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The role of ex-POWs’ PTSD symptoms and trajectories in wives’ secondary traumatization.
Secondary traumatization describes the phenomenon whereby those in proximity to trauma survivors develop psychological symptoms similar to those experienced by the direct survivor. The current study examined secondary trauma (ST) and generalized distress symptoms (general psychiatric symptomatology, functional disability, and self-rated health) in wives of former prisoners of war (ex-POWs). The study compared wives of Israeli ex-POWs from the 1973 Yom Kippur War with wives of a matched control group of non-POW Yom Kippur War combat veterans (CVs). The wives also were divided into groups based on their husbands’ current p...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 29, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Greene, Talya; Lahav, Yael; Bronstein, Israel; Solomon, Zahava Source Type: research

Introduction to the special section on religion and spirituality in family life: Delving into relational spirituality for couples.
In light of the ongoing salience of spirituality and religion for individuals across the globe, this special section presents four rigorous empirical studies that tie conceptually based and potentially malleable spiritual constructs to better marital functioning. These studies exemplify an emerging subfield called Relational Spirituality, which focuses on the ways that couples can draw on specific spiritual cognitions and behaviors to motivate them to create, maintain, and transform their unions (Mahoney, 2010, 2013). In this introduction, we first provide a thumbnail sketch of the past 3 decades of empirical research in t...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 29, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mahoney, Annette; Cano, Annmarie Source Type: research

Maternal child-centered attributions and harsh discipline: The moderating role of maternal working memory across socioeconomic contexts.
Cognitive models of parenting give emphasis to the central role that parental cognitions may play in parental socialization goals. In particular, dual process models suggest that parental attribution styles affect the way parents interpret caregiving situations and enact behaviors, particularly within the realm of discipline. Although research has documented the negative behavioral repercussions of dysfunctional child-centered responsibility biases, there is heterogeneity in the level of these associations. Research has also demonstrated that parental working memory capacity may serve as an individual difference factor in ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 15, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sturge-Apple, Melissa L.; Suor, Jennifer H.; Skibo, Michael A. Source Type: research

Coherence and content of conflict-based narratives: Associations to family risk and maladjustment.
This study examined the role of structural and content characteristics of children’s conflict-based narratives (coherence, positive and aggressive themes) in the association between early childhood family risk and children’s internalizing and externalizing problems in a sample of 193 children (97 girls, 96 boys) aged 3 to 5 years (M = 3.85, SD = .48). Parents participated in an interview on family related risk factors; teachers and parents completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire; children completed conflict-based narratives based on the MacArthur Story Stem Battery (MSSB). We specifically investigated th...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 8, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Müller, Eva; Perren, Sonja; Wustmann Seiler, Corina Source Type: research

Benefit finding and relationship quality in Parkinson’s disease: A pilot dyadic analysis of husbands and wives.
Parkinson’s disease (PD) significantly impacts both patients’ and spouses’ emotional and physical health. However, despite the importance of social relationships for wellbeing, few studies have examined relationship quality and their correlates in individuals with PD and their partners. Specifically, no known studies have examined the association between benefit finding, or the experience of personal growth and other positive changes in the face of a stressor, and perceived marital quality. To address these gaps in the field, 25 married couples participated in a cross-sectional, pilot study. Patients were veterans di...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 1, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mavandadi, Shahrzad; Dobkin, Roseanne; Mamikonyan, Eugenia; Sayers, Steven; Ten Have, Thomas; Weintraub, Daniel Source Type: research

Family and neighborhood disadvantage, home environment, and children’s school readiness.
The purpose of this study was to examine associations between family socioeconomic risk, neighborhood disadvantage, and children’s school readiness. A sample of 420 children from 48 early childcare programs yielded multi-informant data. The average age was 55.3 months (SD = 6.4), with 38% of children being Black, non-Hispanic, Hispanic, or other minority race (American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander). One third (32.4%) of the parents had annual incomes less than $30,000. We used multilevel structural equation modeling to test direct and indirect associations among family socioecon...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 25, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeon, Lieny; Buettner, Cynthia K.; Hur, Eunhye Source Type: research

