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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 20.

Tramadol Ultra Rapid Metabolizers at Risk for Respiratory Depression.
PMID: 26815266 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Pain Physician)
Source: Pain Physician - January 28, 2016 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Dhaliwal G, Hsu D Tags: Pain Physician Source Type: research

The Many Facets of Lipooligosaccharide as a Virulence Factor for Histophilus somni.
Authors: Inzana TJ Abstract The lipooligosaccharide (LOS) of Histophilus somni is a multifaceted molecule that provides critical protection to the bacterium against host defenses, may act as an adhesin, and like similar molecules of gram-negative bacteria, is an endotoxin that signals through toll-like receptor 4 and NF-κB to cause inflammation. The lipid A component is responsible for the endotoxic and apoptotic activity of the LOS. The H. somni LOS lacks O-side chains typically characteristic of gram-negative bacteria that have lipopolysaccharide, but has a complex, microheterogeneous outer core. The LOS of dise...
Source: Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology - January 28, 2016 Category: Microbiology Tags: Curr Top Microbiol Immunol Source Type: research

Predictors of Delayed Postoperative Respiratory Depression Assessed From Naloxone Administration
No abstract available (Source: Survey of Anesthesiology)
Source: Survey of Anesthesiology - January 28, 2016 Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Perioperative Complications Source Type: research

The Heterogeneity Hidden in Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Co-Existing Asthma in Adults: A Population-Based Survey
Conclusions: The diagnosis of AR in the epidemiological setting includes heterogeneous upper airway diseases that affect the clinical features of AR and its interactions with asthma.Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015;168:205-212 (Source: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology)
Source: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology - January 28, 2016 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

The pharmacokinetics of DPH after the administration of a single intravenous or intramuscular dose in healthy dogs
The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of diphenhydramine (DPH) in healthy dogs following a single i.v. or i.m. dose. Dogs were randomly allocated in two treatment groups and received DPH at 1 mg/kg, i.v., or 2 mg/kg, i.m. Blood samples were collected serially over 24 h. Plasma concentrations of DPH were determined by high‐performance liquid chromatography, and noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed with the commercially available software. Cardio‐respiratory parameters, rectal temperature and effects on behaviour, such as sedation or excitement, were recorded. Diphenhydra...
Source: Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics - January 28, 2016 Category: Veterinary Research Authors: A. Sanchez, A. Valverde, M. Sinclair, C. Mosley, A. Singh, A. J. Mutsaers, B. Hanna, Y. Gu, R. Johnson Tags: Scientific Paper Source Type: research

Aging Trajectories in Different Body Systems Share Common Environmental Etiology: The Healthy Aging Twin Study (HATS).
This study, the first of its kind in aging, suggests that diverse organ systems share non-genetic sources of variance for aging trajectories. Confirmatory studies are needed using population-based twin cohorts and alternative methods of handling missing data. PMID: 26810865 [PubMed - in process] (Source: Twin Research and Human Genetics)
Source: Twin Research and Human Genetics - January 28, 2016 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Moayyeri A, Hart DJ, Snieder H, Hammond CJ, Spector TD, Steves CJ Tags: Twin Res Hum Genet Source Type: research

