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This page shows you the most recent publications within this specialty of the MedWorm directory. This is page number 11.

Heart Rate and Respiratory Rate Influence on Heart Rate Variability Repeatability: Effects of the Correction for the Prevailing Heart Rate
Jakub S. G ąsior, Jerzy Sacha, Piotr J. Jeleń, Jakub Zieliński, Jacek Przybylski (Source: Frontiers in Physiology)
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - August 18, 2016 Category: Physiology Source Type: research

Identifying pre-hospital factors which influence outcome for major trauma patients in a regional trauma network: an exploratory study
Conclusion These findings validate GCS, BP and Respiratory Rate values as valid triggers for transport to a Major Trauma Centre. Analysis of the interactions between arrival time, time-on-scene, skill mix and age demand further exploration but tentatively validate the concept of a ‘Golden Hour’ and suggest the potential value of a ‘load and go and play on the way’ approach. (Source: Emergency Medicine Journal)
Source: Emergency Medicine Journal - August 18, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Thompson, L., Hill, M., Davies, C., Shaw, G. Tags: Poster Presentations Source Type: research

Point-of-care lung ultrasound in young children with respiratory tract infections and wheeze
Conclusions Among children with respiratory tract infections and wheeze, a positive LUS seems to distinguish between clinical syndromes by ruling in pneumonia and ruling out asthma. If confirmed in future studies, LUS may emerge as a point-of-care tool to guide diagnosis and disposition in young children with wheeze. (Source: Emergency Medicine Journal)
Source: Emergency Medicine Journal - August 18, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Varshney, T., Mok, E., Shapiro, A. J., Li, P., Dubrovsky, A. S. Tags: Bronchiolitis, Pneumonia (infectious disease), TB and other respiratory infections, Child health, Radiology, Asthma, Bronchitis, Pneumonia (respiratory medicine), Clinical diagnostic tests, Radiology (diagnostics) Original article Source Type: research

Uncoupling Protein 2 Deficiency Results in Higher Neutrophil Counts and Lower B Cell Counts During Ageing in Mice
Progress of age-related haematopoietic diseases as myelodysplastic syndrome has previously been linked to enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) was shown to reduce mitochondrial ROS production by uncoupling of the respiratory chain. The impact of UCP2 loss and elevated ROS on haematopoiesis during ageing has not yet been investigated. Herein, UCP2 knockout mice were analyzed at ageing stages of 3, 12 and 24 months in regard to oxidative and energy status of bone marrow cells. (Source: Experimental Hematology)
Source: Experimental Hematology - August 18, 2016 Category: Hematology Authors: Christin Kretzschmar, Catrin Roolf, Katrin Timmer, Anett Sekora, Gudrun Kn übel, Hugo Murua Escobar, Robert Jaster, Sarah Müller, Georg Fuellen, Rüdiger Köhling, Christian Junghanss Source Type: research

Down's syndrome as a risk factor for severe lower respiratory tract infection due to RSV
ConclusionChildren with Down's syndrome hospitalized due to RSV LRTI, have a longer hospital stay and worse clinical course than children without. Our findings support the need of RSV prevention in children with Down's syndrome, especially in children younger than one year.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. (Source: Acta Paediatrica)
Source: Acta Paediatrica - August 18, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Constanza Galleguillos, B árbara Galleguillos, Guillermo Larios, Gonzalo Menchaca, Louis Bont, Jose A. Castro‐Rodriguez Tags: Regular Article Source Type: research

Implementation of ‘matrix support’ (collaborative care) to reduce asthma and COPD referrals and improve primary care management in Brazil: a pilot observational study
npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine, Published online: 18 August 2016; doi:10.1038/npjpcrm.2016.47 (Source: npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine)
Source: npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine - August 18, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Sonia Maria Martins William Salibe-Filho Lu ís Paulo Tonioli Lu ís Eduardo Pfingesten Patr ícia Dias Braz Juliet McDonnell Si ân Williams D ébora do Carmo Jaime Correia de Sousa Hilary Pinnock Rafael Stelmach Source Type: research

Asthma prescribing, ethnicity and risk of hospital admission: an analysis of 35,864 linked primary and secondary care records in East London
npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine, Published online: 18 August 2016; doi:10.1038/npjpcrm.2016.49 (Source: npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine)
Source: npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine - August 18, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Sally A Hull Shauna McKibben Kate Homer Stephanie JC Taylor Katy Pike Chris Griffiths Source Type: research

