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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 2.

The psychiatric secrets that harm physicians
I know your secrets. I keep secrets for a living. I know about the eye opener before your shift; the Adderall prescribed for your son that you take in the morning; the Xanax a colleague gave you for upcoming air travel that that you take at night; the near DUI that you got out of by showing your hospital badge, the letters “Dr.” prominent on the left side; your wife who tells white lies about why you can’t attend the retirement party of a colleague’s (“Patient emergency. He has to go to the hospital. I do know you understand.”); or why you didn’t show up for your last appointment w...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 20, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The Original Manifesto from Doctors 2.0 & You #doctors20
Acccording to Wikipedia, a manifesto is a public declaration of principles and intentions, often political in nature. The Doctors 2.0 & You manifesto is not political.  It is a collaborative work in progress. Our goal is to identify the ways in which the inclusion of collaborative digital tools and social media platforms can improve care and translate this into the words of a manifesto.  Our point of reference, is  The Cluetrain Manifesto, a set of 95 theses  put forward as a manifesto, or call to action, for all businesses operating within the newly-con...
Source: Denise Silber's eHealth - February 18, 2016 Category: Information Technology Authors: Denise Silber Tags: Doctors 2.0 Source Type: blogs

The racial slurs didn’t hurt. Other things have hurt much more.
You could feel the air rushing out of her lungs and into your face if she was screaming at you. “STOP CALLING ME A WHORE! I AM NOT A WHORE, YOU DIRTY N-GGER!” No one, in fact, was calling her a whore. “DON’T LIE TO ME, MOTHERF-CKER! I HEAR ALL OF YOU CALLING ME A WHORE! I HEARD IT, JUST NOW!” Her best defense was a loud offense that included liberal use of racial and homophobic slurs. We winced and asked her to stop when the colorful epithets flew from her mouth. She glared at us, her face red and fists clenched. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputat...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 15, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

A psychiatrist shares her 5 secrets to love
As a mother of three daughters, I frequently find myself singing along to the catchy tunes of Taylor Swift.  Singer, songwriter, and overall superstar Taylor Swift is famous for penning undeniably captivating love songs. She is popular not only because she has the voice of an angel, a cutting edge look, and a fierce attitude, but also because she is honest and real. Taylor has an uncanny ability to put raw emotion into poetic words. Her lyrics are universally relatable. Young adults can hear a Taylor Swift song, pull out favorite quotes, and better reconcile their own feelings. Many of the adolescent patients I treat as a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 14, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

How my cardiology practice changed with a click
I was a bit nervous as I had never done this before.  I wasn’t even sure what I was going to do once I saw him.  The only certainty in my mind at that time was that this was not the Norman Rockwell image of the physician-patient encounter that I proudly displayed in my office.  He was my age, 40 years old, living on Nantucket with his wife and two kids.  “Traveling off the island isn’t my thing,” he told me at our first encounter.   It was that statement that had brought us to today.  A ringing sound snapped me back to reality.  A big green button appeared on my screen and flashed “ANSWER.”  I didn’t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 13, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Heart Mobile health Source Type: blogs

An open letter to The Lancet, again
On November 13th, five colleagues and I released an open letter to The Lancet and editor Richard Horton about the PACE trial, which the journal published in 2011. The study’s reported findings–that cognitive behavior therapy and graded exercise therapy are effective treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome–have had enormous influence on clinical guidelines for the illness. Last October, Virology Blog published David Tuller’s investigative report on the PACE study’s indefensible methodological lapses. Citing these problems, we noted in the letter that “such flaws have no place in publis...
Source: virology blog - February 11, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Information chronic fatigue syndrome Lancet mecfs myalgic encephalomyelitis PACE request for data Richard Horton vexations Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 121
This article discusses a series of cases where fluids and medications were administered through a rectal catheter (Macy catheter) instead of via more traditional routes. The authors conclude that the successful management of the 3 included patients suggests that the device “may be an appealing alternative route.” I have a hard time believing that IV should be avoided in favor of rectal “access” or that IO sites are ever unavailable in patients with difficulty IV access. Recommended by Anand Swaminathan Emergency medicine Choo EK et al. Managing Intimate Partner Violence in the Emergency Departmen...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 10, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Soren Rudolph Tags: Airway Anaesthetics Education Emergency Medicine Pediatrics Psychiatry and Mental Health R&R in the FASTLANE Resuscitation critical care recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs

