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Self-reports and spouse ratings of neuroticism: Perspectives on emotional adjustment in couples.
Evidence of reciprocal associations between individual emotional adjustment and the quality of intimate relationships has led to the growing use of interventions that combine a focus on couple issues with a focus on individual emotional functioning. In these approaches, spouse ratings of emotional functioning can provide an important second method of assessment, beyond the much more commonly used self-reports. Although an extensive literature demonstrates substantial convergent correlations between self-reported and spouse-rated emotional adjustment, levels of adjustment evident across these 2 assessment methods are much l...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 6, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Smith, Timothy W.; Williams, Paula G. Source Type: research

Salivary cortisol responses to household tasks among couples with unexplained chronic fatigue.
This study examined salivary cortisol levels in couples in which one member had unexplained chronic fatigue (CF). The couples completed questionnaires and seven household activities in a laboratory setting and provided salivary cortisol samples prior to and immediately after the activities, as well as again after completing additional questionnaires and debriefing. The couples rated their interactions as similar to those at home, suggesting ecological validity, and patients with CF experienced the activities as involving more exertion than did their partners. The multilevel model results indicated that patients with CF had...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 6, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Schmaling, Karen B.; Romano, Joan M.; Jensen, Mark P.; Wilkinson, Charles W.; McPherson, Sterling Source Type: research

Marital status, marital quality, and heart rate variability in the MIDUS cohort.
This study uses data from the National Survey of Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) Biomarker Substudy (N = 907) to examine differences in HF-HRV by traditional marital status categories (married, divorced, widowed, and never married) as well as further differentiating between the continuously married and remarried. In addition, links were also examined between HF-HRV and changes in marital quality (marital satisfaction, support, strain) among individuals in long-term marriages. No significant differences in HF-HRV were observed between married persons and those widowed, divorced, and never married. However, continuously...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 6, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Donoho, Carrie J.; Seeman, Teresa E.; Sloan, Richard P.; Crimmins, Eileen M. Source Type: research

Parental criticism is an environmental influence on adolescent somatic symptoms.
Previous studies have suggested that parental criticism leads to more somatic symptoms in adolescent children. However, this research has not assessed the direction of causation or whether genetic and/or environmental influences explain the association between parental criticism and adolescent somatic symptoms. As such, it is impossible to understand the mechanisms that underlie this association. The current study uses the Extended Children of Twins design to examine whether parents’ genes, adolescents’ genes, and/or environmental factors explain the relationship between parental criticism and adolescent somatic sympto...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 6, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Horwitz, Briana N.; Marceau, Kristine; Narusyte, Jurgita; Ganiban, Jody; Spotts, Erica L.; Reiss, David; Lichtenstein, Paul; Neiderhiser, Jenae M. Source Type: research

Can mindful parenting be observed? Relations between observational ratings of mother–youth interactions and mothers’ self-report of mindful parenting.
Research on mindful parenting, an extension of mindfulness to the interpersonal domain of parent–child relationships, has been limited by its reliance on self-report assessment. The current study is the first to examine whether observational indices of parent–youth interactions differentiate between high and low levels of self-reported mindful parenting. The Iowa Family Interaction Rating Scales (IFIRS) were used to code interactions between mothers and their 7th grade youth. Mothers drawn from the top and bottom quartiles (n = 375) of a larger distribution of self-reported interpersonal mindfulness in parenting (N = 8...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 6, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Duncan, Larissa G.; Coatsworth, J. Douglas; Gayles, Jochebed G.; Geier, Mary H.; Greenberg, Mark T. Source Type: research

Two-year outcomes of the Early Risers prevention trial with formerly homeless families residing in supportive housing.
This article reports 2-year outcomes from a cluster randomized, controlled trial of the Early Risers (ER) program implemented as a selective preventive intervention in supportive housing settings for homeless families. Based on the goals of this comprehensive prevention program, we predicted that intervention participants receiving ER services would show improvement in parenting and child outcomes relative to families in treatment-as-usual sites. The sample included 270 children in 161 families, residing in 15 supportive housing sites; multimethod, multi-informant assessments conducted at baseline and yearly thereafter inc...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 6, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gewirtz, Abigail H.; DeGarmo, David S.; Lee, Susanne; Morrell, Nicole; August, Gerald Source Type: research

