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With a little help from our friends: Couple social integration in marriage.
The benefits of social integration (i.e., structural or affective connectedness with others and with social institutions) have been frequently noted for individuals’ personal well-being. In a similar fashion, recent marital research has highlighted how the social integration of a couple also appears to positively affect marital well-being. However, beyond main effects, little research to date has considered whether couples’ social integration possesses moderating effects for spouses’ marital quality as well. Among a sample of 492 married individuals, the present study explored whether spouses’ reports of the social...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 8, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Barton, Allen W.; Futris, Ted G.; Nielsen, Robert B. Source Type: research

Nonsupportive parenting affects telomere length in young adulthood among African Americans: Mediation through substance use.
Telomere length (TL) is an indicator of age-related changes at the cellular level associated with heightened mortality risk. The effect of nonsupportive parenting (NSP) during late adolescence and young adulthood on TL 5 years later was examined in a sample of N = 183 young adult African Americans to determine if effects of NSP on TL were mediated by substance use. Results indicated that the effect of caregiver reported NSP on diminished TL was mediated by escalation of drinking and smoking in young adulthood, even after controlling effects of socioeconomic status risk, gender, BMI, young adult stress, and intervention sta...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 8, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Beach, Steven R. H.; Lei, Man Kit; Brody, Gene H.; Yu, Tianyi; Philibert, Robert A. Source Type: research

Long-term follow-up of a randomized trial of family foundations: Effects on children’s emotional, behavioral, and school adjustment.
This study examines long-term effects of a transition to parenthood program, Family Foundations, designed to enhance child outcomes through a strategic focus on supporting the coparenting relationship. Roughly 5 to 7 years after baseline (pregnancy), parent and teacher reports of internalizing and externalizing problems and school adjustment were collected by mail for 98 children born to couples enrolled in the randomized trial. Teachers reported significantly lower levels of internalizing problems among children in the intervention group compared with children in the control group and, consistent with prior findings at ag...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 8, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Feinberg, Mark E.; Jones, Damon E.; Roettger, Michael E.; Solmeyer, Anna; Hostetler, Michelle L. Source Type: research

Income and children’s behavioral functioning: A sequential mediation analysis.
This study uses data from the Early Steps Multisite (ESM) project (N = 731) to investigate associations between family income in early childhood and children’s conduct problems and emotional problems in middle childhood. The study explores whether the associations from income to child conduct problems and emotional problems operate through maternal depressive symptoms and 3 family risk factors in early childhood—harsh parenting, parenting hassles, and chaos in the home environment. Results of a sequential mediation model revealed significant indirect effects of family income on children’s conduct problems operating t...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Shelleby, Elizabeth C.; Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth; Shaw, Daniel S.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Wilson, Melvin N.; Gardner, Frances Source Type: research

Income, neighborhood stressors, and harsh parenting: Test of moderation by ethnicity, age, and gender.
Family and neighborhood influences related to low-income were examined to understand their association with harsh parenting among an ethnically diverse sample of families. Specifically, a path model linking household income to harsh parenting via neighborhood disorder, fear for safety, maternal depressive symptoms, and family conflict was evaluated using cross-sectional data from 2,132 families with children ages 5–16 years from Chicago. The sample was 42% Mexican American, 41% African American, and 17% European American. Results provide support for a family process model where a lower income-to-needs ratio is associated...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Barajas-Gonzalez, R. Gabriela; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne Source Type: research

Change in participant engagement during a family-based preventive intervention: Ups and downs with time and tension.
This study examines how and why participants’ engagement–conceptualized as a dynamic process wherein participants interact with each other, the interventionists, and the intervention curriculum–changes over time. We apply growth curve models to repeated measures of engagement obtained from 252 families during a 7-week intervention trial. In the models, we examine (a) whether and how engagement changes over time, and the extent of between-person differences in change; and (b) how those changes and differences are related to chronic and session-specific aspects of family tension, while also controlling for differences ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bamberger, Katharine T.; Coatsworth, J. Douglas; Fosco, Gregory M.; Ram, Nilam Source Type: research

