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Advancing family psychology.
To realize the broad and complex nature of the field of family psychology, I have slightly revised the mission statement of the Journal of Family Psychology (JFP) to capture contemporary scholarship in family psychology and to advance systems perspectives in this top-tier scientific journal. Over the next 6 years, I hope that authors will consider JFP as an outlet for their best work in the following areas: (1) JFP addresses societal challenges faced by families today; (2) JFP publishes important studies on what makes couple and family relationships work; (3) JFP is a leader in publishing reports that use cutting-edge soph...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - February 4, 2016 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fiese, Barbara H. Source Type: research

Perceived family social support buffers against the effects of exposure to rocket attacks on adolescent depression, aggression, and severe violence.
The authors compared the protective effects of 3 sources of perceived social support—from family members, friends, and school personnel—on internalizing and externalizing symptoms in adolescents exposed to rocket attacks. Data were based on 362 Israeli adolescents (median age = 14), chronically exposed to rockets from the Gaza Strip, for whom robust effects of exposure on internalizing and externalizing symptoms were reported during the 2009–2010 period (Henrich & Shahar, 2013). New analyses revealed that perceived family social support assessed in 2009 buffered against the effect of exposure to rocket attacks on dep...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 21, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Shahar, Golan; Henrich, Christopher C. Source Type: research

Cognitive–behavioral conjoint therapy for PTSD improves various PTSD symptoms and trauma-related cognitions: Results from a randomized controlled trial.
Numerous studies document an association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and impairments in intimate relationship functioning, and there is evidence that PTSD symptoms and associated impairments are improved by cognitive–behavioral conjoint therapy for PTSD (CBCT for PTSD; Monson & Fredman, 2012). The present study investigated changes across treatment in clinician-rated PTSD symptom clusters and patient-rated trauma-related cognitions in a randomized controlled trial comparing CBCT for PTSD with waitlist in a sample of 40 individuals with PTSD and their partners (N = 40; Monson et al., 2012). Compared with ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - December 14, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Macdonald, Alexandra; Pukay-Martin, Nicole D.; Wagner, Anne C.; Fredman, Steffany J.; Monson, Candice M. Source Type: research

PTSD symptoms and marital adjustment among ex-POWs’ wives.
This study prospectively assessed the implications of war captivity and former prisoners of war’s (ex-POWs) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and PTSD trajectory on their wives’ marital adjustment, adjusting for their secondary traumatization (ST). Results show that marital adjustment of the wives of ex-POWs with PTSD (N = 66) was lower compared to wives of ex-POWs (N = 37) and combat veterans (N = 55) without PTSD symptoms. Investigating the possible mechanism underlying the lower marital adjustment, via a mediating model, indicated that husbands’ PTSD symptoms mediated the association between captivity and the w...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 30, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Levin, Yafit; Greene, Talya; Solomon, Zahava Source Type: research

Secondary traumatization of partners of war veterans: The role of boundary ambiguity.
The existing literature has shown that war veterans’ posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are associated with a higher level of distress in their female partners. However, less agreement exists regarding the sources of this distress and the mechanism by which this process occurs. The current study examined the consequences of Israeli war veterans’ PTSD on their female partners, as manifested by the females’ PTSD symptoms, mental health status, and functioning, while taking into account females’ earlier traumatic events. Using the theory of ambiguous loss, it also suggested boundary ambiguity as a mediating...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 30, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dekel, Rachel; Levinstein, Yoav; Siegel, Alana; Fridkin, Shimon; Svetlitzky, Vlad Source Type: research

The salience and severity of relationship problems among low-income couples.
Developing programs to support low-income married couples requires an accurate understanding of the challenges they face. To address this question, we assessed the salience and severity of relationship problems by asking 862 Black, White, and Latino newlywed spouses (N = 431 couples) living in low-income neighborhoods to (a) free list their 3 biggest sources of disagreement in the marriage, and (b) rate the severity of the problems appearing on a standard relationship problem inventory. Comparing the 2 sources of information revealed that, although relational problems (e.g., communication and moods) were rated as severe on...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 16, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jackson, Grace L.; Trail, Thomas E.; Kennedy, David P.; Williamson, Hannah C.; Bradbury, Thomas N.; Karney, Benjamin R. Source Type: research

