lead to more evidence-based recommendations in the future.Recommended by: Zack RepanshekRead More: Antibiotics for community-acquired pneumonia: Is azithromycin out? (Pulm CCM)The Best of the RestOphthalmology, Ultrasound Vrablik ME et al. The diagnostic accuracy of bedside ocular ultrasonography for the diagnosis of retinal detachment: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Ann Emerg Med 2015; 65(2):199-203. PMID: 24680547Nice meta-analysis of bedside US for retinal detachment in Annals of EM showing 97-100% sensitivity, 83-100% specificity, based...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 23, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Anand Swaminathan Tags: Cardiology Education Emergency Medicine Infectious Disease Intensive Care Ophthalmology Psychiatry and Mental Health Resuscitation Trauma critical care R&R in the FASTLANE recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Doctor’s death an “inconvenience” for patients
An investigation is underway after a Chicago-area doctor is found dead — a suicide according to the medical examiner. What demands investigation is the callousness with which the this doctor’s death was reported by the media — and received by neighbors, many health care professionals themselves.   I’m alerted to the death initially by a Facebook friend: “Pamela, check this out!” Headline: Police: Doctor found dead near hospital in Berwyn. The facts: On Thursday, April 16, a maintenance worker calls the police to request a well-being check on a tenant, Dr. Jon Azkue, a 54-year-old physician employed...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 21, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

How far is too far? A response to Dr. Fredric Brandt’s suicide.
As someone involved in both the medical and acting world, I was tremendously saddened to read about Dr. Fredric Brandt’s recent suicide, which is presumed to be in response to an impersonation of him on the Netflix’s series, The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.  Project Casting, a website offering free casting calls and auditions, posted a link on their website asking, “Did Netflix go too far” and I was shocked by people’s comments. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 21, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The House of God brought attention to medical slang
An excerpt from The Secret Language of Doctors: Cracking the Code of Hospital Culture. When it comes to modern medical slang, there’s Before Shem and After Shem. Shem refers to Samuel Shem, the pen name of Dr. Stephen Bergman, psychiatrist and author of the blockbuster novel The House of God, which introduced millions of readers — and generations of doctors — to the argot that is the lingua franca of residents and interns then and now. I call Bergman the Slangmeister because until he arrived on the scene in 1978 with his satirical novel, little had been published about medical slang. Continue reading ... Yo...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 21, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Hospital Source Type: blogs

Can suicide be prevented?
A pilot deliberately flying a plane full of passengers into a mountain is horrific, unbelievably sad, and, thankfully, very rare. But suicide is far from rare. Tragically, those usually lonely acts of despair are rising.    But can they be prevented? Someone in this country dies by suicide every 12.8 minutes. The national suicide rate has increased to 12.6 suicide deaths per 100,000 and for ages 18 to 35 — the prime of one’s life — only unintentional injuries account for more deaths. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online rep...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 21, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain
No doubt you have heard about the physicians who wrote to Columbia University's  dean of the medical faculty demanding that the school fire Mehmet Oz. The university responded with some banalities about academic freedom.The physicians who wrote the letter seem a bit dodgy; some of them have ties to the GMO industry and the letter seemed to focus inordinately on that subject. But that's neither here nor there. The question is, should Columbia remove Oz from the faculty.Honestly, I'm of two minds about this. It is generally against my religion to see professors fired because of controversial public statements. Free inqu...
Source: Stayin' Alive - April 20, 2015 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

When relationship therapy acts as a powerful anti-depressant
Many people know what it feels like to be depressed. It’s hard to go through life without at some point experiencing that helpless/hopeless feeling. Some people, however, stay stuck in this painful state. In my family therapy practice, I frequently get calls from people seeking help for depression. Sometimes their depression is self-diagnosed, reflecting their experience of ongoing distress.  Other times they’ve been referred by their family doctor.  It’s common for depressed people to worry that  they have a “chemical imbalance”. They often feel burdened and alone, solely responsible for their mood state. Con...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 19, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Mental illness: Is it organ dysfunction like any other?
I often get referrals from the town’s free clinic.  As you would imagine, the patients often have a unique set of problems, coming as they do from the underserved segment of society. One such patient, Julia, was a fiftyish-year-old woman who had recently moved to town from California. She went to the free clinic (not really sure what the original complaint was) and ended up getting a physical exam that revealed a breast mass, which precipitated a mammogram, and then a biopsy, and a breast cancer diagnosis. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A soc...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 19, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Psychiatry Surgery Source Type: blogs