An Update on the Nomination of FDA Commissioner Robert Califf
An increasing number of senators are threatening to block Dr. Robert Califf's nomination to be the next Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The story illustrates an unusual coalition of right and left-leaning members of the Senate, and common refrains about "industry ties" in government and medicine. Ultimately, arcane Senate rules allow the entire process to be stalled by these individual members of the body. The U.S. Senate: Where things go to die (slowly) Members threatening to block Califf's nomination include Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia. He cited Califf's ties to the pharmaceutical indu...
Source: Policy and Medicine - February 9, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Old problems, new solutions: improving acute psychiatric care for adults in England: final report
This report, from an independent commission, highlights system-wide problems in mental healthcare in England including variable quality of care on inpatient units, inadequate availability of inpatient care or alternatives to inpatient admission, and patients remaining in hospital for longer than necessary due to inadequate residential provision. It recommends significant changes to how services are commissioned, organised and monitored across the whole mental health system. It also calls for faster access to acute care and an end to sending severely-ill mental health patients long distances for treatment. Report Summary P...
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - February 9, 2016 Category: UK Health Authors: The King's Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Mental Health Source Type: blogs

5 parenting tips from a child psychiatrist
Without a doubt, parenting is simultaneously the most rewarding and difficult job we have as adults. As a child psychiatrist and mom, I am always asked if I find it easier to parent given my profession. I always respond by saying, “I was the perfect parent until I had children!” I am also universally asked about how to raise happy children. I always pause before I attempt to answer this question. Happiness is fleeting and one of the best things we can do as parents is to allow our children to experience and cope with negative emotions such as sadness, anger, disappointment, and frustration. The real question, I...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 7, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

At Last: The Data To Routinely Discuss Health Spending By Medical Condition
Discussions of health spending trends are constrained by available data. The National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA), maintained by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), presents spending by type of service or product and source of funds. As a result, their annual release analyzes changes primarily in these terms. The BEA National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) include health sector spending broken out by service/product categories that are similar to those in the NHEA. Each month, our Center releases a series of health spending reports in which we combine these, and other data sources, to report on...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - February 5, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Charles Roehrig Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Featured Health Care Satellite Account U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis Source Type: blogs

Reexamining Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Research And Treatment Policy
In recent months, two developments have provided some degree of optimism to people with the illness variously called chronic fatigue syndrome, myalgic encephalomyelitis (“inflammation of the brain and central nervous system, with muscle pain”), CFS/ME, and ME/CFS — the term often used these days by U.S. agencies. Taken together, these developments herald the welcome possibility of significant changes in research and treatment policies for the illness, which is estimated to afflict between 1 and 2.5 million people in the U.S. They also reinforce a critical but often overlooked point: patients can possess far more ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - February 4, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: David Tuller Tags: Drugs and Medical Technology Equity and Disparities Featured Hospitals Public Health Quality chronic fatigue syndrome NIH PACE trial Research Source Type: blogs

The remarkable story of a psychiatrically hospitalized clinician
I am a licensed clinical social worker. And, occasionally, a mental patient. Today, in this inpatient psychiatric unit, I am more a patient than a social worker. It is Monday morning, and I am eating breakfast across from Owen, a muscular, flannel-clad, Paul Bunyan-looking patient. Little pieces of his scrambled eggs keep landing on his copper-colored beard. I sort of want to motion with my hand at where the eggs are on his face, but I’m too tired, and I don’t really care. About anything. Owen is an odiferous, rebel-flag-t-shirt-wearing, phlegm-spitting, hairy-eared mechanic who, to be honest, would not normall...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 3, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error, Continued: A Few Words About “Harassment”
By David Tuller, DrPH David Tuller is academic coordinator of the concurrent masters degree program in public health and journalism at the University of California, Berkeley.   Last week, a commentary in Nature about the debate over data-sharing in science made some excellent points. Unfortunately, the authors lumped “hard-line opponents” of research into chronic fatigue syndrome with those who question climate change and the health effects of tobacco, among others—accusing them of engaging in “endless information requests, complaints to researchers’ universities, online harassment, distortion of scien...
Source: virology blog - February 1, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Commentary Information chronic fatigue syndrome data sharing FOI information requests mecfs myalgic encephalomyelitis PACE vexatious Source Type: blogs

