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This page shows you the latest items in this publication. This is page number 2.

Renal colic: current protocols for emergency presentations
Flank pain caused by renal colic is a common presentation to emergency departments. This paper reviews the acute clinical assessment of these patients, outlines appropriate diagnostic strategies with labwork and imaging and updates the reader on conservative treatments, suitable choices for analgesia and indications for surgical intervention. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment instituted in the Emergency Department can rapidly and effectively manage this excruciatingly painful condition. (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 21, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research

Emergency medicine: this is what we do
No abstract available (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 21, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Emergency Medicine training and working conditions in Europe: a joint EuSEM young doctors – European Junior Doctors Survey
No abstract available (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - October 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Knowledge of ‘trusted person’ and ‘advance directive’ in end-of-life situations in prehospital emergency medicine 10 years after Leonetti’s law publication
No abstract available (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - October 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Management of brain-dead donors outside the intensive care unit: a necessary recourse
No abstract available (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - October 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Stethoscope versus point-of-care ultrasound in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea: a randomized trial
We aimed to determine the accuracies of point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS) and stethoscopes as part of the physical examinations of patients with dyspnea. Three emergency medicine specialists in each of two groups of ultrasound and stethoscope performers underwent didactic and hands-on training on PoCUS and stethoscope usage. All the patients enrolled were randomized to one of two predetermined PoCUS or stethoscope groups. The diagnostic performance of ultrasonography was higher than that of the stethoscope in the diagnoses of heart failure (90 vs. 86%, 1.00 vs. 0.89, and 5.00 vs. 4.92, respectively) and pneumonia (90 vs. 86...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - October 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Short Reports Source Type: research

A quantitative tool for measuring the quality of medical training in emergency medicine
The most common method of assessing the quality of medical education is through a selection of qualitative assessments, usually as part of a programme evaluation. Common qualitative assessments include measurements of students’ and teachers’ participation, outcome measures such as assessment results, and qualitative assessments such as interviews and questionnaires of students and teachers. Programme evaluation can therefore be a process that is both laborious and subject to accusations of a lack of objectivity. As a result, the development of a quantitative tool that could be used alongside a programme evaluation may ...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - October 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Short Reports Source Type: research

Training paramedics in focussed echo in life support
This study is a prospective observational pilot study. Data were collected during a 1-day course training 11 paramedics to perform ELS scans on healthy volunteers. The students were assessed on image acquisition skills and theoretical knowledge (including interpretation). Level 1 ultrasound-trained emergency medicine physicians undertook the training and assessment. Results: All paramedics could obtain images in the parasternal and subxiphoid views. When performing scans in the 10-s pulse check window, 88% of attempts in both views were successful (subxiphoid mean image quality 3.8 out of 5, parasternal 4.0). Theoretical k...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - October 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

A description of echocardiography in life support use during cardiac arrest in an Emergency Department before and after a training programme
Objectives: To investigate echocardiography in life support (ELS) use in Emergency Department (ED) cardiac arrest patients before and after a training day. Methods: A prospective before and after cohort study. Data was collated over a 24-month period before and after an ELS training day from our ED ultrasound database [Registry of Emergency Based Ultrasound Scanning (REBUS)], ED electronic patient records and from stored digital ELS scans. Results: In the year before ELS training, eight of 187 cardiac arrest patients had ELS performed (4.3%). In the year after training, 46 of 232 cardiac arrest patients had ELS performed (...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - October 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Goal-directed ultrasound in emergency medicine: evaluation of a specific training program using an ultrasonic stethoscope
Conclusion: The performance of 30 supervised and goal-oriented examinations appeared adapted to adequately answer clinical questions covered by core applications of emergency US. (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - October 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Use of sedation in children receiving computed tomography after head injuries
Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the use of procedural sedation for head trauma-related computed tomography of the brain (CTB) in children and its association with age and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores. Patients and methods: A retrospective review was carried out of charts of children undergoing a CTB for head injury at a tertiary paediatric emergency department with an annual census of 82 000 over a 2-year period. Patients were identified through the database of an ongoing prospective study involving children with head injuries of all severity. We extracted demographics, GCS scores, characteristics of...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - October 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Emergency department procedural sedation: the London experience
Conclusion: Procedural sedation and analgesia can be safely and effectively performed in the ED by appropriately trained emergency physicians. (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - October 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Ketamine for procedural sedation by a doctor-paramedic prehospital care team: a 4-year description of practice
Conclusion: We describe the use of ketamine over a 4-year period for prehospital procedural sedation. Minimum standards for patient monitoring were documented in only around a quarter of cases. (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - October 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