The road to health care for veterans is baroque
Read the voices of Service: this discussion  thread is a show and tell of what women veterans have to go through to get care. It also demonstrates some traits of women warriors: generosity, tenacity , wisdom , guts and extreme moxie. It is unconscionable that those who served have to come home and fight more battles. Shame on us. Alana Vollmer-Bland Question…..I have a 30% rating for PTSD from Afghanistan. I told the shrink at the VA at the beginning of the claims process and then another counselor at the VA here about the sexual assault while I was on active duty. She spent 6 weeks doing intake on me and waffled be...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - April 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Women Veterans Source Type: blogs

Reducing Inappropriate Psychotropic Prescribing For Children And Youth In Foster Care
There is currently a much-needed national spotlight on the high rates of psychotropic medication use among children and youth in foster care, most of whom receive health coverage through Medicaid. This high-risk population is far more likely to receive psychotropic medications, including antipsychotics---a class of medication with serious side effects---than the Medicaid child population overall. While there are certainly some children and youth who should receive these medications, states must have oversight and monitoring mechanisms to determine when this is---or is not---the case. Many of these children and youth exp...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 17, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Kamala Allen Tags: Equity and Disparities Medicaid and CHIP Access Children drugs foster care Pharma Source Type: blogs

Should there be zero tolerance for depression in the cockpit?
The recent Germanwings tragedy has called commercial aviation’s concept of fitness for flight into question.  Although the official mishap investigation has not yet concluded, available information at the time of this writing points to an intentional crashing of the plane by the 27-year-old co-pilot, Andreas Lubitz. Reports from the co-pilot’s medical records allege he had previously experienced episodes of depression and carried diagnoses for other psychosomatic disorders.  Antidepressants and torn medical memorandums stating that he was not fit for flight were apparently found at the home of Lubitz by invest...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 16, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Update Satellite – 04-15-2015
You’ve heard of a CAT scan? Get ready for the dog sniff. Dogs can identify bladder and prostate cancer with a 98% accuracy rate when smelling male urine samples. Not into the whole dog sniffing thing as a screen for prostate cancer? A $1 screening test using gold nanoparticles 10,000 times smaller than a freckle is more accurate than PSA screenings and gives results in minutes. When blood is mixed with the nanoparticles, tumor biomarkers cling to the surface and cause clumping. I’m guessing the test will cost consumers several hundred dollars. Doctors are using scorpion venom to create “tumor paint”...
Source: WhiteCoat's Call Room - April 16, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WhiteCoat Tags: Healthcare Update Source Type: blogs

A psychiatrist.  Undercover. 
My husband was in the aisle seat, I was in the middle seat, and The Man was in the window seat. The Man had one white earbud in his ear; the other one was dangling in his lap. His right thumb swiped through several screens of his smartphone in less than a second. He heaved a sigh. “This is f*cking lame,” he muttered. The plane was supposed to take off 15 minutes ago. At that time, the captain had announced that the plane had technical difficulties, but he anticipated that we would be up in the air soon. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social me...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 13, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