Introduction to the special section on religion and spirituality in family life: Pathways between relational spirituality, family relationships and personal well-being.
This special section on faith and family life presents 5 studies that each offer novel insights into the complex web of linkages between a target family member’s religious and/or spiritual (R/S) functioning and parental or family factors that may influence the target family member’s psychological or R/S functioning. The outcome domain of interest is adolescent psychological functioning in the first three studies, parental stress in the fourth study, and the R/S functioning of adult children in the fifth study. In this introduction, we feature unique findings from each study. We then highlight 3 key conceptual issues th...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mahoney, Annette; Cano, Annmarie Source Type: research

Intimate relationship involvement, intimate relationship quality, and psychiatric disorders in adolescents.
Prior research has shown that poor relationship quality in marriage and other intimate relationships demonstrates cross-sectional and longitudinal associations with a variety of psychiatric disorders in adults. In comparison, there has been less research on the covariation between relationship quality and psychiatric disorders in adolescents, a developmental period that is associated with elevated risk of incidence of several disorders and that is important for the acquisition and maintenance of intimate relationships. The present study was conducted to examine the associations between intimate relationship involvement, in...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 3, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Whisman, Mark A.; Johnson, Daniel P.; Li, Angela; Robustelli, Briana L. Source Type: research

Genetic susceptibility to family environment: BDNF Val66met and 5-HTTLPR influence depressive symptoms.
Functional genetic polymorphisms associated with Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and serotonin (5-HTTLPR) have demonstrated associations with depression in interaction with environmental stressors. In light of evidence for biological connections between BDNF and serotonin, it is prudent to consider genetic epistasis between variants in these genes in the development of depressive symptoms. The current study examined the effects of val66met, 5-HTTLPR, and family environment quality on youth depressive symptoms in adolescence and young adulthood in a longitudinal sample oversampled for maternal depression history. A...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 27, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dalton, Elizabeth D.; Hammen, Constance L.; Najman, Jake M.; Brennan, Patricia A. Source Type: research

Fathers’ sensitive parenting and the development of early executive functioning.
Using data from a diverse sample of 620 families residing in rural, predominately low-income communities, this study examined longitudinal links between fathers’ sensitive parenting in infancy and toddlerhood and children’s early executive functioning, as well as the contribution of maternal sensitive parenting. After accounting for the quality of concurrent and prior parental care, children’s early cognitive ability, and other child and family factors, fathers’ and mothers’ sensitive and supportive parenting during play at 24 months predicted children’s executive functioning at 3 years of age. In contrast, pat...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 27, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Towe-Goodman, Nissa R.; Willoughby, Michael; Blair, Clancy; Gustafsson, Hanna C.; Mills-Koonce, W. Roger; Cox, Martha J. Source Type: research

Family stress and adolescents’ cognitive functioning: Sleep as a protective factor.
We examined 2 sleep–wake parameters as moderators of the associations between exposure to family stressors and adolescent cognitive functioning. Participants were 252 school-recruited adolescents (M = 15.79 years; 66% European American, 34% African American). Youths reported on 3 dimensions of family stress: marital conflict, harsh parenting, and parental psychological control. Cognitive functioning was indexed through performance on the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities. Sleep minutes and efficiency were measured objectively using actigraphy. Toward identifying unique effects, path models controlled for ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 20, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: El-Sheikh, Mona; Tu, Kelly M.; Erath, Stephen A.; Buckhalt, Joseph A. Source Type: research

Cultural dynamics and marital relationship quality in Mexican-origin families.
Prior research suggests that acculturation may influence relationship outcomes among Mexican-origin married couples, including marital adjustment and distress. Despite much theory and research on parent–child cultural differences and disruptions in the parent–child relationship, no previous research has investigated possible associations between husband–wife cultural differences and marital relationship quality. With a sample of Mexican-origin married couples (N = 398), the current study investigated the relations between husband–wife differences in acculturation (American orientation) and enculturation (Mexican or...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 13, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Cruz, Rick A.; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Corona, Marissa; King, Kevin M.; Cauce, Ana Mari; Robins, Richard W.; Widaman, Keith F.; Conger, Rand D. Source Type: research

A randomized clinical trial to test the efficacy of a family-focused, culturally informed therapy for schizophrenia.
Research strongly suggests that family interventions can benefit patients with schizophrenia, yet current interventions often fail to consider the cultural context and spiritual practices that may make them more effective and relevant to ethnic minority populations. We have developed a family focused, culturally informed treatment for schizophrenia (CIT-S) patients and their caregivers to address this gap. Sixty-nine families were randomized to either 15 sessions of CIT-S or to a 3-session psychoeducation (PSY-ED) control condition. Forty-six families (66.7%) completed the study. The primary aim was to test whether CIT-S w...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 6, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Weisman de Mamani, Amy; Weintraub, Marc J.; Gurak, Kayla; Maura, Jessica Source Type: research

