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Journal of Family Psychology

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The relations of family members’ unique and shared perspectives of family dysfunction to dyad adjustment.
Among a community sample of families (N = 128), this study examined how family members’ shared and unique perspectives of family dysfunction relate to dyad members’ shared views of dyad adjustment within adolescent–mother, adolescent–father, and mother–father dyads. Independent of a family’s family perspective (shared perspective of family dysfunction), the adolescent’s unique perspective was associated with lower security and higher conflict with both mother and father; the father’s unique perspective was associated with lower security and higher conflict with the adolescent, as well as lower marital quali...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 2, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jager, Justin; Yuen, Cynthia X.; Bornstein, Marc H.; Putnick, Diane L.; Hendricks, Charlene Source Type: research

A path modeling approach to understanding family conflict: Reciprocal patterns of parent coercion and adolescent avoidance.
This study uses multilevel path analysis to examine interrelations in observed behavior during 15-min conflict discussions conducted by 103 family triads, looking specifically at parent coercive and youth avoidant behaviors. We also explore the moderating roles of parents’ past aggressive family conflict behavior on parents’ responses to youth behavior. Discussions were coded in 3-min segments. Analyses used time-lagged codes so that a family member’s behavior in 1 segment predicted another family member’s behavior in the following segment. The fully saturated cross-lagged model tested all possible paths (parents...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 12, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Saxbe, Darby E.; Ramos, Michelle R.; Timmons, Adele C.; Rodriguez, Aubrey R.; Margolin, Gayla Source Type: research

For better and for worse: Genes and parenting interact to predict future behavior in romantic relationships.
We tested the differential susceptibility hypothesis with respect to connections between interactions in the family of origin and subsequent behaviors with romantic partners. Focal or target participants (G2) in an ongoing longitudinal study (N = 352) were observed interacting with their parents (G1) during adolescence and again with their romantic partners in adulthood. Independent observers rated positive engagement and hostility by G1 and G2 during structured interaction tasks. We created an index for hypothesized genetic plasticity by summing G2′s allelic variation for polymorphisms in 5 genes (serotonin transporter ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 12, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Masarik, April S.; Conger, Rand D.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Stallings, Michael C.; Martin, Monica J.; Schofield, Thomas J.; Neppl, Tricia K.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Smolen, Andrew; Widaman, Keith F. Source Type: research

Spillover between marital quality and parent–child relationship quality: Parental depressive symptoms as moderators.
Using a daily diary method, this study examined concurrent and time-lagged relations between marital and parent–child relationship qualities, providing a test of the spillover and compensatory hypotheses. In addition, this study tested both mothers’ and fathers’ depressive symptoms as moderators of these daily linkages. Participants were 203 families, in which mothers and fathers completed daily diaries for 15 days. At the end of each reporting day, parents independently rated the emotional quality of their relationship with their spouse and with their child that day. Controlling for global levels of marital satisfac...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 12, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Papp, Lauren M.; Goeke-Morey, Marcie C.; Cummings, E. Mark Source Type: research

The relationship between perceived parenting style, filial piety, and life satisfaction in Hong Kong.
This study examined the relationship between perceived parenting style, filial piety, and life satisfaction among Chinese young adults. A survey was administered to 395 university students in Hong Kong on their perceptions about their parents’ parenting practices, filial piety beliefs, and life satisfaction. The results suggest that perceived authoritative parenting is associated with reciprocal filial piety and contributes positively to the young adults’ life satisfaction. Both perceived authoritative and authoritarian parenting were associated with authoritarian filial piety, but authoritarian filial piety was not as...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 12, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Chen, Wei-Wen Source Type: research

A dyadic examination of family-of-origin influence on newlyweds’ marital satisfaction.
The present study examined the influence of family-of-origin characteristics on current newlywed husbands’ and wives’ marital satisfaction, as well as possible mediation by current conflict resolution style. Results of a series of structural equation models, based on the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM), indicated that the family-of-origin characteristics (e.g., parental divorce, interparental conflict) were associated with lower marital satisfaction, especially for wives. Mixed evidence was found to indicate that conflict resolution style may partially mediate this relationship. Current findings provide evid...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 5, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dennison, Renée Peltz; Koerner, Susan Silverberg; Segrin, Chris Source Type: research