A cluster of three cases of botulism due to Clostridium baratii type F, France, August 2015
A cluster of three cases of food-borne botulism due to Clostridium baratii type F occurred in France in August 2015. All cases required respiratory assistance. Consumption of a Bolognese sauce at the same restaurant was the likely source of contamination. Clostridium baratii was isolated both from stool specimens from the three patients and ground meat used to prepare the sauce. This is the second episode reported in France caused by this rare pathogen. (Source: Eurosurveillance)
Source: Eurosurveillance - January 28, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Cluster of atypical adult Guillain-Barré syndrome temporally associated with neurological illness due to EV-D68 in children, South Wales, United Kingdom, October 2015 to January 2016
We report a cluster of atypical Guillain-Barré syndrome in 10 adults temporally related to a cluster of four children with acute flaccid paralysis, over a 3-month period in South Wales, United Kingdom. All adult cases were male, aged between 24 and 77 years. Seven had prominent facial diplegia at onset. Available electrophysiological studies showed axonal involvement in five adults. Seven reported various forms of respiratory disease before onset of neurological symptoms. The ages of children ranged from one to 13 years, three of the four were two years old or younger. Enterovirus testing is available for three children; ...
Source: Eurosurveillance - January 28, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Understanding nurses' decision‐making when managing weaning from mechanical ventilation: a study of novice and experienced critical care nurses in Scotland and Greece
ConclusionsNurses used patient‐centred information to make a judgment about the patients' ability to wean. Decision‐making strategies that involve categorisation of patient‐centred information can be taught in bespoke educational programmes for mechanical ventilation and weaning. Relevance to clinical practiceAdvanced clinical reasoning skills and accurate detection of cues in respiratory assessment by critical care nurses will ensure optimum patient management in weaning mechanical ventilation. (Source: Journal of Clinical Nursing)
Source: Journal of Clinical Nursing - January 28, 2016 Category: Nursing Authors: Kalliopi Kydonaki, Guro Huby, Jennifer Tocher, Leanne M Aitken Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Ellis–van Creveld syndrome associated with chronic intestinal pseudo‐obstruction
Abstract Ellis–van Creveld (EVC) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypoplastic nails, polydactyly, and achondroplasia. Patients usually exhibit normal cognitive function and no remarkable developmental delay. We herein present an unusual case of EVC syndrome. A Japanese 2‐year‐old boy was born at term, but immediately developed severe respiratory failure due to thorax deformity, postaxial polydactyly and nail hypoplasia. We identified a novel pattern of germinal compound heterozygous nonsense EVC2 mutations of c.1814C > A (p. S605X) and c.2653C > T (p. R885X), leading to the diagn...
Source: Pediatrics International - January 28, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Hideo Iwakura, Katsunori Fujii, Yoshiyuki Furutani, Tomozumi Takatani, Ryota Ebata, Toshio Nakanishi, Tetsuya Mitsunaga, Takeshi Saito, Takashi Kishimoto, Hideo Yoshida, Naoki Shimojo Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Abstracts from the Fifth American Cough Conference
(Source: Lung)
Source: Lung - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Case report: Subjective loss of performance after pulmonary embolism in an athlete– beyond normal values
Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a progressive disease. For patients with operable CTEPH, there is a clear recommendation for surgical removal of persistent thrombi by pulmonary endarte... (Source: BMC Pulmonary Medicine)
Source: BMC Pulmonary Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Daniel Dumitrescu, Felix Gerhardt, Thomas Viethen, Matthias Schmidt, Eckhard Mayer and Stephan Rosenkranz Source Type: research

Controversies and Evolving Concepts in Critical Care
Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2016; 37: 001-002DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1570360Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Full text (Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine)
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Cartin-Ceba, RodrigoPannu, SonalGajic, Ognjen Tags: Preface Source Type: research

Too Little Oxygen: Ventilation, Prone Positioning, and Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Severe Hypoxemia
Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2016; 37: 003-015DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1570366Severe hypoxemia is associated with untoward outcomes in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients. Nevertheless, in and of itself, correction of hypoxemia is not an adequate surrogate outcome for mortality and clear evidence-based targets for correction of hypoxemia remain to be determined. At present, clinical management is directed toward achieving sufficient oxygenation while minimizing toxicity of ventilator-induced lung injury. The gold standard remains lung-protective mechanical ventilation, using lower-tidal volumes and pressure-limited venti...
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Park, Pauline K. Source Type: research

Too Much Oxygen: Hyperoxia and Oxygen Management in Mechanically Ventilated Patients
Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2016; 37: 016-022DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1570359Hyperoxia, or excess oxygen supplementation, prevails in the intensive care unit (ICU) without a beneficial effect and, in some instances, may cause harm. Recent interest and surge in clinical studies in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients has brought this to the attention of clinicians and researchers. Hyperoxia can cause alveolar injury, pulmonary edema, and subsequent systemic inflammatory response and is known to augment ventilator-associated lung injury. Liberal oxygenation practices are also associated with increased mortality in subse...
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Pannu, Sonal R. Source Type: research

Less Is More in the ICU: Resuscitation, Oxygenation and Routine Tests
Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2016; 37: 023-033DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1570358The intensive care unit (ICU) was initially developed in the 1950s to treat patients who required invasive respiratory support and hemodynamic resuscitation. Since the beginning, ICU medicine has focused on maintaining sufficient arterial blood flow and oxygenation to provide adequate tissue oxygen delivery to forestall or reverse organ failure. Over time, ICU medicine became more intensive, with the administration of many diagnostic tests and monitors, invasive procedures, and treatments, often with scant evidence of benefit associated with them. An al...
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Gopalratnam, KavithaForde, Inga C.O'Connor, Jaclyn V.Kaufman, David A. Source Type: research