Editorial Board, Masthead, TOC
(Source: Pediatric Pulmonology)
Source: Pediatric Pulmonology - August 18, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Issue Information Source Type: research

Upcoming events of interest
(Source: Pediatric Pulmonology)
Source: Pediatric Pulmonology - August 18, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: research

Characterization of bronchiectasis in the elderly
This study aimed at evaluating bronchiectasis features in older adults and elderly, along with their clinical outcomes. (Source: Respiratory Medicine)
Source: Respiratory Medicine - August 18, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Giuseppe Bellelli, James D. Chalmers, Giovanni Sotgiu, Simone Dore, Melissa J. McDonnell, Pieter C. Goeminne, Katerina Dimakou, Dusan Skrbic, Andrea Lombi, Federico Pane, Dusanka Obradovic, Thomas C. Fardon, Robert M. Rutherford, Alberto Pesci, Stefano Al Source Type: research

Effects of < i > Porphyromonas gingivalis < /i > LipopolysaccharideTolerized Monocytes on Inflammatory Responses in Neutrophils
by Xiang-qing Zhu, Wei Lu, Yang Chen, Xiao-fan Cheng, Jia-ying Qiu, Yan Xu, Ying Sun Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease induced by bacteria. Exposure of the host to periodontal pathogens and their virulence factors induces a state of hyporesponsiveness to subsequent stimulations, which is termed endotoxin tolerance. The role and mechanism of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)– tolerized monocytes in inflammatory responses in neutrophils are currently unclear. Here, conditioned supernatants were collected from THP-1 cells treated with or without repeated 1 μg/mlPorphyromonas gingivalis (P.gingivalis) LPS. The chemota...
Source: PLoS One - August 18, 2016 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Xiang-qing Zhu Source Type: research

A randomised trial of placing preterm infants on their back or left side after birth
Conclusions Preterm infants on their left side did not have higher SpO2 at 5 min of life. Placing preterm infants on their side at birth is feasible and appears to be a reasonable alternative to placing them on their back. Trial registration number ISRCTN74486341. (Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition)
Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition - August 18, 2016 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Stenke, E., Kieran, E. A., McCarthy, L. K., Dawson, J. A., Van Vonderen, J. J., Kamlin, C. O. F., Davis, P. G., Te Pas, A. B., O'Donnell, C. P. F. Tags: Airway biology Original articles Source Type: research

High-flow support in very preterm infants in Australia and New Zealand
Conclusions HF use in extremely preterm and very preterm infants increased significantly within the ANZNN from 2009 to 2012. (Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition)
Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition - August 18, 2016 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Roberts, C. T., Owen, L. S., Manley, B. J., Davis, P. G., for the Australian & New Zealand Neonatal Network (ANZNN) Tags: Epidemiologic studies, Child health, Infant health, Neonatal and paediatric intensive care, Neonatal health, Neonatal intensive care Original articles Source Type: research

High-flow nasal cannula oxygen and nasal continuous positive airway pressure and full oral feeding in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia
Conclusions In infants with BPD who required respiratory support beyond 34 weeks PMA, use of nCPAP then HHFNC was associated with earlier establishment of full oral feeds. Consideration should be given to assessing stable BPD infants with regard to oral feeding while on CPAP. (Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition)
Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition - August 18, 2016 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Shetty, S., Hunt, K., Douthwaite, A., Athanasiou, M., Hickey, A., Greenough, A. Tags: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, Clinical trials (epidemiology) Original articles Source Type: research

Prediction of infant extubation outcomes using the tension-time index
Conclusions Assessment of TTdi and TTmus cannot be recommended for use in routine clinical practice. (Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition)
Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition - August 18, 2016 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Bhat, P., Peacock, J. L., Rafferty, G. F., Hannam, S., Greenough, A. Tags: Airway biology Original articles Source Type: research

Systemic endogenous erythropoietin and associated disorders in extremely preterm newborns
Conclusions EPO blood concentrations in extremely preterm newborns during the first 2 weeks of life convey information about increased risks of bowel, lung and retinal diseases. (Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition)
Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition - August 18, 2016 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Holm, M., Skranes, J., Dammann, O., Fichorova, R. N., Allred, E. N., Leviton, A. Tags: Eye Diseases, Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, Epidemiologic studies, Ophthalmology, Drugs: endocrine system Original articles Source Type: research