Safety-related moderators of a parent-based HIV prevention intervention in South Africa.
Our study examined factors influencing the effectiveness of a parent-based HIV prevention intervention implemented in Cape Town, South Africa. Caregiver-youth dyads (N = 99) were randomized into intervention or control conditions and assessed longitudinally. The intervention improved a parenting skill associated with youth sexual risk, parent–child communication about sex and HIV. Analyses revealed that over time, intervention participants (female caregivers) who experienced recent intimate partner violence (IPV) or unsafe neighborhoods discussed fewer sex topics with their adolescent children than caregivers in safer ne...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 6, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tarantino, Nicholas; Goodrum, Nada; Armistead, Lisa P.; Cook, Sarah L.; Skinner, Donald; Toefy, Yoesrie Source Type: research

The role of ex-POWs’ PTSD symptoms and trajectories in wives’ secondary traumatization.
Secondary traumatization describes the phenomenon whereby those in proximity to trauma survivors develop psychological symptoms similar to those experienced by the direct survivor. The current study examined secondary trauma (ST) and generalized distress symptoms (general psychiatric symptomatology, functional disability, and self-rated health) in wives of former prisoners of war (ex-POWs). The study compared wives of Israeli ex-POWs from the 1973 Yom Kippur War with wives of a matched control group of non-POW Yom Kippur War combat veterans (CVs). The wives also were divided into groups based on their husbands’ current p...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 29, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Greene, Talya; Lahav, Yael; Bronstein, Israel; Solomon, Zahava Source Type: research

Introduction to the special section on religion and spirituality in family life: Delving into relational spirituality for couples.
In light of the ongoing salience of spirituality and religion for individuals across the globe, this special section presents four rigorous empirical studies that tie conceptually based and potentially malleable spiritual constructs to better marital functioning. These studies exemplify an emerging subfield called Relational Spirituality, which focuses on the ways that couples can draw on specific spiritual cognitions and behaviors to motivate them to create, maintain, and transform their unions (Mahoney, 2010, 2013). In this introduction, we first provide a thumbnail sketch of the past 3 decades of empirical research in t...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 29, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mahoney, Annette; Cano, Annmarie Source Type: research

Daily positive spillover and crossover from mothers’ work to youth health.
Prior research shows that employees’ work experiences can “spill over” into their family lives and “cross over” to affect family members. Expanding on studies that emphasize negative implications of work for family life, this study examined positive work-to-family spillover and positive and negative crossover between mothers and their children. Participants were 174 mothers in the extended care (nursing home) industry and their children (ages 9–17), both of whom completed daily diaries on the same 8 consecutive evenings. On each workday, mothers reported whether they had a positive experience at work, youth rep...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 22, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lawson, Katie M.; Davis, Kelly D.; McHale, Susan M.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Buxton, Orfeu M. Source Type: research

Partner support and maternal depression in the context of the Iowa floods.
A systematic investigation of the role of prenatal partner support in perinatal maternal depression was conducted. Separate facets of partner support were examined (i.e., received support and support adequacy) and a multidimensional model of support was applied to investigate the effects of distinct types of support (i.e., informational, physical comfort, emotional/esteem, and tangible support). Both main and stress-buffering models of partner support were tested in the context of prenatal maternal stress resulting from exposure to a natural disaster. Questionnaire data were analyzed from 145 partnered women using growth c...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 22, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brock, Rebecca L.; O’Hara, Michael W.; Hart, Kimberly J.; McCabe, Jennifer E.; Williamson, J. Austin; Laplante, David P.; Yu, Chunbo; King, Suzanne Source Type: research

Positive parenting, beliefs about parental efficacy, and active coping: Three sources of intergenerational resilience.
Prior research involving parents (G1) and their adult children (G2) shows intergenerational continuity in positive parenting. Previous research, however, has not shown circumstances under which the typically modest effect size for intergenerational continuity is augmented or attenuated. Using a multigenerational data set involving 290 families, we evaluated 2 potential moderators of intergenerational continuity in positive parenting (i.e., beliefs about parenting efficacy and active coping strategies) drawn from prior theoretical work on predictors of parenting (Belsky, 1984). These personal resources of the second-generat...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 15, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Schofield, Thomas J.; Conger, Rand D.; Neppl, Tricia K. Source Type: research

