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Testing the concept of relational entitlement in the dyadic context: Further validation and associations with relationship satisfaction.
The sense of relational entitlement is the perception one has of what one deserves from one’s partner, and it may play a crucial role in determining the quality of a couple’s relationship. However, the concept was only recently subjected to empirical examination. The main goals of the current study were to continue the work initiated by the scale developers (Tolmacz & Mikulincer, 2011) by (1) further validating the Sense of Relational Entitlement Scale (SRE) in a sample of adult couples; and (2) examining the contribution of each partner’s sense of relational entitlement to his or her own and his or her partner’s r...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: George-Levi, Sivan; Vilchinsky, Noa; Tolmacz, Rami; Liberman, Gabriel Source Type: research

Mothers, fathers, sons and daughters: Parental sensitivity in families with two children.
In this study, we observed parenting of mothers and fathers toward their sons and daughters in families with two children, using a within-family approach in a sample with systematically varying family constellations. Participants included 389 families with two children (1 and 3 years of age). Parenting practices were coded during free play using the Emotional Availability Scales (Biringen, 2008). Findings revealed that mothers showed higher levels of sensitivity and lower levels of intrusiveness toward their children than fathers. Furthermore, mothers and fathers were more sensitive and less intrusive toward their oldest c...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 17, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hallers-Haalboom, Elizabeth T.; Mesman, Judi; Groeneveld, Marleen G.; Endendijk, Joyce J.; van Berkel, Sheila R.; van der Pol, Lotte D.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J. Source Type: research

Validation of a culture-contextualized measure of family engagement in the early learning of low-income Latino children.
Given the increased numbers of Latino children entering the U.S. educational system, there is a need to develop culturally contextualized models to understand the ways Latino parents participate in and support their children’s school experiences. Current tools used to measure family engagement have been developed primarily with monolingual English-speaking European American families and thus might not accurately capture the engagement behaviors unique to other ethnic and linguistic groups. The present study builds upon prior mixed-methods research, involving a total of 763 Latino parents, which employed an emic approach ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: McWayne, Christine M.; Melzi, Gigliana Source Type: research

Predicting success in an online parenting intervention: The role of child, parent, and family factors.
The present study involved an examination of the extent to which a wide range of child, parent, family, and program-related factors predicted child behavior and parenting outcomes after participation in an 8-session online version of the Triple P–Positive Parenting Program. Participants were mothers and fathers of 97 children aged between 3 and 8 years displaying elevated levels of disruptive behavior problems. For both mothers and fathers, poorer child behavior outcomes at postintervention were predicted by the number of sessions of the intervention completed by the family. For mothers, postintervention child behavior w...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dittman, Cassandra K.; Farruggia, Susan P.; Palmer, Melanie L.; Sanders, Matthew R.; Keown, Louise J. Source Type: research

Unsupportive partner behaviors, social-cognitive processing, and psychological outcomes in couples coping with early stage breast cancer.
This study examined associations between partner unsupportive behaviors, social and cognitive processing, and adaptation in patients and their spouses using a dyadic and interdependent analytic approach. Women with early stage breast cancer (N = 330) and their spouses completed measures of partner unsupportive behavior, maladaptive social (holding back sharing concerns) and cognitive processing (mental disengagement and behavioral disengagement), and global well-being and cancer distress. Results indicated that both individuals’ reports of unsupportive partner behavior were associated with their own holding back and thei...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Manne, Sharon; Kashy, Deborah A.; Siegel, Scott; Myers Virtue, Shannon; Heckman, Carolyn; Ryan, Danielle Source Type: research

Analyzing change at the dyadic level: The common fate growth model.
For the study of growth in dyads, methods have been developed to analyze growth at the level of the dyad members. In this article, we present a novel approach that we call the Common Fate Growth Model (CFGM). This model permits an analysis of growth at the level of the dyads when members are either distinguishable (e.g., heterosexual couples) or indistinguishable (e.g., lesbian couples). To estimate the model, we describe the use of structural equation modeling (SEM) for both distinguishable and indistinguishable members. For indistinguishable members and small groups, such as families, we provide details for the use of mu...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ledermann, Thomas; Macho, Siegfried Source Type: research