Children’s responses to mother–infant and father–infant interaction with a baby sibling: Jealousy or joy?
Firstborn children’s reactions to mother–infant and father–infant interaction after a sibling’s birth were examined in an investigation of 224 families. Triadic observations of parent–infant–sibling interaction were conducted at 1 month after the birth. Parents reported on children’s problem behaviors at 1 and 4 months after the birth and completed the Attachment Q-sort before the birth. Latent profile analysis (LPA) identified 4 latent classes (behavioral profiles) for mother–infant and father–infant interactions: regulated-exploration, disruptive-dysregulated, approach-avoidant, and anxious-clingy. A fi...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 25, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Volling, Brenda L.; Yu, Tianyi; Gonzalez, Richard; Kennedy, Denise E.; Rosenberg, Lauren; Oh, Wonjung Source Type: research

Couples and breast cancer: Women’s mood and partners’ marital satisfaction predicting support perception.
This study examined the ways in which a woman’s daily mood, pain, and fatigue, and her spouse’s marital satisfaction predict the woman’s report of partner support in the context of breast cancer. Pretest data from a larger intervention study and multilevel modeling were used to examine the effects of women’s daily mood, pain, and fatigue and average levels of mood, pain, and fatigue on women’s report of social support received from her partner, as well as how the effects of mood interacted with partners’ marital satisfaction. Results show that on days in which women reported higher levels of negative or positiv...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 18, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Boeding, Sara E.; Pukay-Martin, Nicole D.; Baucom, Donald H.; Porter, Laura S.; Kirby, Jennifer S.; Gremore, Tina M.; Keefe, Francis J. Source Type: research

The longitudinal impact of intimate partner aggression and relationship status on women’s physical health and depression symptoms.
Intimate partner aggression (IPA) has many detrimental effects, particularly among young women. The present study examined the longitudinal effects of IPA victimization and relationship status on physical health and depression symptoms in a sample of 375 community women between the ages of 18 and 25 years. All variables were assessed at 4 occasions over a 12-month period (i.e., 1 assessment every 4 months). Multilevel modeling revealed that IPA victimization had both between- and within-person effects on women’s health outcomes, and relationship status had within-person effects when women did not report current IPA. Alth...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 18, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Watkins, Laura E.; Jaffe, Anna E.; Hoffman, Lesa; Gratz, Kim L.; Messman-Moore, Terri L.; DiLillo, David Source Type: research

Shared possible selves, other-focus, and perceived wellness of couples with prostate cancer.
Shared possible selves are associated with better well-being in couples through their engagement in and enjoyment of collaboration (Schindler, Berg, Butler, Fortenberry, & Wiebe, 2010). The present study sought to address which partner’s other-focus accounted for this sharedness in possible selves and how the individual and dyadic configurations of other-focused selves relate to health and well-being (i.e., perceived wellness) in an important health context for adult couples—prostate cancer. Sixty-one men diagnosed with prostate cancer and their wives rated their own subjective physical health and well-being and listed...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 11, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Wilson, Stephanie J.; Barrineau, Mary Jon; Butner, Jonathan; Berg, Cynthia A. Source Type: research

Family dynamics and young children’s sibling victimization.
This research examines how family dynamics like interparental conflict, family violence, and quality of parenting are associated with young children’s experiences of sibling victimization. We use nationally representative data from interviews with caregivers of 1,726 children aged 2 to 9 years of age. We hypothesized different family dynamics predictors for a composite of common types of sibling victimization (property, psychological, and mild physical aggression) in comparison to severe physical sibling victimization (victimization that includes physical aggression with a weapon and/or injury). Multinomial regression re...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 11, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tucker, Corinna Jenkins; Finkelhor, David; Turner, Heather; Shattuck, Anne M. Source Type: research

The role of patient pain and physical function on depressive symptoms in couples with lung cancer: A longitudinal dyadic analysis.
Drawing on the Developmental-Contextual Model (Berg & Upchurch, 2007), we examined the association between changes in patient physical health (pain severity and physical function) and changes in depressive symptoms in couples with lung cancer over a 12-month period. Patients and their spouses or partners (n = 77) were recruited using rapid case ascertainment and completed five waves of data collection (baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months). Multilevel modeling was used to examine aggregate and time-varying effects of patient physical health on depressive symptoms. Results indicated that for patients and spouses, patient-rated ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 4, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lyons, Karen S.; Bennett, Jill A.; Nail, Lillian M.; Fromme, Erik K.; Dieckmann, Nathan; Sayer, Aline G. Source Type: research

