Medicine RSS Search Engine

Respiratory Medicine Respiratory Medicine RSS feedThis is an RSS file. You can use it to subscribe to this data in your favourite RSS reader or to display this data on your own website or blog.

This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 3.

Electroencephalographic evidence for a respiratory-related cortical activity specific of the preparation of prephonatory breaths
Publication date: 1 December 2014 Source:Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology, Volume 204 Author(s): Lysandre Tremoureux , Mathieu Raux , Anja Ranohavimparany , Capucine Morélot-Panzini , Pierre Pouget , Thomas Similowski Speech is a major disturbance to automatic breathing control. Speech occurs during exhalation, involving controlled inhibition of automatic inspiration. Additionally, utterances are preceded by prephonatory inspirations that must be prepared to account for prosody and loudness. We hypothesized that the speech-related breathing control activities shaping prephonatory breaths originate in cortic...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

The neural cascade of olfactory processing: A combined fMRI–EEG study
In this study, we leverage the spatial resolution of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) alongside the temporal resolution of EEG to replicate and extend these findings. Brain activation identified by both modalities converged within association regions of the orbitofrontal cortex that were activated from approximately 150–300ms after inspiration onset. EEG/DT was additionally sensitive to more transient activity in primary olfactory regions, including the parahippocampal gyrus and amygdala, occurring approximately 50ms post-inspiration. These results provide a partial validation of the spatial profile of the ol...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

The time-course of cortico-limbic neural responses to air hunger
Publication date: 1 December 2014 Source:Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology, Volume 204 Author(s): Andrew P. Binks , Karleyton C. Evans , Jeffrey D. Reed , Shakeeb H. Moosavi , Robert B. Banzett Several studies have mapped brain regions associated with acute dyspnea perception. However, the time-course of brain activity during sustained dyspnea is unknown. Our objective was to determine the time-course of neural activity when dyspnea is sustained. Eight healthy subjects underwent brain blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic imaging (BOLD-fMRI) during mechanical ventilation with constant mild hypercap...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Weight loss reduces dyspnea on exertion in obese women
In conclusion, moderate weight loss was effective in reducing breathlessness on exertion in obese women who experienced DOE at baseline. (Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology)
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Reprint of “Learning to breathe? Feedforward regulation of the inspiratory motor drive”
Publication date: 1 December 2014 Source:Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology, Volume 204 Author(s): Jonas Zaman , Omer Van den Bergh , Stien Fannes , Ilse Van Diest Claims have been made that breathing is in part controlled by feedforward regulation. In a classical conditioning paradigm, we investigated anticipatory increases in the inspiratory motor drive as measured by inspiratory occlusion pressure (P100). In an acquisition phase, an experimental group (N =13) received a low-intensity resistive load (5cmH2O/l/s) for three consecutive inspirations as Conditioned Stimulus (CS), preceding a load of a stronger i...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Increased cardio-respiratory coupling evoked by slow deep breathing can persist in normal humans
Publication date: 1 December 2014 Source:Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology, Volume 204 Author(s): Thomas E. Dick , Joseph R. Mims , Yee-Hsee Hsieh , Kendall F. Morris , Erica A. Wehrwein Slow deep breathing (SDB) has a therapeutic effect on autonomic tone. Our previous studies suggested that coupling of the cardiovascular to the respiratory system mediates plasticity expressed in sympathetic nerve activity. We hypothesized that SDB evokes short-term plasticity of cardiorespiratory coupling (CRC). We analyzed respiratory frequency (fR), heart rate and its variability (HR&HRV), the power spectral densit...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Respiratory responses following blast-induced traumatic brain injury in rats
Publication date: 1 December 2014 Source:Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology, Volume 204 Author(s): Sherry Adams , Jillian A. Condrey , Hsiu-Wen Tsai , Stanislav I. Svetlov , Paul W. Davenport Blast overpressure (OB) injury in rodents has been employed for modeling the traumatic brain injury (TBI) induced by an improvised explosive device (IED) in military service personnel. IED's can cause respiratory arrest if directed at the thorax due to the fluid–tissue interface of the lungs but it is unclear what respiratory changes occur in a head-directed OB injury. The diaphragm is the primary muscle of inspiration ...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Reprint of “Drawing breath without the command of effectors: The control of respiration following spinal cord injury”
Publication date: 1 December 2014 Source:Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology, Volume 204 Author(s): Philippa M. Warren , Basem I. Awad , Warren J. Alilain The maintenance of blood gas and pH homeostasis is essential to life. As such breathing, and the mechanisms which control ventilation, must be tightly regulated yet highly plastic and dynamic. However, injury to the spinal cord prevents the medullary areas which control respiration from connecting to respiratory effectors and feedback mechanisms below the level of the lesion. This trauma typically leads to severe and permanent functional deficits in the respi...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Reprint of “Breathing and sense of self: Visuo-respiratory conflicts alter body self-consciousness”
Publication date: 1 December 2014 Source:Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology, Volume 204 Author(s): Dan Adler , Bruno Herbelin , Thomas Similowski , Olaf Blanke Bodily self-consciousness depends on the processing of interoceptive and exteroceptive signals. It can be disrupted by inducing signal conflicts. Breathing, at the crossroad between interoception and exteroception, should contribute to bodily self-consciousness. We induced visuo-respiratory conflicts in 17 subjects presented with a virtual body or a parallelepidedal object flashing synchronously or asynchronously with their breathing. A questionnaire de...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