Prevention effects on trajectories of African American adolescents’ exposure to interparental conflict and depressive symptoms.
The present study investigates the trajectory of children’s exposure to interparental conflict during adolescence, its effects on adolescents’ psychological adjustment, as well as the ability of a family-centered prevention program to alter this trajectory. A total of 331 African American couples with an adolescent or preadolescent child participated in a randomized control trial of the Promoting Strong African American Families program, a newly developed program targeting couple and cocaregiving processes. Using a multi-informant, latent growth curve approach, child exposure to interparental conflict during adolescenc...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 6, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Barton, Allen W.; Beach, Steven R. H.; Kogan, Steven M.; Stanley, Scott M.; Fincham, Frank D.; Hurt, Tera R.; Brody, Gene H. Source Type: research

Getting the most out of family data with the R package fSRM.
Family research aims to explore family processes, but is often limited to the examination of unidirectional processes. As the behavior of 1 person has consequences that go beyond that individual, family functioning should be investigated in its full complexity. The social relations model (SRM; Kenny & La Voie, 1984) is a conceptual and analytical model that can disentangle family data from a round-robin design at 3 different levels: the individual level (actor and partner effects), the dyadic level (relationship effects), and the family level (family effect). Its statistical complexity may however be a hurdle for family re...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 2, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Stas, Lara; Schönbrodt, Felix; Loeys, Tom Source Type: research

Divorced mothers’ coparental boundary maintenance after parents repartner.
When divorced parents remarry or cohabit with new partners, it is challenging to maintain functional postdivorce coparenting systems. In this grounded theory study of 19 divorced mothers, we examined the processes by which they maintained boundaries around coparental relationships after 1 or both coparents had repartnered. Mothers saw themselves as captains of the coparenting team, making decisions about who should play what roles in parenting their children. They viewed themselves as having primary responsibility for their children, and they saw their children’s fathers as important coparenting partners. Mothers used a ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 2, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ganong, Lawrence; Coleman, Marilyn; Jamison, Tyler; Feistman, Richard Source Type: research

Parental knowledge of adolescent activities: Links with parental attachment style and adolescent substance use.
Parents’ knowledge of their adolescents’ whereabouts and activities is a robust predictor of adolescent risk behavior, including the use of drugs and alcohol. Surprisingly few studies have attempted to identify parental characteristics that are associated with the degree of parental knowledge. The present study is the first to examine how parental attachment style relates to mother, father, and adolescent reports of parental knowledge. Further, we used structural equation modeling to test the associations among parents’ attachment styles, reports of parental knowledge, and adolescents’ alcohol and marijuana use. Pa...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 2, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jones, Jason D.; Ehrlich, Katherine B.; Lejuez, C. W.; Cassidy, Jude Source Type: research

Dynamic changes in parent affect and adolescent cardiac vagal regulation: A real-time analysis.
The current study explored the role of parents’ negative and positive affect in adolescent respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) reactivity during a parent–adolescent conflict discussion task and the moderating effects of adolescent sex and age. Questionnaire data were collected from 206 adolescents (10–18 years of age; M = 13.37 years) and their primary caregivers (83.3% biological mothers). Electrocardiogram and respiration data were collected from adolescents, and RSA variables were computed. Parent affect was coded during the conflict discussion task. Multilevel modeling was used to distinguish the between- and with...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 2, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Cui, Lixian; Morris, Amanda Sheffield; Harrist, Amanda W.; Larzelere, Robert E.; Criss, Michael M. Source Type: research

Caregiving burden and uplifts: A contradiction or a protective partnership for the quality of life of parents and their children with asthma?
This study aimed to examine the caregiving experience of parents caring for a child with asthma and the moderating role of caregiving uplifts on the associations between caregiving burden and quality of life (QoL) of parents and their children. Participants were 180 dyads of children/adolescents with asthma between 8 and 18 years of age and one of their parents. The parents reported on caregiving burden and uplifts and on their QoL, and the children/adolescents completed a self-report measure of generic QoL. Results showed that although parents of children with intermittent asthma and parents of younger children presented ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 2, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Silva, Neuza; Carona, Carlos; Crespo, Carla; Canavarro, Maria Cristina Source Type: research