What difference does a day make? Examining temporal variations in partner maltreatment.
Routine activities (RA) theory posits that changes in people’s typical daily activities covary with increases or decreases in criminal behaviors, including, but not limited to, partner maltreatment. Using a large clinical database, we examined temporal variations among 24,460 incidents of confirmed partner maltreatment across an 11-year period within the U.S. Air Force (USAF). Specifically, we created regression models that predicted the number of partner maltreatment incidents per day. In addition to several control variables, we coded temporal variables for days of the week, month, year, and several significant days (e...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 5, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: McCarthy, Randy J.; Rabenhorst, Mandy M.; Milner, Joel S.; Travis, Wendy J.; Collins, Pamela S. Source Type: research

Family involvement in the psychological treatment of obsessive–compulsive disorder: A meta-analysis.
Psychological treatments for obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) are increasingly aimed at improving outcomes by directly incorporating family members to address family disruption, dysfunction, or symptom accommodation. Much remains to be learned about the pooled effects of “family inclusive treatment” (FIT) for OCD and factors that may explain variation in response. Random-effects meta-analytic procedures were conducted to empirically evaluate the overall effect of FITs on OCD, and treatment moderators. Study search criteria yielded 29 studies examining FIT response in 1,366 OCD patients. Outcome variables included ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 5, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Thompson-Hollands, Johanna; Edson, Aubrey; Tompson, Martha C.; Comer, Jonathan S. Source Type: research

Parenting intervention effects on parental depressive symptoms: Examining the role of parenting and child behavior.
Parental depression is a major risk factor in child development. Growing research suggests parenting programs can positively impact parental depressive symptoms, although the specific mechanisms that explain these effects are unknown. The current study examined parenting mediated effects of a parenting program on mothers’ and fathers’ depressive symptoms, as well as the role of child behavior in linking parenting to reductions in depressive symptoms. The study samples included 494 mothers and 288 fathers of Mexican origin adolescents who participated in a randomized trial of the Bridges to High School Program/Proyecto ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - May 5, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Wong, Jessie J.; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Montaño, Zorash; Dumka, Larry; Millsap, Roger E. Source Type: research

Joint physical custody and adolescents’ subjective well-being: A personality × environment interaction.
In this study, we investigate whether the association between the residential arrangement of adolescents and 3 measures of subjective well-being (depressive feelings, life satisfaction, and self-esteem) is moderated by the Big Five personality factors. The sample is selected from the national representative Divorce in Flanders study and contains information about 506 children from divorced parents between 14- and 21-years-old. Our findings indicated a consistent pattern of interactions between conscientiousness and joint physical custody for 2 of the 3 subjective well-being indicators. The specific demands of this resident...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 28, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sodermans, An Katrien; Matthijs, Koen Source Type: research

Parenting behaviors and anxious self-talk in youth and parents.
The present study examined the association between parental anxious self-talk, parenting behaviors, and youth anxious self-talk. Parents and youth ages 7 to 14 (M = 10.17; N = 208; 53% male) seeking treatment for anxiety were evaluated for anxiety symptoms, youth anxious self-talk, parental anxious self-talk, and youth-perceived parenting behavior. Youth and parental anxious self-talk were assessed by both child and parent self-reports; youth-perceived parenting behaviors were assessed by youth-reports. Parenting behaviors included separate ratings of paternal and maternal (a) acceptance, (b) psychological control, and (c)...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 28, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Wei, Chiaying; Cummings, Colleen M.; Villabø, Marianne A.; Kendall, Philip C. Source Type: research

Observed parental responsiveness/warmth and children’s coping: Cross-sectional and prospective relations in a family depression preventive intervention.
The current study examined concurrent and prospective relations between observed parenting behaviors and children’s coping strategies in the context of a preventive intervention designed to change both parenting and children’s use of secondary control coping. Questionnaires and direct observations were obtained from parents with a history of depression (N = 180) and their children (ages 9–15 years) at baseline, 6-month (after completion of the intervention), and 18-month follow-up assessments. Cross-sectional analyses indicate that baseline observed parental responsiveness/warmth was significantly associated with com...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 28, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Watson, Kelly H.; Dunbar, Jennifer P.; Thigpen, Jennifer; Reising, Michelle M.; Hudson, Kelsey; McKee, Laura; Forehand, Rex; Compas, Bruce E. Source Type: research