ED Syncope Workup: After H and P, ECG is the Only Test Required for Every Patient.....
Conclusions: Many unnecessary tests are obtained to evaluate syncope. Selecting tests based on history and examination and prioritizing less expensive and higher yield tests would ensure a more informed and cost-effective approach to evaluating older patients with syncope._____________________________________________________________________________4)    Reed MJ.  The ROSE (Risk Stratification of syncope in the emergency department) Study.  J Am Coll Cardiol, 2010; 55:713-721, doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2009.09.049  Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop and validate a clinical deci...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - April 8, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Emergency Department Syncope Workup: After H and P, ECG is the Only Test Required for Every Patient.....
Conclusions: Many unnecessary tests are obtained to evaluate syncope. Selecting tests based on history and examination and prioritizing less expensive and higher yield tests would ensure a more informed and cost-effective approach to evaluating older patients with syncope._____________________________________________________________________________4)    Reed MJ.  The ROSE (Risk Stratification of syncope in the emergency department) Study.  J Am Coll Cardiol, 2010; 55:713-721, doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2009.09.049  Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop and validate a clinical deci...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - April 8, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Targeting Suicide
The recent tragedy with the Germanwings crash in the Alps has started a worldwide discussion about mental illness and suicide. We don’t yet know what happened on this flight and we certainly don’t have access to the medical history of the copilot who is now the focus of the investigation, but this heartbreaking news from France, and the debate that it has spawned, illustrates the difficulties of understanding suicidal behavior, much less predicting it. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - April 3, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Binge eating disorder: Real or disease mongering?
A drug company recently received FDA approval to peddle its speed-like pill for “binge eating disorder” (the very same pill that is already widely overused for ADHD). And it is sparing no expense pushing the drug — a former world tennis champ is the shill and commercials are everywhere. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 2, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Surprising no one
So I was sitting at the dining room table, feverishly always-sometimes-rarely-nevering, when Paul asked me if I wanted something to drink. "Please," I said distractedly, gesturing over into the kitchen. "I already have one started." I meant the half-finished cup of coffee right there on the counter, but bless that man: instead he brought a half-finished bottle of wine. ... The pediatrician had been kind of tenacious about it. "Have you had Charlie evaluated?" Yes, but the verdict was inconclusive. "Have you had him evaluated recently?" No, because we think we know, and we doubt it wi...
Source: a little pregnant - April 2, 2015 Category: Child Development Authors: Julie Tags: Charles in charge Source Type: blogs

ADHD and early death: We often miss the story
Alarming headlines, based on a recent study, declare that diagnosis with ADHD doubles the risk of early death. Psychiatrist Stephen Faraone, commenting on the original study published in the Lancet, concludes that: “for clinicians early diagnosis and treatment should become the rule rather than the exception.” This conclusion represents a false assumption that the deaths occurred in cases that were not treated. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 1, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Testifying in support of medical student mental health
The following is Dr. Pamela Wible’s testimony in support of medical student mental health to the Missouri State Legislature for House Bill 867. I’m Dr. Pamela Wible, a family physician in Oregon. I’ve submitted my CV, witness form, and transcript of my testimony to Chairman Frederick. My schedule prevents me from traveling to Missouri for today’s hearing; however, I thank Vice Chairman Morris and the Committee for allowing me to testify remotely in support of House Bill 867, legislation that would require Missouri medical schools to screen students for depression and offer mental health referrals for those at r...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 1, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Judge Dismisses Off-Label and Kickback Allegations Against Bristol-Myers Squibb, But BMS Must Face Whistleblower Retaliation Suit
District Court Judge William Bertelsman recently dismissed False Claims Act (FCA) allegations against Bristol-Myers Squibb and Otsuka Pharmaceuticals brought by two former BMS sales reps. Despite finding the whistleblowers failed to show that the company engaged in either off-label promotion or kickbacks in violation of the FCA, however, Judge Bertelsman held that the whistleblowers adequately pled wrongful retaliation claims. According to the former sales reps, they tried to bring their compliance concerns up the company chain, but were instead punished with poor performance reviews. Both employees were terminated s...
Source: Policy and Medicine - April 1, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Mental health is a basic human right to fight for
Disruptive Women is embarking on an exciting week…Tuesday we head to NYC where we will be emceeing XX in Health as their retreat takes over the boy’s club (The Harvard Club). Then on Thursday we will be talking to women in tech at MassMEDIC. So as we interact with new disruptive women this week we wanted to reflect back and run some powerful posts from the past. Be sure to check the blog all this week for some of our favorites. The following post by Dr. Agnes Binagwaho, Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Health of Rwanda, is part of Disruptive Women’s “The Value of Health: Creating Economic Security in ...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - March 31, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Mental Health Source Type: blogs

Neglecting Our Own: Well-Being Disparities in Sexual Minority Medical Students
By: Andrés F. Sciolla, MD Dr. Sciolla is an associate professor at the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of California, Davis, co-director of the Doctoring 2 course at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, and medical director of a community mental health clinic, the Northgate Point Regional Support Team, in Sacramento, California. He graduated from the University of Chile School of Medicine and is a board-certified psychiatrist. When it comes to psychological distress, individuals who aspire to a career in medicine are a queer lot. At matriculation, the average medical studen...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - March 30, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective medical student wellness psychological well-being self-rated health sexual and gender minorities Source Type: blogs