Household chaos, sociodemographic risk, coparenting, and parent-infant relations during infants’ first year.
Household chaos is a construct often overlooked in studies of human development, despite its theoretical links with the integrity of individual well-being, family processes, and child development. The present longitudinal study examined relations between household chaos and well-established correlates of chaos (sociodemographic risk, major life events, and personal distress) and several constructs that, to date, are theoretically linked with chaos but never before assessed as correlates (quality of coparenting and emotional availability with infants at bedtime). In addressing this aim, we introduce a new measure of househo...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 23, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Whitesell, Corey J.; Teti, Douglas M.; Crosby, Brian; Kim, Bo-Ram Source Type: research

The validity of retrospectively reported conflict interactions in couples.
This study investigated the extent to which researchers and clinicians can obtain valid retrospective self-reports of couples’ conflict interactions outside a laboratory setting. A distinction was made between relationship attribute variance, regarding a shared perspective of both partners, and informant-specific variance, regarding the unique vantage point of each partner. By examining convergent and divergent associations for each type of variance, this study clarified the risk that responses might be influenced by informant-specific biases related to levels of relationship satisfaction. This study also investigated po...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 16, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Backer-Fulghum, Lindsey M.; Sanford, Keith Source Type: research

Emulating real-life situations with a play task to observe parenting skills and child behaviors.
We describe a systematic process for developing the parent–child play task (PCPT) to assess mother–child interactions for a randomized controlled trial of a video-based parenting program. Participants were 307 mothers and their 3- to 6-year-old children who presented oppositional and disruptive behavior challenges. The validity of the PCPT was investigated by testing (a) the extent to which the tasks elicited the specific parent and child behaviors of interest, (b) the consistency of individuals’ behavior across the play tasks, and (c) the concurrent associations of the PCPT-observed child behaviors and mother report...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 16, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rusby, Julie C.; Metzler, Carol W.; Sanders, Matthew R.; Crowley, Ryann Source Type: research

Trajectories of children’s social interactions with their infant sibling in the first year: A multidimensional approach.
Individual differences in longitudinal trajectories of children’s social behaviors toward their infant sibling were examined simultaneously across multiple social dimensions: Positive engagement (moving toward), antagonism (moving against), and avoidance (moving away). Three distinct social patterns were identified: (C1) positively-engaged (n = 107, 50%); (C2) escalating-antagonism (n = 90, 42%); and (C3) early-onset antagonism (n = 16, 8%). Children in the positively-engaged class had high levels of positive engagement with their infant siblings, coupled with low levels of antagonism and avoidance. The escalating-antago...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 9, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Oh, Wonjung; Volling, Brenda L.; Gonzalez, Richard Source Type: research

Correction to Lougheed et al. (2014).
Reports an error in "Maternal Regulation of Child Affect in Externalizing and Typically-Developing Children" by Jessica P. Lougheed, Tom Hollenstein, Anna Lichtwarck-Aschoff and Isabela Granic (Journal of Family Psychology, Advanced Online Publication, Nov 17, 2014, np). In the article, errors due to a calculation error were noted in Table 2 and in the in-text references to the values reported in Table 2. The corrected version of the paragraph and the corrected version of Table 2 are presented below. The corrected calculations are no different in terms of the significance and direction of effects from the article originall...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 9, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: No authorship indicated Source Type: research

The role of parental self-efficacy in adolescent school-refusal.
Parental characteristics such as psychopathology and parenting practices are understood to be implicated in school-refusal presentations. Expanding upon these largely affective and behavioral factors, the present study sought to examine the role of a parenting cognitive construct—parenting self-efficacy—in understanding school-refusal. School-refusing adolescents (n = 60, 53% male) and school-attending adolescents (n = 46, 39% male) aged 12–17 years (M = 13.93, SD = 1.33), along with a parent, participated in the study. Participants completed study measures of demographics, psychopathology, overall family functioning...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 2, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Carless, Belinda; Melvin, Glenn A.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Newman, Louise K. Source Type: research