The effect of the introduction of a regional major trauma network on triage decisions made by a physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service
Background: A major trauma network (MTN) has been in place in the East of England, with a single hospital operating as the major trauma centre (MTC). The primary aim of this retrospective cohort study was to determine whether triage destination decisions with regard to trauma patients made by a helicopter-based doctor–paramedic team are affected by the introduction of a regional trauma network. In addition, we will describe and discuss the logistics of transfer of injured patients attended by the service. Methods: This is a retrospective database review that was carried out over two 12-month periods. The first period was...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - October 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

First-pass intubation success rate during rapid sequence induction of prehospital anaesthesia by physicians versus paramedics
Introduction: Endotracheal intubation is a frequently performed procedure for securing the airway in critically injured or ill patients. Performing prehospital intubation may be challenging and intubation skills vary. We reviewed the first-attempt tracheal intubation success rate in a Dutch prehospital setting. Patients and methods: We studied our database for all intubations performed by helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) physicians, HEMS nurse and ambulance paramedics under HEMS supervision between January 2007 and July 2012. The primary outcome was success rate, number of intubation attempts and alternative ai...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - October 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Understanding the prehospital physician controversy. Step 2: analysis of on-scene treatment by ambulance nurses and helicopter emergency medical service physicians
Conclusion: HEMS physicians provide additional treatment in 45% of patients. The additional treatment increases the perceived usefulness of the HEMS physician. The presence of the HEMS physician was also considered useful when the physician did not provide any additional treatment, possibly because of diagnostic competence and clinical decision-making. (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - October 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in in-hospital cardiac arrest: a systematic review
With increasing rates of in-hospital cardiac arrest, improving resuscitation outcomes is essential. Mechanical chest compressors seem to be related to improved outcome in out-of hospital cardiac arrest; however, the literature on its use in in-hospital cardiac arrest is scarce. We used the Medline public database to systematically review patient outcomes considering mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in in-hospital cardiac arrest. Fourteen studies were found, most cases (n=17), three cohort studies, a clinical pilot study and a registry study. The reported survival rate was high (35 out of 89 patients, 39%) and full ...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - October 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Difficulties to study the geographical origin of a publication
No abstract available (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Research in prehospital emergency medicine: comparison by geographic origin of publications
No abstract available (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

In a difficult access scenario, supraglottic airway devices improve success and time to ventilation
The success of tracheal intubation (TI) is unacceptably low in unconventional positions. Supraglottic airway devices (SAD) have become an important alternative. An airway manikin was placed in a car, simulating an entrapped motor vehicle accident victim. The rescuer only had access through the driver’s door. Participants were (n=25) anaesthesiologists with experience in prehospital emergency medicine. They attempted to secure the airway by TI or an SAD (Ambu AuraOnce, iGel, laryngeal tube) in a random sequence. Performance was compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistic...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Short Reports Source Type: research

Why do patients with nonurgent conditions present to the Emergency Department despite the availability of alternative services?
The aim of this study was to investigate why nonurgent patients present to the Emergency Department (ED) despite availability of alternative services; also to assess impact of the UK Choose Well Campaign. A convenience sample of nonurgent ED attenders was surveyed in North Wales, UK. More than half of patients sought advice from friends, family, carer or GP before attending ED. Of the one-third of patients who had not tried an alternative service before presenting to ED, reasons given included patients thinking that they might need a radiograph (46%), believing that GP would be unable to help (29%) or stating that GP was n...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Short Reports Source Type: research