Predictors of parenting stress in lesbian, gay, and heterosexual adoptive parents during early parenthood.
Little work has examined parenting stress in adoptive parents, particularly lesbian and gay adoptive parents. The current longitudinal study examined parent-reported child characteristics (measured postplacement) and parent and family characteristics (measured preplacement) as predictors of postplacement parenting stress and change in parenting stress across three time points during the first 2 years of adoptive parenthood, among 148 couples (50 lesbian, 40 gay, and 58 heterosexual) who were first-time parents. Children in the sample were, on average, 5.61 months (SD = 10.26) when placed, and 2.49 years (SD = .85) at the 2...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Goldberg, Abbie E.; Smith, JuliAnna Z. Source Type: research

Does adding an emotion component enhance the Triple P−Positive Parenting Program?
This pilot study aimed to compare the efficacy of a regular offering of the group-delivered Triple P−Positive Parenting Program for child behavior problems with an enhanced version tailored to promote child emotion competence. Families of children between ages 3 and 6 years displaying early-onset conduct problems were randomly assigned to Group Triple P (GTP; final n = 18) or Emotion Enhanced Triple P (EETP; final n = 18), in which parents were encouraged to incorporate emotion labels and causes and to coach emotion competence during discussions of everyday emotional experiences with their child. Compared with parents wh...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 3, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Salmon, Karen; Dittman, Cassandra; Sanders, Matthew; Burson, Rebecca; Hammington, Josie Source Type: research

Depression and anger across 25 years: Changing vulnerabilities in the VSA model.
Guided by the vulnerability-stress adaptation (VSA) model of marriage and a developmental systems perspective, the current study examined the association of mental health trajectories (depressive symptoms and expressed anger) across the transition to adulthood (ages 18 to 25) with perceived life stress in young adulthood (age 32) and adaptive interaction with a romantic partner and relationship risk at midlife (age 43), accounting for concurrent age 43 mental health. Data from a 25-year prospective, longitudinal study of 341 Canadians (178 women and 163 men) show age 18 levels of both mental health variables predicted perc...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 3, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Johnson, Matthew D.; Galambos, Nancy L.; Krahn, Harvey J. Source Type: research

Measurement equivalence of the language-brokering scale for Chinese American adolescents and their parents.
Language brokering occurs frequently in immigrant families. Using data from 279 Chinese American families with adolescents who function as language brokers for their parents, the current study developed a comprehensive scale to assess adolescents’ and their parents’ perceptions of language brokering. Both versions, parent and adolescent, showed stable factor structures. We also examined measurement equivalence, including factorial and construct-validity invariance, for each subscale across parent gender, adolescent gender, adolescent nativity, and translation frequency. In general, metric factorial invariance was obser...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 3, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kim, Su Yeong; Wang, Yijie; Weaver, Scott R.; Shen, Yishan; Wu-Seibold, Nina; Liu, Cindy H. Source Type: research

Characteristics of mother−child conflict and child sex predicting resolution.
Data from 190 mothers and their 5- to 7-year-old children were used to evaluate how characteristics of mother−child conflict discussions contribute to the likelihood of reaching a compromise, a win−loss resolution, or a standoff. Dyads discussed 2 topics they reported having disagreements about that were emotionally arousing. Coders rated global measurements of mothers’ emotional responsiveness, intrusiveness, and negativity; children’s negativity; and the frequency of mothers’ and children’s constructive and oppositional comments. Child sex was examined as a moderator of the relation between discussion charact...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 3, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Nelson, Jackie A.; Boyer, Brittany P.; Sang, Samantha A.; Wilson, Elizabeth K. Source Type: research

What explains violated expectations of parent–child relationship in transition to parenthood?
This study models the role of parent-, delivery- and infant-related underlying mechanisms for VE. It further compares parents with assisted reproductive treatment (ART) and spontaneous conception (SC), and primi- and multiparous couples. The couples (n = 743) separately filled in questionnaires concerning their prenatal expectations (T1) and 2 months postnatal representations (T2) of intimacy and autonomy in the relationship with their child, measured with Subjective Family Picture Test. A negative or positive discrepancy indicated violated expectations. The parent-related (mental health and marital quality), delivery-rela...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 3, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Flykt, Marjo; Palosaari, Esa; Lindblom, Jallu; Vänskä, Mervi; Poikkeus, Piia; Repokari, Leena; Tiitinen, Aila; Tulppala, Maija; Punamäki, Raija-Leena Source Type: research