A longitudinal examination of positive parenting following an acceptance-based couple intervention.
This article explores an innovative approach for increasing positive parenting by targeting specific positive emotional processes within marital relationships. Couple emotional acceptance is a powerful mechanism that has repeatedly been found to improve romantic relationships, but whether these effects extend to the larger family environment is less well understood. The current longitudinal study examined the impact of improved relational acceptance after a couple intervention on mother’s and father’s positive parenting. Participants included 244 parents (122 couples) in the Marriage Checkup (MC) study, a randomized, c...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 9, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Morrill, Melinda Ippolito; Hawrilenko, Matt; Córdova, James V. Source Type: research

Effects of economic hardship: Testing the family stress model over time.
The current study evaluated connections between marital distress, harsh parenting, and child externalizing behaviors in line with predictions from the Family Stress Model (FSM). Prospective, longitudinal data came from 273 mothers, fathers, and children participating when the child was 2, between 3 and 5, and between 6 and 10 years old. Assessments included observational and self-report measures. Information regarding economic hardship and economic pressure were assessed during toddlerhood, and parental emotional distress, couple conflict, and harsh parenting were collected during early childhood. Child externalizing behav...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 9, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Neppl, Tricia K.; Senia, Jennifer M.; Donnellan, M. Brent Source Type: research

The heart of change: Acceptance and intimacy mediate treatment response in a brief couples intervention.
In this study, we examined mediators of a brief couples intervention. Intimate safety, acceptance, and activation were examined in 2 roles: their contribution to marital satisfaction gains in the first 2 weeks after treatment (contemporaneous effects), and how early changes in the mediators influenced longer term changes in marital satisfaction over 2 years of follow-up (lagged effects). Married couples (N = 215) were randomized to either an intervention group or a wait-list control group and followed for 2 years. Latent change-score models were used to examine contemporaneous and time-lagged mediation. A booster intervent...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - November 2, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Hawrilenko, Matt; Gray, Tatiana D.; Córdova, James V. Source Type: research

The effects of parental sensitivity and involvement in caregiving on mother–infant and father–infant attachment in a Portuguese sample.
In the present longitudinal study, we investigated attachment quality in Portuguese mother–infant and in father–infant dyads, and evaluated whether attachment quality was related to parental sensitivity during parent–infant social interaction or to the amount of time each parent spent with the infant during play and in routine caregiving activities (e.g., feeding, bathing, play). The sample consisted of 82 healthy full-term infants (30 girls, 53 boys, 48 first born), and their mothers and fathers from mostly middle-class households. To assess parental sensitivity, mothers and fathers were independently observed durin...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 5, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fuertes, Marina; Faria, Anabela; Beeghly, Marjorie; Lopes-dos-Santos, Pedro Source Type: research

Determinants of father involvement with young children: Evidence from the early childhood longitudinal study–birth cohort.
The current study used data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study–Birth Cohort (ECLS-B; Snow et al., 2007) to explore determinants of resident father involvement. Families (N = 2,900) were measured at 3 time points (9 months, 2 years, and 4 years of age). Father, mother, and child factors were examined in relation to father caregiving and play. Latent change score models indicated that fathers engaged in more caregiving and play behaviors and increased at a faster rate when they more strongly identified with their role as a father. Fathers engaged in more caregiving when mothers reported higher depressive symptoms ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 5, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Planalp, Elizabeth M.; Braungart-Rieker, Julia M. Source Type: research

Relationship of service members’ deployment trauma, PTSD symptoms, and experiential avoidance to postdeployment family reengagement.
This research examined whether military service members’ deployment-related trauma exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and experiential avoidance are associated with their observed levels of positive social engagement, social withdrawal, reactivity-coercion, and distress avoidance during postdeployment family interaction. Self reports of deployment related trauma, postdeployment PTSD symptoms, and experiential avoidance were collected from 184 men who were deployed to the Middle East conflicts, were partnered, and had a child between 4 and 13 years of age. Video samples of parent–child and partner ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - October 5, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brockman, Callie; Snyder, James; Gewirtz, Abigail; Gird, Suzanne R.; Quattlebaum, Jamie; Schmidt, Nicole; Pauldine, Michael R.; Elish, Katie; Schrepferman, Lynn; Hayes, Charles; Zettle, Robert; DeGarmo, David Source Type: research