Therapeutic hypothermia in neonatal cervical spine injury
A baby boy (39 weeks; 3350 g) delivered by forceps following shoulder dystocia was born in a poor condition requiring invasive respiratory support (Apgar scores at 1, 5 and 10 min were 3, 4 and 5, respectively). He was started on passive cooling at the local neonatal unit, and then referred to our centre. At admission, the baby had flaccid quadriparesis, absent deep tendon reflexes and lacked spontaneous respiration; however, the baby had a weak suck and opened his eyes spontaneously. Amplitude-integrated electroencephalography was normal. An MR scan at 12 h showed severe haemorrhagic contusion of the c...
Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition - August 18, 2016 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Montaldo, P., Oliveira, V., Lally, P. J., Chaban, B., Atreja, G., Kirmi, O., Thayyil, S. Tags: Obstetrics and gynaecology, Journalology, Neurological injury, Pregnancy, Child health, Disability, Competing interests (ethics), Trauma, Injury Images in neonatal medicine Source Type: research

Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer
The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3–5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 1...
Source: Journal of Radiation Research - August 18, 2016 Category: Physics Authors: Crane, C. H. Tags: Supplement - ICRR highlights Source Type: research

GPU accelerated dynamic respiratory motion model correction for MRI-guided cardiac interventions
• The highlight of this study is that a GPU accelerated dynamic motion model framework is described.• The proposed method is able to correct for respiratory motion in realtime, and be adaptive to changes in breathing pattern.• This methodology can be used to improve the accuracy of MRI guided cardiovascular interventions. (Source: Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine)
Source: Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine - August 18, 2016 Category: Bioinformatics Authors: Robert Xu, Graham A. Wright Source Type: research

Duox2 is required for the transcription of pattern recognition receptors in acute viral lung infection: An interferon-independent regulatory mechanism
Publication date: Available online 18 August 2016 Source:Antiviral Research Author(s): Seung-No Hong, Ji Young Kim, Hanna Kim, Dong-Young Kim, Tae-Bin Won, Doo Hee Han, Chae Seo Rhee, Hyun Jik Kim The innate immune response, which constitutes the first line of defense against influenza A virus (IAV) infection, is activated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize viral structures. We found that the PRRs, retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5), which have been implicated as interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes, were dominantly responsible for the recogniti...
Source: Antiviral Therapy - August 18, 2016 Category: Virology Source Type: research

Functional Food and dietary supplements For Lung Health
Conclusions This plant metabolites benefits lung health by anti-inflammatory, immune-modulatory, and antioxidant effects. Many pungent flavor components in edible plants activate the mucous membranes of the respiratory tract to help fight microbes and remove undesirable agents. These flavor and aroma compounds can behave as expectorants, decongestant, antitussive, and antimicrobial agents. They enhance mucous membrane secretion, kill pathogens, reduce inflammation and decrease mucous viscosity by weakening the hydrogen bonds in the mucous. For lung cancer, certain plant metabolites help induce apoptosis, suppress angiogene...
Source: Trends in Food Science and Technology - August 18, 2016 Category: Food Science Source Type: research

Scoring of pediatric polysomnograms
This article highlights the problems associated with recording and scoring pediatric polysomnograms according to AASM rules with respect to the number of necessary electrodes, study over one or two nights, scoring of sleep stages (specific patterns for scoring sleep stages and the delta wave amplitude criterion), arousal definition, scoring movements and movement times, and scoring the respiratory pattern. Individual examples are discussed in each case. Beyond the fundamental aspects laid down in the AASM rules, recording and scoring polysomnograms in children necessitates additional understanding of development-specific c...
Source: Somnologie - Schlafforschung und Schlafmedizin - August 18, 2016 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: research

Applicability of data-driven respiratory motion correction to CZT SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging in the clinical setting: The birth of an old wish
(Source: Journal of Nuclear Cardiology)
Source: Journal of Nuclear Cardiology - August 18, 2016 Category: Nuclear Medicine Source Type: research

The P4 Health Spectrum – A Predictive, Preventive, Personalized and Participatory Continuum for Promoting Healthspan
Chronic diseases (i.e., Noncommunicable Diseases), mainly cardiovascular disease, cancer, respiratory diseases and type-2-diabetes, are now the leading cause of death, disability and diminished quality of life on the planet. Moreover, these diseases are also a major financial burden worldwide, significantly impacting the economy of many countries. Healthcare systems and medicine have progressively improved upon the ability to address infectious diseases and react to adverse health events through both surgical interventions and pharmacology; we have become efficient in delivering reactive care (i.e., initiating intervention...
Source: Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases - August 18, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Michael Sagner, Amy McNeil, Pekka Puska, Charles Auffray, Nathan D. Price, Leroy Hood, Carl J. Lavie, Ze-Guang Han, Zhu Chen, Samir Kumar Brahmachari, Bruce S. McEwen, Marcelo B. Soares, Rudi Balling, Elissa Epel, Ross Arena Source Type: research