Are all risks equal? Early experiences of poverty-related risk and children’s functioning.
Using cumulative risk and latent class analysis (LCA) models, we examined how exposure to deep poverty (income-to-needs ratio (Source: Journal of Family Psychology)
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 21, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Roy, Amanda L.; Raver, C. Cybele Source Type: research

Correlates of male cohabiting partner’s involvement in child-rearing tasks in low-income urban Black stepfamilies.
This study examines the link between family relationships (child relationship with mother and the cohabiting partner; parent and cohabiting partner relationship) and involvement of biologically unrelated male cohabiting partners (MCP) in child rearing. The participants were 121 low-income urban Black families consisting of a single mother, MCP, and an adolescent (56% female, M age = 13.7). Assessments were conducted individually with mothers, MCPs, and adolescents via measures administered by interview. MCPs were involved in both domains of child rearing assessed (daily child-related tasks and setting limits) and those ide...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 21, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Forehand, Rex; Parent, Justin; Golub, Andrew; Reid, Megan Source Type: research

Eavesdropping on the family: A pilot investigation of corporal punishment in the home.
This study tested the feasibility of using audio recorders to collect novel information about family interactions. Research into corporal punishment (CP) has relied, almost exclusively, on self-report data; audio recordings have the promise of revealing new insights into the use and immediate consequences of CP. So we could hear how parents respond to child conflicts, 33 mothers wore digital audio recorders for up to 6 evenings. We identified a total of 41 CP incidents, in 15 families and involving 22 parent–child dyads. These incidents were evaluated on 6 guidelines culled from the writings of CP advocates. The results ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 14, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Holden, George W.; Williamson, Paul A.; Holland, Grant W. O. Source Type: research

Cancer conversations in context: Naturalistic observation of couples coping with breast cancer.
This study explored the feasibility and potentials of a naturalistic observation approach to studying dyadic coping in everyday life. Specifically, it examined the natural context and content of the spontaneous cancer conversations of couples coping with cancer, and how they relate to patients’ and spouses’ psychological adjustment. Women with breast cancer (N = 56) and their spouses wore the electronically activated recorder (EAR), an unobtrusive observation method that periodically records snippets of ambient sounds, over one weekend to observe the couples’ cancer conversations in their natural context. Both patien...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 14, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Robbins, Megan L.; López, Ana María; Weihs, Karen L.; Mehl, Matthias R. Source Type: research

Factors linking childhood experiences to adult romantic relationships among African Americans.
It is well known that a high-quality relationship with a romantic partner is related to a variety of positive outcomes associated with health and well-being. Establishing such relationships is an important developmental task for young adults, and past research indicates that there is a link between experiences in the family of origin and the success of later intimate relationships. It has been suggested that this association can be explained by the acquisition of social competencies (e.g., emotions, schemas, traits) that are acquired during childhood in the family of origin and, in turn, influence interaction with adult ro...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 14, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Simons, Leslie Gordon; Simons, Ronald L.; Landor, Antoinette M.; Bryant, Chalandra M.; Beach, Steven R. H. Source Type: research

Parent-child interaction over time in families of young children with borderline intellectual functioning.
A previous study suggested that mothers of 5-year-old children with borderline intellectual functioning displayed lower positive engagement with their children as compared with both mothers of typically developing children and mothers of children with significant developmental delays (Fenning, Baker, Baker, & Crnic, 2007). The current study integrated father data and followed these families over the subsequent 1-year period. Parent and child behavior were coded from naturalistic home observations at both waves. Results revealed that mothers of children with borderline intellectual functioning displayed a greater increase i...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fenning, Rachel M.; Baker, Jason K.; Baker, Bruce L.; Crnic, Keith A. Source Type: research

Testing the concept of relational entitlement in the dyadic context: Further validation and associations with relationship satisfaction.
The sense of relational entitlement is the perception one has of what one deserves from one’s partner, and it may play a crucial role in determining the quality of a couple’s relationship. However, the concept was only recently subjected to empirical examination. The main goals of the current study were to continue the work initiated by the scale developers (Tolmacz & Mikulincer, 2011) by (1) further validating the Sense of Relational Entitlement Scale (SRE) in a sample of adult couples; and (2) examining the contribution of each partner’s sense of relational entitlement to his or her own and his or her partner’s r...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - April 7, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: George-Levi, Sivan; Vilchinsky, Noa; Tolmacz, Rami; Liberman, Gabriel Source Type: research