Preventing adolescent depression with the family check-up: Examining family conflict as a mechanism of change.
This study was conducted with 2 overarching goals: (a) replicate previous work that has implicated the Family Check-Up (FCU), a multilevel, gated intervention model embedded in public middle schools, as an effective strategy for preventing growth in adolescent depressive symptoms and (b) test whether changes in family conflict may be an explanatory mechanism for the long-term, protective effects of the FCU with respect to adolescent depression. This trial was conducted with 593 ethnically diverse families who were randomized to intervention (offered the FCU) or middle school as usual. Complier average causal effect (CACE) ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 28, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Fosco, Gregory M.; Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Connell, Arin M.; Stormshak, Elizabeth A. Source Type: research

Intergenerational continuity in economic hardship, parental positivity, and positive parenting: The association with child behavior.
The current study examined intergenerational continuity in economic hardship, parental positivity, and positive parenting across generations based on both the family stress model (FSM) and the family resilience framework. The study included 220 generation 1 (G1) parents, their target youth (generation 2: G2) who participated from adolescence through adulthood, and the target’s child (generation 3: G3). Assessments included observational and self-report measures. Results indicated that G1 economic hardship negatively influenced both G1 positivity and G1 positive parenting. Similarly, G2 economic hardship was negatively re...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 14, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeon, Shinyoung; Neppl, Tricia K. Source Type: research

Combat exposure, mental health, and relationship functioning among women veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars.
This study examined associations between warzone exposures to combat with postdeployment relationship and family functioning in 134 women who deployed to the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Survey invitations were sent by mail to 600 randomly selected women who experienced recent military deployments and were residing in New England. The web-based survey included measures of combat exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, alcohol misuse, postdeployment stress exposure, family functioning, intimate relationship satisfaction, and parenting. Multivariate linear regression with bootstrapping estimates of ind...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - September 7, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Creech, Suzannah K.; Swift, Robert; Zlotnick, Caron; Taft, Casey; Street, Amy E. Source Type: research

Paternal and maternal warmth and the development of prosociality among preschoolers.
Although the influence of maternal behavior on child outcomes has been extensively studied, there has not been the same attention to the role of paternal behavior in development. This gap in research stands in contrast to the observable shift in parental roles and responsibilities in contemporary society. The goal of this study was to examine the roles of fathers, mothers, and children in the development of children’s prosocial behavior. In the current study we examined the development of reciprocal relations between paternal and maternal behavior and child prosociality over 36 months. Three hundred eighty-one families w...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 24, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Daniel, Ella; Madigan, Sheri; Jenkins, Jennifer Source Type: research

Continuous feelings of love? The parental bond from pregnancy to toddlerhood.
Both prenatal and postnatal parental bonding (i.e., the affective tie from parent to child) have important effects on parental and child functioning. However, research on the continuity and correlates of parental bonding is lacking. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to examine the stability of bonding levels and to explore distinct bonding patterns with a latent class analysis. Moreover, the correlates of these bonding patterns in the parental-, child-, and contextual domain were studied. Levels of maternal (N = 370) and paternal (N = 292) bonding and potential correlates were assessed at 26 weeks of pregnancy, ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 17, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: de Cock, Evi S. A.; Henrichs, Jens; Vreeswijk, Charlotte M. J. M.; Maas, A. Janneke B. M.; Rijk, Catharina H. A. M.; van Bakel, Hedwig J. A. Source Type: research

Parental emotional competence and parenting in low-income families with adolescents.
Ample research has demonstrated that alexithymia, which is characterized by difficulty processing emotions, is associated with disruptions in parenting infants and toddlers. Individuals suffering from alexithymia have among other negative outcomes difficulty building and maintaining interpersonal relationships. Research on emotional expression and recognition has documented the importance of these competencies for the quality of the parent–child relationship and for skills critical for parents of adolescents, such as effective monitoring. However, literature linking parental alexithymia to parenting behaviors and related...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kliewer, Wendy; Borre, Alicia; Wright, Anna W.; Jäggi, Lena; Drazdowski, Tess; Zaharakis, Nikola Source Type: research

Perceived parental security profiles in African American adolescents involved in the juvenile justice system.
Many researchers have shown the importance of parent attachment in childhood and adolescence. The present study extends the attachment literature to African Americans involved in the juvenile justice system (N = 213), and provides an initial inquiry using person-oriented methods. The average age was 16.17 years (SD = 1.44), and the sample was predominantly male (71%). Results of a confirmatory factor analysis of Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment—Short Form (IPPA–S) scores supported a 3-factor model: (a) Communication, (b) Trust, and (c) Alienation. Model-based clustering was applied to IPPA–S scores, and result...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Andretta, James R.; Ramirez, Aaron M.; Barnes, Michael E.; Odom, Terri; Roberson-Adams, Shelia; Woodland, Malcolm H. Source Type: research