Did Andreas Lubitz Have Lyme Disease?
Although the editors of InsideSurgery.com did not participate in the care of Andreas Lubitz, we are following news reports closely. Multiple sources today are reporting that he was under continuing care of a physician who recommended that he stop flying as a commercial airline pilot for Lufthansa controlled Germanwings air service. Lubitz seems to be a well-liked, non-controversial young man from a stable upbringing who by all accounts loved being a pilot. What could have caused him to fly his airliner with another 149 people aboard to their certain annihilation into a French mountainside? One wonders what medical conditi...
Source: Inside Surgery - March 27, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Editor Tags: Infectious Disease andreas lubitz crash germanwings Lyme disease pilot Source Type: blogs

A Plan for Changing Times
When I first determined back in 2013 that it was time for NIMH to update its Strategic Plan, I envisioned a simple “tune-up” and quick turnaround. It quickly became apparent that the mental health research landscape had seen vast changes since we published our plan in 2008. Instead of a tune-up we embarked on a complete re-examination of our priorities and the scientific opportunities that challenged us to look forward into the future. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - March 27, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Two New Independent Reports on the Death of Dan Markingson, But Now What Will Happen?
This report is the first step toward accountability.'The Minnesota Post added the response of Professor Elliott and a colleague,'It’s nice to have an independent confirmation of what we’ve been telling the university for five years, but which they have refused to listen to,' he told MinnPost on Thursday.Elliott said he is not convinced, however, that Kaler and other university leaders are going to take responsibility for what happened in the Markingson case — or take the necessary steps to fix the problem going forward.'One of the most worrying findings in the report was the widespread belief on campus that the unive...
Source: Health Care Renewal - March 25, 2015 Category: Health Management Tags: anechoic effect AstraZeneca atypical anti-psychotics clinical trials conflicts of interest manipulating clinical research research subjects suppression of medical research University of Minnesota Source Type: blogs

Heal the ill but don’t hound the well
An iconoclast must not only have abundant common sense but the gift of the gab to state the obvious. Simply stating won’t do. You must rub it in. My favorite iconoclasts are Peter Skrabanek and Thomas Szasz. Skrabanek was a general practitioner who authored Death of Humane Medicine and Rise of Coercive Healthism. Szasz, a psychiatrist, who volunteered that he entered psychiatry to unveil its pseudoscience, is the Voldermort of psychiatry — he who must not be named (maybe Voldermort is the Szasz of muggles). He wrote several books including Myth of Mental Illness. Neither believed in nominative subtlety. The title o...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 25, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

One of the greatest rewards in health care
When he and I first met, he told me that he had a doctoral degree in psychology, was the CEO of the jail, and could speak 13 languages. To demonstrate, he said, “Hong tong ching chong lai tai!” He then punched the door to his cell and shouted, “GET THE F-CK OUT OF HERE, B-TCH!” I did. The next week, he answered my questions about the pencil drawings on his walls. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 24, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

A therapy program for medical students
I am wearing my favorite scrubs, the teal ones a friend gave to me while I was volunteering in the aftermath of the Haitian earthquake. My first-year classmates and I are in front of the anatomy lab, waiting to see our cadaver for the first time. Our group enters, and we stand around the blue-plastic-cloaked body for a few minutes, preparing ourselves and discussing the task at hand. My anatomy partner pulls back the sheet, and I gasp. I am back in the stifling morgue staring at Susannah again.* Bloated, cold, lifeless. Part of me knows she isn’t Susannah — but the skin is the same color; the evidence of poverty wr...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 23, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Education Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