The effect of tracheal occlusion on respiratory load compensation: Changes in neurons containing inhibitory neurotransmitter in the nucleus of the solitary tract in conscious rats
Publication date: 1 December 2014 Source:Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology, Volume 204 Author(s): Hsiu-Wen Tsai , Jillian Condrey , Sherry Adams , Paul W. Davenport Respiratory load compensation volume–time (V t–T) relationships have been extensively studied in anesthetized animals. There are only a few studies in conscious animals although consciousness and behavior play a critical role in modulation of breathing. The aims of the study were to determine the effect of intermittent and transient tracheal occlusions (ITTO) elicited load compensation responses and the changes in activation of inhibitory glyc...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Enhanced non-eupneic breathing following hypoxic, hypercapnic or hypoxic–hypercapnic gas challenges in conscious mice
We examined whether (1) C57BL6 mice display marked non-eupneic breathing following hypercapnic or hypoxic–hypercapnic challenges, and (2) compared the post-hypoxia changes in non-eupneic breathing of C57BL6 mice to those of B6AF1 (57BL6 dam×A/J sire) and Swiss-Webster mice, which display different ventilatory responses than C57BL6 mice. C57BL6 mice displayed marked increases in respiratory frequency and non-eupneic breathing upon return to room-air after hypoxic (10% O2, 90% N2), hypercapnic (5% CO2, 21% O2 and 74% N2) and hypoxic–hypercapnic (10% O2, 5% CO2 and 85% N2) challenges. B6AF1 mice displayed less tachypnea ...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity is attenuated in adult rats conditioned with chronic hypobaric hypoxia
Publication date: Available online 22 November 2014 Source:Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology Author(s): Yee-Hsee Hsieh , Frank J. Jacono , Ruth E. Siegel , Thomas E. Dick Respiratory modulation of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) depends on numerous factors including prior experience. In our studies, exposing naïve adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats to acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) enhanced respiratory-modulation of splanchnic SNA (sSNA); whereas conditioning them to chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHH) attenuated modulation. Further, AIH can evoke increased SNA in the absence phrenic long-term facilitation. We h...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Inhibition of PI3K or MEK1/2 increases phrenic burst frequency in mice that overexpress cerebral Epo and abolishes the classically hypoxic-induced frequency depression in both control and Epo overexpressing mice
Publication date: Available online 21 November 2014 Source:Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology Author(s): Céline Caravagna , Jorge Soliz Erythropoietin stimulation modulates the central respiratory command in newborn mice. Specifically, the central respiratory depression induced by hypoxia is attenuated by acute (1h) or abolished by chronic erythropoietin stimulation. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. As MEK and PI3K pathways are commonly involved in Epo-mediated effects of neuroprotection and erythropoiesis, we investigated here the implication of PI3K and MEK1/2 in the Epo-mediated regulatio...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Does ammonia trigger hyperventilation in the elasmobranch, Squalus acanthias suckleyi?
We examined the ventilatory response of the spiny dogfish, to elevated internal or environmental ammonia. Sharks were injected via arterial catheters with ammonia solutions or their Na salt equivalents sufficient to increase plasma total ammonia concentration [T Amm]a by 3–5 fold from 145±21μM to 447±150μM using NH4HCO3 and a maximum of 766±100μM using (NH4)2SO4. (NH4)2SO4 caused a small increase in ventilation frequency (+14%) and a large increase in amplitude (+69%), while Na2SO4 did not. However, CO2 partial pressure (P aCO2) also increased and arterial pHa and plasma bicarbonate concentration ([HCO3 −]a) decr...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Regulatory T cells in children with allergy and asthma: It is time to act