The interplay of couple’s shared time, women’s intimacy, and intradyadic stress.
Theoretically, spending time together should be central for couples to build intimacy and should be associated with less relationship stress; however, few empirical studies have examined these links. The present study used 14 days of diary data from 92 women to investigate the interplay between the amount of time they spent with their partner (shared time), intimacy, and daily stress originating inside the relationship (intradyadic stress) on a within- and between-personal level. Multilevel analyses revealed moderation patterns: For example, when women spent more time with their partners than usual on a weekday with low le...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Milek, Anne; Butler, Emily A.; Bodenmann, Guy Source Type: research

Treatment response in couple therapy: Relationship adjustment and individual functioning change processes.
This study, a naturalistic investigation of the process of change in relationship adjustment and individual functioning during conjoint therapy, examined the first 8 sessions of a multisystemic model of couple therapy, integrative problem-centered metaframeworks (Breunlin, Pinsof, Russell, & Lebow, 2011; Pinsof, Breunlin, Russell, & Lebow, 2011). The sample consisted of 125 heterosexual couples who reported on their relationship adjustment and individual functioning before every session using the Systemic Therapy Inventory of Change (Pinsof et al., 2009; Pinsof, Zinbarg, et al., in press). Data were analyzed using dyadic l...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Knobloch-Fedders, Lynne M.; Pinsof, William M.; Haase, Claudia M. Source Type: research

Family enmeshment, adolescent emotional dysregulation, and the moderating role of gender.
Enmeshment plays a key role in many families’ dysfunctional interactions and may be especially detrimental for adolescents. Sixty-four adolescents completed ratings of family enmeshment, perceived distress tolerance, an interpersonal challenge task, and mood ratings before and immediately after the task. Before and during the challenge task, adolescents’ respiratory sinus arrhythmia (an indicator of cardiac vagal tone) was recorded. Associations were tested between adolescents’ perceptions of family enmeshment and 3 aspects of adolescent emotional dysregulation. Adolescents who perceived higher family enmeshment also...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kivisto, Katherine Little; Welsh, Deborah P.; Darling, Nancy; Culpepper, Christi L. Source Type: research

Veteran–child communication about parental PTSD: A mixed methods pilot study.
The majority of adults with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are parents. Parents with PTSD report lower levels of parenting satisfaction, poorer parent–child relationships, and elevated incidence of child distress and behavioral problems in comparison with parents without PTSD. Although literature exists regarding parent–child communication about serious mental illness and physical health problems, research has yet to examine this communication regarding parental PTSD. This 3-site, mixed methods study involved 19 veteran parents who had a diagnosis of PTSD; participants were recruited from VA medical centers. Vete...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sherman, Michelle D.; Larsen, Jessica; Straits-Troster, Kristy; Erbes, Christopher; Tassey, John Source Type: research

Buffering the negative effects of maternal alcohol problems on child behavior.
We examined whether mothers’ warmth or harsh parenting at age 5 moderated the effect of maternal alcohol problems on children’s behavior problems at age 11. Results indicated that mothers’ symptoms of alcohol problems when children were age 5 predicted greater externalizing behavior problems (aggression and rule breaking) when children were age 11. Aggression and rule-breaking behaviors, externalizing behaviors commonly associated with maternal alcohol problems, were lessened when mothers were warm and did not engage in harsh parenting techniques. Our findings highlight the importance of positive parenting techniques...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Conners-Burrow, Nicola A.; McKelvey, Lorraine M.; Pemberton, Joy R.; Mesman, Glenn R.; Holmes, Khiela J.; Bradley, Robert H. Source Type: research

Parental causal attributions and emotions in daily learning situations with the child.
This study investigated the dynamics between the causal attributions parents reported daily for their children’s success in learning situations and parental positive emotions. The sample consisted of 159 mothers and 147 fathers of 162 first graders (83 girls, 79 boys; aged from 6 to 7 years, M = 7.5 years, SD = 3.6 months). Parents filled in a structured diary questionnaire concerning their causal attributions and emotions over 7 successive days in the fall semester and again over 7 successive days in the spring semester. Multilevel analyses showed that both parental causal attributions and positive emotions varied more ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Enlund, Emmi; Aunola, Kaisa; Tolvanen, Asko; Nurmi, Jari-Erik Source Type: research