Optimizing Oxygenation in the Mechanically Ventilated Patient
This article discusses fundamental aspects of respiratory physiology and clinical indices used to describe oxygenation status. Key nursing interventions including patient assessment, positioning, pharmacology, and managing hemodynamic parameters are discussed, emphasizing their effects toward mitigating ventilation –perfusion mismatch and optimizing oxygenation. (Source: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America)
Source: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America - August 18, 2016 Category: Nursing Authors: Glenn Barton, Brandi Vanderspank-Wright, Jacqueline Shea Source Type: research

Structural basis of thiol-based regulation of formaldehyde detoxification in H. influenzae by a MerR regulator with no sensor region
Pathogenic bacteria such as Haemophilus influenzae, a major cause of lower respiratory tract diseases, must cope with a range of electrophiles generated in the host or by endogenous metabolism. Formaldehyde is one such compound that can irreversibly damage proteins and DNA through alkylation and cross-linking and interfere with redox homeostasis. Its detoxification operates under the control of HiNmlR, a protein from the MerR family that lacks a specific sensor region and does not bind metal ions. We demonstrate that HiNmlR is a thiol-dependent transcription factor that modulates H. influenzae response to formaldehyde, wit...
Source: Nucleic Acids Research - August 18, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Counago, R. M., Chen, N. H., Chang, C.-W., Djoko, K. Y., McEwan, A. G., Kobe, B. Tags: Structural Biology Source Type: research

Air pollution during pregnancy and lung development in the child
Air pollution exposure has increased extensively in recent years and there is considerable evidence that exposure to particulate matter can lead to adverse respiratory outcomes. The health impacts of exposure to air pollution during the prenatal period is especially concerning as it can impair organogenesis and organ development, which can lead to long-term complications. Exposure to air pollution during pregnancy affects respiratory health in different ways. Lung development might be impaired by air pollution indirectly by causing lower birth weight, premature birth or disturbed development of the immune system. (Source: ...
Source: Paediatric Respiratory Reviews - August 18, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Insa Korten, Kathryn Ramsey, Philipp Latzin Source Type: research

Diabetes in pregnancy and lung health in offspring: developmental origins of respiratory disease
Diabetes is an increasingly common complication of pregnancy. In parallel with this trend, a rise in chronic lung disease in children has been observed in recent decades. While several adverse health outcomes associated with exposure to diabetes in utero have been documented in epidemiological and experimental studies, few have examined the impact of diabetes in pregnancy on offspring lung health and respiratory disease. We provide a comprehensive overview of current literature on this topic, finding suggestive evidence that exposure to diabetes in utero may have adverse effects on lung development. (Source: Paediatric Respiratory Reviews)
Source: Paediatric Respiratory Reviews - August 18, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Azad MB, Moyce BL, Guillemette L, Pascoe CD, Wicklow B, McGavock JM, Halayko AJ, Dolinsky VW Source Type: research

“In utero alcohol effects on foetal, neonatal and childhood lung disease”
Maternal alcohol use during pregnancy exposes both premature and term newborns to the toxicity of alcohol and its metabolites. Foetal alcohol exposure adversely effects the lung. In contrast to the adult “alcoholic lung” phenotype, an inability to identify the newborn exposed to alcohol in utero has limited our understanding of its effect on adverse pulmonary outcomes. This chapter will review advances in biomarker development of in utero alcohol exposure. We will highlight the current understan ding of in utero alcohol's toxicity to the developing lung and immune defense. (Source: Paediatric Respiratory Reviews)
Source: Paediatric Respiratory Reviews - August 18, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Theresa W. Gauthier, Lou Ann S. Brown Source Type: research

“Pulmonary Effects of Maternal Smoking on the Fetus and Child: Effects on Lung Development, Respiratory Morbidities, and Life Long Lung Health”
Maternal smoking during pregnancy is the largest preventable cause of abnormal in-utero lung development. Despite well known risks, rates of smoking during pregnancy have only slightly decreased over the last ten years, with rates varying from 5-40% worldwide resulting in tens of millions of fetal exposures. Despite multiple approaches to smoking cessation about 50% of smokers will continue to smoke during pregnancy. Maternal genotype plays an important role in the likelihood of continued smoking during pregnancy and the degree to which maternal smoking will affect the fetus. (Source: Paediatric Respiratory Reviews)
Source: Paediatric Respiratory Reviews - August 18, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Cindy T. McEvoy, Eliot R. Spindel Source Type: research