A Roundtable Discussion on Cannabis Use Disorder
Addressing the habit-forming aspects of marijuana.A trio of leading marijuana scientists participated in a panel discussion moderated by Dr. Daniele Piomelli from the School of Medicine at the University of California-Irvine, and published in a recent issue of the journal Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research. Dr. Margaret Haney is with the New York State Psychiatric Institute at Columbia University Medical Center; Dr. Alan J. Budney is affiliated with the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College; and Dr. Pier Vincenzo Piazza works at the Magendie Neurocenter in Bordeaux, France. Excerpts from the long discussion appear ...
Source: Addiction Inbox - February 1, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: Dirk Hanson Source Type: blogs

“After Jesse Longoria recovered from a roadside bomb blast...
"After Jesse Longoria recovered from a roadside bomb blast that nearly killed him in Iraq, he got a job with the Wounded Warrior Project (@wwp), training #veterans to help other veterans. @tamirhasacellphone photographed Jesse, a former @marines sniper, with his 16-month-old son, Noah, for a story about how @wwp's swift rise has led to aggressive styles of fund-raising, marketing and personnel management. Insiders say the charity has also spent millions per year on itself. In 2012, after Jesse had been working at @wwp for about a year, he had to have his right arm amputated and later checked himself into suicide watch at a...
Source: Kidney Notes - January 28, 2016 Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Joshua Schwimmer Source Type: blogs

Depressiegala - Depression gala
I saw about this in De Volkskrant recently, and I thought was such a good idea I would share it here.Het Depressiegala took place on "Blue Monday", 25th January, in the Theater Amsterdam, to raise awareness of depression and raise funds at the same time.  An initiative of two psychiatrists, Esther van Fenema and Bram Bakker, the gala featured singers, journalists, writers, presenters, comedians.  One was the writer Marjolijn van Kooten, who has written of personal mental health experiences, and has appeared with Bram Bakker.  Also there was Edith Schippers, Minister of Health, Welfare and Sport.The site has ...
Source: Browsing - January 27, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: depression Source Type: blogs

Genetic Associations Between Determinants of Intelligence and Determinants of Longevity
There is a well known association between intelligence and life expectancy, part of a web of related correlations that include wealth, social status, networks of relationships, and education, among others. In the case of intelligence, there is the intriguing possibility that genetics plays a significant role in this statistical relationship with longevity, and effects on life span are not just the results of a greater capability to succeed in obtaining wealth, status, and a consequently better usage of medical technology, for example. This paper points out that some of the same genetic variants influence determinants of bo...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 27, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Brain Drain
I find it incredible that, buried in the common advice to consume more “healthy whole grains,” is advice to consume what is, in effect, a mind-active drug. Wheat and grain consumption have very real effects on the brain, thinking, and emotions, some of which are reversible, some of which are permanent. Many of the effects are due to the gliadin protein of wheat, rye, and barley. Dr. Alessio Fasano has mapped out the segments of the gliadin protein that, upon partial digestion (humans are incapable of complete digestion of this grass protein) yield the following peptides (protein fragments): Red = direct cytotox...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 26, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat-Free Lifestyle adhd appetite bipolar Depression emotions gluten grains mind opiates schizophrenia Source Type: blogs

Jama jumps the shark
JAMA JUMPS THE SHARKMedical journals are supposed to promote professional values – scientific, social, and ethical. Quality matters, in each of these domains. Lately, however, highly ranked journals are failing in respect of ethics commentaries. Some editors seem happy to publicize or even to co-author commentaries that are dismissive of current ethics initiatives – like transparency of data reporting and disclosure of conflicts of interest (COI). That’s one way for journals to jump the shark in the race for ratings. They surely get attention and applause in some quarters – but those stunts are net negatives for th...
Source: Health Care Renewal - January 25, 2016 Category: Health Management Tags: Anne Cappola Bernard Carroll conflict of interest conflict of interest blog confluence of interest Garret FitzGerald JAMA Source Type: blogs