Sensitivity, child regulatory processes, and naturally occurring declines in antisocial behavior across childhood.
Despite considerable research on why antisocial behavior develops and interventions that reduce it, aspects of everyday family processes that may promote naturally occurring declines in antisocial behavior or that may result from such declines in most children without intervention are poorly understood. The current study explored family processes that may enable children to replace antisocial tendencies and the effects that declines in antisocial behavior may have on parenting and child regulatory processes. Longitudinal data from 1,022 children (54 months–6th grade) from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Dev...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 15, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Buck, Katharine Ann Source Type: research

Children’s appraisals of conflict, beliefs about aggression, and externalizing problems in families characterized by severe intimate partner violence.
This research examined whether children’s threat and self-blame appraisals regarding interparental conflict and their beliefs about the justifiability of aggression predicted children’s externalizing problems in families in which there had been recent severe intimate partner violence (IPV). Participants were 106 children (62 boys, 44 girls) aged 7 to 10 and their mothers. Families in which there had been recent severe IPV were recruited during their stay at a domestic violence shelter. Children completed measures of threat, self-blame, beliefs about the justifiability of aggression, and externalizing problems. Mothers ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 15, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jouriles, Ernest N.; Vu, Nicole L.; McDonald, Renee; Rosenfield, David Source Type: research

Adoption status and family relationships during the transition to young adulthood.
Although adoptive family research has increased, most has focused on childhood and adolescence. Despite the known importance of parent−adolescent relationships drawn from the general population, we know little about how adoptive family relationships change or remain the same as adopted adolescents enter young adulthood. Using the Sibling Interaction and Behavior Study, the purpose of this study was to build on previous research to explore differences in conflict, closeness, and relationship quality between adoptive and nonadoptive families during the transition from late adolescence into young adulthood. Self-report and ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 15, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Walkner, Amy J.; Rueter, Martha A. Source Type: research

Maternal child-centered attributions and harsh discipline: The moderating role of maternal working memory across socioeconomic contexts.
Cognitive models of parenting give emphasis to the central role that parental cognitions may play in parental socialization goals. In particular, dual process models suggest that parental attribution styles affect the way parents interpret caregiving situations and enact behaviors, particularly within the realm of discipline. Although research has documented the negative behavioral repercussions of dysfunctional child-centered responsibility biases, there is heterogeneity in the level of these associations. Research has also demonstrated that parental working memory capacity may serve as an individual difference factor in ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 15, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sturge-Apple, Melissa L.; Suor, Jennifer H.; Skibo, Michael A. Source Type: research

Coherence and content of conflict-based narratives: Associations to family risk and maladjustment.
This study examined the role of structural and content characteristics of children’s conflict-based narratives (coherence, positive and aggressive themes) in the association between early childhood family risk and children’s internalizing and externalizing problems in a sample of 193 children (97 girls, 96 boys) aged 3 to 5 years (M = 3.85, SD = .48). Parents participated in an interview on family related risk factors; teachers and parents completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire; children completed conflict-based narratives based on the MacArthur Story Stem Battery (MSSB). We specifically investigated th...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 8, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Müller, Eva; Perren, Sonja; Wustmann Seiler, Corina Source Type: research

The effects of domestic violence allegations on custody evaluators’ recommendations.
Judges and attorneys often request professional assessments from child custody evaluators when allegations of adult domestic violence (DV) have been made, but it is unclear whether and how evaluators’ recommendations are impacted by these allegations. Custody evaluators (N = 607) in the United States responded to a multiple-segment factorial vignette designed to examine the effects of 2 key factors in DV allegations: type of alleged violence (conflict-based, control-based) and counterallegations (none, mutual, and female-initiated). Effects of control- versus conflict-based DV allegations by the mother on custody recomme...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 1, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hans, Jason D.; Hardesty, Jennifer L.; Haselschwerdt, Megan L.; Frey, Laura M. Source Type: research

