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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 7.

Aerosol-Transmitted Infections—a New Consideration for Public Health and Infection Control Teams
This article reviews the evidence and characteristics of some of the accepted (tuberculosis, measles, chickenpox, whooping cough) and some of the more opportunistic (influenza, Clostridium difficile, norovirus) aerosol-transmitted infectious agents and outlines methods of detecting and quantifying transmission. (Source: Current Treatment Options in Infectious Diseases)
Source: Current Treatment Options in Infectious Diseases - July 22, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Human Rhinovirus Types and Association with Respiratory Symptoms During the First Year of Life
Human rhinoviruses (HRV) cause respiratory infections and are associated with asthma development. We assessed HRV prevalence, types and association with respiratory symptoms in the first year of life in 20 unselected infants. HRV was detected in 32% of 825 weekly nasal swabs. Seventy-four different types of all three species were identified. HRV presence and related respiratory symptoms are highly heterogeneous. (Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal)
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - July 22, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Brief Reports Source Type: research

Factors Affecting Staphylococcus aureus Colonization of the Nasopharynx in the First 6 Months of Life
Conclusions: SA colonization of NP begins very early in life and declines quickly. Methicillin-resistant SA has lower ability to maintain prolonged colonization status than methicillin-susceptible strains in the first 6 months of life. As the NP is colonized with other respiratory bacterial pathogens, the colonization with SA declines; however, this effect is stronger with Gram-negative bacteria, such as NTHI and MC. (Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal)
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - July 22, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research

Household Food Insecurity is Associated with Respiratory Infections Among 6–11-Month Old Infants in Rural Ghana
Conclusion: Infants living in food insecure households are at an increased risk of respiratory tract morbidity. Interventions that address HHFI might be important to improve infant health in rural Ghana. (Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal)
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - July 22, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research

Stress index for positive end‐expiratory pressure titration in prone position: a piglet study
ConclusionsStress index can be used to titrate PEEP in the prone position in a surfactant‐depleted lung injury model. (Source: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica)
Source: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica - July 22, 2015 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: C. Pan, R. Tang, J. Xie, J. Xu, S. Liu, T. Yu, Y. Huang, F. Guo, Y. Yang, H. Qiu Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Impact of acute exposure to WTC dust on ciliated and goblet cells in lungs of rats
Inhalation Toxicology, Ahead of Print. (Source: Inhalation Toxicology)
Source: Inhalation Toxicology - July 22, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: article Source Type: research

Trends in mortality associated with opening of a full-capacity public emergency department at the main tertiary-level hospital in Tanzania
Conclusions The opening of a full-capacity ED in a tertiary-level hospital in sub-Saharan Africa was associated with a significant decrease in hospital mortality. This is despite a small, but significant, increase in the mortality rate in the ED as compared to that in the casualty room that it replaced. (Source: International Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: International Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 22, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

A maintenance hemodialysis diabetic patient with unexplained pulmonary and gastrointestinal involvement
Abstract A 50‐year‐old man with diabetes mellitus with diabetic retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, hypertension, and end‐stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis, presented with persistent cough and hiccups, continued to be unwell with weight loss, poor appetite, and recurrent respiratory symptoms such as wheezing and cough. Whole body positron emission tomography‐computed tomography scan showed metabolically active lesions in liver, stomach/lesser sac, pancreas, and left sixth rib. As he had repeated bilateral transudative pleural effusion, left mini thoracotomy with pleural biopsy showed no evidence of gr...
Source: Hemodialysis International - July 22, 2015 Category: Hematology Authors: Anand Yuvaraj, Georgi Abraham, Abraham Kurien, Priyanka Koshy, Sanjeev Nair, Sudhakshina Ghosh Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Severe liver failure due to influenza A infection in a hemodialysis patient
We report a case of a hemodialysis patient with influenza A infection who presented with severe hepatitis and liver failure, while his respiratory symptoms were mild. It is important to recognize influenza infection as an unexplained cause of hepatitis and liver failure. In our case, liver failure resolved with supportive treatment. (Source: Hemodialysis International)
Source: Hemodialysis International - July 22, 2015 Category: Hematology Authors: Maggie Ming Yee Mok, Vincent Chi Chung Cheng, Sing Leung Lui, Lorraine Pui Yuen Kwan, Gary Chi Wang Chan, Desmond Yat Hin Yap, Tak Mao Chan, Wai Kei Lo Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Polymorphisms in genes of respiratory control and sudden infant death syndrome
Abstract Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is a multifactorial syndrome and assumingly, among other mechanisms, a deficit in respiratory control leads to a failure of arousal and autoresuscitation when the child is challenged by a stressful homeostatic event, e.g., hypoxia. We hypothesize that genetic polymorphisms involved in respiratory control mediated in the medulla oblongata contribute to SIDS. Therefore, a total of 366 SIDS cases and 421 controls were genotyped for 48 SNPs in 41 candidate genes. Genotyping was performed using Fluidigm nanofluidic technology. Results were obtained for 356 SIDS and 406 contr...
Source: International Journal of Legal Medicine - July 22, 2015 Category: Medical Law Source Type: research