Reliability of electronic recording of waiting times in the emergency department: a prospective multicenter study
We aimed to evaluate the reliability of waiting times (WT) measures electronically retrieved. We prospectively collected true WT in four emergency departments during 20 predefined 2-h inclusion periods, and compared them with the electronically retrieved waiting time (ERWT). We assessed agreement with calculation of rate of outliers (difference exceeding 20 min), bias, and its 95% limits of agreements, and associated Bland and Altman plot. We analyzed 274 patients. The mean difference was −2 min (SD 13) between ERWT and true WT, with a 95% limits of agreements (−28 to 24 min). Bland and Altman plot showed a good ...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Short Reports Source Type: research

The burden of sepsis in the Emergency Department: an observational snapshot
In conclusion our results suggest that sepsis is more common than previously reported and this represents a significant burden on ED. (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Short Reports Source Type: research

Relationship between category size and journals’ impact factor: implications for emergency medicine journals and researchers
Conclusion: There is a negative relationship between JCR size category and IF achieved by the journals. This places EM journals at a clear disadvantage because they represent one of the smallest clinical medical research disciplines. (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Low back pain in the paediatric athlete
Conclusion: No consistent demonstrable association was established between clinical presentation and final diagnosis. It was found that red flags could not be relied upon for the inclusion or the exclusion of a significant radiological finding. This study therefore suggests that, in this population group, a significant diagnosis cannot always be reliably excluded from clinical assessment alone. (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Acute sore throat in children at the emergency department: best medical practice?
Background: Belgian antibiotic (AB) policy guidelines discourage the use of ABs in sore throat in otherwise healthy individuals; yet, 35% of all children with sore throat in our pediatric emergency department receive a prescription for ABs. Objective: To identify factors influencing our physician’s prescription behavior. Patients and methods: Using a retrospective study, we analyzed all medical records of children younger than 16 years of age diagnosed with sore throat (in 2009 and 2010). We included 1345 files. Results: Children younger than 5 years of age received an AB prescription more easily (37.8 vs. 27.7%; P=0.000...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Infection prevention practices in Swedish emergency departments: results from a cross-sectional survey
Conclusion: A minority of Swedish EDs are participating in projects to address hand hygiene and catheter-associated urinary tract infection. Frequent auditing of hand hygiene compliance may improve compliance rates. (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Predictive accuracy and feasibility of risk stratification scores for 28-day mortality of patients with sepsis in an emergency department
Objectives: Sepsis is associated with high mortality. Because early therapy has proven to decrease mortality, a risk stratification tool that quickly and easily quantifies mortality risk of patients will be helpful to guide appropriate treatment. We investigated five scores in terms of (a) predicting 28-day mortality and (b) their feasibility for use in the emergency department (ED). Materials and methods: We carried out a historical cohort study in the ED of Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC). Patients who fulfilled the criteria for sepsis were included if they had been admitted to the hospital by an internist be...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

External validation of the MISSED score to predict mortality in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock in the emergency department
Objective: The Mortality in Severe Sepsis in the Emergency Department (MISSED) score was derived to predict in-hospital mortality in septic patients in the emergency department (ED). The present study aimed to validate the MISSED score in patients receiving early goal-directed therapy (EGDT). Methods: Data were analyzed from 280 patients who received EGDT in a tertiary center ED in Korea. Age 65 years and above, albumin level 27 g/l or less, and international normalized ratio of at least 1.2 were variables included in the MISSED score. Results: With a cutoff point of 5.5, the odds ratio for death was 2.17 (95% confidence i...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Internal emergency department validation of the simplified MISSED score
Background: The MISSED score was derived and validated in emergency department (ED) patients with sepsis who were admitted to the ICU. This score has now been refined and simplified. The independent variables associated with mortality are age at least 65 years, serum albumin 27 g/l or less, and an international normalized ratio at least 1.3. The simplified MISSED score ranges from 0 to 3 depending on the number of variables present. Objective: The primary objective is to validate the simplified MISSED score for predicting all-cause mortality in the ED population admitted with sepsis. The secondary end-point is to validat...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Effectiveness of the Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus protocol in enhancing the function of an Emergency Department in Qatar
Conclusion: A highly protocolized surveillance system limited the impact of MERS-CoV on ED functioning by identifying and prioritizing high-risk patients. The emergence of new infectious diseases requires constant monitoring of interventions to reduce the impact of epidemics on population health and health services. (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Systematic review of frequent users of emergency departments in non-US hospitals: state of the art
This review focuses on frequent users (FUs) of the emergency department (ED). Elucidation of the characteristics of frequent ED users will help to improve healthcare services. A systematic review of the literature (from 1999 onwards) on frequent ED users in non-US hospitals was performed. Twenty-two studies were included. FUs are responsible for a wide variety of 1–31% of ED visits depending on the FU definition used. They have a mean age between 40 and 50 years and are older than nonfrequent users. Chronic physical and mental diseases seem to be the main reasons for frequent ED visits. In terms of social characteristics...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research