What does it mean to live in the age of Abilify? 
I learned recently that the antipsychotic Abilify is the biggest selling prescription drug in the U.S.  To be a top seller, a drug has to be expensive and also widely used.  Abilify is both.  It’s the 14th most prescribed brand-name medication, and it retails for about $30 a pill.  Annual sales are over $7 billion, nearly a billion more than the next runner-up. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 23, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Meds Medications Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The Oklahoma University Conteoversy
Having graduated from Jesuit High School and seen my children graduate from Highland Park High School, even my limited experience assures me that there is no more a right wing group wanting to lynch black people than there is a left wing conspiracy to outlaw the NFL in favor of a national scrabble tournament. What we have is youths saying ‘bad words’ in response to the chanting of evidently ‘bad facts’ by others. The limited experience of the white youths did not let them see that the chanting of ‘bad facts’ was related to experiences which may have been true enough. But the privileged graduates also were not t...
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - March 23, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Thoughts on Leaving Private Practice
The most surprising outrageous thing involved a Brother printer. We had trouble with a network connection; so someone called the helpline. They in turn were referred to someone else who did solve the problem but 'noticed some intrusions in our computer' and scared this HIPAA sensitive staff person who asked for authorizations of $600 and $300 to clear the matter up and 'have something placed on the computer to monitor.' A complete fraud from some outfit in India as it turned out. In printers I have appreciated the speed of the HP Officejet Pro 8600 which has some good HP support tools. RxNT is an excellent eprescribing sol...
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - March 20, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Thoughts on Leaving Private Practice (Equipment and Business Methods)
The most surprising outrageous thing involved a Brother printer. We had trouble with a network connection; so someone called the helpline. They in turn were referred to someone else who did solve the problem but 'noticed some intrusions in our computer' and scared this HIPAA sensitive staff person who asked for authorizations of $600 and $300 to clear the matter up and 'have something placed on the computer to monitor.' A complete fraud from some outfit in India as it turned out. In printers I have appreciated the speed of the HP Officejet Pro 8600 which has some good HP support tools. The Samsung basic small rectangular b...
Source: a psychiatrist who learned from veterans - March 20, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

BRAIN Awareness
After what seems like an endless winter along the East Coast, we have reached what Emily Dickinson famously called the “month of expectation.” And, of course, March is also the time each year we celebrate Brain Awareness Week, the annual celebration of neuroscience with school visits, community lectures, and lab tours to talk about the brain. A list of Brain Awareness events can be found at http://www.dana.org/brainweek/ (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - March 19, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 075
This study further defends the pathway of early discharge from the ED without evocative testing in subsets of patients with low risk chest pain.Recommended by Anand SwaminathanNeurology Edwards C, et al. Residency Training: A failed lumbar puncture is more about obesity than lack of ability. Neurology 2015; 84(10):e69-72. PMID: 25754807This is an interesting article exploring the reasons for LP failure. The authors reviewed all elective LPs done by Neurology residents in a LP clinic. They recorded all the demographic of the patient and the characteristics of the proceduralist. The overall LP failure rate was 19% and it w...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 19, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeremy Fried Tags: Cardiology Emergency Medicine Infectious Disease Neurology R&R in the FASTLANE Respiratory Toxicology and Toxinology literature recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Johnson and Johnson Continues to Pay For Risperdal
In August of 2012, Johnson & Johnson paid a $181 million multi-state consumer protection settlement to resolve charges that the company marketed its antipsychotic drug Risperdal for off-label uses. In November of 2013, J&J paid $2.2 billion to resolve False Claims Act allegations related to misbranding of a number of drugs, including Risperdal. In the past month, the company faced two further blows related to Risperdal. A Philadelphia jury awarded $2.5 million to the plaintiff over J&J’s “failure to warn” about Risperdal side effects. This was the first such case to be heard by a jury, though hundreds of cases ar...
Source: Policy and Medicine - March 18, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Eulogy for the doctor
No physician, however conscientious or careful, can tell what day or hour he may not be the object of some undeserved attack, malicious accusation, blackmail or suit for damages  … “ – Assaults Upon Medical Men. Journal of the American Medical Association, 1892 It’s happened again: A well-liked doctor is killed by his patient. Last year’s horrific death of a physician in our community, a valued colleague shot in his office by a disgruntled if not deranged patient, was a shock.  The recent physician slaying at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital echoed the senselessness of such an event.  Th...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 17, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Hospital Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The Safety Nets Have Gaping Holes – Our Sewing Kit!
Anne Klee & Laurie Harkness In our country, two words that should never be spoken or written in the same sentence are Veteran and homelessness.  Yet all too frequently we hear this is the case.   Ten years ago there were estimated to be 250,000 homeless Veterans on the streets of America each night.  Today through the multi-pronged efforts of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), many state Governor’s, state agencies, and community agencies and partners, there are now less than 50,000 homeless Veterans each night.  Veterans are about 50 percent more ...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - March 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Women Veterans Source Type: blogs

