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Testing specificity among parents’ depressive symptoms, parenting, and child internalizing and externalizing symptoms.
The present study examined the specificity in relations between observed withdrawn and intrusive parenting behaviors and children’s internalizing and externalizing symptoms in an at-risk sample of children (ages 9 to 15 years old) of parents with a history of depression (N = 180). Given past findings that parental depression and parenting behaviors may differentially impact boys and girls, gender was examined as a moderator of the relations between these factors and child adjustment. Correlation and linear regression analyses showed that parental depressive symptoms were significantly related to withdrawn parenting for p...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 15, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gruhn, Meredith A.; Dunbar, Jennifer P.; Watson, Kelly H.; Reising, Michelle M.; McKee, Laura; Forehand, Rex; Cole, David A.; Compas, Bruce E. Source Type: research

Marital violence and coparenting quality after separation.
Research has identified multiple predictors of coparenting quality, but few studies have investigated how intimate partner violence (IPV) affects divorcing couples’ coparenting relationships. We addressed this question in a sample of 154 mothers with different marital IPV experiences. Mothers were recruited within 4 months of a divorce filing and completed two interviews 3 months apart. At Time 1, mothers reported on violence and coercive control during marriage, and postseparation behavioral (e.g., parental communication), emotional (e.g., anger), and intrusion (e.g., harassment) dynamics; at Time 2, they reported on co...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hardesty, Jennifer L.; Crossman, Kimberly A.; Khaw, Lyndal; Raffaelli, Marcela Source Type: research

Child adjustment and parent functioning: Considering the role of child-driven effects.
Based on 13,694 mother–child dyads from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Kindergarten Study (ECLS-K; Rock & Pollack, 2002; Tourangeau, Nord, Lê, Sorongon, & Najarian, 2009), this study is an examination of the bidirectional relations between parental and child functioning from kindergarten through 3rd grade. Results from the cross-lagged models demonstrated that child-driven effects co-occurred with parental effects, and that these effects were comparable in size. At the same time, however, results from the latent profile analysis (LPA) revealed idiosyncratic patterns of parent and child functioning. Compared with child...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Yan, Ni; Ansari, Arya Source Type: research

Advancing family psychology.
To realize the broad and complex nature of the field of family psychology, I have slightly revised the mission statement of the Journal of Family Psychology (JFP) to capture contemporary scholarship in family psychology and to advance systems perspectives in this top-tier scientific journal. Over the next 6 years, I hope that authors will consider JFP as an outlet for their best work in the following areas: (1) JFP addresses societal challenges faced by families today; (2) JFP publishes important studies on what makes couple and family relationships work; (3) JFP is a leader in publishing reports that use cutting-edge soph...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fiese, Barbara H. Source Type: research

The role of multiple-group measurement invariance in family psychology research.
Measurement invariance (MI) is a property of measurement that is often implicitly assumed, but in many cases, not tested. When the assumption of MI is tested, it generally involves determining if the measurement holds longitudinally or cross-culturally. A growing literature shows that other groupings can, and should, be considered as well. Additionally, it is noted that the standard techniques for investigating MI have been focused almost exclusively on the case of 2 groups, with very little work on the case of more than 2 groups, even though the need for such techniques is apparent in many fields of research. This paper i...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 21, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kern, Justin L.; McBride, Brent A.; Laxman, Daniel J.; Dyer, W. Justin; Santos, Rosa M.; Jeans, Laurie M. Source Type: research

Interplay between marital attributions and conflict behavior in predicting depressive symptoms.
Marital attributions—that is, causal inferences and explanations spouses make about their partners’ behavior—have been implicated as predictors of relationship functioning. Extending previous work, we examined marital attributions as a moderator of the link between marital conflict and depressive symptoms 1 year later. Participants were 284 couples who reported on marital attributions and depressive symptoms. Couples also engaged in a videotaped marital conflict interaction, which was later coded for specific conflict behaviors. The results showed that husbands’ and wives’ marital attributions about their partner...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ellison, Jenna K.; Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Papp, Lauren M.; Cummings, E. Mark Source Type: research