Benefit finding and relationship quality in Parkinson’s disease: A pilot dyadic analysis of husbands and wives.
Parkinson’s disease (PD) significantly impacts both patients’ and spouses’ emotional and physical health. However, despite the importance of social relationships for wellbeing, few studies have examined relationship quality and their correlates in individuals with PD and their partners. Specifically, no known studies have examined the association between benefit finding, or the experience of personal growth and other positive changes in the face of a stressor, and perceived marital quality. To address these gaps in the field, 25 married couples participated in a cross-sectional, pilot study. Patients were veterans di...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 1, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mavandadi, Shahrzad; Dobkin, Roseanne; Mamikonyan, Eugenia; Sayers, Steven; Ten Have, Thomas; Weintraub, Daniel Source Type: research

Relationship problems over the early years of marriage: Stability or change?
Although couples’ management of differences and problems is widely assumed to be central to the course and outcome of their relationships, some theoretical perspectives hold that marital conflicts increase over the newlywed years, whereas others maintain that couples’ problems remain stable. We tested these opposing views by examining changes in marital problems and marital satisfaction over the first 4 years of marriage in a sample of 169 newlywed couples. Although marital satisfaction declined on average, overall levels of marital problems remained stable. Analyses of 19 specific problems generally revealed considera...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 25, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lavner, Justin A.; Karney, Benjamin R.; Bradbury, Thomas N. Source Type: research

Family and neighborhood disadvantage, home environment, and children’s school readiness.
The purpose of this study was to examine associations between family socioeconomic risk, neighborhood disadvantage, and children’s school readiness. A sample of 420 children from 48 early childcare programs yielded multi-informant data. The average age was 55.3 months (SD = 6.4), with 38% of children being Black, non-Hispanic, Hispanic, or other minority race (American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander). One third (32.4%) of the parents had annual incomes less than $30,000. We used multilevel structural equation modeling to test direct and indirect associations among family socioecon...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 25, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeon, Lieny; Buettner, Cynthia K.; Hur, Eunhye Source Type: research

Children’s responses to mother–infant and father–infant interaction with a baby sibling: Jealousy or joy?
Firstborn children’s reactions to mother–infant and father–infant interaction after a sibling’s birth were examined in an investigation of 224 families. Triadic observations of parent–infant–sibling interaction were conducted at 1 month after the birth. Parents reported on children’s problem behaviors at 1 and 4 months after the birth and completed the Attachment Q-sort before the birth. Latent profile analysis (LPA) identified 4 latent classes (behavioral profiles) for mother–infant and father–infant interactions: regulated-exploration, disruptive-dysregulated, approach-avoidant, and anxious-clingy. A fi...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 25, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Volling, Brenda L.; Yu, Tianyi; Gonzalez, Richard; Kennedy, Denise E.; Rosenberg, Lauren; Oh, Wonjung Source Type: research

Couples and breast cancer: Women’s mood and partners’ marital satisfaction predicting support perception.
This study examined the ways in which a woman’s daily mood, pain, and fatigue, and her spouse’s marital satisfaction predict the woman’s report of partner support in the context of breast cancer. Pretest data from a larger intervention study and multilevel modeling were used to examine the effects of women’s daily mood, pain, and fatigue and average levels of mood, pain, and fatigue on women’s report of social support received from her partner, as well as how the effects of mood interacted with partners’ marital satisfaction. Results show that on days in which women reported higher levels of negative or positiv...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 18, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Boeding, Sara E.; Pukay-Martin, Nicole D.; Baucom, Donald H.; Porter, Laura S.; Kirby, Jennifer S.; Gremore, Tina M.; Keefe, Francis J. Source Type: research

The longitudinal impact of intimate partner aggression and relationship status on women’s physical health and depression symptoms.
Intimate partner aggression (IPA) has many detrimental effects, particularly among young women. The present study examined the longitudinal effects of IPA victimization and relationship status on physical health and depression symptoms in a sample of 375 community women between the ages of 18 and 25 years. All variables were assessed at 4 occasions over a 12-month period (i.e., 1 assessment every 4 months). Multilevel modeling revealed that IPA victimization had both between- and within-person effects on women’s health outcomes, and relationship status had within-person effects when women did not report current IPA. Alth...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 18, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Watkins, Laura E.; Jaffe, Anna E.; Hoffman, Lesa; Gratz, Kim L.; Messman-Moore, Terri L.; DiLillo, David Source Type: research