How Cool It Is: Targeted Temperature Management for Brain Protection Post–Cardiac Arrest
This article reviews the neuroprotective mechanisms of hypothermia, the evidence supporting targeted temperature management after cardiac resuscitation, areas of persistent uncertainty and controversy, and future research directions.[...]Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  Full text (Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine)
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Rabinstein, Alejandro A. Source Type: research

Balance between Hyperinflammation and Immunosuppression in Sepsis
Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2016; 37: 042-050DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1570356Sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients and the leading cause of death among patients admitted to intensive care units. The immune response in sepsis is characterized by the activation of both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways. These pathways are concurrent, starting early in the course of sepsis. Given the high burden of morbidity and mortality associated with sepsis, there is an increasing interest in immunomodulatory therapies targeted at improving outcomes in sepsis. This review will summarize curr...
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Yadav, HemangCartin-Ceba, Rodrigo Source Type: research

What Is the Evidence for Harm of Neuromuscular Blockade and Corticosteroid Use in the Intensive Care Unit?
Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2016; 37: 051-056DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1570355Neuromuscular blocking agents and corticosteroids are widely used in medicine and in particular in the intensive care unit (ICU). Neuromuscular blockade is commonly used to ease tracheal intubation, to optimize mechanical ventilation and oxygenation in acute respiratory disorders such as status asthmaticus and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), to prevent shivering during therapeutic hypothermia, and also in patients with elevated intracranial pressure. In the ICU, patients with sepsis, ARDS, community-acquired pneumonia, exacerbation of chroni...
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Annane, Djillali Source Type: research

Sweet Spot: Glucose Control in the Intensive Care Unit
Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2016; 37: 057-067DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1570354Hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability are all independently associated with morbidity and mortality of critically ill patients. A strategy aiming at normoglycemia (so-called tight glycemic control) could improve outcomes of critically ill patients, but results from randomized controlled trials of tight glycemic control are conflicting. Strict glycemic control is associated with an increased risk of hypoglycemia, which could offset the benefit of this intervention. Notably, the risk of hypoglycemia is not necessarily removed with less tig...
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: van Hooijdonk, Roosmarijn T. M.Mesotten, DieterKrinsley, James S.Schultz, Marcus J. Source Type: research

Early Warning/Track-and-Trigger Systems to Detect Deterioration and Improve Outcomes in Hospitalized Patients
Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2016; 37: 088-095DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1570352As a global effort toward improving patient safety, a specific area of focus has been the early recognition and rapid intervention in deteriorating ward patients. This focus on “failure to rescue” has led to the construction of early warning/track-and-trigger systems. In this review article, we present a description of the data behind the creation and implementation of such systems, including multiple algorithms and strategies for deployment. Additionally, the strengths and weaknesses of the various systems and their evaluation in the literature are...
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Shiloh, Ariel L.Lominadze, GeorgeGong, Michelle N.Savel, Richard H. Source Type: research

Improving the Patient Handoff Process in the Intensive Care Unit: Keys to Reducing Errors and Improving Outcomes
Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2016; 37: 096-106DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1570351Patient handoffs are highly variable and error prone. They have been recognized as a major health care challenge. Patients in the intensive care unit are particularly vulnerable due to their complex clinical history and the critical nature of their condition. Given a general movement from traditional long call to shift schedules, the number of patient handoffs will likely continue to increase. Optimization of the handoff process has become even more critical to ensure patient safety. In this review, we reflect on the importance of the handoff process, r...
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Colvin, Mai O.Eisen, Lewis A.Gong, Michelle Ng Source Type: research

Who Should Be at the Bedside 24/7: Doctors, Families, Nurses?
Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2016; 37: 107-118DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1570350Critical illness does not keep to regular, daytime business hours; we must provide high-quality care and support for intensive care unit (ICU) patients 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. Whether this mandates the presence of similar numbers and types of personnel throughout all hours of the day, however, has been the subject of much debate and substantial research. In this article, we review the available literature on the consequences of having three groups of care providers at a patient's bedside overnight: physicians, visitors, and nurses. Though few...
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Gershengorn, Hayley B.Garland, Allan Source Type: research