Daily parental knowledge of youth activities is linked to youth physical symptoms and HPA functioning.
Considerable evidence documents linkages between parental knowledge of youth activities and youth risky behavior. We extended this research to determine whether parental knowledge was associated with youth physical health, including reports of physical symptoms (e.g., headaches, stomachaches) and a biomarker of hypothalamic pituitary adrenocortical (HPA) axis functioning (i.e., salivary cortisol levels). Participants were children of employees in the Information Technology division of a Fortune 500 company (N = 132, mean age youth = 13.39 years, 55% female) who participated in a daily diary study. Data were collected via t...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 11, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lippold, Melissa A.; Davis, Kelly D.; McHale, Susan M.; Almeida, David M. Source Type: research

Perceived family social support buffers against the effects of exposure to rocket attacks on adolescent depression, aggression, and severe violence.
The authors compared the protective effects of 3 sources of perceived social support—from family members, friends, and school personnel—on internalizing and externalizing symptoms in adolescents exposed to rocket attacks. Data were based on 362 Israeli adolescents (median age = 14), chronically exposed to rockets from the Gaza Strip, for whom robust effects of exposure on internalizing and externalizing symptoms were reported during the 2009–2010 period (Henrich & Shahar, 2013). New analyses revealed that perceived family social support assessed in 2009 buffered against the effect of exposure to rocket attacks on dep...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 21, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Shahar, Golan; Henrich, Christopher C. Source Type: research

Cognitive–behavioral conjoint therapy for PTSD improves various PTSD symptoms and trauma-related cognitions: Results from a randomized controlled trial.
Numerous studies document an association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and impairments in intimate relationship functioning, and there is evidence that PTSD symptoms and associated impairments are improved by cognitive–behavioral conjoint therapy for PTSD (CBCT for PTSD; Monson & Fredman, 2012). The present study investigated changes across treatment in clinician-rated PTSD symptom clusters and patient-rated trauma-related cognitions in a randomized controlled trial comparing CBCT for PTSD with waitlist in a sample of 40 individuals with PTSD and their partners (N = 40; Monson et al., 2012). Compared with ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 14, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Macdonald, Alexandra; Pukay-Martin, Nicole D.; Wagner, Anne C.; Fredman, Steffany J.; Monson, Candice M. Source Type: research

The role of siblings in adoption outcomes and experiences from adolescence to emerging adulthood.
We present 3 studies using longitudinal, mixed method data within the same overarching sample of adoptive families. Study 1 was a follow-up to Berge et al.’s (2006) study of adolescent adoptees and their adopted siblings with birth family contact; we found evidence of changes in the status of contact collectively experienced by 26 adopted sibling pairs when target adoptees were emerging adults. In Study 2, we found that target adoptees (n = 91) with siblings (adopted or not) who were more involved with target adoptees’ birth family contact demonstrated more favorable behavioral outcomes than target adoptees who had uni...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 14, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Farr, Rachel H.; Flood, Margaux E.; Grotevant, Harold D. Source Type: research

PTSD symptoms and marital adjustment among ex-POWs’ wives.
This study prospectively assessed the implications of war captivity and former prisoners of war’s (ex-POWs) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and PTSD trajectory on their wives’ marital adjustment, adjusting for their secondary traumatization (ST). Results show that marital adjustment of the wives of ex-POWs with PTSD (N = 66) was lower compared to wives of ex-POWs (N = 37) and combat veterans (N = 55) without PTSD symptoms. Investigating the possible mechanism underlying the lower marital adjustment, via a mediating model, indicated that husbands’ PTSD symptoms mediated the association between captivity and the w...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 30, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Levin, Yafit; Greene, Talya; Solomon, Zahava Source Type: research

Secondary traumatization of partners of war veterans: The role of boundary ambiguity.
The existing literature has shown that war veterans’ posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are associated with a higher level of distress in their female partners. However, less agreement exists regarding the sources of this distress and the mechanism by which this process occurs. The current study examined the consequences of Israeli war veterans’ PTSD on their female partners, as manifested by the females’ PTSD symptoms, mental health status, and functioning, while taking into account females’ earlier traumatic events. Using the theory of ambiguous loss, it also suggested boundary ambiguity as a mediating...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 30, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dekel, Rachel; Levinstein, Yoav; Siegel, Alana; Fridkin, Shimon; Svetlitzky, Vlad Source Type: research