Shared possible selves, other-focus, and perceived wellness of couples with prostate cancer.
Shared possible selves are associated with better well-being in couples through their engagement in and enjoyment of collaboration (Schindler, Berg, Butler, Fortenberry, & Wiebe, 2010). The present study sought to address which partner’s other-focus accounted for this sharedness in possible selves and how the individual and dyadic configurations of other-focused selves relate to health and well-being (i.e., perceived wellness) in an important health context for adult couples—prostate cancer. Sixty-one men diagnosed with prostate cancer and their wives rated their own subjective physical health and well-being and listed...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 11, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Wilson, Stephanie J.; Barrineau, Mary Jon; Butner, Jonathan; Berg, Cynthia A. Source Type: research

Family dynamics and young children’s sibling victimization.
This research examines how family dynamics like interparental conflict, family violence, and quality of parenting are associated with young children’s experiences of sibling victimization. We use nationally representative data from interviews with caregivers of 1,726 children aged 2 to 9 years of age. We hypothesized different family dynamics predictors for a composite of common types of sibling victimization (property, psychological, and mild physical aggression) in comparison to severe physical sibling victimization (victimization that includes physical aggression with a weapon and/or injury). Multinomial regression re...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 11, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tucker, Corinna Jenkins; Finkelhor, David; Turner, Heather; Shattuck, Anne M. Source Type: research

The role of patient pain and physical function on depressive symptoms in couples with lung cancer: A longitudinal dyadic analysis.
Drawing on the Developmental-Contextual Model (Berg & Upchurch, 2007), we examined the association between changes in patient physical health (pain severity and physical function) and changes in depressive symptoms in couples with lung cancer over a 12-month period. Patients and their spouses or partners (n = 77) were recruited using rapid case ascertainment and completed five waves of data collection (baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months). Multilevel modeling was used to examine aggregate and time-varying effects of patient physical health on depressive symptoms. Results indicated that for patients and spouses, patient-rated ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 4, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lyons, Karen S.; Bennett, Jill A.; Nail, Lillian M.; Fromme, Erik K.; Dieckmann, Nathan; Sayer, Aline G. Source Type: research

Parent–child relationship quality moderates the link between marital conflict and adolescents’ physiological responses to social evaluative threat.
This study examined how marital conflict and parent–child relationship quality moderate individual differences in adolescents’ adrenocortical and autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses to social evaluative threat. Saliva samples (later assayed for cortisol and alpha-amylase, sAA) were collected from 153 youth (52% female; ages 10–17 years) before and after, and cardiovascular activity was assessed before and during, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Marital conflict predicted higher levels of sAA reactivity but lower levels of heart rate (HR) reactivity. Parent–child relationship quality moderated these associ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 4, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lucas-Thompson, Rachel G.; Granger, Douglas A. Source Type: research

A randomized controlled trial of brief coparenting and relationship interventions during the transition to parenthood.
The transition to parenthood has been repeatedly identified as a stressful period, with couples reporting difficulties in domains of individual, coparenting, and relationship functioning. Moreover, these difficulties have been shown to impact children’s development. To buffer against these difficulties, numerous effective parenting, couple, and combined interventions have been developed; however, these interventions are typically lengthy, which limits their potential for dissemination. Therefore, in the present study, we developed and tested separate 6-hr interventions that focused exclusively on improving either coparen...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 4, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Doss, Brian D.; Cicila, Larisa N.; Hsueh, Annie C.; Morrison, Kristen R.; Carhart, Kathryn Source Type: research

A dyadic analysis of relationships and health: Does couple-level context condition partner effects?
Adding to the growing literature explicating the links between romantic relationships and health, this study examined how both couple-level characteristics, particularly union type (e.g., dating, cohabiting, or marriage) and interracial pairing, and interpersonal characteristics (e.g., partner strain and support), predicted young adults’ physical and mental health. Using dyadic data from a sample of 249 young, primarily Black couples, we hypothesized and found support for the importance of couple-level context, partner behavior, and their interaction in predicting health. Interracial couples (all Black/non-Black pairings...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 4, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Barr, Ashley B.; Simons, Ronald L. Source Type: research

Meaningfulness of service and marital satisfaction in Army couples.
The vast numbers of military service members who have been deployed since 2001 highlights the need to better understand relationships of military couples. A unique consideration in military couples is the concept of meaningfulness of service, or the value service members and their partners place on military service in spite of the sacrifices it requires. In a sample of 606 Army couples, the authors used path analysis to examine how male service members’ and female spouses’ perceived meaningfulness of service added to the prediction of marital satisfaction in both members of the couple, when accounting for service membe...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 21, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bergmann, Jeffrey S.; Renshaw, Keith D.; Allen, Elizabeth S.; Markman, Howard J.; Stanley, Scott M. Source Type: research