Maternal HIV and Paediatric Lung Health
With improved prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV, paediatric HIV disease is less common. However, the number of HIV exposed but uninfected infants is growing. Exposure to maternal HIV impacts infant respiratory health through an increase in known risk factors such as increased preterm birth and low birth weight, suboptimal breastfeeding, increased psychosocial stressors and increased exposure to infective pathogens. Exposure to the HIV virus and altered maternal immune environment result in immunologic changes in the infant that may contribute to respiratory disease risk. (Source: Paediatric Respiratory Reviews)
Source: Paediatric Respiratory Reviews - August 18, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: A.L. Slogrove, L. Frigati, D.M. Gray Source Type: research

Title: Tuberculosis. Digging deep in the soul of humanity
TB is one of the oldest infectious diseases that affected humankind. A quintessential social disease, TB remains one of the world's deadliest communicable diseases, with still a high mortality and burden of disease. Social representations of TB focus on aspects associated to feelings and manifestations awakened by the disease, sometimes reinforcing stigmas and prejudices about the way of perceiving TB. TB is a historic disease now reborn with a deeper social stigma. Despite the modest reduction in TB incidence worldwide, its incidence is still rising in certain crisis-affected populations like refugees, and in those bearin...
Source: Respiratory Medicine - August 18, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Jorge Cervantes Tags: Short communication Source Type: research

Patient Focus and Regulatory Considerations for Inhalation Device Design: Report from the 2015 IPAC-RS/ISAM Workshop
Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery , Vol. 0, No. 0. (Source: Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery)
Source: Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery - August 18, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Nicolas Roche Gerhard Scheuch John N. Pritchard Cornelia Nopitsch-Mai Deepika A. Lakhani Bhawana Saluja Janine Jamieson Andrew Dundon Roisin Wallace Susan Holmes David Cipolla Myrna B. Dolovich Samir A. Shah Svetlana Lyapustina Source Type: research

Contribution of influenza viruses to medically attended acute respiratory illnesses in children in high ‐income countries: a meta‐analysis
ConclusionThe minority of healthy patients aged ≤5 years with medically attended influenza‐like or acute respiratory symptoms have laboratory‐confirmed influenza virus infection, although this varied by influenza season. Prevention efforts should be targeted accordingly. StatementMost influenza‐like illnesses are not laboratory‐confirmed and have similar clinical presentations. Consequently, the true contribution of influenza to acute respiratory infections in children remains uncertain. Our systematic review estimates that this proportion ranges from 11% to 56%. This finding can help both clinicians and public ...
Source: Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses - August 18, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Sarah A. Buchan, Travis S. Hottes, Laura C. Rosella, Natasha S. Crowcroft, Dat Tran, Jeffrey C. Kwong Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Ontogeny and microanatomy of the nasal turbinals in lemuriformes.
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 27535814 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Anatomical Record)
Source: Anatomical Record - August 18, 2016 Category: Anatomy Authors: Smith TD, Martell MC, Rossie JB, Bonar CJ, DeLeon VB Tags: Anat Rec (Hoboken) Source Type: research

A Pseudomonas aeruginosa hepta-acylated lipid A variant associated with cystic fibrosis selectively activates human neutrophils.
Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease causes airway neutrophilia and hyperinflammation without effective bacterial clearance. We evaluated the immunostimulatory activities of lipid A, the membrane anchor of LPS, isolated from mutants of PA that synthesize structural variants, present in the airways of patients with CF, to determine if they correlate with disease severity and progression. In a subset of patients with a severe late stage of CF disease, a unique hepta-acylated lipid A, hepta-1855, is synthesized. In primary human cell cultures, we found that hepta-1855 fu...
Source: Journal of Leukocyte Biology - August 18, 2016 Category: Hematology Authors: SenGupta S, Hittle LE, Ernst RK, Uriarte SM, Mitchell TC Tags: J Leukoc Biol Source Type: research