Family concordance and gender differences in parent-child structured interaction at 12 months.
This observational study examined family concordance and gender differences in early parent–child interaction in the family supportive sociopolitical context of Norway. Mothers and fathers from 39 Norwegian families were observed on separate occasions with their 12-month-old children (20 girls and 19 boys). Data were recorded from observations using microsocial coding methodology based on social interaction learning theory. We found no within-family concordance between mothers’ and fathers’ behaviors with their child. The children’s negative engagement with each parent was moderately correlated. For parents with bo...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 24, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Nordahl, Kristin Berg; Janson, Harald; Manger, Terje; Zachrisson, Henrik Daae Source Type: research

Discrepancy in reports of support exchanges between parents and adult offspring: Within- and between-family differences.
Using data from 929 parent–child dyads nested in 458 three-generation families (aged 76 for the oldest generation, 50 for the middle generation, and 24 for the youngest generation), this study investigated how discrepancies in reports of support that parents and their adult offspring exchanged with one another vary both within and between families, and what factors explain variations in dyadic discrepancies. We found substantial within- and between-family differences in dyadic discrepancies in reports of support exchanges. For downward exchanges (from parents to offspring), both dyad-specific characteristics within a fam...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 17, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kim, Kyungmin; Zarit, Steven H.; Birditt, Kira S.; Fingerman, Karen L. Source Type: research

Early child–parent attachment and peer relations: A meta-analysis of recent research.
A central tenet of Bowlby’s attachment theory is that early child–caregiver attachment is reflected in the quality of the child’s interpersonal relationships throughout life. Schneider, Atkinson, and Tardif (2001) conducted a meta-analysis of studies conducted up to 1998 to corroborate that contention. They found a significant but small to moderate effect size (r = .20). Their finding that studies of friendship bonds had higher effect sizes than studies of other interpersonal relationships has important theoretical ramifications. The present brief report is a meta-analysis that covers research conducted for the same ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Pallini, Susanna; Baiocco, Roberto; Schneider, Barry H.; Madigan, Sheri; Atkinson, Leslie Source Type: research

Economic pressure, cultural adaptation stress, and marital quality among Mexican-origin couples.
Based on data from a sample of 120 first-generation Mexican immigrant couples collected at the start of the Great Recession in the United States, this study tested an actor–partner interdependence mediation model (APIMeM) in which spouses’ perceptions of stress related to economic pressure and cultural adaptation were linked to their own and their partners’ reports of marital satisfaction through spouses’ depressive symptoms and marital negativity. As hypothesized, results supported indirect links between economic and cultural adaptation stressors and spouses’ marital negativity and satisfaction: (1) contextual s...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Helms, Heather M.; Supple, Andrew J.; Su, Jinni; Rodriguez, Yuliana; Cavanaugh, Alyson M.; Hengstebeck, Natalie D. Source Type: research

Exploring processes of change in couple relationship education: Predictors of change in relationship quality.
In the past several decades, a number of largely atheoretical individual and meta-analytic studies of couple relationship education (CRE) programs have focused on program effectiveness without considerations of how these programs work and for whom. To address this gap in the literature, the current study drew upon assumptions from social–cognitive and behavioral theories that are implicit in CRE design to assess the influence of short-term changes from pre- to posttreatment in behaviors and commitment on changes in relationship quality among a racially and economically diverse group of 2,824 individuals who participated ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rauer, Amy J.; Adler-Baeder, Francesca; Lucier-Greer, Mallory; Skuban, Emily; Ketring, Scott A.; Smith, Thomas Source Type: research

Emotional flooding and hostile discipline in the families of toddlers with disruptive behavior problems.
This study examined the relationship between negative parenting practices and dysfunction in parents’ cognitive processing of child affect cues in families of toddlers with disruptive behavior problems. This dysfunction comprised a bias toward the misclassification of child affect as anger (affect appraisal bias) and parents’ proneness to emotional flooding (Gottman, 1991, 1993). Participants were families of toddlers (n = 82; 53% male; aged 18 – 48 months) referred to a tertiary-level health service for the treatment of disruptive behavior problems. Affect appraisal bias was indexed in terms of the discrepancy betwe...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 6, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mence, Melanie; Hawes, David J.; Wedgwood, Lucinda; Morgan, Susan; Barnett, Bryanne; Kohlhoff, Jane; Hunt, Caroline Source Type: research