Maternal stress and internalizing symptoms in preschoolers: The moderating role of narrative coherence.
In the present study, we examined whether maternal psychosocial stress and children’s coherence in story-stem narratives are associated with preschool children’s internalizing symptoms and disorders, and whether narrative coherence moderates the association between maternal stress and children’s internalizing symptoms and disorders. The sample consists of 236 preschool children (129 girls, 107 boys; Mage = 5.15 years) and their mothers. Mothers completed questionnaires on their psychosocial stress burden and on child symptoms. A diagnostic interview (the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment; Egger & Angold, 2004) was...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 2, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Stadelmann, Stephanie; Otto, Yvonne; Andreas, Anna; von Klitzing, Kai; Klein, Annette Maria Source Type: research

A randomized clinical trial of family therapy in juvenile drug court.
The objective of this article is to examine the effectiveness of 2 theoretically different treatments delivered in juvenile drug court—family therapy represented by multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) and group-based treatment represented by adolescent group therapy (AGT)—on offending and substance use. Intent-to-treat sample included 112 youth enrolled in juvenile drug court (primarily male [88%], and Hispanic [59%] or African American [35%]), average age 16.1 years, randomly assigned to either family therapy (n = 55) or group therapy (n = 57). Participants were assessed at baseline and 6, 12, 18 and 24 months foll...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 26, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dakof, Gayle A.; Henderson, Craig E.; Rowe, Cynthia L.; Boustani, Maya; Greenbaum, Paul E.; Wang, Wei; Hawes, Samuel; Linares, Clarisa; Liddle, Howard A. Source Type: research

Correction to Dittman et al. (2014).
Reports an error in "Predicting success in an online parenting intervention: The role of child, parent, and family factors" by Cassandra K. Dittman, Susan P. Farruggia, Melanie L. Palmer, Matthew R. Sanders and Louise J. Keown (Journal of Family Psychology, 2014[Apr], Vol 28[2], 236-243). In the article, disclaimer was inadvertently omitted from the author note. The disclaimer is included. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2014-08130-001.) The present study involved an examination of the extent to which a wide range of child, parent, family, and program-related factors predicted child behav...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 12, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: No authorship indicated Source Type: research

Coparenting and children’s temperament predict firstborns’ cooperation in the care of an infant sibling.
This study examined how coparenting and firstborn children’s temperament predicted children’s cooperative behavior in response to maternal requests for assistance in the care of a 1-month-old infant sibling. Children’s cooperative responding was observed during a diaper change session for 216 firstborns (ages 13 to 70 months; M = 32). Parents also completed questionnaires assessing coparenting and children’s temperament. Results suggested that coparenting quality moderated the association between children’s temperament (i.e., soothability) and children’s cooperation as revealed in a Temperament × Cooperative C...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 12, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Song, Ju-Hyun; Volling, Brenda L. Source Type: research

Correction to Salmon et al. (2014).
Reports an error in "Does adding an emotion component enhance the Triple P−Positive Parenting Program" by Karen Salmon, Cassandra Dittman, Matthew Sanders, Rebecca Burson and Josie Hammington (Journal of Family Psychology, 2014[Apr], Vol 28[2], 244-252). In the article, a disclaimer was inadvertently omitted from the author note. The disclaimer has been included. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2014-07166-001.) This pilot study aimed to compare the efficacy of a regular offering of the group-delivered Triple P−Positive Parenting Program for child behavior problems with an enhanced ver...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 12, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: No authorship indicated Source Type: research

Correction to Sanders (2008).
Reports an error in "Triple P-Positive Parenting Program as a public health approach to strengthening parenting" by Matthew R. Sanders (Journal of Family Psychology, 2008[Aug], Vol 22[4], 506-517). In the article, a disclaimer was inadvertently omitted from the author note. The disclaimer has been included. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2008-10898-003.) Parenting programs have considerable potential to improve the mental health and well-being of children, improve family relationships, and benefit the community at large. However, traditional clinical models of service delivery reach rela...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 12, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: No authorship indicated Source Type: research