The protective role of maternal racial socialization for African American adolescents exposed to community violence.
Urban African American youth’s disproportionate exposure to community violence and increased risk for its adverse consequences have heightened interest in identifying protective factors that mitigate the effects of community violence exposure for these youth. Thus, the present study examined whether maternal racial socialization messages protect African American adolescents against the adverse effects of community violence exposure. Participants were a community sample of African American adolescents (N = 106; mean age = 15.41 years) and their female guardians. For community-violence-exposed youth, maternal racial social...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Henry, Jessica S.; Lambert, Sharon F.; Smith Bynum, Mia Source Type: research

Correction to Foster et al. (2009).
This study examined whether (a) therapist behaviors thought to enhance family treatment predicted caregiver in-session responses, and (b) caregiver race, racial match between caregiver and therapist, and family financial hardship moderated the relationships between therapist and caregiver behavior. Observers coded caregiver and therapist behavior during one session of multisystemic therapy for substance abusing adolescents. Therapist teaching, focusing on strengths, making reinforcing statements, problem solving, and dealing with practical family needs predicted caregiver engagement and/or positive response, regardless of ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: No authorship indicated Source Type: research

Posttraumatic stress and emotion regulation in survivors of intimate partner violence.
We examined child’s emotion regulation as a moderator and mother’s emotion regulation as a mediator of the relation between mother PTSS and child adjustment. Sixty-four female survivors of IPV and their 6–12-year-old children participated. Mothers reported their own PTSS and their children’s adjustment. Child emotion regulation was measured using respiratory sinus arrhythmia, a physiological index of emotion regulation. Mother’s emotion regulation was measured from observer coding of the Parent Meta-Emotion Interview (Katz & Gottman, 1986), which asked mothers about their awareness and regulation of emotion. Chil...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 10, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Gurtovenko, Kyrill Source Type: research

The association of punitive parenting practices and adolescent achievement.
This article uses a nationally representative dataset to investigate the extent to which academic-related parenting practices and the home environment during middle childhood (ages 11–13) predict achievement in late adolescence (N = 486; age range: 16–18 years). Results from path analyses indicated that parental endorsement of punitive strategies (e.g., lecture, punish, restrict activities) in response to academic underperformance during middle school predict lower literacy and math achievement 5 years later. In contrast, more cognitively stimulating homes predict higher literacy and math achievement 5 years later. Par...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 3, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tang, Sandra; Davis-Kean, Pamela E. Source Type: research

Maternal history of parentification and warm responsiveness: The mediating role of knowledge of infant development.
Maternal history of parentification in the family of origin poses subsequent risk to parenting quality during the transition to parenthood. The present study builds on prior work by evaluating whether the association between maternal parentification history and warm responsiveness is mediated by maternal knowledge of infant development in first time mothers. Using data from a prospective longitudinal study on the transition to motherhood, maternal knowledge of infant development and observational codings of warm responsiveness were examined across the first 18 months of parenthood for 374 mothers who also provided retrospe...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 3, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Nuttall, Amy K.; Valentino, Kristin; Wang, Lijuan; Lefever, Jennifer Burke; Borkowski, John G. Source Type: research

Relationship education and marital satisfaction in newlywed couples: A propensity score analysis.
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether premarital relationship education and characteristics of relationship education in a community sample of newlywed couples predicted marital trajectories over 27 months. Newlywed couples (N = 191) completed measures of marital satisfaction 9 times over 27 months, and prior to marriage they provided information about relationship education and demographic, personal, and relationship risk factors for marital distress. Propensity scores (i.e., the probability of receiving relationship education) were estimated using the marital distress risk factors, and used to derive a mat...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - August 3, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Cobb, Rebecca J.; Sullivan, Kieran T. Source Type: research

Gender and ethnicity as moderators: Integrative data analysis of multidimensional family therapy randomized clinical trials.
This study examined gender and ethnicity as moderators of Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) effectiveness for adolescent drug abuse and illustrated the utility of integrative data analysis (IDA; Bauer & Hussong, 2009) for assessing moderation. By pooling participant data from 5 independent MDFT randomized clinical trials (RCTs), IDA increased power to test moderation. Participants were 646 adolescents receiving treatment for drug use, aged 11 to 17 years (M = 15.31, SD = 1.30), with 19% female (n = 126), 14% (n = 92) European American, 35% (n = 225) Hispanic, and 51% (n = 329) African American. Participants were rando...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 27, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Greenbaum, Paul E.; Wang, Wei; Henderson, Craig E.; Kan, Lisa; Hall, Kristin; Dakof, Gayle A.; Liddle, Howard A. Source Type: research