Parent–child relationship quality moderates the link between marital conflict and adolescents’ physiological responses to social evaluative threat.
This study examined how marital conflict and parent–child relationship quality moderate individual differences in adolescents’ adrenocortical and autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses to social evaluative threat. Saliva samples (later assayed for cortisol and alpha-amylase, sAA) were collected from 153 youth (52% female; ages 10–17 years) before and after, and cardiovascular activity was assessed before and during, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Marital conflict predicted higher levels of sAA reactivity but lower levels of heart rate (HR) reactivity. Parent–child relationship quality moderated these associ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 4, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lucas-Thompson, Rachel G.; Granger, Douglas A. Source Type: research

A randomized controlled trial of brief coparenting and relationship interventions during the transition to parenthood.
The transition to parenthood has been repeatedly identified as a stressful period, with couples reporting difficulties in domains of individual, coparenting, and relationship functioning. Moreover, these difficulties have been shown to impact children’s development. To buffer against these difficulties, numerous effective parenting, couple, and combined interventions have been developed; however, these interventions are typically lengthy, which limits their potential for dissemination. Therefore, in the present study, we developed and tested separate 6-hr interventions that focused exclusively on improving either coparen...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 4, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Doss, Brian D.; Cicila, Larisa N.; Hsueh, Annie C.; Morrison, Kristen R.; Carhart, Kathryn Source Type: research

A dyadic analysis of relationships and health: Does couple-level context condition partner effects?
Adding to the growing literature explicating the links between romantic relationships and health, this study examined how both couple-level characteristics, particularly union type (e.g., dating, cohabiting, or marriage) and interracial pairing, and interpersonal characteristics (e.g., partner strain and support), predicted young adults’ physical and mental health. Using dyadic data from a sample of 249 young, primarily Black couples, we hypothesized and found support for the importance of couple-level context, partner behavior, and their interaction in predicting health. Interracial couples (all Black/non-Black pairings...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 4, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Barr, Ashley B.; Simons, Ronald L. Source Type: research

Meaningfulness of service and marital satisfaction in Army couples.
The vast numbers of military service members who have been deployed since 2001 highlights the need to better understand relationships of military couples. A unique consideration in military couples is the concept of meaningfulness of service, or the value service members and their partners place on military service in spite of the sacrifices it requires. In a sample of 606 Army couples, the authors used path analysis to examine how male service members’ and female spouses’ perceived meaningfulness of service added to the prediction of marital satisfaction in both members of the couple, when accounting for service membe...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 21, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bergmann, Jeffrey S.; Renshaw, Keith D.; Allen, Elizabeth S.; Markman, Howard J.; Stanley, Scott M. Source Type: research

Frequency of family meals and 6–11-year-old children’s social behaviors.
Family meals are regarded as an opportunity to promote healthy child development. In this brief report, we examined the relationship between frequency of family meals and children’s social behaviors in 6–11-year-olds. The 2007 U.S. National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) provided data on the frequency of family meals in a sample of 6–11-year-old children (N = 24,167). The following social behavior indicators were examined: child positive social skills, child problematic social behaviors, child engagement in school, and parental aggravation with the child. Individual logistic regression analyses were calculated ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lora, Karina R.; Sisson, Susan B.; DeGrace, Beth W.; Morris, Amanda S. Source Type: research

Associations between relationship quality and depressive symptoms in same-sex couples.
Extending research based on different-sex (i.e., heterosexual) couples, the authors explored associations between romantic relationship quality and depressive symptoms in a geographically diverse sample (N = 571) of U.S. adults in same-sex relationships. The authors also examined whether this association was moderated by individual characteristics (gender, age, and internalized heterosexism) or relationship factors (relationship length, commitment, and interdependence). Results indicated a moderate negative association between relationship quality and depressive symptoms, echoing findings from different-sex couples. This a...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Whitton, Sarah W.; Kuryluk, Amanda D. Source Type: research