Family functioning in the context of parental bipolar disorder: Associations with offspring age, sex, and psychopathology.
This study examined the cross-sectional associations between family functioning (cohesion, expressiveness, and conflict) and psychopathology in 117 offspring (ages 5–18) of 75 parents with BD. We also examined whether age and sex differences moderated these associations. We measured offspring psychopathology by examining current dimensional symptoms and DSM–IV emotional and behavioral disorders. Correlational analyses indicated that higher family conflict and lower cohesion were associated with higher internalizing and externalizing symptoms in offspring. Lower family cohesion was also associated with current offspring...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 22, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Freed, Rachel D.; Tompson, Martha C.; Wang, Christine H.; Otto, Michael W.; Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Henin, Aude Source Type: research

Capitalizing on everyday positive events uniquely predicts daily intimacy and well-being in couples coping with breast cancer.
Capitalization is the relational process of savoring positive life events by sharing them with responsive relationship partners. The purpose of the present study was to use dyadic intensive longitudinal methods to examine novel hypotheses regarding links between capitalization processes and daily intimacy and well-being in women with breast cancer and their intimate partners. Although couples coping with cancer often experience an increase in negative daily life events, we hypothesized that it would be important for them to share and capitalize on positive events in addition to sharing negative events. Female patients with...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 22, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Otto, Amy K.; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Siegel, Scott D.; Belcher, Amber J. Source Type: research

Children exposed to intimate partner violence: Influences of parenting, family distress, and siblings.
The aim of this study was to investigate associations between maternal stress, parenting behavior, and sibling adjustment in relation to child trauma symptoms in families with and without a history of intimate partner violence (IPV). Maternal report was used to measure maternal stress and child trauma symptoms, whereas parenting behavior was assessed through an observational measure. Participants consisted of mothers with 2 school-age siblings recruited from the community. Results indicated that violent families reported higher levels of maternal stress and sibling trauma symptoms than nonviolent families, although no diff...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 22, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tailor, Ketan; Stewart-Tufescu, Ashley; Piotrowski, Caroline Source Type: research

The interpersonal process model of demand/withdraw behavior.
The demand/withdraw interaction pattern is a destructive cycle of relationship communication behavior that is associated with negative individual and relationship outcomes. Demand/withdraw behavior is thought to be strongly linked to partners’ emotional reactions, but current theories are inconsistent with empirical findings. The current study proposes the interpersonal process model of demand/withdraw behavior, which includes linkages between each partners’ emotional reactions and the interpersonal behavior of demanding and withdrawing. Data come from problem solving discussions of 55 German couples with observational...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 15, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Baucom, Brian R.; Dickenson, Janna A.; Atkins, David C.; Baucom, Donald H.; Fischer, Melanie S.; Weusthoff, Sarah; Hahlweg, Kurt; Zimmermann, Tanja Source Type: research

Parent and adolescent intentions to disclose and links to positive social behavior.
Children’s disclosure to parents as a buffer against antisocial behavior, and its parenting antecedents, have been extensively studied in recent years. The influence of parents’ own disclosure on children’s disclosure and positive social behavior has received little attention, however. We assessed mothers’ (n = 149), fathers’ (n= 105), and 12- to 14-year-old early adolescents’ (n = 127) intentions to disclose about distress-related events and rule transgressions, their reasons for disclosing, and links to positive social behavior (assessed by mothers’ ratings of willing compliance and by teachers’ [n = 114]...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 15, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Chaparro, Maria Paula; Grusec, Joan E. Source Type: research

Comparing childhood meal frequency to current meal frequency, routines, and expectations among parents.
This study aims to examine associations between parents’ report of eating family meals while growing up and their current family meal frequency, routines, and expectations. Baseline data were used from the Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment (HOME) Plus study, a randomized controlled trial with a program to promote healthful behaviors and family meals at home. Participants (160 parent/child dyads) completed data collection in 2011–2012 in the Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN metropolitan area. Parents were predominately female (95%) and white (77%) with a mean age of 41.3 years. General linear modeling examined...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 8, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Friend, Sarah; Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Garwick, Ann; Flattum, Colleen Freeh; Draxten, Michelle Source Type: research

Developmental patterns and parental correlates of youth leisure-time physical activity.
This study examined the developmental patterns and parental correlates of youth leisure-time physical activity from middle childhood through adolescence. On 5 occasions across 7 years, fathers, mothers, and children who were first- and second born from 201 European American, working- and middle-class families participated in home and multiple nightly phone interviews. Multilevel modeling revealed that, controlling for family socioeconomic status, neighborhood characteristics, and youth overweight status and physical health, leisure-time physical activity increased during middle childhood and declined across adolescence, an...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 8, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lam, Chun Bun; McHale, Susan M. Source Type: research