Direct and indirect effects of commitment on interdependence and satisfaction in married couples.
This study tested the prediction that an individual’s marital commitment would be positively associated with their own and their partner’s marital satisfaction, and that one’s own marital interdependence would be associated with one’s own marital satisfaction. It also tested the prediction that there would be an indirect effect of marital commitment on marital satisfaction through higher marital interdependence for both the individual and the partner. Predictions were tested on 628 married couples. Overall, results were consistent with predictions. Tests of actor–partner interdependence mediation models revealed ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 23, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Givertz, Michelle; Segrin, Chris; Woszidlo, Alesia Source Type: research

The salience and severity of relationship problems among low-income couples.
Developing programs to support low-income married couples requires an accurate understanding of the challenges they face. To address this question, we assessed the salience and severity of relationship problems by asking 862 Black, White, and Latino newlywed spouses (N = 431 couples) living in low-income neighborhoods to (a) free list their 3 biggest sources of disagreement in the marriage, and (b) rate the severity of the problems appearing on a standard relationship problem inventory. Comparing the 2 sources of information revealed that, although relational problems (e.g., communication and moods) were rated as severe on...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 16, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jackson, Grace L.; Trail, Thomas E.; Kennedy, David P.; Williamson, Hannah C.; Bradbury, Thomas N.; Karney, Benjamin R. Source Type: research

Relationship types among adolescent parents participating in a home-visiting program: A latent-transition analysis.
Young parents (less than 25 years of age) have been shown to have especially low rates of father involvement and union stability. However, research has also shown that parenting experiences of young fathers may not be uniform. There is a need for more research that assesses both the multidimensionality of relationship typologies and their temporality. Using a large longitudinal sample of low-income, young mothers enrolled in a randomized control study of a home-visitation program (n = 704; 61% program, 39% control), we evaluated how mother–father relationship dynamics changed over time. Ten mother-reported indicators of ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 16, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Raskin, Maryna; Fosse, Nathan E.; Fauth, Rebecca C.; Bumgarner, Erin; Easterbrooks, M. Ann Source Type: research

A longitudinal examination of positive parenting following an acceptance-based couple intervention.
This article explores an innovative approach for increasing positive parenting by targeting specific positive emotional processes within marital relationships. Couple emotional acceptance is a powerful mechanism that has repeatedly been found to improve romantic relationships, but whether these effects extend to the larger family environment is less well understood. The current longitudinal study examined the impact of improved relational acceptance after a couple intervention on mother’s and father’s positive parenting. Participants included 244 parents (122 couples) in the Marriage Checkup (MC) study, a randomized, c...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 9, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Morrill, Melinda Ippolito; Hawrilenko, Matt; Córdova, James V. Source Type: research

Effects of economic hardship: Testing the family stress model over time.
The current study evaluated connections between marital distress, harsh parenting, and child externalizing behaviors in line with predictions from the Family Stress Model (FSM). Prospective, longitudinal data came from 273 mothers, fathers, and children participating when the child was 2, between 3 and 5, and between 6 and 10 years old. Assessments included observational and self-report measures. Information regarding economic hardship and economic pressure were assessed during toddlerhood, and parental emotional distress, couple conflict, and harsh parenting were collected during early childhood. Child externalizing behav...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 9, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Neppl, Tricia K.; Senia, Jennifer M.; Donnellan, M. Brent Source Type: research

The influence of family unions and parenthood transitions on self-development.
The present study discusses the impact of union and parenthood transitions on individuals’ self-esteem and sense of mastery development from midadolescence to young adulthood by using multilevel analyses with longitudinal data of 7,339 individuals between ages 15 and 38. The results show that, first, individuals in marital unions show significantly greater rates of growth in self-esteem and sense of mastery, compared with singles. Therefore, entering into marriage provides greater protections to individuals’ self-esteem and sense of mastery. Second, the transition to parenthood brings significant decreases in levels an...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 9, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Chen, Eva Yi-Ju; Enright, Robert D.; Tung, Eli Yi-Liang Source Type: research

The heart of change: Acceptance and intimacy mediate treatment response in a brief couples intervention.
In this study, we examined mediators of a brief couples intervention. Intimate safety, acceptance, and activation were examined in 2 roles: their contribution to marital satisfaction gains in the first 2 weeks after treatment (contemporaneous effects), and how early changes in the mediators influenced longer term changes in marital satisfaction over 2 years of follow-up (lagged effects). Married couples (N = 215) were randomized to either an intervention group or a wait-list control group and followed for 2 years. Latent change-score models were used to examine contemporaneous and time-lagged mediation. A booster intervent...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 2, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hawrilenko, Matt; Gray, Tatiana D.; Córdova, James V. Source Type: research