Frequency of family meals and 6–11-year-old children’s social behaviors.
Family meals are regarded as an opportunity to promote healthy child development. In this brief report, we examined the relationship between frequency of family meals and children’s social behaviors in 6–11-year-olds. The 2007 U.S. National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) provided data on the frequency of family meals in a sample of 6–11-year-old children (N = 24,167). The following social behavior indicators were examined: child positive social skills, child problematic social behaviors, child engagement in school, and parental aggravation with the child. Individual logistic regression analyses were calculated ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lora, Karina R.; Sisson, Susan B.; DeGrace, Beth W.; Morris, Amanda S. Source Type: research

Associations between relationship quality and depressive symptoms in same-sex couples.
Extending research based on different-sex (i.e., heterosexual) couples, the authors explored associations between romantic relationship quality and depressive symptoms in a geographically diverse sample (N = 571) of U.S. adults in same-sex relationships. The authors also examined whether this association was moderated by individual characteristics (gender, age, and internalized heterosexism) or relationship factors (relationship length, commitment, and interdependence). Results indicated a moderate negative association between relationship quality and depressive symptoms, echoing findings from different-sex couples. This a...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Whitton, Sarah W.; Kuryluk, Amanda D. Source Type: research

Examining the impact of a family treatment component for CBITS: When and for whom is it helpful?
This study compared the Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS), as it is typically delivered, to CBITS-plus-family treatment component (CBITS + Family), developed through a community partnership. This study used a quasi-experimental design, capitalizing on ongoing CBITS implementation within a school system. In total, 32 parent/student dyads were recruited in CBITS groups and 32 parent/student dyads were recruited in CBITS + Family groups. Parents and students in both conditions completed pre- and posttreatment measures, in addition to a 6-month posttreatment follow-up assessing symptoms. Families ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Santiago, Catherine DeCarlo; Lennon, Jaclyn M.; Fuller, Anne K.; Brewer, Stephanie K.; Kataoka, Sheryl H. Source Type: research

Father involvement: Identifying and predicting family members’ shared and unique perceptions.
This study also identifies influences on these shared and unique perspectives. Father involvement reports were obtained when the child was 12 and 14 years old. Mother reports overlapped more with the shared view than father or child reports. This suggests the mother’s view may be more in line with broadly recognized father involvement. Regarding antecedents, for fathers’ unique view, a compensatory model partially explains results; that is, negative aspects of family life were positively associated with fathers’ unique view. Children’s unique view of engagement may partially reflect a sentiment override with father...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dyer, W. Justin; Day, Randal D.; Harper, James M. Source Type: research

Associations between prenatal coparenting behavior and observed coparenting behavior at 9-months postpartum.
This study tested whether expectant parents’ behavior in the Prenatal Lausanne Trilogue Play procedure (PLTP), an assessment designed in Switzerland for examining prebirth coparenting behavior, forecasted postnatal observations of coparenting behavior in a sample of first-time parents in the United States. Participants were 182 dual-earner couples expecting their first child. Couples completed the PLTP in the third trimester of pregnancy and observations of coparenting behavior at 9-months postpartum. Structural equation modeling analyses indicated significant continuity between expectant parents’ prenatal coparenting ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Altenburger, Lauren E.; Schoppe-Sullivan, Sarah J.; Lang, Sarah N.; Bower, Daniel J.; Kamp Dush, Claire M. Source Type: research

An ecological model of intimate partner violence perpetration at different levels of severity.
This study proposed and tested an ecological model of both general and clinically significant (i.e., injurious or fear-evoking) IPV perpetration (IPVPerp). Risk and promotive factors from multiple ecological levels of influence (i.e., individual, family, workplace, community) were hypothesized to be important in the prediction of IPVPerp. Although clinically significant IPVPerp and general IPVPerp were hypothesized to relate, specific risks for clinically significant IPVPerp were hypothesized. U.S. Air Force active duty members and civilian spouses (N = 34,861 men; 24,331 women) from 82 sites worldwide completed the 2006 C...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Smith Slep, Amy M.; Foran, Heather M.; Heyman, Richard E. Source Type: research