With a little help from our friends: Couple social integration in marriage.
The benefits of social integration (i.e., structural or affective connectedness with others and with social institutions) have been frequently noted for individuals’ personal well-being. In a similar fashion, recent marital research has highlighted how the social integration of a couple also appears to positively affect marital well-being. However, beyond main effects, little research to date has considered whether couples’ social integration possesses moderating effects for spouses’ marital quality as well. Among a sample of 492 married individuals, the present study explored whether spouses’ reports of the social...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 8, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Barton, Allen W.; Futris, Ted G.; Nielsen, Robert B. Source Type: research

Nonsupportive parenting affects telomere length in young adulthood among African Americans: Mediation through substance use.
Telomere length (TL) is an indicator of age-related changes at the cellular level associated with heightened mortality risk. The effect of nonsupportive parenting (NSP) during late adolescence and young adulthood on TL 5 years later was examined in a sample of N = 183 young adult African Americans to determine if effects of NSP on TL were mediated by substance use. Results indicated that the effect of caregiver reported NSP on diminished TL was mediated by escalation of drinking and smoking in young adulthood, even after controlling effects of socioeconomic status risk, gender, BMI, young adult stress, and intervention sta...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 8, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Beach, Steven R. H.; Lei, Man Kit; Brody, Gene H.; Yu, Tianyi; Philibert, Robert A. Source Type: research

Long-term follow-up of a randomized trial of family foundations: Effects on children’s emotional, behavioral, and school adjustment.
This study examines long-term effects of a transition to parenthood program, Family Foundations, designed to enhance child outcomes through a strategic focus on supporting the coparenting relationship. Roughly 5 to 7 years after baseline (pregnancy), parent and teacher reports of internalizing and externalizing problems and school adjustment were collected by mail for 98 children born to couples enrolled in the randomized trial. Teachers reported significantly lower levels of internalizing problems among children in the intervention group compared with children in the control group and, consistent with prior findings at ag...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 8, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Feinberg, Mark E.; Jones, Damon E.; Roettger, Michael E.; Solmeyer, Anna; Hostetler, Michelle L. Source Type: research

Parenting stress and children’s problem behavior in China: The mediating role of parental psychological aggression.
This study examined the mediating effect of parents’ psychological aggression in the relationship between parenting stress and children’s internalizing (anxiety/depression, withdrawal) and externalizing (aggression, delinquency) problem behaviors 1 year later. Using a sample of 311 intact 2-parent Chinese families with preschoolers, findings revealed that maternal parenting stress had direct effects on children’s internalizing and externalizing problem behavior and indirect effects through maternal psychological aggression. However, neither direct nor indirect effects of fathers’ parenting stress on children’s in...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 1, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Liu, Li; Wang, Meifang Source Type: research

A constructive replication of the association between the oxytocin receptor genotype and parenting.
Behavioral genetic studies have robustly indicated that parenting behaviors are heritable—that is, individual differences in parenting are at least partially a function of genetic differences between persons. Few studies, however, have sought to identify the specific genetic variants that are associated with individual differences in parenting. Genes that influence the oxytocin system are of particular interest, given the growing body of evidence that points to the role of oxytocin for social behaviors, including parenting. The current study conducted examinations of associations between a variant in the oxytocin recepto...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 24, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Klahr, Ashlea M.; Klump, Kelly; Burt, S. Alexandra Source Type: research

Is couple and relationship education effective for lower income participants? A meta-analytic study.
The negative effects of family instability on children and adults have captured the attention of legislators and policymakers wondering if something could be done to help at-risk couples form and sustain healthy relationships and marriages. For a decade now, public funds have supported grants to provide couple and relationship education (CRE) to lower income individuals and couples. This meta-analytic study reviewed 38 studies (with 47 independent samples) assessing the effectiveness of CRE for lower income couples (defined as more than two-thirds of the sample below twice the poverty level) in an attempt to inform current...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 24, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hawkins, Alan J.; Erickson, Sage E. Source Type: research