Emotional health across the transition to first and second unions among emerging adults.
We examined the change in emotional health across the entrance into first and second unions, including cohabiting unions, direct marriage (marriage without premarital cohabitation), and marriage preceded by cohabitation. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997, a nationally representative panel study of youth born between 1980 and 1984 in the United States, pooled fixed-effects regression models indicated that entrance into first cohabiting unions and direct marriages, and all second unions, were significantly associated with reduced emotional distress. Gender differences were found for first unions only; for...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 19, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mernitz, Sara E.; Kamp Dush, Claire Source Type: research

Maternal depressive symptoms, toddler emotion regulation, and subsequent emotion socialization.
Although many studies have examined how maternal depressive symptoms relate to parenting outcomes, less work has examined how symptoms affect emotion socialization, a parenting construct linked to a myriad of socioemotional outcomes in early childhood. In line with a transactional perspective on the family, it is also important to understand how children contribute to these emotional processes. The current study examined how toddler emotion regulation strategies moderated the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and emotion socialization responses, including nonsupportive responses (e.g., minimizing, responding pu...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 12, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Premo, Julie E.; Kiel, Elizabeth J. Source Type: research

Skip the dishes? Not so fast! Sex and housework revisited.
This study provides a robust counterpoint to recent findings suggesting that men’s participation in housework is harmful to a couple’s sex life. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 12, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Johnson, Matthew D.; Galambos, Nancy L.; Anderson, Jared R. Source Type: research

Relational closeness moderates the association between maternal overcontrol and children’s depressive symptoms.
In this study we examine the association between self-reported maternal OC and child depressive symptoms, as moderated by multiple indicators of closeness within the parent–child relationship. An ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of children (N = 106, Mage = 10.27 years) and their mothers participated in this cross-sectional study. Mothers reported on their overcontrolling parenting and children reported on their depressive symptoms. Children and mothers participated in structured interviews that were analyzed for we-talk, a behavioral measure of closeness; they also self-reported their closeness. Results i...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 5, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sichko, Stassja; Borelli, Jessica L.; Rasmussen, Hannah F.; Smiley, Patricia A. Source Type: research

The effects of parental sensitivity and involvement in caregiving on mother–infant and father–infant attachment in a Portuguese sample.
In the present longitudinal study, we investigated attachment quality in Portuguese mother–infant and in father–infant dyads, and evaluated whether attachment quality was related to parental sensitivity during parent–infant social interaction or to the amount of time each parent spent with the infant during play and in routine caregiving activities (e.g., feeding, bathing, play). The sample consisted of 82 healthy full-term infants (30 girls, 53 boys, 48 first born), and their mothers and fathers from mostly middle-class households. To assess parental sensitivity, mothers and fathers were independently observed durin...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 5, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fuertes, Marina; Faria, Anabela; Beeghly, Marjorie; Lopes-dos-Santos, Pedro Source Type: research

Determinants of father involvement with young children: Evidence from the early childhood longitudinal study–birth cohort.
The current study used data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study–Birth Cohort (ECLS-B; Snow et al., 2007) to explore determinants of resident father involvement. Families (N = 2,900) were measured at 3 time points (9 months, 2 years, and 4 years of age). Father, mother, and child factors were examined in relation to father caregiving and play. Latent change score models indicated that fathers engaged in more caregiving and play behaviors and increased at a faster rate when they more strongly identified with their role as a father. Fathers engaged in more caregiving when mothers reported higher depressive symptoms ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 5, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Planalp, Elizabeth M.; Braungart-Rieker, Julia M. Source Type: research