Mothers, fathers, sons and daughters: Parental sensitivity in families with two children.
In this study, we observed parenting of mothers and fathers toward their sons and daughters in families with two children, using a within-family approach in a sample with systematically varying family constellations. Participants included 389 families with two children (1 and 3 years of age). Parenting practices were coded during free play using the Emotional Availability Scales (Biringen, 2008). Findings revealed that mothers showed higher levels of sensitivity and lower levels of intrusiveness toward their children than fathers. Furthermore, mothers and fathers were more sensitive and less intrusive toward their oldest c...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 17, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hallers-Haalboom, Elizabeth T.; Mesman, Judi; Groeneveld, Marleen G.; Endendijk, Joyce J.; van Berkel, Sheila R.; van der Pol, Lotte D.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J. Source Type: research

Validation of a culture-contextualized measure of family engagement in the early learning of low-income Latino children.
Given the increased numbers of Latino children entering the U.S. educational system, there is a need to develop culturally contextualized models to understand the ways Latino parents participate in and support their children’s school experiences. Current tools used to measure family engagement have been developed primarily with monolingual English-speaking European American families and thus might not accurately capture the engagement behaviors unique to other ethnic and linguistic groups. The present study builds upon prior mixed-methods research, involving a total of 763 Latino parents, which employed an emic approach ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: McWayne, Christine M.; Melzi, Gigliana Source Type: research

Predicting success in an online parenting intervention: The role of child, parent, and family factors.
The present study involved an examination of the extent to which a wide range of child, parent, family, and program-related factors predicted child behavior and parenting outcomes after participation in an 8-session online version of the Triple P–Positive Parenting Program. Participants were mothers and fathers of 97 children aged between 3 and 8 years displaying elevated levels of disruptive behavior problems. For both mothers and fathers, poorer child behavior outcomes at postintervention were predicted by the number of sessions of the intervention completed by the family. For mothers, postintervention child behavior w...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dittman, Cassandra K.; Farruggia, Susan P.; Palmer, Melanie L.; Sanders, Matthew R.; Keown, Louise J. Source Type: research

Unsupportive partner behaviors, social-cognitive processing, and psychological outcomes in couples coping with early stage breast cancer.
This study examined associations between partner unsupportive behaviors, social and cognitive processing, and adaptation in patients and their spouses using a dyadic and interdependent analytic approach. Women with early stage breast cancer (N = 330) and their spouses completed measures of partner unsupportive behavior, maladaptive social (holding back sharing concerns) and cognitive processing (mental disengagement and behavioral disengagement), and global well-being and cancer distress. Results indicated that both individuals’ reports of unsupportive partner behavior were associated with their own holding back and thei...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Manne, Sharon; Kashy, Deborah A.; Siegel, Scott; Myers Virtue, Shannon; Heckman, Carolyn; Ryan, Danielle Source Type: research

Analyzing change at the dyadic level: The common fate growth model.
For the study of growth in dyads, methods have been developed to analyze growth at the level of the dyad members. In this article, we present a novel approach that we call the Common Fate Growth Model (CFGM). This model permits an analysis of growth at the level of the dyads when members are either distinguishable (e.g., heterosexual couples) or indistinguishable (e.g., lesbian couples). To estimate the model, we describe the use of structural equation modeling (SEM) for both distinguishable and indistinguishable members. For indistinguishable members and small groups, such as families, we provide details for the use of mu...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ledermann, Thomas; Macho, Siegfried Source Type: research

Predictors of parenting stress in lesbian, gay, and heterosexual adoptive parents during early parenthood.
Little work has examined parenting stress in adoptive parents, particularly lesbian and gay adoptive parents. The current longitudinal study examined parent-reported child characteristics (measured postplacement) and parent and family characteristics (measured preplacement) as predictors of postplacement parenting stress and change in parenting stress across three time points during the first 2 years of adoptive parenthood, among 148 couples (50 lesbian, 40 gay, and 58 heterosexual) who were first-time parents. Children in the sample were, on average, 5.61 months (SD = 10.26) when placed, and 2.49 years (SD = .85) at the 2...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Goldberg, Abbie E.; Smith, JuliAnna Z. Source Type: research