Parenting stress and parent support among mothers with high and low education.
This study explored whether variation in maternal parenting stress in a population sample was associated with support deficits. To obtain a clearer understanding of support deficits among mothers of high and low education, we distinguished subgroups according to mothers’ migrant and single-parent status. Participants were 5,865 mothers from the Growing Up in Scotland Study, who were interviewed when their children were 10 months old. Parenting stress was greater among mothers with either high or low education than among mothers with intermediate education, although it was highest for those with low education. Support def...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 20, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Parkes, Alison; Sweeting, Helen; Wight, Daniel Source Type: research

Beyond the average marital communication: Latent profiles of the observed interactions among Chinese newlywed couples.
Employing a multicontext observational design, using a person-centered approach, and treating the marital dyad as the unit of analysis, this study examined the within-couple communication patterning of 144 Chinese newlywed couples and its association with relationship satisfaction. Latent profile analysis consistently revealed 3 profiles of spouses’ interactive behaviors across contexts differing in both topic nature (i.e., problem-solving vs. social support) and initiator (i.e., husbands vs. wives): (a) traditionally undemonstrative profile, (b) emotionally quarrelling profile, and (c) warmly supportive profile. The pre...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 20, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Cao, Hongjian; Fang, Xiaoyi; Fine, Mark A.; Ju, Xiaoyan; Lan, Jing; Liu, Xuanwen Source Type: research

Predicting long-term risk for relationship dissolution using nonparametric conditional survival trees.
Identifying risk factors for divorce or separation is an important step in the prevention of negative individual outcomes and societal costs associated with relationship dissolution. Programs that aim to prevent relationship distress and dissolution typically focus on changing processes that occur during couple conflict, although the predictive ability of conflict-specific variables has not been examined in the context of other factors related to relationship dissolution. The authors examine whether emotional responding and communication during couple conflict predict relationship dissolution after controlling for overall ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 20, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kliem, Sören; Weusthoff, Sarah; Hahlweg, Kurt; Baucom, Katherine J. W.; Baucom, Brian R. Source Type: research

Holding back, intimacy, and psychological and relationship outcomes among couples coping with prostate cancer.
The present study evaluated intimacy as a mechanism for the effects of holding back sharing concerns about cancer on couples’ psychological distress, well-being, and marital satisfaction using the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM), and evaluated 2 possible moderators of these associations: the number of patient and spouse cancer concerns. We had 139 men treated for localized prostate cancer in the past year and their spouses complete surveys about holding back sharing cancer concerns, intimacy, distress, and relationship satisfaction, as well as patient and spouse cancer concerns. APIM-indicated that the associa...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 20, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Manne, Sharon L.; Kissane, David; Zaider, Talia; Kashy, Deborah; Lee, David; Heckman, Carolyn; Virtue, Shannon Myers Source Type: research

Decreases in perceived maternal criticism predict improvement in subthreshold psychotic symptoms in a randomized trial of family-focused therapy for individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis.
This study was conducted within a randomized controlled trial across 8 sites. The perceived criticism scale was completed by 90 families prior to treatment and by 41 families at 6-month reassessment. Evaluators, blind to treatment condition, rated subthreshold symptoms of psychosis at baseline, 6- and 12-month assessments. Perceived maternal criticism decreased from pre- to posttreatment for both treatment groups, and this change in criticism predicted decreases in subthreshold positive symptoms at 12-month follow-up. This study offers evidence that participation in structured family treatment is associated with improvemen...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 13, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: O’Brien, Mary P.; Miklowitz, David J.; Cannon, Tyrone D. Source Type: research

Dimensions of attachment and commitment across the transition to parenthood.
We used structural equation modeling and actor–partner interdependence models to test dyadic associations between adult attachment and changes in relationship commitment at the transition to parenthood in a sample of 182 dual-earner couples. Overall, more avoidant individuals experienced significant changes in commitment at the transition to parenthood; specifically, higher avoidance was associated with decreases in personal confidence and dedication. More anxious fathers experienced increases in personal felt constraint while anxious mothers’ commitment remained stable. Partners of more anxious individuals experienced...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 13, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ferriby, Megan; Kotila, Letitia; Kamp Dush, Claire; Schoppe-Sullivan, Sarah Source Type: research