Examining the impact of a family treatment component for CBITS: When and for whom is it helpful?
This study compared the Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS), as it is typically delivered, to CBITS-plus-family treatment component (CBITS + Family), developed through a community partnership. This study used a quasi-experimental design, capitalizing on ongoing CBITS implementation within a school system. In total, 32 parent/student dyads were recruited in CBITS groups and 32 parent/student dyads were recruited in CBITS + Family groups. Parents and students in both conditions completed pre- and posttreatment measures, in addition to a 6-month posttreatment follow-up assessing symptoms. Families ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Santiago, Catherine DeCarlo; Lennon, Jaclyn M.; Fuller, Anne K.; Brewer, Stephanie K.; Kataoka, Sheryl H. Source Type: research

Father involvement: Identifying and predicting family members’ shared and unique perceptions.
This study also identifies influences on these shared and unique perspectives. Father involvement reports were obtained when the child was 12 and 14 years old. Mother reports overlapped more with the shared view than father or child reports. This suggests the mother’s view may be more in line with broadly recognized father involvement. Regarding antecedents, for fathers’ unique view, a compensatory model partially explains results; that is, negative aspects of family life were positively associated with fathers’ unique view. Children’s unique view of engagement may partially reflect a sentiment override with father...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dyer, W. Justin; Day, Randal D.; Harper, James M. Source Type: research

Associations between prenatal coparenting behavior and observed coparenting behavior at 9-months postpartum.
This study tested whether expectant parents’ behavior in the Prenatal Lausanne Trilogue Play procedure (PLTP), an assessment designed in Switzerland for examining prebirth coparenting behavior, forecasted postnatal observations of coparenting behavior in a sample of first-time parents in the United States. Participants were 182 dual-earner couples expecting their first child. Couples completed the PLTP in the third trimester of pregnancy and observations of coparenting behavior at 9-months postpartum. Structural equation modeling analyses indicated significant continuity between expectant parents’ prenatal coparenting ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Altenburger, Lauren E.; Schoppe-Sullivan, Sarah J.; Lang, Sarah N.; Bower, Daniel J.; Kamp Dush, Claire M. Source Type: research

An ecological model of intimate partner violence perpetration at different levels of severity.
This study proposed and tested an ecological model of both general and clinically significant (i.e., injurious or fear-evoking) IPV perpetration (IPVPerp). Risk and promotive factors from multiple ecological levels of influence (i.e., individual, family, workplace, community) were hypothesized to be important in the prediction of IPVPerp. Although clinically significant IPVPerp and general IPVPerp were hypothesized to relate, specific risks for clinically significant IPVPerp were hypothesized. U.S. Air Force active duty members and civilian spouses (N = 34,861 men; 24,331 women) from 82 sites worldwide completed the 2006 C...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Smith Slep, Amy M.; Foran, Heather M.; Heyman, Richard E. Source Type: research

Sanctification of marriage and spiritual intimacy predicting observed marital interactions across the transition to parenthood.
We examined whether 164 heterosexual, married couples’ reports of the sanctification of their marriage and their spiritual intimacy predicted their observed behavior across the transition to parenthood, using highly conservative statistical strategies to control for time-invariant factors and time-varying factors (marital love, collaborative communication skills) that could explain away these links. Spouses provided self-reports of marital sanctification and love, and joint reports of spiritual intimacy and collaboration by each partner. Criterion variables were positive and negative behaviors that spouses exhibited duri...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 23, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kusner, Katherine G.; Mahoney, Annette; Pargament, Kenneth I.; DeMaris, Alfred Source Type: research

Maternal dispositional empathy and electrodermal reactivity: Interactive contributions to maternal sensitivity with toddler-aged children.
The present study investigated maternal dispositional empathy and skin conductance level (SCL) reactivity to infant emotional cues as joint predictors of maternal sensitivity. Sixty-four mother–toddler dyads (31 boys) were observed across a series of interaction tasks during a laboratory visit, and maternal sensitivity was coded from approximately 55 minutes of observation per family. In a second, mother-only laboratory visit, maternal SCL reactivity to infant cues was assessed using a cry–laugh audio paradigm. Mothers reported on their dispositional empathy via a questionnaire. As hypothesized, mothers with greater di...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 23, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Emery, Helen T.; McElwain, Nancy L.; Groh, Ashley M.; Haydon, Katherine C.; Roisman, Glenn I. Source Type: research