Does adding an emotion component enhance the Triple P−Positive Parenting Program?
This pilot study aimed to compare the efficacy of a regular offering of the group-delivered Triple P−Positive Parenting Program for child behavior problems with an enhanced version tailored to promote child emotion competence. Families of children between ages 3 and 6 years displaying early-onset conduct problems were randomly assigned to Group Triple P (GTP; final n = 18) or Emotion Enhanced Triple P (EETP; final n = 18), in which parents were encouraged to incorporate emotion labels and causes and to coach emotion competence during discussions of everyday emotional experiences with their child. Compared with parents wh...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 3, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Salmon, Karen; Dittman, Cassandra; Sanders, Matthew; Burson, Rebecca; Hammington, Josie Source Type: research

Depression and anger across 25 years: Changing vulnerabilities in the VSA model.
Guided by the vulnerability-stress adaptation (VSA) model of marriage and a developmental systems perspective, the current study examined the association of mental health trajectories (depressive symptoms and expressed anger) across the transition to adulthood (ages 18 to 25) with perceived life stress in young adulthood (age 32) and adaptive interaction with a romantic partner and relationship risk at midlife (age 43), accounting for concurrent age 43 mental health. Data from a 25-year prospective, longitudinal study of 341 Canadians (178 women and 163 men) show age 18 levels of both mental health variables predicted perc...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 3, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Johnson, Matthew D.; Galambos, Nancy L.; Krahn, Harvey J. Source Type: research

Measurement equivalence of the language-brokering scale for Chinese American adolescents and their parents.
Language brokering occurs frequently in immigrant families. Using data from 279 Chinese American families with adolescents who function as language brokers for their parents, the current study developed a comprehensive scale to assess adolescents’ and their parents’ perceptions of language brokering. Both versions, parent and adolescent, showed stable factor structures. We also examined measurement equivalence, including factorial and construct-validity invariance, for each subscale across parent gender, adolescent gender, adolescent nativity, and translation frequency. In general, metric factorial invariance was obser...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 3, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kim, Su Yeong; Wang, Yijie; Weaver, Scott R.; Shen, Yishan; Wu-Seibold, Nina; Liu, Cindy H. Source Type: research

Characteristics of mother−child conflict and child sex predicting resolution.
Data from 190 mothers and their 5- to 7-year-old children were used to evaluate how characteristics of mother−child conflict discussions contribute to the likelihood of reaching a compromise, a win−loss resolution, or a standoff. Dyads discussed 2 topics they reported having disagreements about that were emotionally arousing. Coders rated global measurements of mothers’ emotional responsiveness, intrusiveness, and negativity; children’s negativity; and the frequency of mothers’ and children’s constructive and oppositional comments. Child sex was examined as a moderator of the relation between discussion charact...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 3, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Nelson, Jackie A.; Boyer, Brittany P.; Sang, Samantha A.; Wilson, Elizabeth K. Source Type: research

What explains violated expectations of parent–child relationship in transition to parenthood?
This study models the role of parent-, delivery- and infant-related underlying mechanisms for VE. It further compares parents with assisted reproductive treatment (ART) and spontaneous conception (SC), and primi- and multiparous couples. The couples (n = 743) separately filled in questionnaires concerning their prenatal expectations (T1) and 2 months postnatal representations (T2) of intimacy and autonomy in the relationship with their child, measured with Subjective Family Picture Test. A negative or positive discrepancy indicated violated expectations. The parent-related (mental health and marital quality), delivery-rela...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - March 3, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Flykt, Marjo; Palosaari, Esa; Lindblom, Jallu; Vänskä, Mervi; Poikkeus, Piia; Repokari, Leena; Tiitinen, Aila; Tulppala, Maija; Punamäki, Raija-Leena Source Type: research

Family concordance and gender differences in parent-child structured interaction at 12 months.
This observational study examined family concordance and gender differences in early parent–child interaction in the family supportive sociopolitical context of Norway. Mothers and fathers from 39 Norwegian families were observed on separate occasions with their 12-month-old children (20 girls and 19 boys). Data were recorded from observations using microsocial coding methodology based on social interaction learning theory. We found no within-family concordance between mothers’ and fathers’ behaviors with their child. The children’s negative engagement with each parent was moderately correlated. For parents with bo...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 24, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Nordahl, Kristin Berg; Janson, Harald; Manger, Terje; Zachrisson, Henrik Daae Source Type: research