Relationship of service members’ deployment trauma, PTSD symptoms, and experiential avoidance to postdeployment family reengagement.
This research examined whether military service members’ deployment-related trauma exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and experiential avoidance are associated with their observed levels of positive social engagement, social withdrawal, reactivity-coercion, and distress avoidance during postdeployment family interaction. Self reports of deployment related trauma, postdeployment PTSD symptoms, and experiential avoidance were collected from 184 men who were deployed to the Middle East conflicts, were partnered, and had a child between 4 and 13 years of age. Video samples of parent–child and partner ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 5, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brockman, Callie; Snyder, James; Gewirtz, Abigail; Gird, Suzanne R.; Quattlebaum, Jamie; Schmidt, Nicole; Pauldine, Michael R.; Elish, Katie; Schrepferman, Lynn; Hayes, Charles; Zettle, Robert; DeGarmo, David Source Type: research

Preventing adolescent depression with the family check-up: Examining family conflict as a mechanism of change.
This study was conducted with 2 overarching goals: (a) replicate previous work that has implicated the Family Check-Up (FCU), a multilevel, gated intervention model embedded in public middle schools, as an effective strategy for preventing growth in adolescent depressive symptoms and (b) test whether changes in family conflict may be an explanatory mechanism for the long-term, protective effects of the FCU with respect to adolescent depression. This trial was conducted with 593 ethnically diverse families who were randomized to intervention (offered the FCU) or middle school as usual. Complier average causal effect (CACE) ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 28, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fosco, Gregory M.; Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Connell, Arin M.; Stormshak, Elizabeth A. Source Type: research

Understanding affiliate stigma faced by heterosexual family and friends of LGB people: A measurement development study.
The present study describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual Affiliate Stigma Measure (LGB-ASM). Existing qualitative research and feedback from experts in stigma research contributed to the development of 48 items that were subjected to psychometric evaluation resulting in the final 17-item measure. Exploratory factor analysis of data from 471 LGB affiliates (family members and close friends of LGB individuals) resulted in 3 factors reflecting experiences of LGB affiliate stigma including (a) public discrimination/rejection affiliate stigma, (b) vicarious affiliate stigma, and (c) ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 28, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Robinson, Matthew A.; Brewster, Melanie E. Source Type: research

The role of parental warmth and hostility on adolescents’ prosocial behavior toward multiple targets.
The current study examined the influence that parental warmth/support and verbal hostility had on adolescents’ prosocial behavior toward multiple targets (stranger, friend, family) using multiple reporters (self, parent, observations). Data were taken from Times 2 and 3 of a longitudinal project and included 500 adolescents and their parents (M age of child at Time 2 = 12.34). Structural equation models suggested that mother warmth was associated with prosocial behavior toward family, while father warmth was associated with prosocial behavior toward friends. Findings also suggested that adolescents’ prosocial behavior ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 28, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Padilla-Walker, Laura M.; Nielson, Matthew G.; Day, Randal D. Source Type: research

Communication and relationship satisfaction in Chinese, Western, and intercultural Chinese–Western couples.
The current study compared Chinese, Western, and intercultural Chinese–Western couples’ communication and examined how culture moderates the association of communication with relationship satisfaction. We coded the communication of 33 Western couples, 36 Chinese couples, and 54 intercultural Chinese–Western couples when discussing a relationship problem and when reminiscing about positive relationship events. Couples with Chinese female partners showed fewer positive behaviors and more negative behaviors (as classified in existing Western coding systems) than couples with Western female partners. The male partner’s...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 14, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hiew, Danika N.; Halford, W. Kim; van de Vijver, Fons J. R.; Liu, Shuang Source Type: research

Intergenerational continuity in economic hardship, parental positivity, and positive parenting: The association with child behavior.
The current study examined intergenerational continuity in economic hardship, parental positivity, and positive parenting across generations based on both the family stress model (FSM) and the family resilience framework. The study included 220 generation 1 (G1) parents, their target youth (generation 2: G2) who participated from adolescence through adulthood, and the target’s child (generation 3: G3). Assessments included observational and self-report measures. Results indicated that G1 economic hardship negatively influenced both G1 positivity and G1 positive parenting. Similarly, G2 economic hardship was negatively re...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 14, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeon, Shinyoung; Neppl, Tricia K. Source Type: research

Predictors of race, adoption, and sexual orientation related socialization of adoptive parents of young children.
Using a sample of 125 lesbian, gay, and heterosexual adoptive parent couples with young children (M = 6.32 years), this study examined predictors of direct socialization (preparation for adoptism, racism, and heterosexism) and indirect socialization (modeling interactions by responding to outsiders’ inquiries about their child’s adoptive status, racial background, or family structure). In terms of direct socialization, parents of older children tended to engage in more socialization around adoptism and heterosexism, and parents of daughters tended to engage in more socialization around racism and heterosexism. Greater ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 14, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Goldberg, Abbie E.; Smith, JuliAnna Z. Source Type: research