Asymmetric dimethylarginine contributes to airway nitric oxide deficiency in patients with COPD
ConclusionWhile circulating ADMA is higher, NO is lower in COPD and both show a strong correlation to the degree of airflow limitation. ADMA seems to be a possible new marker of prognosis of COPD and can be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of COPD. (Source: The Clinical Respiratory Journal)
Source: The Clinical Respiratory Journal - July 22, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Murat Aydin, Nejat Altintas, Levent Cem Mutlu, Bulent Bilir, Mustafa Oran, Feti Tülübaş, Birol Topçu, İsmail Tayfur, Volkan Küçükyalçin, Gizem Kaplan, Ahmet Gürel Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Increased disease activity, severity and autoantibody positivity in rheumatoid arthritis patients with co‐existent bronchiectasis
ConclusionsIncreased levels of RA disease activity, severity and RA autoantibodies are demonstrated in patients with RA and co‐existent bronchiectasis compared to patients with RA alone, despite lower tobacco exposure. This study demonstrates that BRRA is a more severe systemic disease than RA alone. (Source: APLAR Journal of Rheumatology)
Source: APLAR Journal of Rheumatology - July 22, 2015 Category: Rheumatology Authors: Elizabeth Perry, Paul Eggleton, Anthony De Soyza, David Hutchinson, Clive Kelly Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Disrupting differential hypoxia in peripheral veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
Patients receiving circulatory support with peripheral veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) are at risk of developing differential hypoxia. This phenomenon occurs in patients with concomitant respiratory failure. Poorly oxygenated blood, ejected into the ascending aorta from the left ventricle, competes with retrograde flow from the ECMO circuit, potentially causing myocardial and cerebral ischaemia. In a recent Critical Care article, Hou et al. use an animal model of peripheral VA-ECMO to study the physiology of differential hypoxia. Their findings support a dual circuit hypothesis, and show how dif...
Source: Critical Care - July 22, 2015 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Matthew Cove Source Type: research

A Drosophila model for mito-nuclear diseases generated by an incompatible interaction between tRNA and tRNA synthetase [RESEARCH ARTICLE]
ABSTRACT Communication between the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes is vital for cellular function. The assembly of mitochondrial enzyme complexes, which produce the majority of cellular energy, requires the coordinated expression and translation of both mitochondrially and nuclear-encoded proteins. The joint genetic architecture of this system complicates the basis of mitochondrial diseases, and mutations both in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)- and nuclear-encoded genes have been implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction. Previously, in a set of mitochondrial-nuclear introgression strains, we characterized a dual genome epistas...
Source: DMM Disease Models and Mechanisms - July 22, 2015 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Holmbeck, M. A., Donner, J. R., Villa-Cuesta, E., Rand, D. M. Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Electrical aspects of the osmorespiratory compromise: TEP responses to hypoxia in the euryhaline killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) in freshwater and seawater [SHORT COMMUNICATION]
Chris M. Wood and Martin Grosell The osmorespiratory compromise, the trade-off between the requirements for respiratory and ionoregulatory homeostasis at the gills, becomes more intense during environmental hypoxia. One aspect that has been previously overlooked is possible change in transepithelial potential (TEP) caused by hypoxia, which will influence branchial ionic fluxes. Using the euryhaline killifish, we show that acute hypoxia reduces the TEP across the gills by approximately 10 mV in animals acclimated to both freshwater (FW) and seawater (SW), with a higher PO2 threshold in the former. TEP becomes nega...
Source: Journal of Experimental Biology - July 22, 2015 Category: Biology Authors: Wood, C. M., Grosell, M. Tags: SHORT COMMUNICATION Source Type: research