Discrepancy in reports of support exchanges between parents and adult offspring: Within- and between-family differences.
Using data from 929 parent–child dyads nested in 458 three-generation families (aged 76 for the oldest generation, 50 for the middle generation, and 24 for the youngest generation), this study investigated how discrepancies in reports of support that parents and their adult offspring exchanged with one another vary both within and between families, and what factors explain variations in dyadic discrepancies. We found substantial within- and between-family differences in dyadic discrepancies in reports of support exchanges. For downward exchanges (from parents to offspring), both dyad-specific characteristics within a fam...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 17, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kim, Kyungmin; Zarit, Steven H.; Birditt, Kira S.; Fingerman, Karen L. Source Type: research

Early child–parent attachment and peer relations: A meta-analysis of recent research.
A central tenet of Bowlby’s attachment theory is that early child–caregiver attachment is reflected in the quality of the child’s interpersonal relationships throughout life. Schneider, Atkinson, and Tardif (2001) conducted a meta-analysis of studies conducted up to 1998 to corroborate that contention. They found a significant but small to moderate effect size (r = .20). Their finding that studies of friendship bonds had higher effect sizes than studies of other interpersonal relationships has important theoretical ramifications. The present brief report is a meta-analysis that covers research conducted for the same ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Pallini, Susanna; Baiocco, Roberto; Schneider, Barry H.; Madigan, Sheri; Atkinson, Leslie Source Type: research

Economic pressure, cultural adaptation stress, and marital quality among Mexican-origin couples.
Based on data from a sample of 120 first-generation Mexican immigrant couples collected at the start of the Great Recession in the United States, this study tested an actor–partner interdependence mediation model (APIMeM) in which spouses’ perceptions of stress related to economic pressure and cultural adaptation were linked to their own and their partners’ reports of marital satisfaction through spouses’ depressive symptoms and marital negativity. As hypothesized, results supported indirect links between economic and cultural adaptation stressors and spouses’ marital negativity and satisfaction: (1) contextual s...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Helms, Heather M.; Supple, Andrew J.; Su, Jinni; Rodriguez, Yuliana; Cavanaugh, Alyson M.; Hengstebeck, Natalie D. Source Type: research

Exploring processes of change in couple relationship education: Predictors of change in relationship quality.
In the past several decades, a number of largely atheoretical individual and meta-analytic studies of couple relationship education (CRE) programs have focused on program effectiveness without considerations of how these programs work and for whom. To address this gap in the literature, the current study drew upon assumptions from social–cognitive and behavioral theories that are implicit in CRE design to assess the influence of short-term changes from pre- to posttreatment in behaviors and commitment on changes in relationship quality among a racially and economically diverse group of 2,824 individuals who participated ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 10, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rauer, Amy J.; Adler-Baeder, Francesca; Lucier-Greer, Mallory; Skuban, Emily; Ketring, Scott A.; Smith, Thomas Source Type: research

Emotional flooding and hostile discipline in the families of toddlers with disruptive behavior problems.
This study examined the relationship between negative parenting practices and dysfunction in parents’ cognitive processing of child affect cues in families of toddlers with disruptive behavior problems. This dysfunction comprised a bias toward the misclassification of child affect as anger (affect appraisal bias) and parents’ proneness to emotional flooding (Gottman, 1991, 1993). Participants were families of toddlers (n = 82; 53% male; aged 18 – 48 months) referred to a tertiary-level health service for the treatment of disruptive behavior problems. Affect appraisal bias was indexed in terms of the discrepancy betwe...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - January 6, 2014 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mence, Melanie; Hawes, David J.; Wedgwood, Lucinda; Morgan, Susan; Barnett, Bryanne; Kohlhoff, Jane; Hunt, Caroline Source Type: research

Low-income women’s employment experiences and their financial, personal, and family well-being.
Low-income women’s rates of employment have grown dramatically in recent years, yet the stability and quality of their employment remain low. Using panel data from the Three-City Study following 1,586 low-income African American, Latina, and European American women, this study assessed associations between women’s employment quality (wages; receipt of health insurance) and stability (work consistency; job transitions) and their financial, personal, and family well-being. Hierarchical linear models assessing within-person effects found that increases in wages were associated with improved financial well-being and physic...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 30, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Coley, Rebekah Levine; Lombardi, Caitlin McPherran Source Type: research