An evaluation of hospital admission respiratory disease attributed to sulfur dioxide ambient concentration in Ahvaz from 2011 through 2013.
Abstract There is no doubt that air pollutants have adverse impacts on human health. The main objective of this study was to evaluate hospital admission respiratory disease (HARD) attributed to sulfur dioxide levels in Ahvaz during three successive years. Data was taken from Iranian Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The AirQ2,2,3 model is used to quantify the impact of SO2 on inhabitants of Ahvaz and in terms of hospital admission respiratory diseases. This is a kind of statistical model which is based on some epidemiological indices such as relative risk, baseline incidence, and attributable proportion. Samp...
Source: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International - August 18, 2016 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Goudarzi G, Geravandi S, Idani E, Hosseini SA, Baneshi MM, Yari AR, Vosoughi M, Dobaradaran S, Shirali S, Marzooni MB, Ghomeishi A, Alavi N, Alavi SS, Mohammadi MJ Tags: Environ Sci Pollut Res Int Source Type: research

Protective effect of Cistanchis A on ethanol-induced damage in primary cultured mouse hepatocytes.
Abstract Cistanoside A (C. A) was one of phenylethanol glycosides isolated from Cistanche deserticola, a tonic in traditional Chinese medicine. In our previous research, we demonstrated that Cistanoside A (C. A) possess the protective activities on CCl4 induced hepatotoxicity in mice, such as increasing free radicals clearing activities, alleviating lipid-overoxidation damage, and improving respiratory chain function in mitochondria. Meanwhile, our previous research also demonstrated C.A possess protective activities on alcohol induced hepatotoxicity in mice, shown in ameliorate the hepatic function indices, light...
Source: Biomedicine and pharmacotherapy = Biomedecine and pharmacotherapie - August 18, 2016 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Luo H, Cao R, Wang L, Zhu L Tags: Biomed Pharmacother Source Type: research

Evaluation of Pharmacy-Driven Dexmedetomidine Stewardship and Appropriate Use Guidelines in a Community Hospital Setting.
CONCLUSIONS: Pharmacy-driven dexmedetomidine appropriate use guidelines decreased the use of dexmedetomidine and increased cost savings at a community hospital without adversely affecting clinical outcomes. PMID: 27543645 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: The Annals of Pharmacotherapy)
Source: The Annals of Pharmacotherapy - August 18, 2016 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Schickli MA, Eberwein KA, Short MR, Ratliff PD Tags: Ann Pharmacother Source Type: research

miR210 modulates respiratory burst in Apostichopus japonicus coelomocytes via targeting Toll-like receptor.
Abstract Immune responses of species in Echinodermata remains mysterious due to the lack of efforts made in the study of host defense mechanism in these species. More researches start focusing on this ancient immune system with the recognition the economic values of several species in this phylum, especially sea cucumbers. Here, we reported a study in the innate immunity of a sea cucumber species (Apostichopus japonicus) in response to infection of Vibrio splendidus. A novel differential expressed miRNA (miR-210) from the diseased sea cucumber coelomocytes was identified in our study. This miRNA molecule modulates...
Source: Developmental and Comparative Immunology - August 18, 2016 Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Li C, Zhao M, Zhang C, Zhang W, Zhao X, Duan X, Xu W Tags: Dev Comp Immunol Source Type: research

Duox2 is required for the transcription of pattern recognition receptors in acute viral lung infection: An interferon-independent regulatory mechanism.
Abstract The innate immune response, which constitutes the first line of defense against influenza A virus (IAV) infection, is activated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize viral structures. We found that the PRRs, retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5), which have been implicated as interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes, were dominantly responsible for the recognition of IAV in lungs of mice at 3 and 7 days post infection (dpi). Intranasal administration of IFNs enhanced RIG-I and MDA5 gene expression after IAV infection and mRNA levels of RI...
Source: Antiviral Research - August 18, 2016 Category: Virology Authors: Hong SN, Kim JY, Kim H, Kim DY, Won TB, Han DH, Rhee CS, Kim HJ Tags: Antiviral Res Source Type: research

Tuberculosis. Digging deep in the soul of humanity
Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the oldest infectious diseases that affected humankind. A quintessential social disease, TB remains one of the world's deadliest communicable diseases, with still a high mortality and burden of disease. Social representations of TB focus on aspects associated to feelings and manifestations awakened by the disease, sometimes reinforcing stigmas and prejudices about the way of perceiving TB. TB is a historic disease now reborn with a deeper social stigma. Despite the modest reduction in TB incidence worldwide, its incidence is still rising in certain crisis-affected populations like refugees, and ...
Source: Respiratory Medicine - August 18, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Jorge Cervantes Tags: Short communication Source Type: research