Low-income women’s employment experiences and their financial, personal, and family well-being.
Low-income women’s rates of employment have grown dramatically in recent years, yet the stability and quality of their employment remain low. Using panel data from the Three-City Study following 1,586 low-income African American, Latina, and European American women, this study assessed associations between women’s employment quality (wages; receipt of health insurance) and stability (work consistency; job transitions) and their financial, personal, and family well-being. Hierarchical linear models assessing within-person effects found that increases in wages were associated with improved financial well-being and physic...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 30, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Coley, Rebekah Levine; Lombardi, Caitlin McPherran Source Type: research

Stress generation in a developmental context: The role of youth depressive symptoms, maternal depression, the parent–child relationship, and family stress.
The present study examined stress generation in a developmental and family context among 171 mothers and their preadolescent children, ages 8–12 years, at baseline (Time 1) and 1-year follow-up (Time 2). In the current study, we examined the bidirectional relationship between children’s depressive symptoms and dependent family stress. Results suggest that children’s baseline level of depressive symptoms predicted the generation of dependent family stress 1 year later. However, baseline dependent family stress did not predict an increase in children’s depressive symptoms 1 year later. In addition, we examined whethe...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 30, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Chan, Priscilla T.; Doan, Stacey N.; Tompson, Martha C. Source Type: research

Maternal emotional availability during infant bedtime: An ecological framework.
Mothers’ depressive symptoms, coparenting quality, maternal and infant sleep, and infant temperament during infants’ first 6 months were examined as predictors of mothers’ emotional availability (EA) at bedtime with their infants at 9 months. Maternal EA was assessed from video recordings of mother–infant interactions. Whereas mother-reported coparenting quality was both directly and indirectly predictive of EA, changes in depressive symptoms during the first 6 months only predicted lower EA when infants were temperamentally highly surgent. These results suggest that the influences on emotional availability during ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 30, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kim, Bo-Ram; Teti, Douglas M. Source Type: research

Within- and between-family differences in cooperative and competitive coparenting.
Coparenting, the coordination between adults in their parental roles, contributes to the functioning of multiple family subsystems. The ecological context model of coparenting posits that multiple factors, including contextual, marital, and child characteristics, influence coparenting behavior (Feinberg, 2003). To date, coparenting has primarily been considered a between-family construct, and the focus has been on examining the factors that account for differences in coparenting across families. There is very limited research exploring variations in coparenting within-families across contexts. To address this gap, the curr...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Blandon, Alysia Y.; Scrimgeour, Meghan B.; Stifter, Cynthia A.; Buss, Kristin A. Source Type: research

Reductions in depressive symptoms among substance-abusing runaway adolescents and their primary caretakers: A randomized clinical trial.
This study reports secondary outcome findings on depressive symptoms from a randomized clinical trial testing three interventions for substance-abusing runaway adolescents. In particular, the effect of a family systems therapy, Ecologically Based Family Therapy (EBFT), and two individual therapies, the Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) and Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MET), on adolescent and primary caretaker (PC) depressive symptoms were compared. Findings showed that youth’s depressive symptoms were significantly reduced in each treatment to 2 years postbaseline. However, the trajectory of change differed acr...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Guo, Xiamei; Slesnick, Natasha; Feng, Xin Source Type: research

Intrapersonal, interpersonal, and contextual risk factors for overprovision of partner support in marriage.
Recent research indicates that receiving too much support from one’s spouse (i.e., overprovision of support) is actually more detrimental to marriage than not receiving enough support. The principal goal of the present study was to develop a novel framework for explaining the pathways through which couples experience overprovision of support in their marriages. Intrapersonal factors (anxious and avoidant attachment), interpersonal factors (conflict management and emotional intimacy), and contextual factors (stress originating outside of the marriage) were assessed during the transition into marriage as potential risk fac...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brock, Rebecca L.; Lawrence, Erika Source Type: research

Enhancing the parent–child relationship: A Hong Kong community-based randomized controlled trial.
Adolescence is a critical risk period for negative academic and behavioral outcomes, but a strong parent–child relationship can be a powerful protective factor. Our previous pilot of an academic-community agency collaborative randomized controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated initial evidence of benefit for a parenting intervention with preadolescents in Hong Kong. The present RCT assessed the effect of brief training in positive discipline parenting skills on parental satisfaction with the parent–child relationship. A community sample of 461 Hong Kong Chinese parents of children aged 10–13 years were randomized to (a) t...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fabrizio, Cecilia S.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Ip, Alison K. Y.; Lam, Tai Hing Source Type: research