The level of evidence for emergency department performance indicators: systematic review
The aim of this study was to perform a comprehensive systematic review of emergency department performance indicators in relation to evidence. A systematic search was performed through PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL and COCHRANE databases with (and including synonyms of) the search words: [emergency medicine OR emergency department] AND [quality indicator(s) OR performance indicator(s) OR performance measure(s)]. Articles were included according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria using the PRISMA protocol. The level of evidence was rated according to the evidence levels by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Performanc...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research

Outbreaks, Middle East respiratory syndrome and sepsis in emergency care
No abstract available (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Response to Li and colleagues on hyperglycemia in hip fracture patients
No abstract available (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 25, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Assessing the association of hyperglycaemia with mortality in patients with hip fractures
No abstract available (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 25, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Ultrasound evaluation of an atypical traumatic rupture of the tunica albuginea
No abstract available (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 25, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Severe Accidental Hypothermia Center
Hypothermic patients may be rewarmed using passive or active techniques. In case of severe accidental hypothermia (temperature (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 25, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Short Reports Source Type: research

Acute stroke: why do some patients arrive in time and others do not?
The aim of this study was to evaluate which factors are associated with early hospital arrival and help-seeking delays in acute stroke. All consecutive eligible patients were interviewed face-to-face within 72 h of admission. Factors associated with early arrival were assessed by univariate and multivariate analysis. The data of 195 patients were analysed. The patients who first called the emergency medical services rather than the family physician arrived earlier (odds ratio 15.9, 95% confidence interval 3.23–78.3, P (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 25, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Short Reports Source Type: research

Lactate is associated with increased 10-day mortality in acute medical patients: a hospital-based cohort study
An increased lactate level is related to increased mortality in subpopulations of critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether lactate was related to mortality in an emergency department (ED) setting of undifferentiated medical patients. All adult patients admitted from March 2009 to August 2011 to a medical ED with lactate measured within 6 h after arrival were studied. Lactate was stratified into 1-mmol/l intervals and analysed in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 5317 patients were included, 46.9% men, median age 71 years (5–95% percentiles 25–90 years). The media...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 25, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Short Reports Source Type: research

What parental characteristics can predict child maltreatment at the Emergency Department? Considering expansion of the Hague Protocol
This study investigated whether additional parental characteristics could be included to improve the chance of detection. Using a nested case–control design, we compared parents identified as child abusers who were missed by the Protocol with a matched group of nonabusing parents. The parental characteristics used were, among others, all physical injuries possibly resulting from domestic violence, psychological, or mental complaints that might indicate elevated domestic stress levels and the number of Emergency Department visits during the previous year. None of the characteristics were statistically significantly associ...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 25, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Short Reports Source Type: research