Stress generation in a developmental context: The role of youth depressive symptoms, maternal depression, the parent–child relationship, and family stress.
The present study examined stress generation in a developmental and family context among 171 mothers and their preadolescent children, ages 8–12 years, at baseline (Time 1) and 1-year follow-up (Time 2). In the current study, we examined the bidirectional relationship between children’s depressive symptoms and dependent family stress. Results suggest that children’s baseline level of depressive symptoms predicted the generation of dependent family stress 1 year later. However, baseline dependent family stress did not predict an increase in children’s depressive symptoms 1 year later. In addition, we examined whethe...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 30, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Chan, Priscilla T.; Doan, Stacey N.; Tompson, Martha C. Source Type: research

Maternal emotional availability during infant bedtime: An ecological framework.
Mothers’ depressive symptoms, coparenting quality, maternal and infant sleep, and infant temperament during infants’ first 6 months were examined as predictors of mothers’ emotional availability (EA) at bedtime with their infants at 9 months. Maternal EA was assessed from video recordings of mother–infant interactions. Whereas mother-reported coparenting quality was both directly and indirectly predictive of EA, changes in depressive symptoms during the first 6 months only predicted lower EA when infants were temperamentally highly surgent. These results suggest that the influences on emotional availability during ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 30, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kim, Bo-Ram; Teti, Douglas M. Source Type: research

Within- and between-family differences in cooperative and competitive coparenting.
Coparenting, the coordination between adults in their parental roles, contributes to the functioning of multiple family subsystems. The ecological context model of coparenting posits that multiple factors, including contextual, marital, and child characteristics, influence coparenting behavior (Feinberg, 2003). To date, coparenting has primarily been considered a between-family construct, and the focus has been on examining the factors that account for differences in coparenting across families. There is very limited research exploring variations in coparenting within-families across contexts. To address this gap, the curr...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Blandon, Alysia Y.; Scrimgeour, Meghan B.; Stifter, Cynthia A.; Buss, Kristin A. Source Type: research

Reductions in depressive symptoms among substance-abusing runaway adolescents and their primary caretakers: A randomized clinical trial.
This study reports secondary outcome findings on depressive symptoms from a randomized clinical trial testing three interventions for substance-abusing runaway adolescents. In particular, the effect of a family systems therapy, Ecologically Based Family Therapy (EBFT), and two individual therapies, the Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) and Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MET), on adolescent and primary caretaker (PC) depressive symptoms were compared. Findings showed that youth’s depressive symptoms were significantly reduced in each treatment to 2 years postbaseline. However, the trajectory of change differed acr...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Guo, Xiamei; Slesnick, Natasha; Feng, Xin Source Type: research

Intrapersonal, interpersonal, and contextual risk factors for overprovision of partner support in marriage.
Recent research indicates that receiving too much support from one’s spouse (i.e., overprovision of support) is actually more detrimental to marriage than not receiving enough support. The principal goal of the present study was to develop a novel framework for explaining the pathways through which couples experience overprovision of support in their marriages. Intrapersonal factors (anxious and avoidant attachment), interpersonal factors (conflict management and emotional intimacy), and contextual factors (stress originating outside of the marriage) were assessed during the transition into marriage as potential risk fac...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brock, Rebecca L.; Lawrence, Erika Source Type: research

Enhancing the parent–child relationship: A Hong Kong community-based randomized controlled trial.
Adolescence is a critical risk period for negative academic and behavioral outcomes, but a strong parent–child relationship can be a powerful protective factor. Our previous pilot of an academic-community agency collaborative randomized controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated initial evidence of benefit for a parenting intervention with preadolescents in Hong Kong. The present RCT assessed the effect of brief training in positive discipline parenting skills on parental satisfaction with the parent–child relationship. A community sample of 461 Hong Kong Chinese parents of children aged 10–13 years were randomized to (a) t...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fabrizio, Cecilia S.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Ip, Alison K. Y.; Lam, Tai Hing Source Type: research

Parental endorsement of spanking and children’s internalizing and externalizing problems in African American and Hispanic families.
This study assessed prospective, bidirectional associations between maternal endorsement of spanking and children’s internalizing and externalizing behavior problems in low-income urban African American and Hispanic (N = 592) families drawn from the Three City Study. Children in sample families were followed from early childhood through middle childhood with 3 sets of interviews and assessments at ages 3, 4, and 9 years. Cross-lagged path analyses tested longitudinal bidirectional associations between parental endorsement of spanking and children’s internalizing and externalizing problems, with multigroup comparisons e...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 23, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Coley, Rebekah Levine; Kull, Melissa A.; Carrano, Jennifer Source Type: research