Mediation and moderation of divorce effects on children’s behavior problems.
Using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, we examined children’s internalizing and externalizing behavior problems from age 5 to 15 years in relation to whether they had experienced a parental divorce. Children from divorced families had more behavior problems compared with a propensity-score-matched sample of children from intact families, according to both teachers and mothers. They exhibited more internalizing and externalizing problems at the first assessment after the parents’ separation and at the last available assessment (age 11...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 24, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Weaver, Jennifer M.; Schofield, Thomas J. Source Type: research

Maternal regulation of child affect in externalizing and typically-developing children.
[Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 29(1) of Journal of Family Psychology (see record 2015-05006-001). In the article, errors due to a calculation error were noted in Table 2 and in the in-text references to the values reported in Table 2. The corrected version of the paragraph and the corrected version of Table 2 are presented in the erratum. The corrected calculations are no different in terms of the significance and direction of effects from the article originally published, and thus the interpretation of the results was not affected by this error.] Temporal contingencies between children...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 17, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lougheed, Jessica P.; Hollenstein, Tom; Lichtwarck-Aschoff, Anna; Granic, Isabela Source Type: research

Mothers’ power assertion; children’s negative, adversarial orientation; and future behavior problems in low-income families: Early maternal responsiveness as a moderator of the developmental cascade.
This study elucidates a potential process that may link parental power assertion with behavior problems and highlights how positive aspects of parenting can moderate this process and defuse maladaptive developmental cascades. It also suggests possible targets for parenting intervention and prevention efforts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 17, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kim, Sanghag; Kochanska, Grazyna Source Type: research

Income and children’s behavioral functioning: A sequential mediation analysis.
This study uses data from the Early Steps Multisite (ESM) project (N = 731) to investigate associations between family income in early childhood and children’s conduct problems and emotional problems in middle childhood. The study explores whether the associations from income to child conduct problems and emotional problems operate through maternal depressive symptoms and 3 family risk factors in early childhood—harsh parenting, parenting hassles, and chaos in the home environment. Results of a sequential mediation model revealed significant indirect effects of family income on children’s conduct problems operating t...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Shelleby, Elizabeth C.; Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth; Shaw, Daniel S.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Wilson, Melvin N.; Gardner, Frances Source Type: research

Income, neighborhood stressors, and harsh parenting: Test of moderation by ethnicity, age, and gender.
Family and neighborhood influences related to low-income were examined to understand their association with harsh parenting among an ethnically diverse sample of families. Specifically, a path model linking household income to harsh parenting via neighborhood disorder, fear for safety, maternal depressive symptoms, and family conflict was evaluated using cross-sectional data from 2,132 families with children ages 5–16 years from Chicago. The sample was 42% Mexican American, 41% African American, and 17% European American. Results provide support for a family process model where a lower income-to-needs ratio is associated...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Barajas-Gonzalez, R. Gabriela; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne Source Type: research

Change in participant engagement during a family-based preventive intervention: Ups and downs with time and tension.
This study examines how and why participants’ engagement–conceptualized as a dynamic process wherein participants interact with each other, the interventionists, and the intervention curriculum–changes over time. We apply growth curve models to repeated measures of engagement obtained from 252 families during a 7-week intervention trial. In the models, we examine (a) whether and how engagement changes over time, and the extent of between-person differences in change; and (b) how those changes and differences are related to chronic and session-specific aspects of family tension, while also controlling for differences ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bamberger, Katharine T.; Coatsworth, J. Douglas; Fosco, Gregory M.; Ram, Nilam Source Type: research

Introduction to the special section on religion and spirituality in family life: Pathways between relational spirituality, family relationships and personal well-being.
This special section on faith and family life presents 5 studies that each offer novel insights into the complex web of linkages between a target family member’s religious and/or spiritual (R/S) functioning and parental or family factors that may influence the target family member’s psychological or R/S functioning. The outcome domain of interest is adolescent psychological functioning in the first three studies, parental stress in the fourth study, and the R/S functioning of adult children in the fifth study. In this introduction, we feature unique findings from each study. We then highlight 3 key conceptual issues th...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mahoney, Annette; Cano, Annmarie Source Type: research