How this doctor beat burnout. You can, too.
2015 was a year to regroup and reassess my professional goals.  Immediately after residency, I did as most physicians do — apply and hope to get a job that pays well and is in a good location.  Similar to the personalities of most physicians, I am a workaholic and overachiever.  Therefore, since graduating residency, I strove to perform well at my job, treated my patients to the best of my ability, passed my psychiatry board exams, in addition to participating in extra professional activities on the side (gave psychiatry talks, restarted blogging again, enrolled in a psychoanalytic course, etc.) while attempt...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 23, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

A hypocrite in a coffee shop
The woman in ill fitting snow pants and parka, as if there is such a thing as well-fitting snow pants and parka, clumps of blonde stuck-together hair poking out of her non-hipster cap, you know exactly what she looks like, stares at me from the sagging mid-century couch across the alcove in the café where I have set up my laptop, a scone, a huge cup of expensive coffee described as “an approachable blend with toffee undertones” and have nothing to be responsible for for the next two and one half hours except a new writing project. These are rare moments of fallow field that we creative types crave like a low level cra...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 22, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Patient Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error, Continued: More Nonsense from The Lancet Psychiatry
By David Tuller, DrPH David Tuller is academic coordinator of the concurrent masters degree program in public health and journalism at the University of California, Berkeley.   The PACE authors have long demonstrated great facility in evading questions they don’t want to answer. They did this in their response to correspondence about the original 2011 Lancet paper. They did it again in the correspondence about the 2013 recovery paper, and in their response to my Virology Blog series. Now they have done it in their answer to critics of their most recent paper on follow-up data, published last October in The Lancet ...
Source: virology blog - January 19, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Commentary Information chronic fatigue syndrome GET graded exercise therapy Lancet mecfs Michael Sharpe myalgic encephalomyelitis PACE trial Source Type: blogs

A daily decision to prioritize my patients over my notes
It’s been a long day in the psychiatry clinic. Seeing patients is never dull, and each interaction is meaningful in its own way. From the moment they walk into my office to the moment they leave, I try my best to be fully present with the patients sitting in front of me. That means listening to every word, watching every nuance of body language, hearing every concern — both spoken and unspoken. It means bearing their grief as they tell me about the father they’re losing to cancer, their pain as they suffer through profound bouts of depression and their agony as they recall their nightmares of childhood trauma. It...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 16, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Health IT Source Type: blogs

Diversionary Tactic
Rita Rubin, in the new JAMA, discusses the relationship between mental health treatment and gun violence. Since we can't seem to get any policies implemented that will actually reduce gun violence, it's fashionable for politicians to use the problem as an argument for improving accessibility of behavioral health services.I am reluctant to be contrarian about this because I'm all for getting people the help they need. However, this is an excellent example of the way cognitive biases distort our politics. While it is true that mass shooters -- like the perpetrators of the attack on Gabby Giffords and the Aurora, Colorado mov...
Source: Stayin' Alive - January 12, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

CMS’ Standardized Plan Option Could Reduce Discrimination
The objective is to make sure shoppers can compare plans on premiums and provider networks, knowing that the rest of the benefit design has largely identical cost-sharing requirements. It has become clear that failing to standardize all benefits could allow insurers to set cost-sharing amounts that discourage enrollment by those with certain chronic diseases. Promoting Standardization Standardized options appear to be an excellent way to ease health plan decisions and reduce or eliminate discriminatory benefit designs. The adoption of such plans should be encouraged to improve choices for consumers. One option would be a r...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - January 6, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Douglas Jacobs Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Equity and Disparities Featured Payment Policy Quality Adverse Tiering CMS Essential Health Benefits HIV/AIDS Massachusetts New York States Source Type: blogs

Farewell
In his farewell post, Dr. Insel looks back at six years of the director’s blog and reflects on the tasks ahead in mental health research and practice. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