Flight-motor-driven respiratory airflow increases tracheal oxygen to nearly atmospheric level in blowflies (Calliphora vicina) [RESEARCH ARTICLE]
Lutz T. Wasserthal It is widely accepted that an efficient oxygen supply and removal of CO2 in small flying insects are sufficiently performed by diffusion with open spiracles. This paper shows that in the tethered flying blowfly, gas exchange occurs by autoventilation and unidirectional airflow. The air is inspired through the mesothoracic spiracles (Sp1) during the downstroke of the wings and is expired through the metathoracic spiracles (Sp2) during the upstroke. This directed airflow through the thoracic tracheal system was documented by pre-atrial pressure measurements at the Sp1 and Sp2, revealing a sub-atmospheric m...
Source: Journal of Experimental Biology - July 22, 2015 Category: Biology Authors: Wasserthal, L. T. Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research

Flow cytometric measurement of respiratory burst activity and surface expression of neutrophils for septic patient prognosis
Conclusions: Neutrophil surface antigen (CD64, CD10, and CD16) could reflect sepsis severity. High CD64 expression and high RBA at early phase of sepsis might be associated with better prognosis, whereas high expression of CD10 and CD16 at late phase of sepsis might be associated with better prognosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. (Source: Cytometry Part B: Clinical Cytometry)
Source: Cytometry Part B: Clinical Cytometry - July 22, 2015 Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Mi Hyun Bae, So Hee Park, Chan‐Jeoung Park, Eun‐Jung Cho, Bo‐Ra Lee, Young Jin Kim, Sang Hyuk Park, Young‐Uk Cho, Seongsoo Jang, Dong‐Keun Song, Sang‐Bum Hong Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus–Associated Disease in Feedlot Cattle
Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDv) is associated with bovine respiratory disease complex and other diseases of feedlot cattle. Although occasionally a primary pathogen, BVDv’s impact on cattle health is through the immunosuppressive effects of the virus and its synergism with other pathogens. The simple presence or absence of BVDv does not result in consistent health outcomes because BVDv is only one of many risk factors that contribute to disease syndromes. Current interventions have limitations and the optimum strategy for their uses to limit the health, production, and economic costs associated with BVDv have to be ca...
Source: Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice - July 22, 2015 Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Robert L. Larson Source Type: research

A Systematic Review of Bovine Respiratory Disease Diagnosis Focused on Diagnostic Confirmation, Early Detection, and Prediction of Unfavorable Outcomes in Feedlot Cattle
A large proportion of newly arrived feedlot cattle are affected with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Economic losses could be reduced by accurate, early detection. This review evaluates the available literature regarding BRD confirmatory diagnostic tests, early detection methods, and modalities to estimate post-therapeutic prognosis or predict unfavorable or fatal outcomes. Scientific evidence promotes the use of haptoglobin to confirm BRD status. Feeding behavior, infrared thermography, and reticulorumen boluses are promising methods. Retrospective analyses of routinely collected treatment and cohort data can be used to...
Source: Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice - July 22, 2015 Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Barbara Wolfger, Edouard Timsit, Brad J. White, Karin Orsel Source Type: research

Plant-based Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus VLPs induce an immune response in mice
Publication date: Available online 22 July 2015 Source:Research in Veterinary Science Author(s): Laura Uribe-Campero, Alberto Monrroy-García, Ana L. Durán-Meza, María V. Villagrana-Escareño, Jaime Ruíz-García, Jesús Hernández, Héctor G. Núñez-Palenius, Miguel A. Gómez-Lim Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) significantly affects the swine industry worldwide. An efficient, protective vaccine is still lacking. Here, we report for the first time the generation and purification of PRRSV virus like particles (VLPs) by expressing GP5, M and N genes in Nicotiana silvestris plants. The...
Source: Research in Veterinary Science - July 22, 2015 Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research

Innate and adaptive immunity against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus
Publication date: Available online 17 July 2015 Source:Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology Author(s): Crystal L. Loving, Fernando A. Osorio, Michael P. Murtaugh, Federico A. Zuckermann Many highly effective vaccines have been produced against viruses whose virulent infection elicits strong and durable protective immunity. In these cases, characterization of immune effector mechanisms and identification of protective epitopes/immunogens has been informative for the development of successful vaccine programs. Diseases in which the immune system does not rapidly clear the acute infection and/or convalescent immuni...
Source: Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology - July 22, 2015 Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research