Intimate relationship involvement, intimate relationship quality, and psychiatric disorders in adolescents.
Prior research has shown that poor relationship quality in marriage and other intimate relationships demonstrates cross-sectional and longitudinal associations with a variety of psychiatric disorders in adults. In comparison, there has been less research on the covariation between relationship quality and psychiatric disorders in adolescents, a developmental period that is associated with elevated risk of incidence of several disorders and that is important for the acquisition and maintenance of intimate relationships. The present study was conducted to examine the associations between intimate relationship involvement, in...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 3, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Whisman, Mark A.; Johnson, Daniel P.; Li, Angela; Robustelli, Briana L. Source Type: research

Genetic susceptibility to family environment: BDNF Val66met and 5-HTTLPR influence depressive symptoms.
Functional genetic polymorphisms associated with Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and serotonin (5-HTTLPR) have demonstrated associations with depression in interaction with environmental stressors. In light of evidence for biological connections between BDNF and serotonin, it is prudent to consider genetic epistasis between variants in these genes in the development of depressive symptoms. The current study examined the effects of val66met, 5-HTTLPR, and family environment quality on youth depressive symptoms in adolescence and young adulthood in a longitudinal sample oversampled for maternal depression history. A...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 27, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dalton, Elizabeth D.; Hammen, Constance L.; Najman, Jake M.; Brennan, Patricia A. Source Type: research

Fathers’ sensitive parenting and the development of early executive functioning.
Using data from a diverse sample of 620 families residing in rural, predominately low-income communities, this study examined longitudinal links between fathers’ sensitive parenting in infancy and toddlerhood and children’s early executive functioning, as well as the contribution of maternal sensitive parenting. After accounting for the quality of concurrent and prior parental care, children’s early cognitive ability, and other child and family factors, fathers’ and mothers’ sensitive and supportive parenting during play at 24 months predicted children’s executive functioning at 3 years of age. In contrast, pat...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 27, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Towe-Goodman, Nissa R.; Willoughby, Michael; Blair, Clancy; Gustafsson, Hanna C.; Mills-Koonce, W. Roger; Cox, Martha J. Source Type: research

Family stress and adolescents’ cognitive functioning: Sleep as a protective factor.
We examined 2 sleep–wake parameters as moderators of the associations between exposure to family stressors and adolescent cognitive functioning. Participants were 252 school-recruited adolescents (M = 15.79 years; 66% European American, 34% African American). Youths reported on 3 dimensions of family stress: marital conflict, harsh parenting, and parental psychological control. Cognitive functioning was indexed through performance on the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities. Sleep minutes and efficiency were measured objectively using actigraphy. Toward identifying unique effects, path models controlled for ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 20, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: El-Sheikh, Mona; Tu, Kelly M.; Erath, Stephen A.; Buckhalt, Joseph A. Source Type: research

Cultural dynamics and marital relationship quality in Mexican-origin families.
Prior research suggests that acculturation may influence relationship outcomes among Mexican-origin married couples, including marital adjustment and distress. Despite much theory and research on parent–child cultural differences and disruptions in the parent–child relationship, no previous research has investigated possible associations between husband–wife cultural differences and marital relationship quality. With a sample of Mexican-origin married couples (N = 398), the current study investigated the relations between husband–wife differences in acculturation (American orientation) and enculturation (Mexican or...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 13, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Cruz, Rick A.; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Corona, Marissa; King, Kevin M.; Cauce, Ana Mari; Robins, Richard W.; Widaman, Keith F.; Conger, Rand D. Source Type: research

A randomized clinical trial to test the efficacy of a family-focused, culturally informed therapy for schizophrenia.
Research strongly suggests that family interventions can benefit patients with schizophrenia, yet current interventions often fail to consider the cultural context and spiritual practices that may make them more effective and relevant to ethnic minority populations. We have developed a family focused, culturally informed treatment for schizophrenia (CIT-S) patients and their caregivers to address this gap. Sixty-nine families were randomized to either 15 sessions of CIT-S or to a 3-session psychoeducation (PSY-ED) control condition. Forty-six families (66.7%) completed the study. The primary aim was to test whether CIT-S w...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 6, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Weisman de Mamani, Amy; Weintraub, Marc J.; Gurak, Kayla; Maura, Jessica Source Type: research