Parental endorsement of spanking and children’s internalizing and externalizing problems in African American and Hispanic families.
This study assessed prospective, bidirectional associations between maternal endorsement of spanking and children’s internalizing and externalizing behavior problems in low-income urban African American and Hispanic (N = 592) families drawn from the Three City Study. Children in sample families were followed from early childhood through middle childhood with 3 sets of interviews and assessments at ages 3, 4, and 9 years. Cross-lagged path analyses tested longitudinal bidirectional associations between parental endorsement of spanking and children’s internalizing and externalizing problems, with multigroup comparisons e...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Coley, Rebekah Levine; Kull, Melissa A.; Carrano, Jennifer Source Type: research

Disappointment’s sting is greater than help’s balm: Quasi-signal detection of daily support matching.
The optimal matching model of support suggests that supportive behaviors are effective when they match recipients’ needs or goals. In 2 studies, we used quasi-signal detection to test this model. Specifically, we simultaneously modeled the associations of affective and relational outcomes with matching (“hits”), underprovision (“misses”), and overprovision (“false alarms”) regarding emotional or practical support. In both studies (N = 44 and 38 couples, respectively), both partners in committed relationships reported daily receipt of and desire for support, as well as moods and relational outcomes for 21 days...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bar-Kalifa, Eran; Rafaeli, Eshkol Source Type: research

Internalizing and externalizing symptoms in young children exposed to intimate partner violence: Examining intervening processes.
Children’s emotion dysregulation, children’s appraisals, maternal psychological functioning, and harsh discipline were investigated as potential mediators in the putative link between exposure to intimate partner violence and poor child outcomes. Participants included 132 children ages 6–8 and their mothers who had been enrolled in a longitudinal study of parenting and children’s social development. The mothers were receiving some form of government-based economic assistance or other social services, and were currently involved in a romantic relationship. Results of structural equation modeling indicated children...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Zarling, Amie Langer; Taber-Thomas, Sarah; Murray, Amanda; Knuston, John F.; Lawrence, Erika; Valles, Nizete-Ly; DeGarmo, David S.; Bank, Lew Source Type: research

Coparenting in immigrant Chinese Canadian families: The role of discrepancies in acculturation and expectations for adolescent assistance.
For immigrant families, differential acculturation between mothers and fathers may present challenges to parenting adolescents. The current study investigated the concurrent relations among discrepancies in parental acculturation, discrepancies in parental expectations for adolescents, and coparenting quality with a sample of 162 married immigrant Chinese Canadian couples with adolescents (mean age = 14.94 years; SD = 1.73). Acculturation was assessed as parents’ behavioral involvement in both Canadian and Chinese cultures. As predicted, mother–father differences in acculturation (in relation to both cultures) were rel...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Chance, Lauren J.; Costigan, Catherine L.; Leadbeater, Bonnie J. Source Type: research

Patterns of depressive parenting: Why they occur and their role in early developmental risk.
This study examined subgroups of depressed mothers who differ on their intrusive and withdrawn behavior. It explored the stability of these differences, why they occur, and their role in children’s early developmental risk. With 6- to 24-month data from 1,364 dyads, latent class analysis identified 3 stable patterns of early parenting among mothers consistently above clinical thresholds on depressive symptoms (n = 159): 2 low-functioning patterns (high intrusive, high intrusive/high withdrawn) and 1 high-functioning pattern (low intrusive/low withdrawn). Low-functioning depressed mothers were no more depressed than high-...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Wang, Yiji; Dix, Theodore Source Type: research

Correction to Pelucchi et al. (2013).
This study investigates self-forgiveness for real hurts committed against the partner in a romantic relationship (N = 168 couples). Using a dyadic perspective, we evaluated whether offender self-forgiveness, conceived as a bidimensional construct distinct from self-excusing, was uniquely related to both own and partner relationship satisfaction. For both males and females, offending partners were more satisfied with their romantic relationship to the extent that they had more positive and less negative sentiment and thoughts toward themselves, whereas victimized partners were more satisfied with the relationship when the o...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Pelucchi, Sara; Paleari, F. Giorgia; Regalia, Camillo; Fincham, Frank D. Source Type: research