When couples disconnect: Rumination and withdrawal as maladaptive responses to everyday stress.
Previous research has highlighted the importance of examining the interpersonal context of stress and coping. How individuals in a relationship respond to one another and cope with stress together have important outcomes on both individual and dyadic levels. The current study sought to examine 2 deleterious coping responses, rumination and interpersonal withdrawal, as they relate to occupational stress and interact in the home setting. An intensive longitudinal design was employed in a sample of 87 couples in which 1 partner was working as a paramedic. Over a period of 4 consecutive work shifts, daily reports of marital te...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 16, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: King, David B.; DeLongis, Anita Source Type: research

Gender minority stress, mental health, and relationship quality: A dyadic investigation of transgender women and their cisgender male partners.
Research has demonstrated associations between experiences of discrimination, relationship quality, and mental health. However, critical questions remain unanswered with regard to how stigma enacted and experienced at the dyadic-level influences relationship quality and mental health for transgender women and their cisgender (nontransgender) male partners. The present study sought to examine how experiences of transgender-related discrimination (i.e., unfair treatment, harassment) and relationship stigma (i.e., the real or anticipated fear of rejection based on one’s romantic affiliation) were associated with both partne...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 16, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gamarel, Kristi E.; Reisner, Sari L.; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Nemoto, Tooru; Operario, Don Source Type: research

The relations of family members’ unique and shared perspectives of family dysfunction to dyad adjustment.
Among a community sample of families (N = 128), this study examined how family members’ shared and unique perspectives of family dysfunction relate to dyad members’ shared views of dyad adjustment within adolescent–mother, adolescent–father, and mother–father dyads. Independent of a family’s family perspective (shared perspective of family dysfunction), the adolescent’s unique perspective was associated with lower security and higher conflict with both mother and father; the father’s unique perspective was associated with lower security and higher conflict with the adolescent, as well as lower marital quali...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 2, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jager, Justin; Yuen, Cynthia X.; Bornstein, Marc H.; Putnick, Diane L.; Hendricks, Charlene Source Type: research

Compassionate love as a mechanism linking sacred qualities of marriage to older couples’ marital satisfaction.
Previous work has underscored the robust links between sanctification of marriage and marital outcomes, and recent developments in the literature suggest that compassionate love, which is important for intimate relationships, may act as a mediator of that relationship. Accordingly, the current study used actor–partner interdependence models to examine the relationship between a spiritual cognition (i.e., perceived sacred qualities of marriage) and marital satisfaction, and to determine whether that relationship is mediated by compassionate love, in a sample of older married couples (N = 64). Results revealed that wives...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 26, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sabey, Allen K.; Rauer, Amy J.; Jensen, Jakob F. Source Type: research

Sibling relationship patterns and their associations with child competence and problem behavior.
The present study is the first to examine patterns in sibling relationship quality and the associations of these patterns with internalizing and externalizing problem behavior, as well as self-perceived competence, in middle childhood. Self-report questionnaires (e.g., Sibling Relationship Questionnaire, Self-Perception Profile for Children, Youth Self Report) were administered among 1,670 Dutch children (Mage = 11.40 years, SD = .83) attending 51 different Dutch schools. Three sibling relationship clusters were found: a conflictual cluster (low on warmth, high on conflict), an affect-intense cluster (above average on warm...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 26, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Buist, Kirsten L.; Vermande, Marjolijn Source Type: research

Parents’ differential treatment and adolescents’ delinquent behaviors: Direct and indirect effects of difference-score and perception-based measures.
Discussion focuses on the distinctions and links between these 2 approaches within the social comparison theory framework and the greater context of family levels of conflict and intimacy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 12, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jensen, Alexander C.; Whiteman, Shawn D. Source Type: research

A path modeling approach to understanding family conflict: Reciprocal patterns of parent coercion and adolescent avoidance.
This study uses multilevel path analysis to examine interrelations in observed behavior during 15-min conflict discussions conducted by 103 family triads, looking specifically at parent coercive and youth avoidant behaviors. We also explore the moderating roles of parents’ past aggressive family conflict behavior on parents’ responses to youth behavior. Discussions were coded in 3-min segments. Analyses used time-lagged codes so that a family member’s behavior in 1 segment predicted another family member’s behavior in the following segment. The fully saturated cross-lagged model tested all possible paths (parents...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 12, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Saxbe, Darby E.; Ramos, Michelle R.; Timmons, Adele C.; Rodriguez, Aubrey R.; Margolin, Gayla Source Type: research