The role of infectious diseases in the catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome
Publication date: Available online 22 July 2015 Source:Autoimmunity Reviews Author(s): M. Garcia-Carrasco, C. Mendoza-Pinto, S. Macias-Diaz, F. Vazquez de Lara, I. Etchegaray-Morales, J.L. Galvez-Romero, S. Mendez-Martinez, R. Cervera Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS), also called “Asherson syndrome”, is a variant of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) that occurs in less than 1% of APS cases. The etiology of CAPS is uncertain; however, several triggering factors have been recognized. The most common of these are infectious diseases, particularly those of the respiratory tract. CAPS pathogenesis i...
Source: Autoimmunity Reviews - July 22, 2015 Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

Respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic motion monitoring during stereotactic liver radiation therapy: First results.
CONCLUSION: Respiratory gating based on internal electromagnetic motion monitoring was performed for two liver SBRT patients. The gating added robustness to the dose delivery and ensured a high CTV dose even in the presence of large intrafraction motion. PMID: 26198651 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Acta Oncologica)
Source: Acta Oncologica - July 22, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Poulsen PR, Worm ES, Hansen R, Larsen LP, Grau C, Høyer M Tags: Acta Oncol Source Type: research

Identification and comparison of the predictors of maximal inspiratory force and handgrip in a healthy elderly population. The Proof study
A severe weakness of peripheral muscles occurs in half of the persons aged 80 years or older. The common factors between muscle depletion and reduced respiratory strength have not yet been established. (Source: Clinical Nutrition)
Source: Clinical Nutrition - July 22, 2015 Category: Nutrition Authors: Frédéric Costes, Sébastien Celle, Martin Garet, Michel Kossovsky, Frédéric Roche, Jean Claude Barthélémy Source Type: research

Concentration of fractional excretion of nitric oxide (FENO): A potential airway biomarker of restored CFTR function
Lower airway biomarkers of restored cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function are limited. We hypothesized that fractional excretion of nitric oxide (FENO), typically low in CF patients, would demonstrate reproducibility during CFTR-independent therapies, and increase during CFTR-specific intervention (ivacaftor) in patients with CFTR gating mutations. (Source: Journal of Cystic Fibrosis)
Source: Journal of Cystic Fibrosis - July 22, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Kavitha Kotha, Rhonda D. Szczesniak, Anjaparavanda P. Naren, Matthew C. Fenchel, Leo L. Duan, Gary L. McPhail, John P. Clancy Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Association Between Glucose Metabolism and Sleep-Disordered Breathing during REM Sleep.
CONCLUSIONS: AHIREM is associated with insulin resistance but not with fasting glycemia or glucose intolerance. PMID: 26200994 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine)
Source: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - July 22, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Chami HA, Gottlieb DJ, Redline S, Punjabi NM Tags: Am J Respir Crit Care Med Source Type: research

A Multicenter Randomized Trial of Continuous versus Intermittent β-Lactam Infusion in Severe Sepsis.
CONCLUSIONS: In critically ill patients with severe sepsis, there was no difference in outcomes between β-lactam antibiotic administration by continuous and intermittent infusion. Clinical trial registration available at www.anzctr.org.au, ID ACTRN12612000138886. PMID: 26200166 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine)
Source: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - July 22, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Dulhunty JM, Roberts JA, Davis JS, Webb SA, Bellomo R, Gomersall C, Shirwadkar C, Eastwood GM, Myburgh J, Paterson DL, Starr T, Paul SK, Lipman J Tags: Am J Respir Crit Care Med Source Type: research

Airflow Limitation and Histology-shift in the National Lung Screening Trial: the NLST-ACRIN Cohort Substudy (N=18, 714).
Conclusions In the CT arm of the NLST-ACRIN cohort, COPD status was associated with a doubling of lung cancer incidence, no apparent overdiagnosis and a more favourable stage shift. PMID: 26199983 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine)
Source: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - July 22, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Young RP, Duan F, Chiles C, Hopkins RJ, Gamble GD, Greco EM, Gatsonis C, Aberle D Tags: Am J Respir Crit Care Med Source Type: research

Antiviral activities of whey proteins.
Abstract Milk contains an array of proteins with useful bioactivities. Many milk proteins encompassing native or chemically modified casein, lactoferrin, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-lactoglobulin demonstrated antiviral activities. Casein and alpha-lactalbumin gained anti-HIV activity after modification with 3-hydroxyphthalic anhydride. Many milk proteins inhibited HIV reverse transcriptase. Bovine glycolactin, angiogenin-1, lactogenin, casein, alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine lactoferrampin, and human lactoferrampin inhibited HIV-1 protease and integrase. Several mammalian lactoferrins prevented hepati...
Source: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology - July 22, 2015 Category: Microbiology Authors: Ng TB, Cheung RC, Wong JH, Wang Y, Ip DT, Wan DC, Xia J Tags: Appl Microbiol Biotechnol Source Type: research