Does premarital education decrease or increase couples’ later help-seeking?
Interventions intended to prevent relationship distress are expected to enhance relationship satisfaction and, in turn, reduce the need for later couples counseling. We test this prediction against an alternative possibility: participation in preventive interventions may operate as a gateway for later help-seeking, paradoxically increasing receipt of later couples counseling. A cross-sectional study of 2,126 married individuals examined whether participation in premarital education covaried inversely or directly with couples counseling. Consistent with the gateway hypothesis, receiving premarital education covaried with an...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Williamson, Hannah C.; Trail, Thomas E.; Bradbury, Thomas N.; Karney, Benjamin R. Source Type: research

Two-year follow-up of a randomized effectiveness trial evaluating MST for juveniles who sexually offend.
Building on prior efficacy trials (i.e., university-based, graduate students as therapists), the primary purpose of this study was to determine whether favorable 12-month outcomes, obtained in a randomized effectiveness trial (i.e., implemented by practitioners in a community mental health center) of multisystemic therapy (MST) with juveniles who had sexually offended (JSO), were sustained through a second year of follow-up. JSO (n = 124 male youth) and their families were randomly assigned to MST, which was family based and delivered by community-based practitioners, or to treatment as usual (TAU), which was primarily gro...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 4, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Letourneau, Elizabeth J.; Henggeler, Scott W.; McCart, Michael R.; Borduin, Charles M.; Schewe, Paul A.; Armstrong, Kevin S. Source Type: research

Longitudinal effect of defensive denial on relationship instability.
Maladaptive communication may often undermine the long-term stability of romantic relationships. We hypothesized that defensive denial may be a salient type of maladaptive communication that erodes relationship stability over time because it may lead to more caustic conflict-escalating behaviors. Additionally, we hypothesized that defensive denial observed in romantic relationships could be linked back to defensive denial observed in the family of origin. Using data from the Family Transitions Project, we specified longitudinal models in which observed defensive denial in romantic relationships affected self-reported and p...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 4, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lannin, Daniel G.; Bittner, Karen E.; Lorenz, Frederick O. Source Type: research

Intimate partner violence and children’s memory.
The current study was designed to examine the relation between intimate partner violence (IPV) and children’s memory and drew from a socioeconomically and racially diverse sample of children living in and around a midsized southeastern city (n = 140). Mother-reported IPV when the children were 30 months old was a significant predictor of children’s short-term, working, and deliberate memory at 60 months of age, even after controlling for the children’s sex and race, the families’ income-to-needs ratio, the children’s expressive vocabulary, and maternal harsh-intrusive parenting behaviors. These findings add to th...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 4, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gustafsson, Hanna C.; Coffman, Jennifer L.; Harris, Latonya S.; Langley, Hillary A.; Ornstein, Peter A.; Cox, Martha J. Source Type: research

Development of a brief parent-report risk index for children following parental divorce.
This article reports on the development of a brief 15-item parent-report risk index (Child Risk Index for Divorced or Separated Families; CRI-DS) to predict problem outcomes of children who have experienced parental divorce. A series of analyses using 3 data sets were conducted that identified and cross-validated a parsimonious set of items representing parent report of child behavior problems and family level risk and protective factors, each of which contributed to the predictive accuracy of the index. The index predicted child behavior outcomes and substance abuse problems up to 6 years later. The index has acceptable l...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 4, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tein, Jenn-Yun; Sandler, Irwin N.; Braver, Sanford L.; Wolchik, Sharlene A. Source Type: research

Socioeconomic status and parenting in ethnic minority families: Testing a minority family stress model.
According to the family stress model (Conger & Donnellan, 2007), low socioeconomic status (SES) predicts less-than-optimal parenting through family stress. Minority families generally come from lower SES backgrounds than majority families, and may experience additional stressors associated with their minority status, such as acculturation stress. The primary goal of this study was to test a minority family stress model with a general family stress pathway, as well as a pathway specific to ethnic minority families. The sample consisted of 107 Turkish–Dutch mothers and their 5- to 6-year-old children, and positive parentin...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 4, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Emmen, Rosanneke A. G.; Malda, Maike; Mesman, Judi; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Prevoo, Mariëlle J. L.; Yeniad, Nihal Source Type: research