Disappointment’s sting is greater than help’s balm: Quasi-signal detection of daily support matching.
The optimal matching model of support suggests that supportive behaviors are effective when they match recipients’ needs or goals. In 2 studies, we used quasi-signal detection to test this model. Specifically, we simultaneously modeled the associations of affective and relational outcomes with matching (“hits”), underprovision (“misses”), and overprovision (“false alarms”) regarding emotional or practical support. In both studies (N = 44 and 38 couples, respectively), both partners in committed relationships reported daily receipt of and desire for support, as well as moods and relational outcomes for 21 days...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bar-Kalifa, Eran; Rafaeli, Eshkol Source Type: research

Internalizing and externalizing symptoms in young children exposed to intimate partner violence: Examining intervening processes.
Children’s emotion dysregulation, children’s appraisals, maternal psychological functioning, and harsh discipline were investigated as potential mediators in the putative link between exposure to intimate partner violence and poor child outcomes. Participants included 132 children ages 6–8 and their mothers who had been enrolled in a longitudinal study of parenting and children’s social development. The mothers were receiving some form of government-based economic assistance or other social services, and were currently involved in a romantic relationship. Results of structural equation modeling indicated children...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Zarling, Amie Langer; Taber-Thomas, Sarah; Murray, Amanda; Knuston, John F.; Lawrence, Erika; Valles, Nizete-Ly; DeGarmo, David S.; Bank, Lew Source Type: research

Coparenting in immigrant Chinese Canadian families: The role of discrepancies in acculturation and expectations for adolescent assistance.
For immigrant families, differential acculturation between mothers and fathers may present challenges to parenting adolescents. The current study investigated the concurrent relations among discrepancies in parental acculturation, discrepancies in parental expectations for adolescents, and coparenting quality with a sample of 162 married immigrant Chinese Canadian couples with adolescents (mean age = 14.94 years; SD = 1.73). Acculturation was assessed as parents’ behavioral involvement in both Canadian and Chinese cultures. As predicted, mother–father differences in acculturation (in relation to both cultures) were rel...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Chance, Lauren J.; Costigan, Catherine L.; Leadbeater, Bonnie J. Source Type: research

Patterns of depressive parenting: Why they occur and their role in early developmental risk.
This study examined subgroups of depressed mothers who differ on their intrusive and withdrawn behavior. It explored the stability of these differences, why they occur, and their role in children’s early developmental risk. With 6- to 24-month data from 1,364 dyads, latent class analysis identified 3 stable patterns of early parenting among mothers consistently above clinical thresholds on depressive symptoms (n = 159): 2 low-functioning patterns (high intrusive, high intrusive/high withdrawn) and 1 high-functioning pattern (low intrusive/low withdrawn). Low-functioning depressed mothers were no more depressed than high-...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Wang, Yiji; Dix, Theodore Source Type: research

Correction to Pelucchi et al. (2013).
This study investigates self-forgiveness for real hurts committed against the partner in a romantic relationship (N = 168 couples). Using a dyadic perspective, we evaluated whether offender self-forgiveness, conceived as a bidimensional construct distinct from self-excusing, was uniquely related to both own and partner relationship satisfaction. For both males and females, offending partners were more satisfied with their romantic relationship to the extent that they had more positive and less negative sentiment and thoughts toward themselves, whereas victimized partners were more satisfied with the relationship when the o...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Pelucchi, Sara; Paleari, F. Giorgia; Regalia, Camillo; Fincham, Frank D. Source Type: research

Does premarital education decrease or increase couples’ later help-seeking?
Interventions intended to prevent relationship distress are expected to enhance relationship satisfaction and, in turn, reduce the need for later couples counseling. We test this prediction against an alternative possibility: participation in preventive interventions may operate as a gateway for later help-seeking, paradoxically increasing receipt of later couples counseling. A cross-sectional study of 2,126 married individuals examined whether participation in premarital education covaried inversely or directly with couples counseling. Consistent with the gateway hypothesis, receiving premarital education covaried with an...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 2, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Williamson, Hannah C.; Trail, Thomas E.; Bradbury, Thomas N.; Karney, Benjamin R. Source Type: research