Does adolescents’ religiousness moderate links between harsh parenting and adolescent substance use?
We examined whether religiousness moderates the links between parents’ psychological and physical aggression and adolescent substance use directly and indirectly through adolescent self-control. The sample comprised adolescents (n = 220, 45% female) and their primary caregivers. Structural equation modeling analyses suggested that adolescents with low religiousness were likely to engage in substance use when subjected to harsh parenting, but there was no association between harsh parenting and substance use among adolescents with high religiousness. Furthermore, although harsh parenting was related to poor adolescent sel...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 30, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kim-Spoon, Jungmeen; Farley, Julee P.; Holmes, Christopher J.; Longo, Gregory S. Source Type: research

Adolescents’ relationship with God and internalizing adjustment over time: The moderating role of maternal religious coping.
A growing literature supports the importance of understanding the link between religiosity and youths’ adjustment and development, but in the absence of rigorous, longitudinal designs, questions remain about the direction of effect and the role of family factors. This paper investigates the bidirectional association between adolescents’ relationship with God and their internalizing adjustment. Results from 2-wave, SEM cross-lag analyses of data from 667 mother/adolescent dyads in Belfast, Northern Ireland (50% male, M age = 15.75 years old) supports a risk model suggesting that greater internalizing problems predict a ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 23, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Goeke-Morey, Marcie C.; Taylor, Laura K.; Merrilees, Christine E.; Shirlow, Peter; Cummings, E. Mark Source Type: research

Sanctification of marriage and spiritual intimacy predicting observed marital interactions across the transition to parenthood.
We examined whether 164 heterosexual, married couples’ reports of the sanctification of their marriage and their spiritual intimacy predicted their observed behavior across the transition to parenthood, using highly conservative statistical strategies to control for time-invariant factors and time-varying factors (marital love, collaborative communication skills) that could explain away these links. Spouses provided self-reports of marital sanctification and love, and joint reports of spiritual intimacy and collaboration by each partner. Criterion variables were positive and negative behaviors that spouses exhibited duri...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 23, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kusner, Katherine G.; Mahoney, Annette; Pargament, Kenneth I.; DeMaris, Alfred Source Type: research

Maternal dispositional empathy and electrodermal reactivity: Interactive contributions to maternal sensitivity with toddler-aged children.
The present study investigated maternal dispositional empathy and skin conductance level (SCL) reactivity to infant emotional cues as joint predictors of maternal sensitivity. Sixty-four mother–toddler dyads (31 boys) were observed across a series of interaction tasks during a laboratory visit, and maternal sensitivity was coded from approximately 55 minutes of observation per family. In a second, mother-only laboratory visit, maternal SCL reactivity to infant cues was assessed using a cry–laugh audio paradigm. Mothers reported on their dispositional empathy via a questionnaire. As hypothesized, mothers with greater di...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 23, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Emery, Helen T.; McElwain, Nancy L.; Groh, Ashley M.; Haydon, Katherine C.; Roisman, Glenn I. Source Type: research

When couples disconnect: Rumination and withdrawal as maladaptive responses to everyday stress.
Previous research has highlighted the importance of examining the interpersonal context of stress and coping. How individuals in a relationship respond to one another and cope with stress together have important outcomes on both individual and dyadic levels. The current study sought to examine 2 deleterious coping responses, rumination and interpersonal withdrawal, as they relate to occupational stress and interact in the home setting. An intensive longitudinal design was employed in a sample of 87 couples in which 1 partner was working as a paramedic. Over a period of 4 consecutive work shifts, daily reports of marital te...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 16, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: King, David B.; DeLongis, Anita Source Type: research

Gender minority stress, mental health, and relationship quality: A dyadic investigation of transgender women and their cisgender male partners.
Research has demonstrated associations between experiences of discrimination, relationship quality, and mental health. However, critical questions remain unanswered with regard to how stigma enacted and experienced at the dyadic-level influences relationship quality and mental health for transgender women and their cisgender (nontransgender) male partners. The present study sought to examine how experiences of transgender-related discrimination (i.e., unfair treatment, harassment) and relationship stigma (i.e., the real or anticipated fear of rejection based on one’s romantic affiliation) were associated with both partne...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 16, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gamarel, Kristi E.; Reisner, Sari L.; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Nemoto, Tooru; Operario, Don Source Type: research