Predictors of parenting stress trajectories in premature infant–mother dyads.
This prospective longitudinal study examined predictors of parenting stress trajectories over time in a sample of 125 mothers and their preterm infants. Infant (multiple birth, gestational age, days hospitalized, and neonatal health risks) and maternal (socioeconomic, education, depressive symptoms, social support, and quality of interaction during infant feeding) characteristics were collected just prior to infant hospital discharge. Parenting stress and maternal interaction quality during play were measured at 4, 24, and 36 months corrected age. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to analyze infant and maternal charact...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 4, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Spinelli, Maria; Poehlmann, Julie; Bolt, Daniel Source Type: research

Little tyrants or just plain tired: Evaluating attributions for caregiving outcomes across the transition to parenthood.
There is now substantial evidence that parental attributions for power over negative caregiving outcomes play an important role in the intergenerational transmission of child maltreatment. Despite the substantial research and clinical significance of this construct, and the widely held assumption that it represents a trait-like attributional style, there is a lack of empirical support for its long-term stability, especially over the transition to parenthood. The present study examined the stability of 88 at-risk women’s perceived power over caregiving failure from the 3rd trimester of their 1st pregnancy to 18 months pos...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 4, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bernstein, Rosemary E.; Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Measelle, Jeffrey R.; Hailey, Brianna C.; Ablow, Jennifer C. Source Type: research

Daily parenting engagement among new mothers and fathers: The role of romantic attachment in dual-earner families.
We investigated the association of prenatal assessments of mothers’ and fathers’ self-reported romantic attachment anxiety and avoidance with the time mothers and fathers reported in proximity-focused and exploration-focused engagement with their infants at 9 months postpartum. Our sample of 136 dual-earner couples came from a larger longitudinal study of the transition to parenthood. Time in proximity-focused (interactions that emphasize physical or emotional connection) and exploration-focused (activities that stimulate and build knowledge of the world) engagement on workdays and nonworkdays were measured using time ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 14, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lang, Sarah N.; Schoppe-Sullivan, Sarah J.; Kotila, Letitia E.; Kamp Dush, Claire M. Source Type: research

Relations of parenting quality, interparental conflict, and overnights with mental health problems of children in divorcing families with high legal conflict.
The current study examined the associations between child mental health problems and the quality of maternal and paternal parenting, and how these associations were moderated by three contextual factors: quality of parenting by the other parent, interparental conflict, and the number of overnights parents had with the child. Data for the current study came from a sample of divorcing families who are in high legal conflict over developing or maintaining a parenting plan following divorce. Analyses revealed that the associations between child mental health problems and positive maternal and paternal parenting were moderated ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 7, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sandler, Irwin N.; Wheeler, Lorey A.; Braver, Sanford L. Source Type: research

Does dyadic coping mediate the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and marital quality?
This study tested for the mediational effects of dyadic coping in the observed relationship between emotional intelligence, assessed both as ability and as trait, and quality of marital relations. We used a standard dyadic design involving 100 newlywed heterosexual couples who were assessed on EI measures along with measures of dyadic coping and perceived marital quality. Total dyadic coping, as well as dyadic coping of oneself and dyadic coping of partner, were observed to mediate the association between EI and marital quality. These data provide some support for the commonly held assumption that EI plays a role in marita...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 7, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Zeidner, Moshe; Kloda, Iris; Matthews, Gerald Source Type: research

Family income and appraisals of parental conflict as predictors of psychological adjustment and diurnal cortisol in emerging adulthood.
The goal of the current study was to provide the first investigation of whether appraisals of parental marital conflict mediate associations of family income with emerging adult psychological adjustment and diurnal cortisol production. Participants were 178 college students who provided 3 saliva samples across the day and reported their family income, adjustment (depressive symptoms, perceived daily stress, internalizing problems, and externalizing problems), and appraisals of their parents’ conflict (including perceptions of frequency, intensity, resolution, stability, as well as perceived threat and self-blame for conf...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 7, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lucas-Thompson, Rachel G.; Hostinar, Camelia E. Source Type: research

Patterns of intimate partner violence in a large, epidemiological sample of divorcing couples.
In many jurisdictions divorcing couples are court-ordered to participate in divorce mediation to resolve parenting plan disputes prior to a court allowing a case to proceed to trial. Historically, a significant number (40–80%) of these divorcing couples enter this highly stressful legal process having experienced violence and abuse within the relationship (Pearson, 1997). Several researchers have developed typologies that describe couple-level patterns of Intimate Partner Violence and Abuse (IPV/A) behaviors; one research team suggested their typology could apply specifically to such divorcing people (Kelly & Johnson, 20...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 7, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Beck, Connie J. A.; Anderson, Edward R.; O’Hara, Karey L.; Benjamin, G. Andrew H. Source Type: research