Marital orientation and relationship well-being among cohabiting couples.
The aim of this study was to expand on previous studies of cohabitation to understand the relationship between marital orientations and the relationship well-being of cohabiting couples with a particular focus on using dyadic analyses to understand within-couple patterns. Results from a sample of 1,837 couples provided evidence that an intent to delay marriage and a lower importance placed on marriage for 1 partner was related to lower relationship well-being assessments for both partners in the areas of couple satisfaction, stability, and communication. Greater differences between partners in the intent to delay marriage ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 7, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Willoughby, Brian J.; Belt, Dallin Source Type: research

Combat exposure, mental health, and relationship functioning among women veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars.
This study examined associations between warzone exposures to combat with postdeployment relationship and family functioning in 134 women who deployed to the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Survey invitations were sent by mail to 600 randomly selected women who experienced recent military deployments and were residing in New England. The web-based survey included measures of combat exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, alcohol misuse, postdeployment stress exposure, family functioning, intimate relationship satisfaction, and parenting. Multivariate linear regression with bootstrapping estimates of ind...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 7, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Creech, Suzannah K.; Swift, Robert; Zlotnick, Caron; Taft, Casey; Street, Amy E. Source Type: research

Conflict, negative emotion, and reports of partners’ relationship maintenance in same-sex couples.
The literature on relationship maintenance has focused primarily on the beneficial outcomes of maintenance, and, as a result, little is known about relational processes that may interfere with reports of partners’ maintenance. The authors examine how daily conflict influences individuals’ reports of their partners’ maintenance, and how a constructive communication style buffers this influence by reducing negative emotion on conflict days. In a daily diary study of 98 same-sex couples in romantic relationships, they found that the negative association between conflict and reports of a partner’s relationship maintena...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 31, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ogolsky, Brian G.; Gray, Christine R. Source Type: research

Health risk behaviors and depressive symptoms among Hispanic adolescents: Examining acculturation discrepancies and family functioning.
Drawing from a theory of bicultural family functioning 2 models were tested to examine the longitudinal effects of acculturation-related variables on adolescent health risk behaviors and depressive symptoms (HRB/DS) mediated by caregiver and adolescent reports of family functioning. One model examined the effects of caregiver-adolescent acculturation discrepancies in relation to family functioning and HRB/DS. A second model examined the individual effects of caregiver and adolescent acculturation components in relation to family functioning and HRB/DS. A sample of 302 recently immigrated Hispanic caregiver-child dyads comp...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 24, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Cano, Miguel Ángel; Schwartz, Seth J.; Castillo, Linda G.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Huang, Shi; Zamboanga, Byron L.; Romero, Andrea J.; Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.; Córdova, David; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E.; Lizzi, Karina M.; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Soto, Da Source Type: research

Paternal and maternal warmth and the development of prosociality among preschoolers.
Although the influence of maternal behavior on child outcomes has been extensively studied, there has not been the same attention to the role of paternal behavior in development. This gap in research stands in contrast to the observable shift in parental roles and responsibilities in contemporary society. The goal of this study was to examine the roles of fathers, mothers, and children in the development of children’s prosocial behavior. In the current study we examined the development of reciprocal relations between paternal and maternal behavior and child prosociality over 36 months. Three hundred eighty-one families w...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 24, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Daniel, Ella; Madigan, Sheri; Jenkins, Jennifer Source Type: research

Continuous feelings of love? The parental bond from pregnancy to toddlerhood.
Both prenatal and postnatal parental bonding (i.e., the affective tie from parent to child) have important effects on parental and child functioning. However, research on the continuity and correlates of parental bonding is lacking. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to examine the stability of bonding levels and to explore distinct bonding patterns with a latent class analysis. Moreover, the correlates of these bonding patterns in the parental-, child-, and contextual domain were studied. Levels of maternal (N = 370) and paternal (N = 292) bonding and potential correlates were assessed at 26 weeks of pregnancy, ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 17, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: de Cock, Evi S. A.; Henrichs, Jens; Vreeswijk, Charlotte M. J. M.; Maas, A. Janneke B. M.; Rijk, Catharina H. A. M.; van Bakel, Hedwig J. A. Source Type: research