Physical aggression, compromised social support, and 10-year marital outcomes: Testing a relational spillover model.
The purpose of the present study was to test a relational spillover model of physical aggression whereby physical aggression affects marital outcomes due to its effects on how spouses ask for and provide support to one another. Newlywed couples (n = 172) reported levels of physical aggression over the past year and engaged in interactions designed to elicit social support; marital adjustment, and stability were assessed periodically over the first 10 years of marriage. Multilevel modeling revealed that negative support behavior mediated the relationship between physical aggression and 10-year marital adjustment levels wher...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 13, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sullivan, Kieran T.; Pasch, Lauri A.; Lawrence, Erika; Bradbury, Thomas N. Source Type: research

Association of parental warmth and harsh discipline with developmental trajectories of depressive symptoms among adolescents in Chinese society.
This article examines the relationship between parenting styles and the development of depressive symptoms among adolescents. We analyzed a nationally representative longitudinal data set of adolescents aged 12 to 14 in Taiwan. Results from growth mixture modeling revealed a nonlinear increase in the intensity of depressive symptoms between early and middle adolescence. More pronounced depressive symptoms in earlier years were also shown to be associated with more rapid development of similar symptoms later in adolescence. Perceived parenting styles, as manifest in parental warmth and harsh discipline, were categorized int...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 13, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Wang, Yu-Chung Lawrence; Chan, Hsun-Yu; Lin, Ching-Wen; Li, Jia-Ru Source Type: research

Conformity expectations: Differential effects on IVF twins and singletons’ parent-child relationships and adjustment.
This study proposes that parents’ conformity expectations for children have differential effects on parent–child relationships for twin and singleton children, which indirectly explains twins’ more optimum psychosocial adjustment. Parental conformity expectations, parent–child relationship satisfaction, and children’s emotional, behavioral, and attention problems were assessed in a sample of 288 6- to 12-year-old IVF-conceived twins and singletons. Overall, parents of twins had higher expectations for child conformity to parent rules than singleton parents. Path models demonstrate that twin status and parental ex...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 13, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Anderson, Kayla N.; Rueter, Martha A.; Connor, Jennifer J.; Chen, Muzi; Damario, Mark Source Type: research

Dyadic coping mediates the association of sanctification with marital satisfaction and well-being.
Some studies suggest that the sanctification of marriage, or considering marriage sacred, is related to positive marital outcomes (e.g., marital satisfaction, conflict resolution). However, the mechanisms explaining this association have not been sufficiently investigated. In the current study, we analyzed supportive dyadic coping as a potential mediator of the relation between marriage sanctity and marital satisfaction, as well as between marriage sanctity and well-being. Self-reported data were collected from 215 Romanian couples (N = 430) belonging to the Christian Orthodox religion. Analyses using the common fate model...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 6, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rusu, Petruta P.; Hilpert, Peter; Beach, Steven R. H.; Turliuc, Maria N.; Bodenmann, Guy Source Type: research

Transactional processes in children born preterm: Influences of mother–child interactions and parenting stress.
This prospective, longitudinal study examined the transactional relations among perceived maternal parenting stress, maternal insensitivity, and child behavior across toddlerhood through age 6 within families of a child born preterm. A sample of 173 mother–child dyads were followed from just before the infant was discharged from the neonatal intensive care unit to 6 years of age, with observational measurements of maternal insensitivity and child noncompliance (24 and 36 months), maternal self-reports of perceived parenting stress (24 months, 36 months, 6 years), and maternal reports of child externalizing behavior at 6 ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 6, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gerstein, Emily D.; Poehlmann-Tynan, Julie Source Type: research

What’s your motivation to be pregnant? Relations between motives for parenthood and women’s prenatal functioning.
Prenatal psychological adjustment is a critical predictor of postnatal maternal adjustment, which, in turn, relates to a child’s psychological development. As such, it is important to examine possible correlates of women’s psychological functioning during pregnancy. Grounded in self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000), the present research investigated the link between women’s motives for having a child and prenatal maternal psychological adjustment. Specifically, in a sample of 208 pregnant women, we examined the relation between women’s intensity (i.e., quantity) and quality of motivation for having a child ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 6, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Brenning, Katrijn; Soenens, Bart; Vansteenkiste, Maarten Source Type: research