Adapting the ABCDEF Bundle to Meet the Needs of Patients Requiring Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation in the Long-Term Acute Care Hospital Setting: Historical Perspectives and Practical Implications
This article is about such an extrapolation from the intensive care unit (ICU) to the long-term acute care hospital (LTACH) setting. Chronic critical illness is an emerging, disabling, costly, and yet relatively silent epidemic that is central to both of these settings. The number of chronically critically ill patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation is expected to reach unprecedented levels over the next decade. Despite the prevalence, numerous distressing symptoms, and exceptionally poor outcomes associated with chronic critical illness, to date there is very limited scientific evidence available to guide the ...
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Balas, Michele C.Devlin, John W.Verceles, Avelino C.Morris, PeterEly, E. Wesley Source Type: research

Early Psychological Therapy in Critical Illness
Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2016; 37: 136-142DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1570367Survivors of critical illness often experience long-lasting impairments in mental, cognitive, and physical functioning. Acute stress reactions and delusional memories appear to play an important role in psychological morbidity following critical illness, and few interventions exist to address these symptoms. This review elucidates acute psychological stressors experienced by the critically ill. The effects of psychological stress and state of mind on disease are discussed using examples from the non–intensive care unit (ICU) literature, including a re...
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.Philbrick, Kemuel L.Parker, Ann M.Needham, Dale M. Source Type: research

Erratum to: Asbestos-Related Lung Cancer and Malignant Mesothelioma of the Pleura: Selected Current Issues (Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2015;36(3):334–346)
Semin Respir Crit Care Med 2016; 37: 143-144DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1570120Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Full text (Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine)
Source: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Markowitz, Steven Tags: Erratum Source Type: research

Pleural disease in infants and children: management updates
This article addresses new treatments for congenital hydrothorax and chylothorax, parapneumonic effusions, and spontaneous pneumothoraces in children. Invasive fetal surgical methods to drain pleural fluid in utero improve survival and reduce the chance of postnatal pulmonary hypoplasia. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and intrapleural instillation of fibrinolytic agents produce similar outcomes for children with empyema and/or parapneumonic effusions. Spontaneous primary pneumothoraces in older children and young adults are increasingly treated with drainage methods that prevent or reduce hospitalizations. Newer trea...
Source: Current Respiratory Care Reports - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Microglia PACAP and glutamate: Friends or foes in seizure-induced autonomic dysfunction and SUDEP?
Publication date: Available online 26 January 2016 Source:Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology Author(s): Amol M. Bhandare, Komal Kapoor, Melissa M.J. Farnham, Paul M. Pilowsky Seizure-induced cardiorespiratory autonomic dysfunction is a major cause of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), and the underlying mechanism is unclear. Seizures lead to increased synthesis, and release of glutamate, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), and other neurotransmitters, and cause extensive activation of microglia at multiple regions in the brain including central autonomic cardiorespiratory ...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Understanding COPD: A vision on phenotypes, comorbidities and treatment approach
Publication date: Available online 27 January 2016 Source:Revista Portuguesa de Pneumologia (English Edition) Author(s): E. Fragoso, S. André, J.P. Boleo-Tomé, V. Areias, J. Munhá, J. Cardoso Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) phenotypes have become increasingly recognized as important for grouping patients with similar presentation and/or behavior, within the heterogeneity of the disease. The primary aim of identifying phenotypes is to provide patients with the best health care possible, tailoring the therapeutic approach to each patient. However, the identification of specific phenotypes has been hin...
Source: Revista Portuguesa de Pneumologia - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Abel Ayerza
Publication date: Available online 28 January 2016 Source:The Lancet Respiratory Medicine Author(s): Priya Venkatesan (Source: The Lancet Respiratory Medicine)
Source: The Lancet Respiratory Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

NICE guidance on nintedanib for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
Publication date: Available online 27 January 2016 Source:The Lancet Respiratory Medicine Author(s): Sophie Laurenson, Raisa Sidhu, Melinda Goodall, Amanda I Adler (Source: The Lancet Respiratory Medicine)
Source: The Lancet Respiratory Medicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Moderate exercise attenuated airway resistance and inflammation induced by cigarette smoke solution and endotoxin in rats
Conclusions We demonstrated that 2 weeks of treadmill exercise improved airway resistance and diaphragm muscle contractile force in rats exposed to repetitive CSS plus endotoxin. We propose that local inflammation was attenuated by aerobic exercise, which increased diaphragm muscle contractility. (Source: Sport Sciences for Health)
Source: Sport Sciences for Health - January 28, 2016 Category: Sports Medicine Source Type: research