Stress, relationship satisfaction, and health among African American women: Genetic moderation of effects.
We examined whether romantic relationship satisfaction would serve as a link between early and later stressors which in turn would influence the thyroid function index (TFI), an indicator of physiological stress response. Using the framework of genetic susceptibility theory combined with hypotheses derived from the vulnerability-stress-adaptation and stress-generation models, we tested whether the hypothesized mediational model would be conditioned by 5-HTTLPR genotype, with greater effects and stronger evidence of mediation among carriers of the “s” allele. In a sample of African American women in romantic relationshi...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Lei, Man-Kit; Beach, Steven R. H.; Simons, Ronald L.; Barr, Ashley B.; Cutrona, Carolyn E.; Philibert, Robert A. Source Type: research

Parental emotional competence and parenting in low-income families with adolescents.
Ample research has demonstrated that alexithymia, which is characterized by difficulty processing emotions, is associated with disruptions in parenting infants and toddlers. Individuals suffering from alexithymia have among other negative outcomes difficulty building and maintaining interpersonal relationships. Research on emotional expression and recognition has documented the importance of these competencies for the quality of the parent–child relationship and for skills critical for parents of adolescents, such as effective monitoring. However, literature linking parental alexithymia to parenting behaviors and related...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kliewer, Wendy; Borre, Alicia; Wright, Anna W.; Jäggi, Lena; Drazdowski, Tess; Zaharakis, Nikola Source Type: research

Perceived parental security profiles in African American adolescents involved in the juvenile justice system.
Many researchers have shown the importance of parent attachment in childhood and adolescence. The present study extends the attachment literature to African Americans involved in the juvenile justice system (N = 213), and provides an initial inquiry using person-oriented methods. The average age was 16.17 years (SD = 1.44), and the sample was predominantly male (71%). Results of a confirmatory factor analysis of Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment—Short Form (IPPA–S) scores supported a 3-factor model: (a) Communication, (b) Trust, and (c) Alienation. Model-based clustering was applied to IPPA–S scores, and result...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Andretta, James R.; Ramirez, Aaron M.; Barnes, Michael E.; Odom, Terri; Roberson-Adams, Shelia; Woodland, Malcolm H. Source Type: research

The interplay of couple’s shared time, women’s intimacy, and intradyadic stress.
Theoretically, spending time together should be central for couples to build intimacy and should be associated with less relationship stress; however, few empirical studies have examined these links. The present study used 14 days of diary data from 92 women to investigate the interplay between the amount of time they spent with their partner (shared time), intimacy, and daily stress originating inside the relationship (intradyadic stress) on a within- and between-personal level. Multilevel analyses revealed moderation patterns: For example, when women spent more time with their partners than usual on a weekday with low le...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Milek, Anne; Butler, Emily A.; Bodenmann, Guy Source Type: research

Treatment response in couple therapy: Relationship adjustment and individual functioning change processes.
This study, a naturalistic investigation of the process of change in relationship adjustment and individual functioning during conjoint therapy, examined the first 8 sessions of a multisystemic model of couple therapy, integrative problem-centered metaframeworks (Breunlin, Pinsof, Russell, & Lebow, 2011; Pinsof, Breunlin, Russell, & Lebow, 2011). The sample consisted of 125 heterosexual couples who reported on their relationship adjustment and individual functioning before every session using the Systemic Therapy Inventory of Change (Pinsof et al., 2009; Pinsof, Zinbarg, et al., in press). Data were analyzed using dyadic l...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Knobloch-Fedders, Lynne M.; Pinsof, William M.; Haase, Claudia M. Source Type: research

Family enmeshment, adolescent emotional dysregulation, and the moderating role of gender.
Enmeshment plays a key role in many families’ dysfunctional interactions and may be especially detrimental for adolescents. Sixty-four adolescents completed ratings of family enmeshment, perceived distress tolerance, an interpersonal challenge task, and mood ratings before and immediately after the task. Before and during the challenge task, adolescents’ respiratory sinus arrhythmia (an indicator of cardiac vagal tone) was recorded. Associations were tested between adolescents’ perceptions of family enmeshment and 3 aspects of adolescent emotional dysregulation. Adolescents who perceived higher family enmeshment also...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kivisto, Katherine Little; Welsh, Deborah P.; Darling, Nancy; Culpepper, Christi L. Source Type: research