Publication date: Available online 18 November 2014 Source:Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology Author(s): Anna Stelmaszczyk-Emmel Nowadays allergy and asthma are a huge medical problem. Despite deeper and more precise knowledge concerning their pathogenesis and the role of the immune system in these processes, so far immunotherapy is the only treatment which can modify the course of these diseases. Considering that regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have a great significance in pathogenesis of both diseases it seems appropriate to pay attention to their role in the treatment process. This work summarizes the Treg ...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Was the appearance of surfactants in air breathing vertebrates ultimately the cause of decompression sickness and autoimmune disease?
Publication date: Available online 18 November 2014 Source:Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology Author(s): Ran Arieli All air breathing vertebrates are endowed with pulmonary surfactants, surface-active lipoprotein complexes formed by type II alveolar cells. Surfactants are deposited in clearly defined areas on the luminal aspect of blood vessels, producing hydrophobic spots. Gas nanobubbles measuring 5–100nm form spontaneously on the smooth hydrophobic spot from dissolved gas. Bubbles nucleate and grow at these spots after decompression from high pressure. Proteins with hydrophobic regions circulating in the ...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Respiratory neuron characterization reveals intrinsic bursting properties in isolated adult turtle brainstems (Trachemys scripta)
Publication date: Available online 13 November 2014 Source:Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology Author(s): Stephen M. Johnson , Michael S. Hedrick , Bryan M. Krause , Jacob P. Nilles , Mark A. Chapman It is not known whether respiratory neurons with intrinsic bursting properties exist within ectothermic vertebrate respiratory control systems. Thus, isolated adult turtle brainstems spontaneously producing respiratory motor output were used to identify and classify respiratory neurons based on their firing pattern relative to hypoglossal (XII) nerve activity. Most respiratory neurons (183/212) had peak activity du...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Repetitive measurements of enhanced pause (Penh)
This study aimed to assess the validity of Penh values derived through repetitive measurements of both absolute and ratio Penh values in 10 male C57BL/6 mice on days 0, 3, 7, and 15. Tests of within-subject effects revealed significant differences in both the absolute and ratio Penh values across the different time points. The administration of challenge aerosolized methacholine concentrations of 25, 50, and 100mg/ml resulted in significant differences in the ratio Penh values across the various time points. The findings of the present study indicate that Penh is not a good index for repetitive measurement because the Penh...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Source of ventilatory complexity in the postmetamorphic tadpole brainstem, Pelophylax ridibundus: A pharmacological study
This study aimed at determining the source of this complexity. The neural respiratory output was recorded during exposure to increasing concentration of DAMGO or to reduced chloride concentration. Complexity was quantified with the noise limit (NL) and the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) values. DAMGO decreased lung frequency (p <0.0001), NL (p <0.0001) and LLE (p =0.0001) without changing buccal frequency (p =0.2392). Reduced concentration of chloride decreased buccal frequency (p =0.011) without changing lung frequency (p =0.2393) whereas NL (p =0.011) and LLE (p =0.027) increased significantly. When taking...
Source: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology - November 27, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Advances in paediatric pulmonary vascular disease associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia
Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine, Ahead of Print. (Source: Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine)
Source: Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine - November 26, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: article Source Type: research