Asymmetric partner pronoun use and demand–withdraw interaction in couples coping with health problems.
Recent research links first-person plural pronoun use (we-talk) by individual romantic partners to adaptive relationship functioning and individual health outcomes. To examine a possible boundary condition of adaptive we-talk in couples coping with health problems, we correlated asymmetric couple-level we/I-ratios (more we-talk relative to I-talk by the spouse than the patient) with a concurrent pattern of directional demand–withdraw (D-W) interaction in which the spouse demands change while the patient withdraws. Couples in which a partner who abused alcohol (n = 65), smoked cigarettes despite having heart or lung disea...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 7, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rentscher, Kelly E.; Rohrbaugh, Michael J.; Shoham, Varda; Mehl, Matthias R. Source Type: research

Longitudinal patterns of relationship adjustment among German parents.
In this study, we used latent growth curve mixture modeling to examine the trajectories of relationship adjustment among German parents across a 4-year period (N = 242). Approximately 90% of men and women could be classified as showing high relationship adjustment and a stable or increasing trajectory. The remaining 10%, were initially more distressed and showed a decline in relationship adjustment over time. In addition, latent relationship adjustment trajectory class significantly predicted change in men’s depressive symptoms over the 4 years; for women, relationship-adjustment trajectory class was related to depressiv...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 16, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Foran, Heather M.; Hahlweg, Kurt; Kliem, Sören; O’Leary, K. Daniel Source Type: research

Exploring the impact of skin tone on family dynamics and race-related outcomes.
Racism has historically been a primary source of discrimination against African Americans, but there has been little research on the role that skin tone plays in explaining experiences with racism. Similarly, colorism within African American families and the ways in which skin tone influences family processes is an understudied area of research. Using data from a longitudinal sample of African American families (n = 767), we assessed whether skin tone impacted experiences with discrimination or was related to differences in quality of parenting and racial socialization within families. Findings indicated no link between sk...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 16, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Landor, Antoinette M.; Simons, Leslie Gordon; Simons, Ronald L.; Brody, Gene H.; Bryant, Chalandra M.; Gibbons, Frederick X.; Granberg, Ellen M.; Melby, Janet N. Source Type: research

Spouses’ involvement in their partners’ diabetes management: Associations with spouse stress and perceived marital quality.
Spouses frequently attempt to influence (control) or support their chronically ill partners’ adherence behaviors. Studies have documented effects of spousal control and support on chronically ill individuals, but little is known about how these two forms of involvement in a partner’s disease management may be associated with spouses’ stress or the quality of their interactions with their ill partners. The current study sought to address this gap by examining spouses’ day-to-day involvement in their marital partner’s management of type 2 diabetes (n = 129). Multilevel analyses of daily diary data revealed that on ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 16, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: August, Kristin J.; Rook, Karen S.; Franks, Melissa M.; Parris Stephens, Mary Ann Source Type: research

Parenting self-efficacy predicts perceptions of infant negative temperament characteristics, not vice versa.
Infant temperamental characteristics have been found associated with decreasing parenting self-efficacy (PSE) during the first year after birth, which has been generally interpreted as a child effect on the parent. To test direction of effects, PSE was assessed during the third trimester of pregnancy and twice after birth together with perceived infant temperament in a group of first-time pregnant women (N = 616). Cross-lagged path analysis showed that PSE, even when assessed prior to birth, predicted characteristics of infant negative temperament. Infant negative temperamental characteristics were concurrently, but not pr...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 9, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Verhage, Marije L.; Oosterman, Mirjam; Schuengel, Carlo Source Type: research

Similarity of relationship standards, couple communication patterns, and marital satisfaction among Chinese couples.
Prior research has indicated that partners’ standards for their couple relationships are associated with their levels of marital satisfaction, both in terms of similarity between standards and the degree to which partners are able to resolve differences in their standards constructively. However, little is known about processes through which couples effectively cope with conflicting relationship standards. Furthermore, most research on relationship standards has been conducted in Western countries, and there is a need for more information about the role of this form of cognition in Asian and other cultures. In the presen...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 9, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Chi, Peilian; Epstein, Norman B.; Fang, Xiaoyi; Lam, Debbie O. B.; Li, Xiaoming Source Type: research