Physiological linkage in couples and its implications for individual and interpersonal functioning: A literature review.
Do partners’ levels of physiological arousal become linked in close relationships? The term physiological linkage describes covariation between people in their moment-to-moment physiological states. The current review presents a conceptual framework to guide research on linkage in romantic relationships and discusses the potential implications of being linked. Evidence of linkage was found across a broad range of physiological indices and in a variety of contexts, including during laboratory-based conflict and in daily life. Four hypotheses regarding how linkage relates to individual and interpersonal functioning are eva...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 6, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Timmons, Adela C.; Margolin, Gayla; Saxbe, Darby E. Source Type: research

The meaning of emotional overinvolvement in early development: Prospective relations with child behavior problems.
Emotional overinvolvement (EOI) in parents’ Five Minute Speech Samples (FMSSs; Magaña-Amato, 1993) is thought to measure overconcern and enmeshment with one’s child. Although related to maladaptive outcomes in studies of adult children, FMSS EOI evidences varied relations with behavior problems in studies with young children. These mixed findings may indicate that certain FMSS EOI criteria reflect inappropriate and excessive involvement with adult children, but do not indicate maladaptive processes when parenting younger children. Thus, this study evaluated relations of each FMSS EOI criterion with changes in child be...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - July 6, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Khafi, Tamar Y.; Yates, Tuppett M.; Sher-Censor, Efrat Source Type: research

Relationship stigma and relationship outcomes in interracial and same-sex relationships: Examination of sources and buffers.
Interracial and same-sex romantic relationships are more common and socially accepted in the United States than ever before; yet, stigmatization of these relationships persists, with consequences for relationship dynamics. We conducted an online survey study with adults living in the United States in interracial and same-sex relationships to examine associations of relationship stigma from family, friends, and public with several relationship outcomes (i.e., investment, satisfaction, intimate partner aggression victimization and perpetration, commitment, intimacy, trust, passion, love, sexual communication, and sexual sati...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rosenthal, Lisa; Starks, Tyrel J. Source Type: research

Effectiveness and moderators of the preventive intervention kids in divorce situations: A randomized controlled trial.
This study evaluated the school-based, child-directed prevention program Kids In Divorce Situations (KIDS) using a randomized controlled trial. The sample consisted of 156 children randomly assigned at the school level into an experimental (80 children) and control condition (76 children). In addition, 131 mothers and 76 fathers participated in the study. Four assessments took place: a pretest, a posttest, and two follow-up assessments conducted 6 months and 1 year after finishing KIDS. Latent growth analyses demonstrated that the intervention significantly reduced child-reported emotional problems and enhanced child-repor...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Pelleboer-Gunnink, Hannah A.; Van der Valk, Inge E.; Branje, Susan J. T.; Van Doorn, Muriel D.; Deković, Maja Source Type: research

Trajectories of fathers’ psychological distress across the early parenting period: Implications for parenting.
This study investigates the association between fathers’ mental health trajectories and key parenting behaviors (warmth, hostility, consistency) spanning the first 8–9 years postpartum. Secondary analyses of 5 waves of data from 2,662 fathers participating in the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children were conducted. Latent growth class analysis was used to identify distinct trajectories of fathers’ distress (Kessler-6; Kessler et al., 2003), and latent growth models estimated parenting warmth, hostility, and consistency. Multiple group analyses were conducted to describe and compare the course of parenting behavi...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Giallo, Rebecca; Cooklin, Amanda; Brown, Stephanie; Christensen, Daniel; Kingston, Dawn; Liu, Cindy H.; Wade, Catherine; Nicholson, Jan M. Source Type: research

Neurophysiological correlates of children’s processing of interparental conflict cues.
This study builds on the literature on child exposure to marital conflict by testing whether mother-reported marital conflict exposure predicts a child’s P3 event-related potential (ERP) components generated in response to viewing quasi–marital conflict photos. We collected ERP data from 23 children (9–11 years of age) while presenting photos of actors pretending to be a couple depicting interpersonal anger, happiness, and neutrality. To elicit the P3 ERP, stimuli were presented using an oddball paradigm, with angry and happy photos presented on 20% of trials each and neutral photos presented on the remaining 60% of ...
Source: Journal of Family Psychology - June 29, 2015 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Schermerhorn, Alice C.; Bates, John E.; Puce, Aina; Molfese, Dennis L. Source Type: research