Urates in exhaled breath condensate as a biomarker of control in childhood asthma
Journal of Asthma, Ahead of Print. (Source: Journal of Asthma)
Source: Journal of Asthma - November 26, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: article Source Type: research

The Effect of Aging on Pulmonary Function
Age-related anatomic, physiologic, and immunologic changes to the pulmonary system, as well as a high prevalence of chronic pulmonary diseases, puts the geriatric patient at an especially high risk for postoperative pulmonary complications. Successful perioperative respiratory care of the geriatric patient relies on careful risk assessment and optimization of pulmonary function and support. The success of such efforts aimed at preventing and/or mitigating pulmonary complications in the geriatric patient depends on a thorough, individualized, yet standardized and evidence-based approach to the care of every patient. (Source...
Source: Surgical Clinics of North America - November 26, 2014 Category: Surgery Authors: Elie Ramly, Haytham M.A. Kaafarani, George C. Velmahos Source Type: research

Increased Risk of Complications After Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in the Elderly: An Analysis of 6253 Patients in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database
Conclusion. Older age is an independent risk factor for greater morbidity and longer hospitalizations after ACDF, even after adjustment for comorbidities when compared with younger patients. Surgeons should be aware of the increased risk of multiple complications for patients of advanced age in their surgical decision making. Level of Evidence: 3 (Source: Spine)
Source: Spine - November 26, 2014 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Cervical Spine Source Type: research

Assessing asthma control and associated risk factors among persons with current asthma – findings from the child and adult Asthma Call-back Survey
Journal of Asthma, Ahead of Print. (Source: Journal of Asthma)
Source: Journal of Asthma - November 26, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: article Source Type: research

Associations between Co-Detected Respiratory Viruses in Children with Acute Respiratory Infections.
Abstract Viruses are the major etiological agents of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in young children. Although respiratory virus co-detections are common, analysis of combinations of co-detected viruses has never been conducted in Japan. Nineteen respiratory viruses or subtypes were surveyed using multiplex real-time PCR on 1,044 pediatric (patient age < 6 years) ARI specimens collected in Osaka City, Japan between January 2010 and December 2011. In total, 891 specimens (85.3%) were virus positive (1,414 viruses were detected), and 388 of the virus-positive specimens (43.5%, 388/891) were positive for mult...
Source: Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases - November 26, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Kaida A, Kubo H, Takakura K, Sekiguchi J, Yamamoto SP, Kohdera U, Togawa M, Amo K, Shiomi M, Ohyama M, Goto K, Hase A, Kageyama T, Iritani N Tags: Jpn J Infect Dis Source Type: research

Effect of Host Factors on Neutrophil Functions in Response to Burkholderia pseudomallei in Healthy Thai Subjects.
This study therefore indicated the importance of age, glycemic control, and antibody levels in the activity of neutrophils in melioidosis. PMID: 25410558 [PubMed - in process] (Source: Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases)
Source: Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases - November 26, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Saengmuang P, Kewcharoenwong C, Tippayawat P, Nithichanon A, Buddhisa S, Lertmemongkolchai G Tags: Jpn J Infect Dis Source Type: research

Askin's tumour in pregnancy with dismal prognosis
Abstract Askin's tumour is a rare malignant neoplasm of the chest wall. A 23‐year‐old primigravida patient was admitted to the hospital with complaints of chest wall swelling, cough and dyspnoea. Radiological examination showed a chest wall mass in right hemithorax with erosion of ribs and moderate pleural effusion. Fine‐needle aspiration cytology was suggestive of malignant small round cell tumour. Immunohistochemical analysis together with the clinical and radiological findings led to the definitive diagnosis of Askin's tumour. Despite receiving multimodality therapy, she had residual soft tissue mass and died afte...
Source: The Clinical Respiratory Journal - November 26, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Kiranjit Sidhu, Surender Kashyap, R. S. Negi, Anjali Solanki Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Glomus tumor of the trachea
(Source: The Clinical Respiratory Journal)
Source: The Clinical Respiratory Journal - November 26, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Zahra Aryan, Khawaja Salman Zaki, Michael Machuzak, Atul C. Mehta Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research