For better and for worse: Genes and parenting interact to predict future behavior in romantic relationships.
We tested the differential susceptibility hypothesis with respect to connections between interactions in the family of origin and subsequent behaviors with romantic partners. Focal or target participants (G2) in an ongoing longitudinal study (N = 352) were observed interacting with their parents (G1) during adolescence and again with their romantic partners in adulthood. Independent observers rated positive engagement and hostility by G1 and G2 during structured interaction tasks. We created an index for hypothesized genetic plasticity by summing G2′s allelic variation for polymorphisms in 5 genes (serotonin transporter ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 12, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Masarik, April S.; Conger, Rand D.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Stallings, Michael C.; Martin, Monica J.; Schofield, Thomas J.; Neppl, Tricia K.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Smolen, Andrew; Widaman, Keith F. Source Type: research

Spillover between marital quality and parent–child relationship quality: Parental depressive symptoms as moderators.
Using a daily diary method, this study examined concurrent and time-lagged relations between marital and parent–child relationship qualities, providing a test of the spillover and compensatory hypotheses. In addition, this study tested both mothers’ and fathers’ depressive symptoms as moderators of these daily linkages. Participants were 203 families, in which mothers and fathers completed daily diaries for 15 days. At the end of each reporting day, parents independently rated the emotional quality of their relationship with their spouse and with their child that day. Controlling for global levels of marital satisfac...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 12, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Papp, Lauren M.; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C.; Cummings, E. Mark Source Type: research

The relationship between perceived parenting style, filial piety, and life satisfaction in Hong Kong.
This study examined the relationship between perceived parenting style, filial piety, and life satisfaction among Chinese young adults. A survey was administered to 395 university students in Hong Kong on their perceptions about their parents’ parenting practices, filial piety beliefs, and life satisfaction. The results suggest that perceived authoritative parenting is associated with reciprocal filial piety and contributes positively to the young adults’ life satisfaction. Both perceived authoritative and authoritarian parenting were associated with authoritarian filial piety, but authoritarian filial piety was not as...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 12, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Chen, Wei-Wen Source Type: research

Mutual influences in adult romantic attachment, religious coping, and marital adjustment.
In this study, we examined associations among romantic attachment anxiety and avoidance, positive and negative religious coping, and marital adjustment in a community sample of 81 heterosexual couples. Multilevel modeling (MLM) for the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM; Cook & Kenny, 2005) was used to analyze data from both spouses. Romantic attachment avoidance was associated with less positive religious coping, and romantic attachment anxiety was associated with more negative religious coping. Findings are discussed in light of Hall, Fujikawa, Halcrow, Hill, and Delaney’s (2009) Implicit Internal Working Model ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 5, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Pollard, Sara E.; Riggs, Shelley A.; Hook, Joshua N. Source Type: research

A dyadic examination of family-of-origin influence on newlyweds’ marital satisfaction.
The present study examined the influence of family-of-origin characteristics on current newlywed husbands’ and wives’ marital satisfaction, as well as possible mediation by current conflict resolution style. Results of a series of structural equation models, based on the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM), indicated that the family-of-origin characteristics (e.g., parental divorce, interparental conflict) were associated with lower marital satisfaction, especially for wives. Mixed evidence was found to indicate that conflict resolution style may partially mediate this relationship. Current findings provide evid...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 5, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dennison, Renée Peltz; Koerner, Susan Silverberg; Segrin, Chris Source Type: research

What difference does a day make? Examining temporal variations in partner maltreatment.
Routine activities (RA) theory posits that changes in people’s typical daily activities covary with increases or decreases in criminal behaviors, including, but not limited to, partner maltreatment. Using a large clinical database, we examined temporal variations among 24,460 incidents of confirmed partner maltreatment across an 11-year period within the U.S. Air Force (USAF). Specifically, we created regression models that predicted the number of partner maltreatment incidents per day. In addition to several control variables, we coded temporal variables for days of the week, month, year, and several significant days (e...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 5, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: McCarthy, Randy J.; Rabenhorst, Mandy M.; Milner, Joel S.; Travis, Wendy J.; Collins, Pamela S. Source Type: research