Veteran–child communication about parental PTSD: A mixed methods pilot study.
The majority of adults with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are parents. Parents with PTSD report lower levels of parenting satisfaction, poorer parent–child relationships, and elevated incidence of child distress and behavioral problems in comparison with parents without PTSD. Although literature exists regarding parent–child communication about serious mental illness and physical health problems, research has yet to examine this communication regarding parental PTSD. This 3-site, mixed methods study involved 19 veteran parents who had a diagnosis of PTSD; participants were recruited from VA medical centers. Vete...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sherman, Michelle D.; Larsen, Jessica; Straits-Troster, Kristy; Erbes, Christopher; Tassey, John Source Type: research

Buffering the negative effects of maternal alcohol problems on child behavior.
We examined whether mothers’ warmth or harsh parenting at age 5 moderated the effect of maternal alcohol problems on children’s behavior problems at age 11. Results indicated that mothers’ symptoms of alcohol problems when children were age 5 predicted greater externalizing behavior problems (aggression and rule breaking) when children were age 11. Aggression and rule-breaking behaviors, externalizing behaviors commonly associated with maternal alcohol problems, were lessened when mothers were warm and did not engage in harsh parenting techniques. Our findings highlight the importance of positive parenting techniques...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Conners-Burrow, Nicola A.; McKelvey, Lorraine M.; Pemberton, Joy R.; Mesman, Glenn R.; Holmes, Khiela J.; Bradley, Robert H. Source Type: research

Parental causal attributions and emotions in daily learning situations with the child.
This study investigated the dynamics between the causal attributions parents reported daily for their children’s success in learning situations and parental positive emotions. The sample consisted of 159 mothers and 147 fathers of 162 first graders (83 girls, 79 boys; aged from 6 to 7 years, M = 7.5 years, SD = 3.6 months). Parents filled in a structured diary questionnaire concerning their causal attributions and emotions over 7 successive days in the fall semester and again over 7 successive days in the spring semester. Multilevel analyses showed that both parental causal attributions and positive emotions varied more ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Enlund, Emmi; Aunola, Kaisa; Tolvanen, Asko; Nurmi, Jari-Erik Source Type: research

The protective role of maternal racial socialization for African American adolescents exposed to community violence.
Urban African American youth’s disproportionate exposure to community violence and increased risk for its adverse consequences have heightened interest in identifying protective factors that mitigate the effects of community violence exposure for these youth. Thus, the present study examined whether maternal racial socialization messages protect African American adolescents against the adverse effects of community violence exposure. Participants were a community sample of African American adolescents (N = 106; mean age = 15.41 years) and their female guardians. For community-violence-exposed youth, maternal racial social...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Henry, Jessica S.; Lambert, Sharon F.; Smith Bynum, Mia Source Type: research

Correction to Foster et al. (2009).
This study examined whether (a) therapist behaviors thought to enhance family treatment predicted caregiver in-session responses, and (b) caregiver race, racial match between caregiver and therapist, and family financial hardship moderated the relationships between therapist and caregiver behavior. Observers coded caregiver and therapist behavior during one session of multisystemic therapy for substance abusing adolescents. Therapist teaching, focusing on strengths, making reinforcing statements, problem solving, and dealing with practical family needs predicted caregiver engagement and/or positive response, regardless of ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: No authorship indicated Source Type: research

Posttraumatic stress and emotion regulation in survivors of intimate partner violence.
We examined child’s emotion regulation as a moderator and mother’s emotion regulation as a mediator of the relation between mother PTSS and child adjustment. Sixty-four female survivors of IPV and their 6–12-year-old children participated. Mothers reported their own PTSS and their children’s adjustment. Child emotion regulation was measured using respiratory sinus arrhythmia, a physiological index of emotion regulation. Mother’s emotion regulation was measured from observer coding of the Parent Meta-Emotion Interview (Katz & Gottman, 1986), which asked mothers about their awareness and regulation of emotion. Chil...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Gurtovenko, Kyrill Source Type: research