New hope for treating psychosis
Results from a major NIMH project provide evidence that coordinated specialty care can improve outcomes for first episode psychosis. Dr. Insel blogs about the RAISE project and other recent studies of coordinated care. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Look who is getting into mental health research
Tech companies are bringing their ability to extract knowledge from data to health care. Dr. Insel gives some examples that show the potential of new tech-based approaches to diagnosis and treatment. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

August at NIMH
Despite its reputation as a month for slowing down, August is busy at NIMH as the end of the fiscal year approaches. Dr. Insel takes time out to give an update on NIMH-supported clinical trials. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

The Brain’s Critical Balance
The BRAIN Initiative is supporting scientists aiming to understand how the 86 billion neurons in the brain act together to enable consciousness and behavior. Dr. Insel gives a snapshot of recent work and its implications for understanding normal and disordered brain function. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Quality Counts
The Institute of Medicine has issued a report looking at the effectiveness of psychosocial treatments for mental disorders. Dr. Insel blogs about the need to ensure that consumers needing treatment receive evidence-based therapies. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Viewing the STARRS Data
Last week, two important research events unfolded without fanfare and without headlines. June 30 marked the end of the first phase of Army STARRS, the largest study of mental health risk and resilience ever conducted among military personnel. July 1 marked the release of Army STARRS data for use by the broad scientific community. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Accentuate the Positive: Rhythm and Blues
Researchers were able to reverse some of the behavioral effects of stress in mice by stimulating brain cells activated by pleasure. Dr. Insel describes the work and its implications for understanding depression. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Early BRAIN Breakthroughs
Dr. Insel blogs about recent breakthroughs from the BRAIN Initiative, which show the promise of what we can accomplish with investment focused on new tool development to better understand and treat brain disorders. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Something Interesting is Happening
Dr. Insel discusses how the Precision Medicine Initiative will create a new kind of patient-driven research, which is similar to how innovative companies have created a new share economy based on trust. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Training for the Future
Dr. Insel talks about the importance of incorporating neuroscience in the training of psychiatric residents and a new initiative to do that. The clinician of 2025 will need to know about the science of the brain. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Mental Health Awareness Month: By the Numbers
Statistics paint a picture of the impact of mental illness in the United States; Dr. Insel reviews the numbers for Mental Health Awareness Month. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Crowdsourcing RDoC
NIMH’s RDoC initiative is in keeping with current interest in precision medicine. In his latest blogpost, Dr. Insel invites the research community to engage in discussion on the RDoC online forum. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

What Caused This to Happen? – Part 2
A London neuroscientist suggests two kinds of causes for disease; Dr. Insel talks about the implications of this view for understanding mental disorders. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Targeting Suicide
Suicide only occasionally makes the national news, but it is the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S. Dr. Insel talks about the need for research targeted directly at suicide and recent efforts to raise awareness and marshal research. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

A Plan for Changing Times
NIMH’s new Strategic Plan for Research is a broad roadmap for the Institute’s priorities for the next five years; Dr. Insel provides context and an overview. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

BRAIN Awareness
March 16-22 is Brain Awareness Week, an opportunity to celebrate neuroscience. Dr. Insel talks about some exciting areas of research underway on the brain. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Transparency
Dr. Insel introduces a white paper posted on the NIMH website which provides answers to many of the most common questions NIMH receives about how it makes funding decisions. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Collaborative Care
Dr. Insel lauds University of Washington psychiatrist and researchers Wayne Katon and the collaborative care approach for depression he helped develop. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Mortality and Mental Disorders
A recent paper reports findings on the reduction in life expectancy among people with mental illness relative to the general population; Dr. Insel discusses the magnitude and reasons for this excess mortality. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Immune to Stress?
We tend to assume that the secrets to understanding individual differences in resilience to stress must be sought in the brain. Now, findings in mice suggest that the peripheral immune system might play a pivotal role. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs

Precision Medicine for Mental Disorders
In his latest blog, Dr. Insel discusses precision medicine, which is the new hot topic in research and what it means for mental health. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - December 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Thomas Insel Source Type: blogs