Family involvement in the psychological treatment of obsessive–compulsive disorder: A meta-analysis.
Psychological treatments for obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) are increasingly aimed at improving outcomes by directly incorporating family members to address family disruption, dysfunction, or symptom accommodation. Much remains to be learned about the pooled effects of “family inclusive treatment” (FIT) for OCD and factors that may explain variation in response. Random-effects meta-analytic procedures were conducted to empirically evaluate the overall effect of FITs on OCD, and treatment moderators. Study search criteria yielded 29 studies examining FIT response in 1,366 OCD patients. Outcome variables included ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 5, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Thompson-Hollands, Johanna; Edson, Aubrey; Tompson, Martha C.; Comer, Jonathan S. Source Type: research

Parenting intervention effects on parental depressive symptoms: Examining the role of parenting and child behavior.
Parental depression is a major risk factor in child development. Growing research suggests parenting programs can positively impact parental depressive symptoms, although the specific mechanisms that explain these effects are unknown. The current study examined parenting mediated effects of a parenting program on mothers’ and fathers’ depressive symptoms, as well as the role of child behavior in linking parenting to reductions in depressive symptoms. The study samples included 494 mothers and 288 fathers of Mexican origin adolescents who participated in a randomized trial of the Bridges to High School Program/Proyecto ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 5, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Wong, Jessie J.; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Montaño, Zorash; Dumka, Larry; Millsap, Roger E. Source Type: research

Joint physical custody and adolescents’ subjective well-being: A personality × environment interaction.
In this study, we investigate whether the association between the residential arrangement of adolescents and 3 measures of subjective well-being (depressive feelings, life satisfaction, and self-esteem) is moderated by the Big Five personality factors. The sample is selected from the national representative Divorce in Flanders study and contains information about 506 children from divorced parents between 14- and 21-years-old. Our findings indicated a consistent pattern of interactions between conscientiousness and joint physical custody for 2 of the 3 subjective well-being indicators. The specific demands of this resident...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 28, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sodermans, An Katrien; Matthijs, Koen Source Type: research

Parenting behaviors and anxious self-talk in youth and parents.
The present study examined the association between parental anxious self-talk, parenting behaviors, and youth anxious self-talk. Parents and youth ages 7 to 14 (M = 10.17; N = 208; 53% male) seeking treatment for anxiety were evaluated for anxiety symptoms, youth anxious self-talk, parental anxious self-talk, and youth-perceived parenting behavior. Youth and parental anxious self-talk were assessed by both child and parent self-reports; youth-perceived parenting behaviors were assessed by youth-reports. Parenting behaviors included separate ratings of paternal and maternal (a) acceptance, (b) psychological control, and (c)...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 28, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Wei, Chiaying; Cummings, Colleen M.; Villabø, Marianne A.; Kendall, Philip C. Source Type: research

Observed parental responsiveness/warmth and children’s coping: Cross-sectional and prospective relations in a family depression preventive intervention.
The current study examined concurrent and prospective relations between observed parenting behaviors and children’s coping strategies in the context of a preventive intervention designed to change both parenting and children’s use of secondary control coping. Questionnaires and direct observations were obtained from parents with a history of depression (N = 180) and their children (ages 9–15 years) at baseline, 6-month (after completion of the intervention), and 18-month follow-up assessments. Cross-sectional analyses indicate that baseline observed parental responsiveness/warmth was significantly associated with com...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 28, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Watson, Kelly H.; Dunbar, Jennifer P.; Thigpen, Jennifer; Reising, Michelle M.; Hudson, Kelsey; McKee, Laura; Forehand, Rex; Compas, Bruce E. Source Type: research

Are all risks equal? Early experiences of poverty-related risk and children’s functioning.
Using cumulative risk and latent class analysis (LCA) models, we examined how exposure to deep poverty (income-to-needs ratio (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 21, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Roy, Amanda L.; Raver, C. Cybele Source Type: research

Correlates of male cohabiting partner’s involvement in child-rearing tasks in low-income urban Black stepfamilies.
This study examines the link between family relationships (child relationship with mother and the cohabiting partner; parent and cohabiting partner relationship) and involvement of biologically unrelated male cohabiting partners (MCP) in child rearing. The participants were 121 low-income urban Black families consisting of a single mother, MCP, and an adolescent (56% female, M age = 13.7). Assessments were conducted individually with mothers, MCPs, and adolescents via measures administered by interview. MCPs were involved in both domains of child rearing assessed (daily child-related tasks and setting limits) and those ide...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 21, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Forehand, Rex; Parent, Justin; Golub, Andrew; Reid, Megan Source Type: research