Sex hormone-related neurosteroids differentially rescue bioenergetic deficits induced by amyloid-β or hyperphosphorylated tau protein.
Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease marked by a progressive cognitive decline. Metabolic impairments are common hallmarks of AD, and amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and hyperphosphorylated tau protein-the two foremost histopathological signs of AD-have been implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction. Neurosteroids have recently shown promise in alleviating cognitive and neuronal sequelae of AD. The present study evaluates the impact of neurosteroids belonging to the sex hormone family (progesterone, estradiol, estrone, testosterone, 3α-androstanediol) on mitochondrial dysfunction in...
Source: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS - July 22, 2015 Category: Cytology Authors: Grimm A, Biliouris EE, Lang UE, Götz J, Mensah-Nyagan AG, Eckert A Tags: Cell Mol Life Sci Source Type: research

Silencing of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 in human lung microvascular endothelial cells using particle platforms for siRNA delivery.
Abstract Acute lung injury (ALI) and its most severe manifestation, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), is a clinical syndrome defined by acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates consistent with edema. In-hospital mortality is 38.5% for ALI, and 41.1% for ARDS. Activation of alveolar macrophages in the donor lung causes the release of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, such as TNF-α. To determine the relevance of TNF-α in disrupting bronchial endothelial cell function, we stimulated human THP-1 macrophages with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and used the cytokine-supplemen...
Source: Current Drug Targets - July 22, 2015 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Bai L, Andersson HA, McConnell K, Chan D, Hernandez M, Gonzalez J, Liu X, La Francesca S, Sakamoto J, Serda RE Tags: Curr Drug Targets Source Type: research

Paresthesia and sensory disturbances associated with 2009 pandemic vaccine receipt: Clinical features and risk factors.
CONCLUSION: Paresthesia following 2009 pandemic vaccine receipt lasted several weeks and included other motor-sensory disturbances in an important subset of patients. Although it does not correspond with known neurological disease, and causality remains uncertain, further investigation is warranted to understand the nature and frequency of paresthesia as a possible AEFI with influenza vaccines. PMID: 26209839 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Vaccine)
Source: Vaccine - July 22, 2015 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: De Serres G, Rouleau I, Skowronski DM, Ouakki M, Lacroix K, Bédard F, Toth E, Landry M, Dupré N Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research

Antiadenovirus drug discovery: potential targets and evaluation methodologies.
Abstract Human adenoviruses (HAdV) are the cause of many acute infections, mostly in the respiratory and gastrointestinal (GI) tracts, as well as conjunctivitis. HAdV diseases in immunocompetent individuals are mostly self-limiting; however, in immunocompromised individuals, especially in pediatric units, HAdV infections are the cause of high morbidity and mortality. Despite the significant clinical impact, there are currently no approved antiviral therapies for HAdV infections. Here, we provide an overview of the different targets that could be considered for the design of specific drugs against HAdV, as well as t...
Source: Drug Discovery Today - July 22, 2015 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Martínez-Aguado P, Serna-Gallego A, Marrugal-Lorenzo JA, Gómez-Marín I, Sánchez-Céspedes J Tags: Drug Discov Today Source Type: research

Study of correlation between forced vital capacity and demand for healthcare services in severe asthmatics
Conclusion For this sample we conclude, that reduced forced vital capacity correlated with asthma severity, defined by greater demand for care in the ER, ICU and hospital ward and was more evident in women. (Source: Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine)
Source: Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine - July 21, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research

Ambient PM2.5 exposure exacerbates severity of allergic asthma in previously sensitized mice
Journal of Asthma, Ahead of Print. (Source: Journal of Asthma)
Source: Journal of Asthma - July 21, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: article Source Type: research

Olfactory deposition of inhaled nanoparticles in humans
Inhalation Toxicology, Ahead of Print. (Source: Inhalation Toxicology)
Source: Inhalation Toxicology - July 21, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: article Source Type: research

A mechanistic review of silica-induced inhalation toxicity
Inhalation Toxicology, Ahead of Print. (Source: Inhalation Toxicology)
Source: Inhalation Toxicology - July 21, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: article Source Type: research