Air versus ground transport of patients with acute myocardial infarction: experience in a rural-based helicopter medical service
Conclusion: Using HEMS in a rural region allows STEMI patients to benefit from appropriate rescue care with delays similar to those seen in urban settings. (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 25, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Emergency dispatch process and patient outcome in bystander-witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with a shockable rhythm
This study was part of the FINNRESUSCI study focusing on the epidemiology and outcome of OHCA in Finland. Witnessed [not by Emergency Medical Service (EMS)] OHCA patients with initial shockable rhythm in the southern and the eastern parts of Finland during a 6-month period from March 1 to August 31 2010, were electronically collected from eight dispatch centres and from paper case reports filled out by EMS crews. Results: Of the 164 patients, 82.3% (n=135) were correctly recognized by the EMD as cardiac arrests. The majority of all calls (90.7%) were dispatched within 2 min. Patients were more likely to survive and be disc...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 25, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Rapid infusion pump overestimates delivered flow during rapid vascular filling: a bench study
Objective: Despite now being rarely used in the prehospital and emergency department arena because of their excessive length and low inner diameter, narrow-bore central venous catheters (CVC) are sometime used to perform fluid resuscitation using a rapid infusion pump to enhance delivered flow. In this bench study, we tested the hypothesis that the delivered flow rate downstream from the catheter connected to a rapid infusion pump would be significantly lower than the preset flow rate, and this difference would be affected by the catheter size. Materials and methods: Eight units of each type of catheter [two 15 and 20 cm n...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 25, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Acute allergic reactions in the emergency department: characteristics and management practices
Conclusion: The incidence of ED visits for acute allergic reaction was high compared with other studies, although the majority of cases were mild. Deviations from published guidelines on the treatment of anaphylaxis are common, with rare use of epinephrine and heavy reliance on H1-antihistamines both in the ED and at discharge. This did not seem to result in any measurable impact on mortality. (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 25, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Does offering pricing information to resident physicians in the emergency department potentially reduce laboratory and radiology costs?
Objectives: The aim of this study was to establish whether price list information could reduce laboratory and radiological examination costs in emergency departments (EDs). Materials and methods: A prospective survey of adult (>16 years old) admissions was conducted at the ED of a university hospital in Belgium. Nine resident emergency physicians were followed for a span of 6 months, which was divided into 2-month periods: control (October and November 2011), intervention (December 2011 to January 2012), and washout (February and March 2012). Laboratory and radiological costs for each of the daily admissions were calculate...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 25, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Decreased general condition in the emergency department: high in-hospital mortality and a broad range of discharge diagnoses
Background: Decreased general condition (DGC) is a frequent presenting complaint within the Adaptive Triage Process. DGC describes a nonspecific decline in health and well-being, and it is common among elderly patients in the emergency department (ED). Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the in-hospital mortality among patients presenting with DGC with that among patients in the corresponding triage category presenting with other complaints to an ED. The secondary aim was to describe the discharge diagnoses of patients presenting with DGC. Methods: All patients admitted to Södersjukhuset from the ED in 2008 were inc...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 25, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Targets and the emergency medical system – intended and unintended consequences
Objective: There is interest in health service reform and efficiencies; health service providers collect statistics, set targets and compare institutions. In January 2009, in Ireland, a national waiting time target of 6 h was set from registration in the emergency department (ED) to admission or discharge. The aim of this study was to assess the consequences of the introduction of this target on our institution and the Acute Medical Admission Unit. Methods: All emergency medical admissions were tracked over 7 years and in-hospital mortality, length of stay and ED ‘wait’ numbers and times were summarized. Results: There...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 25, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

Quality of work life, burnout, and stress in emergency department physicians: a qualitative review
A 2006 literature review reported that emergency department (ED) physicians showed elevated burnout levels and highlighted several environment and personal issues contributing toward burnout. Research on burnout in EDs is limited. We propose an updated qualitative review on the relationships between work stress, burnout, and quality of work life in ED physicians. We searched MEDLINE, PsycInfo, and Science Direct for studies published since 2005. Of 491 papers, 10 papers were retained, using validated measures and having a minimum of 75 participants. Data extraction was performed manually by the first author and was reviewe...
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 25, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

Rhythm recognition is accountable for the majority of hands-off time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation – a simulation study: Erratum
No abstract available (Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: European Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 6, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Erratum Source Type: research