Eavesdropping on the family: A pilot investigation of corporal punishment in the home.
This study tested the feasibility of using audio recorders to collect novel information about family interactions. Research into corporal punishment (CP) has relied, almost exclusively, on self-report data; audio recordings have the promise of revealing new insights into the use and immediate consequences of CP. So we could hear how parents respond to child conflicts, 33 mothers wore digital audio recorders for up to 6 evenings. We identified a total of 41 CP incidents, in 15 families and involving 22 parent–child dyads. These incidents were evaluated on 6 guidelines culled from the writings of CP advocates. The results ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 14, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Holden, George W.; Williamson, Paul A.; Holland, Grant W. O. Source Type: research

Cancer conversations in context: Naturalistic observation of couples coping with breast cancer.
This study explored the feasibility and potentials of a naturalistic observation approach to studying dyadic coping in everyday life. Specifically, it examined the natural context and content of the spontaneous cancer conversations of couples coping with cancer, and how they relate to patients’ and spouses’ psychological adjustment. Women with breast cancer (N = 56) and their spouses wore the electronically activated recorder (EAR), an unobtrusive observation method that periodically records snippets of ambient sounds, over one weekend to observe the couples’ cancer conversations in their natural context. Both patien...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 14, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Robbins, Megan L.; López, Ana María; Weihs, Karen L.; Mehl, Matthias R. Source Type: research

Factors linking childhood experiences to adult romantic relationships among African Americans.
It is well known that a high-quality relationship with a romantic partner is related to a variety of positive outcomes associated with health and well-being. Establishing such relationships is an important developmental task for young adults, and past research indicates that there is a link between experiences in the family of origin and the success of later intimate relationships. It has been suggested that this association can be explained by the acquisition of social competencies (e.g., emotions, schemas, traits) that are acquired during childhood in the family of origin and, in turn, influence interaction with adult ro...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 14, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Simons, Leslie Gordon; Simons, Ronald L.; Landor, Antoinette M.; Bryant, Chalandra M.; Beach, Steven R. H. Source Type: research

Parent-child interaction over time in families of young children with borderline intellectual functioning.
A previous study suggested that mothers of 5-year-old children with borderline intellectual functioning displayed lower positive engagement with their children as compared with both mothers of typically developing children and mothers of children with significant developmental delays (Fenning, Baker, Baker, & Crnic, 2007). The current study integrated father data and followed these families over the subsequent 1-year period. Parent and child behavior were coded from naturalistic home observations at both waves. Results revealed that mothers of children with borderline intellectual functioning displayed a greater increase i...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fenning, Rachel M.; Baker, Jason K.; Baker, Bruce L.; Crnic, Keith A. Source Type: research

Testing the concept of relational entitlement in the dyadic context: Further validation and associations with relationship satisfaction.
The sense of relational entitlement is the perception one has of what one deserves from one’s partner, and it may play a crucial role in determining the quality of a couple’s relationship. However, the concept was only recently subjected to empirical examination. The main goals of the current study were to continue the work initiated by the scale developers (Tolmacz & Mikulincer, 2011) by (1) further validating the Sense of Relational Entitlement Scale (SRE) in a sample of adult couples; and (2) examining the contribution of each partner’s sense of relational entitlement to his or her own and his or her partner’s r...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: George-Levi, Sivan; Vilchinsky, Noa; Tolmacz, Rami; Liberman, Gabriel Source Type: research

Mothers, fathers, sons and daughters: Parental sensitivity in families with two children.
In this study, we observed parenting of mothers and fathers toward their sons and daughters in families with two children, using a within-family approach in a sample with systematically varying family constellations. Participants included 389 families with two children (1 and 3 years of age). Parenting practices were coded during free play using the Emotional Availability Scales (Biringen, 2008). Findings revealed that mothers showed higher levels of sensitivity and lower levels of intrusiveness toward their children than fathers. Furthermore, mothers and fathers were more sensitive and less intrusive toward their oldest c...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 17, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hallers-Haalboom, Elizabeth T.; Mesman, Judi; Groeneveld, Marleen G.; Endendijk, Joyce J.; van Berkel, Sheila R.; van der Pol, Lotte D.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J. Source Type: research