Airways resistance and specific conductance for the diagnosis of obstructive airways diseases
This study investigated the contribution of R AW and sG AW to a diagnosis of obstructive airways disease and their role in differentiating asthma from COPD. Methods: 976 subjects admitted for the first time to a pulmonary practice in Belgium were included. Clinical diagnoses were based on complete pulmonary function tests and supported by investigations of physicians’ discretion. 651 subjects had a final diagnosis of obstructive diseases, 168 had another respiratory disease and 157 subjects had no respiratory disease (healthy controls). Results: R AW and s...
Source: BioMed Central - July 21, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Marko TopalovicEric DeromChristian OsadnikThierry TroostersMarc DecramerWim Janssenson behalf of the Belgian Pulmonary Function Study Investigators Source Type: research

Lung stress and strain calculations in mechanically ventilated patients in the intensive care unit
ConclusionStress and strain can reliably be calculated at the bedside based on non‐invasive EELV measurements during a decremental PEEP trial in patients with different diseases. (Source: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica)
Source: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica - July 21, 2015 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: P. Blankman, D. Hasan, I. G. Bikker, D. Gommers Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

What motivates antibiotic dispensing in accredited drug dispensing outlets in Tanzania? A qualitative study
Conclusion To reduce inappropriate antibiotic use, integrated interventions must include communities, health facilities, and ADDOs. Periodic refresher training with an emphasis on communication skills is crucial in helping dispensers deal with customers who demand antibiotics. Responsible authorities should ensure that ADDOs always have the necessary tools and resources available. (Source: Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control)
Source: Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control - July 21, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

Morbidities in Neonates Delivered Electively at Early Term
Conclusion Despite recommendations, more than one-third of term babies are delivered electively at <39 weeks. The fivefold augmented respiratory morbidity and fourfold increased NICU admissions in early term neonates, and the least morbidity in neonates delivered at 39 weeks emphasize the importance of restricting the non-emergent/elective deliveries to 39 weeks of gestation. (Source: The Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology of India)
Source: The Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology of India - July 21, 2015 Category: OBGYN Source Type: research

Admission serum magnesium levels and the risk of acute respiratory failure
ConclusionBoth admission hypomagnesemia and hypermagnesemia were associated with an increased risk for in‐hospital ARF. (Source: International Journal of Clinical Practice)
Source: International Journal of Clinical Practice - July 21, 2015 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: C. Thongprayoon, W. Cheungpasitporn, N. Srivali, S. B. Erickson Tags: Original Paper Source Type: research

Pulmonary ultrasound and pulse oximetry versus chest radiography and arterial blood gas analysis for the diagnosis of acute respiratory distress syndrome: a pilot study
This study was designed to test whether pulmonary ultrasound and pulse oximetry could be used in place of traditional radiographic and oxygenation evaluation for ARDS. Methods: This study was a prospective, single-center study in the ICU of Harborview Medical Center, a referral hospital in Seattle, Washington, USA. Bedside pulmonary ultrasound was performed on ICU patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation. Pulse oximetric oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ), partial pressure of oxygen (PaO 2 ), fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO 2 ), provider diagnoses, and chest...
Source: Critical Care - July 21, 2015 Category: Intensive Care Authors: Cameron BassDana SajedAdeyinka AdedipeT. West Source Type: research

Influenza dynamics and control in households [Medical Sciences]
Household-based interventions are the mainstay of public health policy against epidemic respiratory pathogens when vaccination is not available. Although the efficacy of these interventions has traditionally been measured by their ability to reduce the proportion of household contacts who exhibit symptoms [household secondary attack rate (hSAR)], this metric is difficult... (Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences)
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - July 21, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Lau, M. S. Y., Cowling, B. J., Cook, A. R., Riley, S. Tags: Biological Sciences Source Type: research

The two transmembrane helices of CcoP are sufficient for assembly of the cbb3-type heme-copper oxygen reductase from Vibrio cholerae
Publication date: October 2015 Source:Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Bioenergetics, Volume 1847, Issue 10 Author(s): Young O. Ahn, Hyun Ju Lee, Daniel Kaluka, Syun-Ru Yeh, Denis L. Rousseau, Pia Ädelroth, Robert B. Gennis The C-family (cbb 3) of heme-copper oxygen reductases are proton-pumping enzymes terminating the aerobic respiratory chains of many bacteria, including a number of human pathogens. The most common form of these enzymes contains one copy each of 4 subunits encoded by the ccoNOQP operon. In the cbb 3 from Rhodobacter capsulatus, the enzyme is assembled in a stepwise manner, with an essentia...
Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) Bioenergetics - July 21, 2015 Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research