Increasing Bad Press for Today's Healthcare Information Technology - Deserved and Overdue
Here are three candid, quite revealing articles about the distaste for today's health IT that appeared recently.  I will address each,The first seems like pure deja vu (see my June 4, 2009 post "If The Military Can't Get Electronic Health Records Right, Why Would We Think Conflicted EHR Companies And IT-Backwater Hospitals Can?" at http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2009/06/if-military-cant-get-electronic-health.html):1.  Forbes:  Pentagon's $11 Billion Healthcare Record System Will Be Obsolete Before It's Even Built -  March 3, 2015http://www.forbes.com/sites/lorenthompson/2015/03/03/military-healthcare-11-...
Source: Health Care Renewal - March 16, 2015 Category: Health Management Tags: forbes health affairs healthcare IT difficulties healthcare IT risks HealthcareDive.com Source Type: blogs

Should Medical Staff ‘Google’ Patients?
Note: The Bioethics Program blog will be moving to its new home on April 1, 2015. Be sure to change your bookmarks to http://bioethics.uniongraduatecollege.edu/blog/   by Brandon Hamm, Bioethics Program Alum (MSBioethics 2012) On several occasions, a new admission or psychiatric consultation has been accompanied by patient information that was “googled” by nursing or consulting practitioners. On some […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 16, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: The Bioethics Program Tags: Health Care Privacy Clinical Care paternalism syndicated Source Type: blogs

Transparency
Last week we had our annual House appropriations subcommittee hearing to discuss next year’s budget for NIH. The bipartisan enthusiasm for NIH and its mission was striking, so striking that ranking member Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) ended the hearing by suggesting a “group hug.” Amidst the rare bipartisan romance, there were a few challenging questions, including one about how NIH sets priorities. Dr. Andy Harris (R-MD), the only member of Congress who has been an NIH grantee, put it this way: “Eighty-four million Americans have heart disease, and yet the amount we spend per death is a hundred times less on heart disease t...
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - March 14, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Destruction of Lives with the Stroke of a Pen
Protect Our Defenders is a non-profit human rights organization that honors, supports and gives voice to the brave women and men in uniform who have been raped or sexually assaulted by fellow service members.  Nancy Parrish Paula Coughlin Men and women serving in our military who are raped or sexually assaulted face overwhelming obstacles in order to receive adequate health care. Instead of assuring victims that their distress about their attacks is a normal response, the Department of Defense (DoD) has a record of mistreating victims by labeling them with errant diagnoses of personality or adjustment disorders. Based on ...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - March 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Women Veterans Source Type: blogs

Depression: Why not START with a nutritional solution?
If you experience depression, you will typically be prescribed an antidepressant, an SSRI or other agent. If you consult a psychologist or counselor, the underlying psychological underpinnings (if any) are explored, strategies devised to cope. But there will almost never be talk about your diet, nutritional deficiencies that amplify dark moods, the life habits that allow demons to emerge. Yet there are some very powerful strategies available that have potential to substantially lift mood. Such solutions won’t, of course, erase the effects of childhood trauma or grieving from personal loss, but they can help smooth th...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 9, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle anxiety Depression gluten grains Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Assisted physician suicide: Are doctors killing doctors?
Standing on the edge of his hotel balcony, a doctor describes the rolling hills. He tells me, “It’s a beautiful place to die.” Ten minutes later, he agrees not to injure himself — for now. I’m not running a physician suicide hotline. But doctors keep calling me. It’s midnight, and I’m speaking to a psychiatry intern. Bullied by residents and her attending, she cries, “I’ve lost my self-confidence. I’m depressed. On psych meds now. But I don’t feel better.” Then a fourth-year medical student shares a similar story. “I was normal before med school. Now I’m so afraid. I can’t go on,” she so...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 9, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Facebook Launches Suicide Prevention Initiative - WSJ video
Facebook is partnering with suicide prevention organizations on a new tool to identify people in distress. Forefront research scientist Ursula Whiteside discusses the project with Sara Murray. Posted at Clinical Cases and Images. Stay updated and subscribe, follow us on Twitter and connect on Facebook. (Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog)
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - March 8, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Depression Facebook Psychiatry Source Type: blogs